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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/20/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    (Been a while since this has happened) Came home for lunch and stumbled over BOY SLAVES (1939) on TCM. (Get your minds out of the gutter in re: the title, It’s a somewhat Horatio Algerian tale of some wild boy runaways who end up indentured servants in a rural turpentine mill (It’s a great study of how the peonage system was being used in America at the time, letting people get goods and food on credit at inflated prices and then making them work it off forever) Just a damn fine piece of filmmaking, in the very end it kind of turns into WHITE HEAT as enacted by Mrs. Cagney’s 8th Grade Class, And you know what? I liked it. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED And quite well shot, very fluid camera movement and great use of light especially in the final court room scene where natural sunlight seems to be streaming through the windows. ANNE SHIRLEY- Two years after her best supporting actress nomination – doesn’t show up till the final act, but when she does she’s incredible. Absolutely sensational performance, have you ever seen a performance by an actress in a 1930 or 40 something film where she was actually properly styled and they didn’t have her hair set and glamour make up Because she was in the part of someone poor or a child? There were parts of watching her final moments in the film that seemed like it was a present day actress merely filmed in black-and-white. Just riveting
  2. 1 point
    From time to time we will pick an actor/actress and using their filmography on imdb watch all (or most of all) of their movies in chronological order. We decided to Richard Widmark next. I own hundreds of classic movies, have recorded hundreds more over the years and use TCM to catch different ones from time to time. I was surprised to find I only own 11 Widmark movies. In looking at the first 13 of his movies starting with 1947 Kiss of Death I was disappointed to find how few of them are available to stream, rent or watch on TCM. Checking their times shown and frequency on TCM was disappointing too. Looks like I will have to buy a lot of dvds to see his movies and wondered why they don't show more on TCM? Also, in looking at his upcoming movies on TCM I can only see two: No Way Out, The Long Ships (don't have this one!) I can select More with the down arrow but it doesn't load any others and appears to have a webpage issue. Hopefully there are more and ones I don't have. Any alternatives to buying (rental or streaming or other, that I might have overlooked?) Here are the ones I checked so far: 1947 Kiss of Death - No streaming or rental, TCM shown 4x, last one 01-2016 1948 Street with No Name - No streaming or rental, TCM 1x, last one 6-2017 1948 Road House - No streaming or rental, TCM 1x 11-2009) 1949 Down to the Sea in Ships - No streaming or rental, 1x 3-2013) 1949 Slattery's Hurricane - No streaming or rental, TCM never 1950 Night and the City - No streaming or rental, 7x (4-2019, 11-2017) 1951 Panic in the Streets - (I recorded sometime, so I didn't check availability) 1950 No Way Out - (I recorded sometime, so I didn't check availability) 1951 Halls of Montezema - No streaming or rental, TCM never 1952 Red Skies of Montana - No streaming or rental, TCM never 1952 Don't Bother to Knock - No streaming or rental, TCM 2x (9-2011, 11-2011)
  3. 1 point
    I loved that movie when I was a little girl. Especially the ending where the always sensitive and slightly disturbed John Kerr ends up in the controversial drapes and makes a weak joke about it. Only Vincente Minnelli could handle something that slight and a little maudlin to make it into a successful and at timea riveting entertainment.
  4. 1 point
    He may have stiffed 'em, better check and see if he ever paid it.
  5. 1 point
    https://www.forbes.com/sites/tonifitzgerald/2019/06/12/the-looney-tunes-are-back-watch-the-new-bugs-bunny-cartoon/#312af64a18de Bugs Bunny avoids the axe chop by Elmer Fudd in a new cartoon. WARNER BROS. ANIMATION Get ready for anvils, axes and wascally wabbits galore. The Looney Tunes crew is officially back, and on Wednesday their first video in a new series rolled out at the Annecy International Animation Film Festival, where earlier this week Disney made headlines by confirming a Chip 'N Dale reboot for its new streaming platform. Warner Bros. Animation (WBA) had announced the new 'toons were cominglast month, but Wednesday marked the first time any footage had been released. The new series will feature all the old favorites from the Looney Tunes heyday, including Bugs Bunny, who stars in the first short, naturally. He's pursued by Elmer Fudd in "Dynamite Dance," which continues the WBA long-running obsession with dynamite and features clever, always violent interplay between the rabbit and the hunter set to a classical music background. David Gemmill directed the short, which bowed in front of a standing room-only crowd at Annecy. This first short is basically to whet everyone's appetite for the main event, which is 1,000 minutes of Looney Tunes action that will debut across digital, mobile and broadcast platforms. They're slated for release later this year. All the classic characters will be in them, such as Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, Tweety, Sylvester and more. Warner Bros. produced the original series of Looney Tunes cartoons from 1940 to 1969. Bugs Bunny, the shorts' trademark character, bowed in 1940and will celebrate his 80th birthday next year. He was originally voiced by Mel Blanc. -I like that this one is closer in animation style to the original 1940s shorts. Very nice
  6. 1 point
    Great Depression Cooking https://www.youtube.com/user/DepressionCooking/videos?disable_polymer=1 Note to the completists: I'm not just posting a single video here because this is an entire channel. If you are going to watch earlier classic movies and revel in the depression times, then it follows you will probably want to experience depression-era recipes that actual US immigrants brought over from the old country, after they first passed through Ellis Island (actually just familiar, cheap to source, and easy to make for them at the time). Parts of my family came over, and I grew up eating things like stuffed cabbage, beet soup, hrutka, and my favorite: pirohy (roughly pronounced "pi-daw-hee") [not at all like the tiny little frozen grocery store pierogies]. I enjoyed these things, not so much out of any love for the Great Depression as that was before my time and nothing at all to idolize, but because my relatives prepared stuff like this for us when they visited and it was just a little bit different. It was their thing. http://www.slovakcooking.com/2010/recipes/pierogi/ https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/hrutka-egg-cheese-174728
  7. 1 point
    LIVE A LITTLE LOVE A LITTLE
  8. 1 point
    The Bridges of Madison County next: Leon Uris
  9. 1 point
    By Golly, Mr. Nip, why is it NOT surprising you find the subject so darned funny.... --------------------------------------------- ".....The series chronicles their unjust detainment, illegal interrogation and the dismissal of evidence that pointed to their innocence, further highlighting the flaws in a system that is supposed to be rooted in truth and justice. Systemic biases and racism cost these boys their childhood. Sensationalized media coverage — including a 1989 full-page ad placed by Trump — made it almost impossible for them to be treated fairly. And the trial also exposed the dehumanization of Black children and life-threatening consequences — things that still occur today....... https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/why-trump-all-americans-must-watch-ava-duvernay-s-central-ncna1019421
  10. 1 point
    from this afternoon, don't remember seeing this one before & it was quite effective and WITHOUT the Dead End Kids!! 1:15 PM drama Boy Slaves (1939) Synopsis: A young runaway ends up in a juvenile labor camp. Dir: P. J. Wolfson Cast: Anne Shirley , Roger Daniel , James McCallion . LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW: 😧 P J Wolfson. Anne Shirley, Roger Daniel, James McCallion, Walter Ward, Charles Powers, Johnny Fitzgerald, Walter Tetley, Charles Lane. "Grim social drama about a gang of impoverished runaways who are promised work by oily businessman Lane, only to end up behind barbed wire in a forced labor camp. Scrappy grade-B hybrid of WILD BOYS OF THE ROAD and I AM A FUGITIVE FROM A CHAIN GANG is dated but still packs a punch."
  11. 1 point
    are there any outtakes of widmark as Tommy Udo? we need more of widmark as smilin' Tommy.
  12. 1 point
    Think you're referring to "the Chuck Jones take": We still get that from the new cartoon-lore-showoff fourth-grade-retentive cable animators, except that even that's now pumped up to staccato "whip" movements with funny sound FX, because Fast is Funny. (Especially if you're ADHD, got into the cartoon business straight out of high school, and want to show off to the world everything you thought was funny at ten.) Yes, we've got a lot of 'Boomer animators showing off how much of classic Chuck Jones they remember, but what they don't have is a sense of how Chuck could wring out sympathy for both Bugs or the villain, by drawing the gag out and leaving long enough time for expression, apprehension, embarrassment, chagrin, or even Daffy's frustration at seeing Elmer fall for one of Bugs' disguises. (We see almost every animator fanboy-homage Wile E. Coyote pulling out his "Stop, in the name of humanity!" sign before being mowed down by a bus, but it doesn't have what Chuck put into it--They seem to think the bus is funnier.) One of my all-time favorite Jones gags, that had me laughing in tears as a kid, was from Knight-Mare Hare (1955)--Where Connecticut-yankee Bugs, back in King Arthur time, puts out a dragon's fire with a seltzer bottle, and the dragon, after an understandably worried Chuck-take, tests to see whether his pilot-light's gone out, with a perfectly insecure look of "(Uh...'Roar'??)": We had sympathy for Bugs because one bit of smart revenge is worth a thousand dynamite-sticks.
  13. 1 point
    I agree with what you mean and think that is why many of the newer cartoons fail but also keep in mind that this was just a one minute sample of what the shorts will be like.
  14. 1 point
    Thanks for saying this. I tend to agree. Also, a Star of the Month retrospective typically provides four or five nights of films. The first few weeks can be English-language titles, then the last night can focus on foreign language movies the star made. It lends to more variety.
  15. 1 point
    Let me respectfully disagree 100% with that sentiment. First, I think we can safely assume that most TCM viewers are capable of reading subtitles in foreign movies just as they are with silents. Great movies don't consist of nothing but the Hollywood version, and the sad truth is that if we confine our non-white SUTS choices to "classic Hollywood" we're going to invariably wind up showing the same movies that play many times a year. Another sad truth is that until Poitier came along, the featured African American roles primarily consisted of embarrassing stereotypes of maids and other servile types, even if the actors and actresses did make the best of what they were given to play. Second, we've already had several foreign actors and actresses featured under SUTS, with most of the films being subtitled rather than dubbed into English or made in Hollywood. Why should it be any different for Toshiro Mifune than it was for Catherine Deneuve or Jeanne Moreau?
  16. 1 point
    High Life (2018). Directed by Claire Denis, I admired this film’s lo-fi minimalism. After a while, though, the story of a group of people traveling in space, in a ship that looks like a boxcar, grew confoundingly pretentious. Who are these people, who look like models in a perfume commercial? We learn they’re guinea pigs serving death sentences who are sent on a mission to harness energy from a black hole. High Life seems to confuse ambivalence as high art. Starring Robert Pattinson in a performance I found overly restrained to the point of being listless. The only character generating any interest was Juliette Binoche’s de facto leader. She plays a doctor with a Dr. Moreau complex, only this time sticking with humans, chewing up the scenery and spitting it out. The ship has a special room where the passengers can pleasure themselves. The scene in which Binoche’s character enters the room, and what she does, is one of the most extreme examples of self-indulgence I’ve seen. She makes Meg Ryan’s histrionics in When Harry Met Sally look like a poetry recitation. Grade C+.
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  20. 1 point
    In the film EVERY CROOK AND NANNY Pat Morita, in one scene, is sitting in a bar, three sheets gone trying to explain to the guy on the next stool how... "We Japanese can't pronounce the letter "R". Oh, and we can't say the letter "L" either"..... All the while PERFECTLY pronouncing them! Sepiatone
  21. 1 point
    Why not Toshiro Mifune? He’s a legend around the world, not just japan. You’ve got plenty of popular films to show like Seven Samurai, Rashamon, The Hidden Fortress and even some of his English films like Midway.
  22. 1 point
    It's been awhile since I've watched both films. The 1959 version is the one I first was exposed to on the old AMC, around 1990. My grandparents were very racist (and I mean VERY racist) so I was surprised they'd be willing to sit down and watch. I watched it with them and while it seemed dated (in the early 90s), I was drawn into the story. I didn't glimpse the 1934 original until about ten years later, and I liked it better. The relationship between the two women seems more realistic to me in the first version. It doesn't matter if they are starting a pancake business or selling shoes, I just feel they are in sync and that whatever they put their minds to, they're bound to be a success. The Sirk production has Turner's character as the more successful one out of the gate, and the black woman is almost more of a hanger-on. So that aspect doesn't work for me in the remake. I feel the women are more equal in the first picture. Also, despite the story with Colbert's character and the man played by Warren William, I feel as if Colbert's soul mate is really Beavers. I am not saying there is a lesbian undercurrent per se, but I really don't think they need a man. They have each other, their daughters, and their business. So it makes the story a bit more daring and potent. And when Beavers dies, I feel the loss of the character a bit more, because it's not so much about a disapproving daughter who lost her mother, but it's about a grown woman who's lost her best friend and life companion.
  23. 1 point
    Hope you all had a chance to enjoy Thelma Ritter's fabulous performance as 'Moe,' on Noir Alley this weekend with the great Eddie Muller. I've been taking some time off from social media to continue working on Thelma Ritter: Hollywood's Favorite New Yorker . I'll be posting more photos from the TCM Film Festival 2019 later in the month. Enjoy your summer!
  24. 1 point
    Gene Kelly directed Hello, Dolly! starring Barbra Streisand
  25. 0 points
    POLITICO‏Verified account@politico Donald Trump presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom to Arthur Laffer, known as the "Father of Supply-Side Economics"

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