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Daily Dose of Doozy #15: Remixing of Classic Genres: ZAZ and Leslie Nielsen


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#1 Rejana Raj

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Posted 17 October 2016 - 02:53 PM

ZAZ's approach on film parody or film spoofs in this comic scene is based on police/detective movies. One of the best examples that I could cite is Detective Philip Marlowe who is played by the enigmatic Humphrey Bogart in thriller "The Big Sleep".

 

ZAZ's film "The Naked Gun" was a parody/spoof on detective films whereas Young Frankenstein is parody/spoof on classic horror cinema. The latter movie was a sheer tribute to the horror monster and creature movies while the former is more indulged in mocking the law enforcement agency/private eyes.

 

It could be said that Peter Sellers' version of Inspector Clouseau is similar with Leslie Nielsen's Frank Drebin. Inspector Clouseau is an amateurish detective who gets into messiest mess whereas Detective Frank Drebin is a maladroit who may get into trouble but comes out of it.

 

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#2 Martha S.

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 06:41 PM

If Clouseau is a “self-conscious klutz,” Drebin is an “oblivious force of nature.”  Drebin seldom realizes he has made a mistake; he is blissfully unaware of the chaos that he creates around him (as demonstrated by his parking skills).  While Clouseau is often involved in the chaos he creates, Drebin is a “catalyst for chaos.”  His presence facilitates the chaos, yet he is (usually) not involved in it.           

 

Great way to put it. I was struggling to explain this in my answer.


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#3 Martha S.

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Posted 10 October 2016 - 06:27 PM

1. How would you describe ZAZ's approach to film parody or film spoofs in this scene? Cite specific examples.

 

It's pretty much wall-to-wall gags, one after another, and they don't limit themselves to parodying a specific genre, but throw in slapstick elements and visual gags wherever they can, whether or not they further the plot (like the scene where "Al" walks in, the camera never moves to include his face in the scene, and when Drebin tells him he has something in his mouth, about a quarter of a banana falls out). Also, there's the random gag where two characters walk through a door while Drebin walks past the fake scenery half-wall (it calls more attention to the filmmaking, and to me has more of a surreal quality, than similar humor based on the scenery in Young Frankenstein). But character is still involved, as Nielsen plays it completely straight and his character remains pompous, but clueless, throughout.

 

2. How is ZAZ's approach to spoofing similar to or different from Mel Brook and Gene Wilder's approach in yesterday's Daily Dose?

 

I'd say Young Frankenstein's gags are usually related to the genre, either playing with the conventions of the film (the scene in the science class) or the sets and scenery (like the exchange between Frankenstein and Terri Garr's character, Inga, when they arrive at the castle with its massive door ****--"What ****!" "Thank you, Doctor!"--the revolving bookshelf scene, or the scene when the table used for Frankenstein's experiments with the monster lowers from the ceiling to reveal Inga and Frankenstein, who've obviously just slept together.) With Brooks and Wilder, the gags are usually part of the plot, or further the plot--for instance, the "Puttin' on the Ritz" dance number doesn't come out of nowhere, as it might in a ZAZ film (say, the troopers in Top Secret!); it's Frankenstein's way of showing the world what his creation is capable of.) ZAZ films are more anarchic, I'd say.

 

3. In the context of slapstick comedy, compare Peter Sellers' Inspector Clouseau with Leslie Nielsen's Frank Drebin.

 

Both characters take themselves seriously, but are constantly doing ridiculous things or leaving chaos in their wake. Both could be called pompous or pretentious, but I think Drebin is more so. Leslie Nielsen's deep voice adds to that pompous feel.

 

Also, Drebin doesn't seem to notice his screwups, or be aware of how stupid he comes off. Like when he tries to look through the microscope with his closed eye. When he's corrected, he simply looks through the other eye, without reacting emotionally at all. And in the scene when the car's airbags inflate, I'm pretty sure we're meant to think he has no idea what happened--although at the very end it seems like maybe a look of recognition crosses his face at the end).

 

Inspector Clouseau, on the other hand, is often seen trying to recover his dignity (as in the billiards Daily Dose scene, where he tries to blame his clumsiness on the designer of the cue rack and then on the house's architect). Also, from what I remember of the Nielsen comedies, the physical stuff usually happens around him, but he usually isn't doing a lot of physical acting (pratfalls, etc.) himself. Sellers is more adept at physical humor, I think. 


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#4 pumatamer

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Posted 09 October 2016 - 09:00 PM

3. In the context of slapstick comedy, compare Peter Sellers' Inspector Clouseau with Leslie Nielsen's Frank Drebin. I love both of these comedic actors but there is something glorious about Nielsen's Drebin and his happy-go-lucky, pass the buck, absurdity. Sellers' performance seems more classical and trained. It is really difficult to describe the difference between them, to be honest! 


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#5 Laughing Bird

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 05:28 PM

1- ZAZ approach:  One gag's completion lingers as new gag is set up. One gag segues into the next.  Example 1: Car's airbags deploying - first the driver's side, effecting the gear change, then the passenger side, then after Frank jumps out of the way of the car, the car has back seat airbags deployed, then after car explodes, the trunk is being dragged.  Then the car turns the corner and lingering effect of where is going to go and wreak havoc, as Frank tells cop to get the witnesses names.  Example 2: The Swiss Army shoe is demonstrated and then while Ed is playing with the shoe, the next gag, the cufflinks is introduced and because of the lingering effect of the fascination with the shoe, Ed gets shot with the dart and passes out.  Then next gag is set up, where Frank looks into the microscope and Ed comes to from the dart.   Example 3: Tall lab guy comes with microscope for next gag.  Audience can't see his head - he's so tall.  He has a banana in his hand which in itself is funny.  Frank is affixed on the height of the guy, looking up at him, tells him he has something on the side of his face.  We imagine the banana on his face.... then, "no, the other side."  The microscope becomes set up for the next gag as tall guy walks away.  Example 4: Debin can't see anything in the microscope just as Ed comes to, feeling his neck and says, "Use your open eye Frank."  He looks up and his left eye that he was looking with is closed.  Next gag, where Frank adjusts the microscope so that the glass slide is crushed.... then he looks up and his left eye is still closed.  It's so stupid, but I can't help but laugh because Leslie Nielsen pulls off the dead pan so well.  Everyone is deadpan, serious about their importance as cops and crimefighters.  The film parodies TV shows like Dragnet and Get Smart.  There are elements of Marlowe films, so the movie has a mix of film noir and comedy and action.  Like in the Marlowe films, the protagonist (Frank Debin) recounts the story in narrative, hardboiled style.

2- Compare Mel Brooks/Gene Wilder style with ZAZ style: Spoofs are similar in that there is  a lot of deadpanning.  Gags include ridiculous accidents that are elaborated on.  They are different in the society of people involved- Pink Panther scene - elite society, Naked Gun - thugs.

In both, the protagonists mask their mistakes.  In both scenes there is a spy-like 007 influence - Naked Gun in the lab, Pink Panther, with the pool table, playing pool.

3- Clouseau wants to be more than he is - he is addressed with courtesy as Inspector Clouseau.  Debin is pragmatic and he is called by his first name in the scene (Frank).  They are both self-effacing and self-important (don't want to be centred out for their mistakes and have a one-focus mission.  Debin is more Marlow style, hardboiled.  Clouseau is more the romantic spy type.


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#6 Thief12

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 11:53 AM

Unlike Young Frankenstein, the ZAZ approach in Naked Gun is very broad and over-the-top. They parody a lot of the conventions of police and crime films, down to the exaggerated explosions and some specific lines.

 

ZAZ also doesn't target only police procedurals/crime films; there's a bit touching on gang films (the graffiti wall), but most notably James Bond/spy films.

 

I think there are a lot of similarities between Drebin and Clouseau, but considering that I've only seen a bit of Clouseau, I would say that Drebin seems more oblivious. But still, both are clumsy as hell, while delivering deadpan comments.


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#7 startspreading

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Posted 05 October 2016 - 09:26 AM

1. How would you describe ZAZ's approach to film parody or film spoofs in this scene? Cite specific examples.

 

The scene starts with a voiceover narration, something very common in film noir and police procedural films. A common procedure, taking note of a car’s license plate, is mocked, because the car that tries to run over Frank Drebin is his own. And when in the lab, the shoe weapon demonstration is very similar to what we see in spy movies, like the 007 ones, and also reminded me of the TV series Get Smart.

 

2. How is ZAZ's approach to spoofing similar to or different from Mel Brook and Gene Wilder's approach in yesterday's Daily Dose?

 

I see that they are similar in many ways, especially when it comes to the broad slapstick Mel Brooks added to Young Frankenstein. But I’d say the spoof in YF is more direct, more obvious, while in ZAZ’s approach we have a broader genre being spoofed: it’s not only Frankenstein and The Bride of Frankenstein, ZAZ spoof the whole airplane disaster / police procedure sub-genres.

 

3. In the context of slapstick comedy, compare Peter Sellers' Inspector Clouseau with Leslie Nielsen's Frank Drebin.

 

I think they have a lot in common: they are both inapt police officers who, despite doing many things wrong, keep a straight face and don’t realize they are messing up with the whole investigation.


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#8 Larynxa

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 06:32 PM

[color=#2d3b45][font='Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif]
 
 
And before the naked gun came around Leslie Nelson was a serious actor in dramatic roles but later on in his life became the funny man.


In real life, Leslie Nielsen was an extremely funny person. He and Robert Goulet were both Canadian actors, who got typecast as dashing dramatic heroes, because of their good looks and gorgeous baritone voices. But the two of them were mischeivous best buddies, who loved playing pranks using little hand-operated flatulence-noisemakers. After Nielsen became a comedy star, he often said that, in the past, he'd been a comedian pretending to be a dramatic actor, but now he could finally be himself.
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#9 Popcorn97

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 10:08 AM

1. How would you describe ZAZ's approach to film parody or film spoofs in this scene? Cite specific examples.

The car driving its self, Nielsen walking thru the wall to the lab, the james bond tricks or gags. Gags are going on thru out the scene on and off screen.

 

 

2. How is ZAZ's approach to spoofing similar to or different from Mel Brook and Gene Wilder's approach in yesterday's Daily Dose?

​Both are almost doing the same kind of spoof relating to the kind of film they are spoofing. Mel Brooks was a black and white horror spoof while the ZAZ's were a police spoof and in color.

 

 

3. In the context of slapstick comedy, compare Peter Sellers' Inspector Clouseau with Leslie Nielsen's Frank Drebin.

 

Both of them would be great in a film. Both are police inspectors. Both actors do slap stick comedy and use the props around them to make the scene funny. And before the naked gun came around Leslie Nelson was a serious actor in dramatic roles but later on in his life became the funny man. And I feel like Sellers was almost type casted in comedy roles after the pink panther films. He did a dramatic role back in the early 80s called being there. great film. 


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#10 Bill Holmes

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Posted 03 October 2016 - 09:13 AM

1. There's a phrase that comes to mind - "everything but the kitchen sink" - but ZAZ will also toss in that sink as well. The broader the joke, the better. Nielsen's car almost running him over is funny enough, but then the bullets, the dozen airbags, the fire hydrant, the explosion, and then finally the deadpan "Did anyone get the plate? Did anyone see the driver?" makes it that much more absurd. (One of my favorite sight gags of theirs is Robert Stack whipping off a pair of shades - ala David Caruso - for dramatic effect, only to reveal a smaller pair of shades underneath!)

 

2. I think the beauty of Wilder and Brooks is their ability to play both the long and short game, whether it's a callback gag ("Hedley!") or very subtle gags (someone pointed out that "Bruher" means "glue" in German, which makes it even funnier that the mention of her name would make horses anywhere in earshot whinny in fear). ZAZ is like a machine gun shooting pies in your face; even if you duck a few, most will get you. Gags are layered on thick, and even if a whole concept sails over your head, there's another in a minute. What I love about ZAZ and Brooks is that repeated viewings of their films - and I mean DOZENS of times - prove to be still funny.

 

3. I imagine anyone watching Airplane, Naked Gun or Police Squad - never having seen Leslie Nielsen before - would laugh hysterically at his pitch-perfect performance. But having seen Nielsen play dramatic roles (often a bad guy in a crime film) it was twice as funny; it's as if he was parodying his own career as well as the genre. Robert Stack also nailed this (1941 and Airplane) as did Lloyd Bridges. But Nielsen was the best, because it was obvious he was willing to play along with whatever ZAZ came up with, no matter how absurd or physically demanding. Sellers as Clouseau was probably not as dramatic a change (PS was a chameleon and not a "type") and was just as game for physical slapstick, but probably had a more focused character (language gags, dead serious) than Nielsen's Drebin. Drebin also did not usually frustrate and antagonize his superiors, which was central to Clouseau. And both bumblers somehow were successful at the end.


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#11 rajmct01

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 09:32 PM

How would you describe ZAZ's approach to film parody or film spoofs in this scene? Cite specific examples.

When the car went off down the road, the police were just standing there. That was a spoof of the series that showed inept cops. The scene with the scientist and his gadgets reminded me of spoofs of James Bond. The shoe bit was like Maxwell Smart and Control. I liked the Swiss Army knife joke. I really liked the wall spraying the taggers with paint (what goes around comes around).
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#12 TexasGoose

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Posted 01 October 2016 - 04:27 PM

ZAZ does indeed parody and spoof the police genre by putting slapstick humor at a breakneck speed into the beginning of the clip. It starts right up with near miss, hitting garbage cans, over-sized airbags, car rolling, nearly hitting him, his catching car on fire with his gun shots, car hitting fire hydrant and finally car getting away driverless and on fire. Slam Blam from start to finish. Very slapstick.

 

ZAZ's approach and the team of Wilder & Brooks approach are similar in they are both spoofing specific films and genres, Brooks and Wilder with Frankenstein and other Universal Monster movies of the 30's and ZAZ with Dragnet and other police TV dramas from the 60's and 70's. Other than that they see and use comedy and slapstick differtly.

 

Drebin played by Nielsen and Clouseau played by Sellers are very much comedy partners. They are both bumkins that somehow despite their many comical missteps, and lack of real logic or police skill, manage to catch the bad guy and save the day. 


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#13 Schlinged

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Posted 01 October 2016 - 02:01 PM

Questions:
1. How would you describe ZAZ's approach to film parody or film spoofs in this scene? 
ZAZ spoofs Dragnet with Nielsen doing Jack Webb-style narration to open the scene, then pays homage to Edwards' Inspector Clouseau by having Nielsen running over the trash cans and then moves totally into spoofing with the multiple-inflating air bags (which didn't exist at the time period) and having the car drive down the road, hit a fire extinguisher, blow up and then execute a right hand turn. Drebin continued to ask questions about the car until he realizes it was his and then excuses himself from the scene. ZAZ does indeed parody and spoof the police genre by putting slapstick humor at a breakneck speed into the beginning of the clip.
 
2. How is ZAZ's approach to spoofing similar to or different from Mel Brooks and Gene Wilder's approach in yesterday's Daily Dose?
Wilder and Brooks stated that they worked well together due to Wilder doing a micro-approach and Brooks doing a macro approach to the writing of Young Frankenstein. YF seemed not to be a spoof or even a parody but more of a homage, whereas ZAZ uses any and all jokes in bringing in other genres to mix with the police procedural spoofing/parody, but seems to be more slapstick in its humor rather than YF. 
 
3. In the context of slapstick comedy, compare Peter Sellers' Inspector Clouseau with Leslie Nielsen's Frank Drebin.
In both characters, two inept policeman seem to have risen to the rank of inspector/detective due to luck rather than any real skill. Those around both Drebin and Clouseau, particular their immediate supervisors, also seem to suffer the misfortune of the bumbling behaviors. They both get the girl and have assistants also seem to suffer violent misfortunes to their bosses bumbling styles. Clouseau seems to be more a caricature than Drebin.

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#14 Marianne

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 01:32 PM

This clip from Naked Gun starts as a parody to Dragnet, with Nielsen narrating like Sgt. Joe Friday. It then switches to spoof as Nielsen jumps out of the way of his car coming toward him, fires on it, and asks people if anyone caught the license plate; a light humored and senseless scene - funny all the way. It continues the spoof in the lab with the Swiss Army Shoe, reminding me of the shoe with knife in From Russia With Love.  The roll of his eyes when he says he has to go inside the building, reminded me of Igor in Young Frankstein, which brings us to Wilder.

 

I consider Brooks and Wilder's approach to slapstick as slapstick, with the character taking prat falls, fast talking (or not) and getting into unbelievable situations.  ZAZ's approach combine a few of their approaches, with Drebin walking past the wall on the way to the Laboratory without going through the door, but I see ZAZ's parody more similar to Stanley Kramer's It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (I almost forgot a Mad).

 

Drebin is a bumbling detective in trouble with his boss, just like Clouseau.  Peter Sellers is more flexible in his physical activities and violence and doesn't skip a beat.  Leslie Nielsen, while a good slapstick comedian, is a bit more reserved in his falls and physical activities.  Plus, Sellers uses that hysterical french accent.

 

Dare I say it?! This difference in physical comedy between Peter Sellers and Leslie Nielsen may have more to do with the differences in their ages. It's hard to take a pratfall as one gets older!


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#15 jkbrenna

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 11:49 AM

This clip from Naked Gun starts as a parody to Dragnet, with Nielsen narrating like Sgt. Joe Friday. It then switches to spoof as Nielsen jumps out of the way of his car coming toward him, fires on it, and asks people if anyone caught the license plate; a light humored and senseless scene - funny all the way. It continues the spoof in the lab with the Swiss Army Shoe, reminding me of the shoe with knife in From Russia With Love.  The roll of his eyes when he says he has to go inside the building, reminded me of Igor in Young Frankstein, which brings us to Wilder.

 

I consider Brooks and Wilder's approach to slapstick as slapstick, with the character taking prat falls, fast talking (or not) and getting into unbelievable situations.  ZAZ's approach combine a few of their approaches, with Drebin walking past the wall on the way to the Laboratory without going through the door, but I see ZAZ's parody more similar to Stanley Kramer's It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (I almost forgot a Mad).

 

Drebin is a bumbling detective in trouble with his boss, just like Clouseau.  Peter Sellers is more flexible in his physical activities and violence and doesn't skip a beat.  Leslie Nielsen, while a good slapstick comedian, is a bit more reserved in his falls and physical activities.  Plus, Sellers uses that hysterical french accent.


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#16 felipe1912t

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Posted 30 September 2016 - 08:52 AM

The short clip exemplifies how the movie parodies police/investigation genre. The first thing we see is Leslie Nielsen arriving the station by parking his car the worst way possible. Justa  few moments later, the clumsy inspector is unable to watch on the microscope, in one more clear demonstration of how the movie is constantly spoofing with another genre. In that way, I can say that the whole movie is a succession of spoofs on a exaggerated way, making it a true parody.

 

It seems to me that yesterday's Daily of Dose had more respect to the original reference. The movie was shot in black-and-white, used real sets and so on. So we had a homage to Frankenstein with lots of gag scenes on it. ZAZ's approach on this case is much more cynical, exaggerated, based on visual gags. Text doesn't have the interest to be faithful to another movie. So today's clip doesn't concerns so much to be a homage to anything. It's more free to construct the situations.

 

Inspector Clouseau still has the make-believe characteristic to make audience believe that all those situations, although exaggerated, are plausible real. Frank Drebin jokes a lot with that concept, and we see that clearly right on the beginning of the clip with the parking car sequence: air-bags couldn't be like that, neither the explosion and so on. Probably because of the parody aspect, Leslie Nielsen's character permits himself to go over the edge of what's beliavable or not.


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#17 Emma D.

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 09:15 PM

  1. With ZAZ's approach to film comedy, you could almost watch this scene in cartoon version and still have the serious quality of the jokes set throughout the scene.  The nuances of some of the scenes, like those that make you say something like, "Woah, why did he walk around the wall and not through the door?" or that personalize some of the acts, like mistaking your car for a runaway driver, make for an inherently funny film.  With this, hugg, flashy comedy scenes are needless, but probably welcomed.     
  2. While watching this Daily Dose, many of the comedic bits closely resembled that of Brooks/Wilder, in that I could picture the two films exchanging scenes (while fitting it to each respective movie) and the flow of comedy would never seem to vary.  Both sets of creators incorporated a sense of seamless 'normal-ness' to each particular comedic bit, a quality that somehow takes the hilarity of each bit and fits it appropriately to the circumstance the characters are in while not seeming too outlandish or random, even to the audience.  But, that applies to all comedy films/shows/etc., (especially those that parody or spoof) in that the characters in these situations don't necessarily see the strangeness of the occurrences that we see, as the audience.
  3. The two characters of Drebin and Clouseau resemble one another in that they both seem unqualified for their jobs.  In the Daily Dose, it even mentions that "Drebin is probably the most bumbling film detective since . . . Clouseau."  Both have many clumsy, foolish, and downright simple moments, while still giving us a deadpan seriousness in respect to their characters and their situations.

(P.S.  I recognized Nielson from this famous scene: "Don't Call Me Shirley")


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#18 Bluboo

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 09:06 PM

1. How would you describe ZAZ's approach to film parody or film spoofs in this scene? Cite specific examples.

With very few exceptions, one scene after another is a new gag with little or no set-up.everything that Neilsen does is a parody of the straight-laced detectives (especially Sgt Joe Friday). Neilsen is forever hitting other cars, garbage pails, or other obstacles. When his own car "attacks" him, he shoots and blows it up. The crime lab becomes a spoof of James Bond and Q. The gags, verbal and physical, just keep coming and coming.


2. How is ZAZ's approach to spoofing similar to or different from Mel Brook and Gene Wilder's approach in yesterday's Daily Dose?

I believe that ZAZ is very different from Brooks and Wilder. The comedy and slapstick in Airplane or The Naked Gunis driven by characters themselves who are spoofs, parodies, or stereotypes. Neilsen in TNG and Hayes in Airplane are spoofs of their movie counterparts. The supporting cast members are also flaky, so the interaction between actors drives the action and creates the comedy. With Brooks and Wilder, the characters are fairly "normal" but are placed in odd situations through the progression of the plot. As funny as it may seem, even Peter Boyle is fairly normal as witnessed in the scene with Gene Hackman and the little girl.

3. In the context of slapstick comedy, compare Peter Sellers' Inspector Clouseau with Leslie Nielsen's Frank Drebin.

I would say that Neilsen's Drebin might be a homage or parody of Clouseau. I believe the main difference is that Clouseau is bumbling and clumsy, so the vast majority of his slapstick is physical. Drebin is just plain clueless and inept, and a majority of the slapstick is verbal or based or sight gags. The physical comedy is so far out that it has to be make-believe (the opening scene, fondling the statues, diving on Queen Elizabeth). Clouseau is also make-believe, but it has more realism (falling off the couch, fighting Kato, falling into a pool).

#19 JazzGuyy

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 07:40 PM

The previous comments have covered a lot of ground but I also see some other influences beyond those of previous movies and TV shows. I see some influence from the Warner Bros. cartoons, particularly some of the most surreal ones and also Mad magazines parodies of comic books, movies and TV shows. In some of the MAD magazine stuff there is stuff going on in both the foreground and background of the cartoon panels, just like in the ZAZ movies. The whole ZAZ approach is to almost wear you out with an onslaught of gags with action and gags often taking place all over the film frame and not just where you would be expected to focus. The idea seems to be that if you throw enough bits into a scene at least some of what is seen will make someone in the audience laugh. I may be laughing at what's going on in the foreground while you are laughing at the stuff happening in the background. Overwhelm the audience with gags. Subtlety is not an element here as it is in the films of a Woody Allen.


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#20 CynthiaV

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Posted 29 September 2016 - 07:21 PM

1. How would you describe ZAZ's approach to film parody or film spoofs in this scene? Cite specific examples.

Violent, physical, continuous. The Michael Bey of comedy. Destruction on an epic scale, the car careening out of control, the exploding gas tank, fire, the hit hydrant, water gushing up like a geyser, people diving, screaming, running till the car is out of the scene. And Drebin perpetually clueless that it is his own car.

2. How is ZAZ's approach to spoofing similar to or different from Mel Brook and Gene Wilder's approach in yesterday's Daily Dose?

In this clip the comic approach is more reminiscent of Stanley Kramer's, "It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World," since the gag is anything but subtle spoofing. The humor is mostly violent and physical whereas Brooks' and Wilder's humor is mostly verbal, artful.

3. In the context of slapstick comedy, compare Peter Sellers' Inspector Clouseau with Leslie Nielsen's Frank Drebin.

They are very similar. Both leave a trail of destruction in their wakes. Both see themselves as intelligent, competent and clever, able to outwit any and all criminals despite the circumstances. Drebin and Clouseau bumble along but somehow despite their many comical missteps and failed logic they both manage to catch the bad guy and save the day.
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