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Barbara Stanwyck in The Big Valley


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#1 rayban

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Posted 18 January 2017 - 01:43 PM

Today, on MeTV, on "The Big Valley", there was an interesting episode that was titled "The Good Thieves"

 

Nick and Heath became involved with an outlaw gang (two gentlemen-like brothers) who committed their crimes other than where they lived and were known in their own county as much-loved, very generous humanitarians.

 

Nick and Heath were able to bring them down, though.

 

The "bad boys" were played quite convincingly by Russell Johnson and Charles Grodin.

 

A young boy who idolized the brothers became involved in protecting them from Nick and Heath.

 

He was played very nicely by Flip Mark.

 

Barbara Stanwyck was hovering on the edges of this one - and she is always such a treat for the eyes and ears.

 

You go, Barb!! 


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#2 wouldbestar

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Posted 14 January 2017 - 11:48 AM

If you're a Richard Long fan you must see a 77 Sunset Strip episode, One False Step.  It's a remake of Strangers on a Train with Long in the Robert Walker role.  Charming one moment, psychotic killer the next, he even manages to be sympathetic when finally caught.  This and his performance in that TBV episode Days of Wrath-which will be on next week-show how good an actor he really was.  Even in b&w those blue eyes stand out.   


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#3 rayban

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 06:12 PM

Yes, James Whitmore was around - a lot.

 

By the way, that wasn't John Anderson; it was Royal Dano.

 

 

I stand corrected.  I did say "I think"-that's dangerous at my age.  With either man you always saw some fine acting. 

Yes, I agree, I saw Royal Dano in a "The Rifleman" episode, in which he played a badly damaged Civil War veteran who was claiming that he could do the work of any ONE healthy man.

 

He was both convincing - and heartbreaking.


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#4 wouldbestar

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 05:39 PM

Yes, James Whitmore was around - a lot.

 

By the way, that wasn't John Anderson; it was Royal Dano.

 

 

I stand corrected.  I did say "I think"-that's dangerous at my age.  With either man you always saw some fine acting. 


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#5 rayban

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Posted 07 January 2017 - 01:40 PM

Today, on MeTV, on "The Big Valley", there was a conventional entry about a man (Norman Alden) who was convicted of killing a priest, but had escaped and was holding schoolchildren hostage where Audra Barkley herself was the school teacher.

 

Conventional it might have been and, yet, it was a superbly done episode.

 

It had an interesting angle, too - Jarrod Barkley was convinced that the man was innocent, but, as it turned out, the man was far from innocent.

 

Another interesting angle was that a child (Stephen Liss), as the young son of the witness against the convicted killer, was involved in the development of the plot.

 

A third interesting angle - Victoria Barkley was very angry that Nick didn't tell her that Audra and her pupils were being held hostage.

 

"The Big Valley" could be conventional but with a very decided difference.     


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#6 Terrence1

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 02:25 PM

I agree with the number of episodes with James Whitmore.  My problem with that is that each time he appeared, he left such an impression on me that it was a little distracting to see him play so many varied characters.  That's not to take anything away from his great performances.  And the one with Susan Strasberg is exceptionally good. 


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#7 TopBilled

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Posted 06 January 2017 - 08:23 AM

Yes, James Whitmore was around - a lot.

 

By the way, that wasn't John Anderson; it was Royal Dano.

 

Dano did a few different episodes of The Big Valley. He had a long career as a character actor.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#8 rayban

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 09:28 PM

James Whitmore was on so many of the episodes he could have saved money and lived on the set.  He was usually a villain. In one I remember he's a hired gun who tries to keep a boundary war between the Barkleys and a neighbor-I think the great John Anderson-going so he can make more money, even to the point of killing people on both sides.  I think the only one who matched him for guest appearances were James Gregory and Richard Anderson.  What great casting!   

Yes, James Whitmore was around - a lot.

 

By the way, that wasn't John Anderson; it was Royal Dano.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#9 wouldbestar

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 07:57 PM

James Whitmore was on so many of the episodes he could have saved money and lived on the set.  He was usually a villain. In one I remember he's a hired gun who tries to keep a boundary war between the Barkleys and a neighbor-I think the great John Anderson-going so he can make more money, even to the point of killing people on both sides.  I think the only one who matched him for guest appearances were James Gregory and Richard Anderson.  What great casting!   


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#10 rayban

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Posted 05 January 2017 - 03:43 PM

Today, on MeTV, there was a first-rate episode which starred Susan Strasberg and James Whitmore.

 

Susan Strasberg was a saloon girl who was thrown out of town and ended up on a stage with the Barkleys.

 

Arriving at their destination, James Whitmore, the town's sheriff, took one look at her and ordered her out of town.

 

The Barkleys were kind to her and invited her to dinner.

 

The sheriff nearly killed a young man who had taken a shine to Strasberg.

 

Clearly, the sheriff had a zealot's devotion to the Word Of God.

 

In the end, he gave in to his desire for Strasberg.

 

And, in trying to get her away from Whitmore, Heath (Lee Majors) was forced to kill him.

 

Superb work from Strasberg, who never became the star that her family name had always promised.

 

A frightening performance from Whitmore, a Method actor if ever there was one.

 

This one was such a well-written episode in the fight between Good and So-Called Evil, in which the Good becomes the Bad.  


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#11 TopBilled

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Posted 26 December 2016 - 09:47 AM

I was looking up images for CHARRO!, and this picture of Elvis reminded me of Lee Majors:

 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-12-26%2Bat%2B7.40.1


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#12 TopBilled

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Posted 24 December 2016 - 03:23 PM

Yesterday, on MeTV, on "The Big Valley", an okay episode about a town that was in danger of being flooded, but the guest cast was such a treat - Lonny Chapman, Dennis Hopper, Cloris Leachman and Rhodes Reason.

 

I agree. Not a very stellar episode in terms of the story (mostly a Heath-centered one that took him away from the ranch) but the guest stars were amazing. There was a nice closing scene where Cloris Leachman performed a song.


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#13 rayban

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Posted 24 December 2016 - 02:53 PM

Yesterfay, on MeTV, on "The Big Valley", an okay episode about a town that was in danger of being flooded, but the guest cast was such a treat - Lonny Chapman, Dennis Hopper, Cloris Leachman and Rhodes Reason.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#14 rayban

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 07:07 PM

Roger Davis was just so - GORGEOUS.  But I don't remember him from TV.


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#15 TopBilled

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 05:29 PM

Roger Davis... He was equally good and bad.  Oh, and Jaclyn Smith's first husband. 

 

Yes, she should have held on to him. What was she thinking?


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#16 wouldbestar

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 05:25 PM

 

In a minor role, a recently hired man on the Barkley ranch whom the Senator thought might be an assassin, there was an extremely beautiful young man by the name of Roger Davis.

 

 

 

Roger Davis was all over our TV screens in the 60's and 70's.  He started out at WB in a war series, The Gallant Men, and the Twilight Zone episode, Spur of the Moment, as the cause of one of the most surprising endings of the series.  Then there was Once an Eagle with Sam Elliott-the plot didn't matter when those two were on screen-and Alias Smith and Jones.  He was equally good and bad.  Oh, and Jaclyn Smith's first husband. 


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#17 TopBilled

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 04:38 PM

Today, on MeTV, on "The Big Valley", there was an interesting episode that featured an outstanding performance from Robert Goulet as a bogus preacher/healer.

 

Mr. Goulet was an extremely beautiful man.

 

That's another one I haven't seen. When I was going through my set of DVDs for the entire series, one of the discs was cracked and I had to throw it out. So there are four or five episodes I don't have and still need to see.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#18 rayban

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Posted 21 December 2016 - 04:20 PM

Today, on MeTV, on "The Big Valley", there was an interesting episode that featured an outstanding performance from Robert Goulet as a bogus preacher/healer.

 

Mr. Goulet was an extremely beautiful man.

 

 


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#19 rayban

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Posted 19 December 2016 - 07:17 PM

I haven't seen this one-- somehow I missed it. Thanks for the great summary.

I do like these out-of-the-ordinary episodes - and "The Big Valley" seems to have done a lot of them.


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Posted 19 December 2016 - 05:00 PM

Today, on MeTV, on "The Big Valley", there was a very interesting episode about a senator (Andrew Duggan) who was obsessed with being assassinated and his assistant (Robert Ellenstein) who tried hard to keep the man together.

 

In a minor role, a recently hired man on the Barkley ranch whom the Senator thought might be an assassin, there was an extremely beautiful young man by the name of Roger Davis.

 

In the end, in order to save Jarrod Barkley's life, the Senator's assistant was forced to kill the Senator, who wanted to kill Jarrod in the belief that Jarrod was an assassin.

 

This drama had real impact - in that it was about a public figure who are far removed from his public image.

 

Andrew Duggan and Robert Ellenstein were both superb.

 

I haven't seen this one-- somehow I missed it. Thanks for the great summary.


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