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TopBilled’s Essentials


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#41 TopBilled

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 02:18 PM

Theme for July 2017: Disney Renaissance

 

screen-shot-2017-06-26-at-12-36-13-pm.pn

 

Saturday July 8, 2017

POCAHONTAS (1995), with Irene Bedard. Studio/production company: Walt Disney Feature Animation.

 

screen-shot-2017-06-26-at-12-36-04-pm.pn

 

Saturday July 15, 2017

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME (1996), with Tom Hulce. Studio/production company: Walt Disney Feature Animation.

 
screen-shot-2017-06-26-at-12-37-51-pm.pn

 

Saturday July 22, 2017

HERCULES (1997), with Tate Donovan. Studio/production company: Walt Disney Feature Animation.

 

screen-shot-2017-06-26-at-12-37-43-pm.pn

 

Saturday July 29, 2017

MULAN (1998), with Ming-Na Wen. Studio/production company: Walt Disney Feature Animation.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#42 TopBilled

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 12:03 PM

Essential: A SIMPLE PLAN (1998)

 

screen-shot-2017-06-22-at-3-09-48-pm.png


A SIMPLE PLAN was released by Paramount in the late ’90s when neo-noir was making a bit of a comeback. Set in Minnesota, and filmed there as well as in Wisconsin, it is best remembered for its wintery landscapes and its uniformly strong acting. Bill Paxton stars as lead character Hank Mitchell, a man who would like to get ahead in life just once. Bridget Fonda plays his money-hungry wife Sarah (the Lady Macbeth of the story). And featured as Paxton’s loser brother Jacob, who helps find some loot, is Billy Bob Thornton. Thornton was nominated for a supporting Oscar, and should have nabbed it.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-06-at-1-47-56-pm.png


The plot is quite simple. Hank and Jacob are out driving one day with Jacob’s friend Lou (Brent Briscoe), when they discover a deserted plane with a duffel bag that contains over four million dollars. They don’t know how the plane crashed in a snow-covered area or whose money it might have been. But if they just stay quiet, they might be able to keep the cash if nobody comes to claim it. That's easier said than done.
 

screen-shot-2017-05-30-at-6-39-52-pm.png


The guys take off with the dough and Hank puts it somewhere for safe keeping. But soon they decide, because of Sarah’s nagging, that they should cheat Lou out of his share. They go to Lou’s house, start drinking with him and do a little role play. Hank and Jacob want Lou to pretend he’s saying something self-incriminating. Jacob says it’s all in fun and after one too many beers, Lou does say it, which Hank secretly records on tape.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-22-at-3-10-40-pm.png


Their little game of pretend turns into a huge tragedy when Lou realizes he’s been tricked. He goes for his rifle, and threatens to kill Hank if he doesn’t turn over the tape. Jacob comes to Hank’s defense; there is a graphic shootout that leaves Lou dead on the floor, along with his wife. Hank and Jacob decide to shoot up the place even more and make it look like Lou lost his mind and killed his wife, then himself. Somehow the sheriff believes it all.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-22-at-3-12-25-pm.png


Things become even more complicated when an investigator (Gary Cole) shows up to locate the downed aircraft and retrieve the missing money. It is soon revealed that he’s not an actual lawman but someone only interested in getting his hands on the four million.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-22-at-3-11-04-pm.png


Hank and Jacob return to the site of the crash with him, and there’s a standoff. To say it ends badly for Jacob is putting it mildly. Hank survives, and the movie’s coda shows him and his wife back to how they were in the beginning, struggling to survive financially (because Hank decided to burn the ill-gotten money). The best thing to do when you come across something that doesn’t belong to you is to just go about your business as if you didn't see it. Keep life simple.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-06-at-1-57-53-pm.png


A SIMPLE PLAN is directed by Sam Raimi and can be streamed on Amazon Prime.


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#43 rayban

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 03:13 PM

Essential: PURPLE NOON (1960)

 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-6-00-05-pm.png


There’s something unique about PURPLE NOON, which gives it a distinct advantage over the 1999 remake. And that’s Alain Delon who brings a special quality to the role of Tom Ripley. In an early scene we are shown that Tom emulates his French friend Philippe with whom he is carousing around Italy.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-23-22-pm.png


Philippe comes in and discovers Tom wearing his clothes and admiring himself in front of a mirror. At one point Tom becomes so entranced with his image as “Philippe,” he kisses himself in the mirror. It’s more than mere narcissism, it’s a charming sort of adoration, where he is not in love with himself but with the image of what he can become. This leads him to commit murder and assume Philippe’s identity.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-23-56-pm.png


In Patricia Highsmith’s novel, first published in 1955, Tom gets away with his crimes. But in PURPLE NOON, it is suggested that he has been caught– or is about to get caught at the end of the story. It’s a simple plot, really. One man covets another man’s life, has somewhat been used and abused, then takes over. Though there are greater complexities hinted at in the material.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-21-40-pm.png


After Tom has eliminated Philippe in the physical sense, he becomes “Philippe,” which means psychologically the murder victim lives on. People get fooled by Tom/”Philippe”– including Marge, who is Philippe’s girlfriend in the beginning, then Tom’s girlfriend after the murder.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-23-39-pm.png


Does she even know which man most satisfies her? Of course, she will never receive full attention, because he is playing a game with the police, and anyone else that might figure things out. Soon a guy named Freddy arrives from America and starts to put it all together. Tom murders Freddy, too. And in a clever twist, he pins Freddy’s killing on the dead Philippe.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-01-at-6-49-26-am.png


PURPLE NOON has glossy production values, but it’s also a hard-hitting psychological crime drama. The main character is a rich grifter; a man who switches from one locale to the next, and from one identity to the next. Ultimately, Tom Ripley gets what’s coming to him. When the police summon him at the end, he goes forward  without full knowledge that evidence of “Philippe” will be where he’s going. And that he will probably lead yet another life– in prison.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-24-16-pm.png


PURPLE NOON is directed by Rene Clement and can be streamed on FilmStruck.

 

Actually, neither film is faithful to Patricia Highsmith's original novel.

 

But I do prefer the re-make, because it openly embraces the implied homosexual context of the original novel.

 

Also, I do prefer Matt Damon to Alan Delon, because Matt Damon is much more convincing as a young man who is desperate to make himself over.


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#44 TopBilled

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 09:09 AM

Thanks, TopBilled, for your post on "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three".  The film is a top-notch suspense thriller and after having seen it many times, it never fails to satisfy and leave me on edge even though I know the ending.   

 

As an interesting footnote, after the film was released, for many years the New York City Transit Authority banned any train leaving Pelham station at 1:23 feeling it would be too much of a reminder to the public.  Eventually this policy was rescinded, however, dispatchers have in most cases avoided scheduling a Pelham train at 1:23.  

 

Thanks Marsha for the bit of trivia. Interesting how movies can affect real life.

 

Tomorrow I will wrap-up this month's theme with my review of A SIMPLE PLAN. 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#45 MarshaKatz

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 08:14 AM

Thanks, TopBilled, for your post on "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three".  The film is a top-notch suspense thriller and after having seen it many times, it never fails to satisfy and leave me on edge even though I know the ending.   

 

As an interesting footnote, after the film was released, for many years the New York City Transit Authority banned any train leaving Pelham station at 1:23 feeling it would be too much of a reminder to the public.  Eventually this policy was rescinded, however, dispatchers have in most cases avoided scheduling a Pelham train at 1:23.  


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#46 TopBilled

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 01:34 PM

Essential: THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE (1974)

 

screen-shot-2017-06-13-at-4-14-41-pm.png


It takes a while for some bad guys to take Pelham One Two Three. This is because Peter Stone’s screenplay concerns itself with establishing the individual identities of the crooks; showing us the various passengers on a subway they commandeer; presenting the lieutenant who inevitably gets drawn into the intrigue; and the lieutenant’s coworkers; as well as a politician who has a stake in the outcome. It’s not quite a cast of thousands but almost, and they each represent a unique point of view.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-13-at-4-24-23-pm.png


Walter Matthau in a non-comedic role plays Lt. Zachary Garber, a savvy gent who does things by-the-book in order to thwart the criminal gang. The crooks go by color-coded names, and they are led by Robert Shaw– a mercenary who is about as ruthless as they come.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-13-at-4-12-18-pm.png


Shaw’s cohorts include Martin Balsam as a former motorman who knows how to steer things after they get rid of the original conductor; as well as a gangster type character portrayed by Hector Elizondo. Also in this lawless group is Earl Hindman as a powerful brute. In short, these are four men you don’t want to mess with– which unfortunately some passengers learn the hard way.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-13-at-4-12-59-pm.png


Stone’s screenplay is based on Morton Freedgood’s bestselling novel and it uses the basic scenario to give us some detailed character sketches. Stone also presents aspects of New York City that make the story’s metropolitan setting a character in its own right. Because the drama builds so gradually, we get a sense of people with interconnecting lives and competing agendas. A large portion of the action, of course, takes place underground. So we are plunged into a somewhat claustrophobic environment that becomes increasingly tense when things begin to unravel.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-13-at-4-14-28-pm.png


The 2009 remake turned the story into a battle of wills between the lieutenant and the mastermind of the hijacking. But the 1974 version is considerably better, because it depicts a broader cross-section of people involved in the siege all trying to get out alive. Many of them do not know how to survive. The hijacking is supposed to bring a considerable sum of money to the gang for turning the hostages back over, and it is supposed to lead to the perfect getaway which they’ve painstakingly mapped out. But the lieutenant and his men put the kibosh on all that. In the end, three of the gang members have been killed and only one remains standing– the motorman/conductor played by Martin Balsam. There’s a clever twist in the last scene that prevents Balsam from getting away with the money. It's nothing to sneeze at.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-13-at-4-14-07-pm.png
 

THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE is directed by Joseph Sargent and can be streamed on Amazon Prime.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-13-at-4-24-02-pm.png


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#47 TopBilled

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 06:54 PM

On Saturday I will post my review:

 

screen-shot-2017-06-13-at-4-53-39-pm.png


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#48 TopBilled

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 02:45 PM

Thanks, TopBilled, for your PURPLE NOON post.  I've never seen this film, but after reading your post, I am even more anxious to do so.  Having seen "The Talented Mr. Ripley", I'm particularly interested in watching Alain Delon's performance in this role, since I was not enamored of Matt Damon's performance and as a result, I became more interested in Jude Law's performance as Philippe.  However, from your post, it is Delon's performance that intensifies the film and makes the criminal character of Tom Ripley more cold bloodedly interesting.  I'm really looking forward to seeing this film.  

 

You're welcome Marsha. So many more things to say about this great film and about Alain Delon.

 

First, unlike Damon who was well-established, this was Delon's breakthrough hit. So when he made it he was not yet a star. I think he's a lot hungrier than Damon in the role, he's not a polished movie actor at this point, and we get a much grittier, more realistic portrayal of a man who wants the good things in life (which I would assume is an extension of Delon's own desire to become famous and successful). We get a blend of innocence and calculated determination, totally missing from Damon's performance. 

 

I think Freddy's death is actually more interesting than Philippe's. Visually Clement's camera uses some different angles when Freddy enters the hotel suite and Tom clobbers him. Then we have the sequence where Tom takes him down to the car and drives the body away, meeting people on the sidewalk and acting like Freddy is just drunk instead of dead. Clement provides very fluid camera movement to accommodate such action, and it's all so smooth and well-staged. 

 

Psychologically Freddy's death takes on greater dimension if you see Tom as someone who assumes multiple personalities. Meaning Tom has become Philippe killing Freddy so Tom can continue to live the good life.

 

One thing I didn't mention in my review is that PURPLE NOON was released around the same time as Hitchcock's PSYCHO. But while we learn about Norman's background with his mother, we don't get very much background on Tom's early life. He's really on his own, and unlike Norman, he's nomadic. He just keeps moving on, so his desperate and dangerous activities continue quite easily and cover more ground.


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#49 MarshaKatz

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 02:35 PM

Essential: PURPLE NOON (1960)

 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-6-00-05-pm.png


There’s something unique about PURPLE NOON, which gives it a distinct advantage over the 1999 remake. And that’s Alain Delon who brings a special quality to the role of Tom Ripley. In an early scene we are shown that Tom emulates his French friend Philippe with whom he is carousing around Italy.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-23-22-pm.png


Philippe comes in and discovers Tom wearing his clothes and admiring himself in front of a mirror. At one point Tom becomes so entranced with his image as “Philippe,” he kisses himself in the mirror. It’s more than mere narcissism, it’s a charming sort of adoration, where he is not in love with himself but with the image of what he can become. This leads him to commit murder and assume Philippe’s identity.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-23-56-pm.png


In Patricia Highsmith’s novel, first published in 1955, Tom gets away with his crimes. But in PURPLE NOON, it is suggested that he has been caught– or is about to get caught at the end of the story. It’s a simple plot, really. One man covets another man’s life, has somewhat been used and abused, then takes over. Though there are greater complexities hinted at in the material.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-21-40-pm.png


After Tom has eliminated Philippe in the physical sense, he becomes “Philippe,” which means psychologically the murder victim lives on. People get fooled by Tom/”Philippe”– including Marge, who is Philippe’s girlfriend in the beginning, then Tom’s girlfriend after the murder.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-23-39-pm.png


Does she even know which man most satisfies her? Of course, she will never receive full attention, because he is playing a game with the police, and anyone else that might figure things out. Soon a guy named Freddy arrives from America and starts to put it all together. Tom murders Freddy, too. And in a clever twist, he pins Freddy’s killing on the dead Philippe.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-01-at-6-49-26-am.png


PURPLE NOON has glossy production values, but it’s also a hard-hitting psychological crime drama. The main character is a rich grifter; a man who switches from one locale to the next, and from one identity to the next. Ultimately, Tom Ripley gets what’s coming to him. When the police summon him at the end, he goes forward  without full knowledge that evidence of “Philippe” will be where he’s going. And that he will probably lead yet another life– in prison.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-24-16-pm.png


PURPLE NOON is directed by Rene Clement and can be streamed on FilmStruck.

 

Thanks, TopBilled, for your PURPLE NOON post.  I've never seen this film, but after reading your post, I am even more anxious to do so.  Having seen "The Talented Mr. Ripley", I'm particularly interested in watching Alain Delon's performance in this role, since I was not enamored of Matt Damon's performance and as a result, I became more interested in Jude Law's performance as Philippe.  However, from your post, it is Delon's performance that intensifies the film and makes the criminal character of Tom Ripley more cold bloodedly interesting.  I'm really looking forward to seeing this film.  


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#50 TopBilled

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 10:37 AM

Essential: PURPLE NOON (1960)

 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-6-00-05-pm.png


There’s something unique about PURPLE NOON, which gives it a distinct advantage over the 1999 remake. And that’s Alain Delon who brings a special quality to the role of Tom Ripley. In an early scene we are shown that Tom emulates his French friend Philippe with whom he is carousing around Italy.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-23-22-pm.png


Philippe comes in and discovers Tom wearing his clothes and admiring himself in front of a mirror. At one point Tom becomes so entranced with his image as “Philippe,” he kisses himself in the mirror. It’s more than mere narcissism, it’s a charming sort of adoration, where he is not in love with himself but with the image of what he can become. This leads him to commit murder and assume Philippe’s identity.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-23-56-pm.png


In Patricia Highsmith’s novel, first published in 1955, Tom gets away with his crimes. But in PURPLE NOON, it is suggested that he has been caught– or is about to get caught at the end of the story. It’s a simple plot, really. One man covets another man’s life, has somewhat been used and abused, then takes over. Though there are greater complexities hinted at in the material.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-21-40-pm.png


After Tom has eliminated Philippe in the physical sense, he becomes “Philippe,” which means psychologically the murder victim lives on. People get fooled by Tom/”Philippe”– including Marge, who is Philippe’s girlfriend in the beginning, then Tom’s girlfriend after the murder.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-23-39-pm.png


Does she even know which man most satisfies her? Of course, she will never receive full attention, because he is playing a game with the police, and anyone else that might figure things out. Soon a guy named Freddy arrives from America and starts to put it all together. Tom murders Freddy, too. And in a clever twist, he pins Freddy’s killing on the dead Philippe.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-01-at-6-49-26-am.png


PURPLE NOON has glossy production values, but it’s also a hard-hitting psychological crime drama. The main character is a rich grifter; a man who switches from one locale to the next, and from one identity to the next. Ultimately, Tom Ripley gets what’s coming to him. When the police summon him at the end, he goes forward  without full knowledge that evidence of “Philippe” will be where he’s going. And that he will probably lead yet another life– in prison.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-5-24-16-pm.png


PURPLE NOON is directed by Rene Clement and can be streamed on FilmStruck.


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#51 TopBilled

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 08:12 PM

Such a great film. Look for my review on Saturday:

 

screen-shot-2017-06-08-at-6-11-00-pm.png


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#52 TopBilled

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 01:33 PM

Thanks, TB, for your DOUBLE INDEMNITY post.  Your synopsis is a perfectly matter-of-fact format, which is why I like this film so much. Thanks for pointing out the "father/son" relationship between Neff (MacMurray) and Keyes (Robinson) which, to me, is what gives the film just a glimpse of heartfelt feeling between two of the characters in the midst of cold pre-meditated murder. The three leads mesh wonderfully, and although I have seen this film numerous times, each viewing never fails to bring me great pleasure. I look forward to reading your posts about PURPLE NOON, which I have not yet seen, THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE, TWO, THREE, and A SIMPLE PLAN.

 

You're welcome Marsha. I like what you said about Neff and Keyes, and how this is juxtaposed with the sinister relationship Neff has with Phyllis Dietrichson. I haven't read Cain's book, but I think it's interesting how Chandler and Wilder give us some of her backstory, that she was probably responsible for the death of the first Mrs. Dietrichson. It's almost a reverse of REBECCA, where the young new wife is not at all innocent but is instead a cold-blooded killer. 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#53 MarshaKatz

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 12:03 PM

Thanks, TB, for your DOUBLE INDEMNITY post.  Your synopsis is a perfectly matter-of-fact format, which is why I like this film so much. Thanks for pointing out the "father/son" relationship between Neff (MacMurray) and Keyes (Robinson) which, to me, is what gives the film just a glimpse of heartfelt feeling between two of the characters in the midst of cold pre-meditated murder. The three leads mesh wonderfully, and although I have seen this film numerous times, each viewing never fails to bring me great pleasure. I look forward to reading your posts about PURPLE NOON, which I have not yet seen, THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE, TWO, THREE, and A SIMPLE PLAN.


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#54 TopBilled

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 11:55 AM

Hi, TB.  I'm looking forward to reading your DOUBLE INDEMNITY post tomorrow especially since I'm such an admirer of Billy Wilder. I'm always eager to read varied opinions on his films. 

 

I just posted it this morning, Marsha. If you scroll down a little, you should see it. :)


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#55 MarshaKatz

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 11:43 AM

You're welcome. I watched DOUBLE INDEMNITY again this afternoon to work on my review, which I will post tomorrow. These are such great movies. Can't wait till we get to PURPLE NOON; THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE; and A SIMPLE PLAN. I've especially been wanting to talk about A SIMPLE PLAN for a long time.

Hi, TB.  I'm looking forward to reading your DOUBLE INDEMNITY post tomorrow especially since I'm such an admirer of Billy Wilder. I'm always eager to read varied opinions on his films. 



#56 TopBilled

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 10:25 AM

Essential: DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944)

 

screen-shot-2017-06-02-at-1-13-54-pm.png


This month I’m looking at films where crooks almost get away with their crimes. Most of the main characters are motivated by greed, or at least the chance to get their hands on money, so they can improve their lot in life. Nobody really knows how long Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck) was hatching her plan to kill an older unsuspecting husband in DOUBLE INDEMNITY. But when insurance man Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray) showed up on her doorstep one afternoon, she saw a chance and embraced it.
 

1fbb8-screen2bshot2b2016-10-182bat2b4-56


The movie is based on a James Cain novel, and its screenplay was co-written by Raymond Chandler and Billy Wilder. As the story begins Mrs. Dietrichson wants to get rid of her husband, and if she can somehow make it look like an accident, she will be able to cash in on a double indemnity clause. For those who don’t know– an indemnity is a security or protection against a loss. If there is a certain type of accidental death, the payout will be twice as great.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-02-at-1-16-04-pm.png


Of course, the loss of Phyllis Dietrichson’s husband isn’t something that will cause her any real pain or remorse. In order to carry out the diabolical plan, she needs help from that handsome insurance man. At first Neff balks at the idea; he insists he is no murderer. But this changes when he gets drawn into her web of deception. Soon they’ve decided her husband’s death should occur during a train trip he is scheduled to take.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-02-at-1-10-01-pm.png


At the station Neff poses as an injured Mr. Dietrichson, whom they’ve already killed and stashed in the trunk of a car. Mrs. Dietrichson lovingly sees Neff off in front of witnesses, then drives away with the dead body. In the next part Neff heads to the back of the train, and jumps off, making it seem as if Dietrichson took an accidental tumble off the moving locomotive.  At the same time Mrs. Dietrichson brings the car around with the dead body, which they place along the track with the crutches. It all goes according to plan until Neff’s boss, a man named Keyes (Edward G. Robinson), gets involved.
 

screen-shot-2017-06-02-at-1-10-55-pm.png


Keyes doesn’t think it really was an accident. Of course, if he didn’t, the couple would get away with their crime and live happily ever after. In production code Hollywood, this simply can’t be allowed. So we have scenes where Keyes starts investigating– poking around to find out what really happened the night Dietrichson died. Some of the Neff-Keyes interaction is interesting to watch, because there’s a warm father-son type bond shared between them. Keyes probably doesn’t want Neff to be guilty, but it is his duty to uncover the facts.
 

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To the writers’ credit we don’t actually see Neff full of regret, until near the end. After he regains his conscience, he goes to the Dietrichson home to set things right. There’s a quarrel, and Mrs. Dietrichson shoots Neff, who also shoots her. Realizing he’s killed Mrs. Dietrichson and knowing he has been shot himself, Neff makes his way back to the office to record a full confession into a dictaphone machine. He is critically injured in the film’s final moments, after the confession has been completed and Keyes has arrived.
 

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This was the second of four pairings for MacMurray and Stanwyck. In their films together, the characters they portray don’t usually enjoy a happy ending. Robinson would work with Stanwyck again in a Columbia western– that time she was his unsympathetic wife. The three stars had long, distinguished screen careers. But DOUBLE INDEMNITY is a high point for all of them. It functions like a policy they took out to insure their legacy against any flops.
 

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DOUBLE INDEMNITY is directed by Billy Wilder and airs occasionally on TCM. 


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#57 ChristineHoard

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 06:35 PM

Glad to see that TopBilled is going to talk about the original PELHAM and not the remake.


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#58 TopBilled

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 06:20 PM

TB, I really enjoy your "Essentials" monthly film picks for that very reason. I've never seen PURPLE NOON with Alain Delon but now I'm going to add it to my viewing list. Thanks for mentioning this film. 

 

You're welcome. I watched DOUBLE INDEMNITY again this afternoon to work on my review, which I will post tomorrow. These are such great movies. Can't wait till we get to PURPLE NOON; THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE; and A SIMPLE PLAN. I've especially been wanting to talk about A SIMPLE PLAN for a long time.


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#59 MarshaKatz

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 11:53 AM

Thanks Marsha. Hopefully people will seek out all these great films. If there had been five Saturdays in June I would have included THE ASPHALT JUNGLE. I also debated between PURPLE NOON and THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY but ended up choosing the Alain Delon picture because it had been awhile since I covered a foreign film in this thread.

TB, I really enjoy your "Essentials" monthly film picks for that very reason. I've never seen PURPLE NOON with Alain Delon but now I'm going to add it to my viewing list. Thanks for mentioning this film. 


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#60 TopBilled

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 11:42 AM

TB, your June category is just terrific. So many films fall into this category.

 

I'm not adept at posting photos, but I'd like to add these films:

 

THE ASPHALT JUNGLE

SEVEN THIEVES

THE KILLING

BLOOD SIMPLE

BEFORE THE DEVIL KNOWS YOU'RE DEAD

 

Thanks Marsha. Hopefully people will seek out all these great films. If there had been five Saturdays in June I would have included THE ASPHALT JUNGLE. I also debated between PURPLE NOON and THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY but ended up choosing the Alain Delon picture because it had been awhile since I covered a foreign film in this thread.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).





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