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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Stupid Science


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#21 MovieMadness

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 10:30 AM

Antarctic study shows central ice sheet is stable since milder times

Central parts of Antarctica's ice sheet have been stable for millions of years, from a time when conditions were considerably warmer than now, research suggests.

The study of mountains in West Antarctica will help scientists improve their predictions of how the region might respond to continuing climate change. Its findings could also show how ice loss might contribute to sea level rise.

Although the discovery demonstrates the long-term stability of some parts of Antarctica's ice sheet, scientists remain concerned that ice at its coastline is vulnerable to rising temperatures.

Researchers from the Universities of Edinburgh and Northumbria studied rocks on slopes of the Ellsworth Mountains, whose peaks protrude through the ice sheet.

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For some reason I think this study will be buried and not see the light of day again, it contradicts all the "experts" on global warming. Notice how it also admits there were times when things were considerably warmer, contradicting the scare studies of this being the hottest times on record.

 


  • NipkowDisc likes this

Things are never so bad they can't be made worse.


#22 MovieMadness

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 10:17 AM

Plastic Pollution at 4 Coastal California Hotspots Violates Clean Water Act

OAKLAND, CA – San Francisco Bay and at least three other California coastlines suffer severe plastic pollution that violates the federal Clean Water Act, according to an appeal the Center for Biological Diversity has filed with the California State Water Resources Control Board.

 

A Center review of scientific studies found that the Bay and its surrounding coastline and the waters off San Diego, the North Coast and Channel Islands National Park should be declared impaired by the water board. That designation would require state officials to clean up plastic pollution sources.

 

“Californians are literally swimming in plastic,” said Blake Kopcho, who conducted the survey for the Center. “This pollution is disturbingly widespread, from microfibers in the San Diego surf to water bottles on Eureka’s Clam Beach. State water officials need to acknowledge the problem and clean up the plastic that’s fouling our coastline and infecting marine life.”

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I can't believe this, California is a polluter of plastics with all of the environmentalists that live there?


Things are never so bad they can't be made worse.


#23 hamradio

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 10:05 PM

I am not a pilot but I believe that the correct terminology is: "it has the glide ratio of a brick."

 

Believe it or not, that was said about the Space Shuttle, without computers it's has the flight characteristics of a brick.



#24 SansFin

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 01:35 PM

A flying car will drop like a rock.

 

 

I am not a pilot but I believe that the correct terminology is: "it has the glide ratio of a brick."


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Russian nesting dolls are full of themselves.


#25 hamradio

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 11:44 AM

 

I have found this to be commonly known in several cultures:

 

Engine Failure
 
An airliner is flying across country, when the pilot comes on the PA to announce, "we have some bad news. One of the engines just failed and as a result, we will be delayed by 30 minutes."
 
A bit later, the pilot returns, "we have some more bad news. Another engine just failed, and we will be delayed an additional hour."
 
Another bit later, "Sorry folks, more bad news. A third engine just failed, and so, since we will be running only on the one remaining engine, the flight will be delayed by another two hours."
 
At this point, a disgruntled passenger turns to his neighbor and says, "I sure hope that last engine keeps working or else we'll be up here all night!"

 

 

An airplane has wings with some glide capability.  A helicopter can auto rotate down.  A flying car will drop like a rock.



#26 SansFin

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 11:41 AM

The idea is still the same, using ducted fans to provide lift.  What happens if ONE malfunctions?

 

 

I have found this to be commonly known in several cultures:

 

Engine Failure
 
An airliner is flying across country, when the pilot comes on the PA to announce, "we have some bad news. One of the engines just failed and as a result, we will be delayed by 30 minutes."
 
A bit later, the pilot returns, "we have some more bad news. Another engine just failed, and we will be delayed an additional hour."
 
Another bit later, "Sorry folks, more bad news. A third engine just failed, and so, since we will be running only on the one remaining engine, the flight will be delayed by another two hours."
 
At this point, a disgruntled passenger turns to his neighbor and says, "I sure hope that last engine keeps working or else we'll be up here all night!"

  • MovieMadness and LawrenceA like this

My Avatar: Little girl ghost from "義足のMoses"

 

Russian nesting dolls are full of themselves.


#27 hamradio

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 11:10 AM

Back to the future: Toyota working on making a 'flying car'

TOYOTA, Japan — Toyota Motor Corp. is working on a "flying car."

 

A startup backed by the Japanese automaker has developed a test model that engineers hope will eventually develop into a tiny car with a driver who'll be able to light the Olympic torch in the 2020 Tokyo games. For now, however, the project is a concoction of aluminum framing and eight propellers that barely gets off the ground and crashes after several seconds.

 

Toyota has invested 42.5 million yen ($386,000) in startup Cartivator Resource Management to work on "Sky Drive ." At a test flight Saturday in the city where the automaker is based, the gadgetry, about the size of a car and loaded with batteries and sensors, blew up a lot of sand and made a lot of noise.

 

It managed to get up as high as eye level for several seconds before tilting and falling to the ground. Basketballs attached to its bottom served as cushions. After several attempts, the endeavor had to be canceled after one of the covers got detached from the frame and broke, damaging the propellers.

****************************************************

Good luck Toyota, even NASA wouldn't hire this bunch.

 

1496494443_10002061+Japan+Toyota+In+Skie

 

 

The idea is still the same, using ducted fans to provide lift.  What happens if ONE malfunctions?

 

f00fd27fc1b7792b2591cf3e2660e318.jpg

 

 

"Back To The Future" uses anti gravity to provide lift which I see never will come to be.


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#28 MovieMadness

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 10:38 AM

Plants Affect Climate, Too

A Columbia Engineering study finds vegetation can influence climate and weather patterns by 30 percent.

The study published Monday in Nature Geoscience is the first to look at the interaction between the biosphere and atmosphere using just observational data. The findings are being applied to development of a model showing how the interaction may change with the changing climate and determine what drives photosynthesis.

"While we can currently make fairly reliable weather predictions, as, for example, five-day forecasts, we do not have good predictive power on sub-seasonal to seasonal time scale, which is essential for food security," study leader Pierre Gentine, associate professor of earth and environmental engineering, said in a press release.

Vegetation releases water vapor during photosynthesis, which in turn alters surface energy fluxes and contributes to cloud formation, which, in turn, affects the amount of sunlight reaching Earth, affecting the planet’s energy balance and sometimes leading to precipitation.

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Everybody here could have told them that plants affect climate, how scary is it that it took them this long to figure it out. And people trust them to regulate climate change?


Things are never so bad they can't be made worse.


#29 MovieMadness

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 10:29 AM

Back to the future: Toyota working on making a 'flying car'

TOYOTA, Japan — Toyota Motor Corp. is working on a "flying car."

 

A startup backed by the Japanese automaker has developed a test model that engineers hope will eventually develop into a tiny car with a driver who'll be able to light the Olympic torch in the 2020 Tokyo games. For now, however, the project is a concoction of aluminum framing and eight propellers that barely gets off the ground and crashes after several seconds.

 

Toyota has invested 42.5 million yen ($386,000) in startup Cartivator Resource Management to work on "Sky Drive ." At a test flight Saturday in the city where the automaker is based, the gadgetry, about the size of a car and loaded with batteries and sensors, blew up a lot of sand and made a lot of noise.

 

It managed to get up as high as eye level for several seconds before tilting and falling to the ground. Basketballs attached to its bottom served as cushions. After several attempts, the endeavor had to be canceled after one of the covers got detached from the frame and broke, damaging the propellers.

****************************************************

Good luck Toyota, even NASA wouldn't hire this bunch.

 

1496494443_10002061+Japan+Toyota+In+Skie

 

 


Things are never so bad they can't be made worse.


#30 MovieMadness

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 10:24 AM

A pioneering computer scientist wants algorithms to be regulated like cars, banks, and drugs

It’s convenient when Facebook can tag your friends in photos for you, and it’s fun when Snapchat can apply a filter to your face. Both are examples of algorithms that have been trained to recognize eyes, noses, and mouths with consistent accuracy.

When these programs are wrong—like when Facebook mistakes you for your sibling or even your mom—it’s hardly a problem. In other situations, though, we give artificial intelligence much more responsibility, with larger consequences when it inevitably backfires.

Ben Shneiderman, a computer scientist from the University of Maryland, thinks the risks are big enough that it’s time to for the government to get involved. In a lecture on May 30 to the Alan Turing Institute in London, he called for a “National Algorithm Safety Board,” similar to the US’s National Transportation Safety Board for vehicles, which would provide both ongoing and retroactive oversight for high-stakes algorithms.

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If people have been suckered into believing the world's governments can regulate climate change, why not add algorithms to the list.


Things are never so bad they can't be made worse.


#31 hamradio

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 11:54 AM

Back in the 70' -  80's it was global cooling, 2000's global warming.  Some say global warming could bring on an ice age.  Can't seem to make up their mind if it's going to be cold or hot. :blink:



#32 MovieMadness

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 11:48 AM

Study: People are Confused about Climate Change, Weather and Climate Definitions

Local weather apparently plays a major part in people’s opinions on climate change, which was previously defined as global warming until recently, as a study discovered.

 

George Washington University geography professor Michael L. Mann, a co-author of the study, explained that people who saw record-low temperatures are more skeptical of climate change.

Per an article in the GW Magazine, Mann said that a difficult part about informing the public about climate change is “the cognitive disconnect between local and global events” (i.e. defining climate change for the lay person).

 

He added, “It is easy to assume that what you experience at home must be happening elsewhere.”

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Here is another "study" that laments the people who don't fall for the global warming scam. Maybe if they could accurately predict the weather beyond one day people would listen more.


Things are never so bad they can't be made worse.


#33 hamradio

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 11:45 AM

Luck of the Irish.



#34 MovieMadness

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 11:42 AM

Irish beach reappears 33 years after vanishing into Atlantic Ocean

ACHILL ISLAND, Ireland (Reuters) - A beach that was swept away more than 30 years ago from a remote island off the west coast of Ireland has reappeared after thousands of tons of sand were deposited on top of the rocky coastline.

The 300 meter beach near the tiny village of Dooagh on Achill Island vanished in 1984 when storms stripped it of its sand, leaving nothing more than a series of rock pools.

But after high spring tides last month, locals found that the Atlantic Ocean had returned the sand.

"It's enormously significant," Sean Molloy of Achill's tourism office told the Irish Times newspaper, recalling how the popular beach once sustained four hotels and a number of guesthouses on the west coast of the island of 2,600 people.

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Beaches are suppose to be disappearing because of global warming, and here is one that has reappeared. Apparently it never read Al Gore's famous book.


Things are never so bad they can't be made worse.


#35 Vautrin

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 04:22 PM

Somewhere, Howard Hughes is splitting a gut.

Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#36 NipkowDisc

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 03:02 PM

Paul Allen's Massive Stratolaunch Aircraft Emerges From Hangar

We already knew that Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's company Stratolaunch was building an enormous airplane to "make access to space more convenient, reliable, and routine."

 

Now we finally have a look at the first complete version of the Stratolaunch aircraft.

 

Stratolaunch—the world's largest airplane by wingspan—rolled out of its hangar in California's Mojave Desert for the first time ever on Wednesday, ready to begin fueling tests. "This marks the completion of the initial aircraft construction phase and transition into the aircraft ground and flight testing phase," the Stratolaunch team wrote in a news release.

 

The company said it's on track to carry out Stratolaunch's first launch demonstration "as early as 2019."

********************************************************

I hope the pilots wear parachutes, this aircraft doesn't look very stable for some reason. Maybe it's the small wing holding it all together and all of those tires.

 

636319049018303463-stratolaunch1.jpg

it doan look aerodynamically attractive.


"okay, so we're moving right along, folks" -al pacino, dog day afternoon


#37 NipkowDisc

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 03:00 PM

Paul Allen's Massive Stratolaunch Aircraft Emerges From Hangar

We already knew that Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's company Stratolaunch was building an enormous airplane to "make access to space more convenient, reliable, and routine."

 

Now we finally have a look at the first complete version of the Stratolaunch aircraft.

 

Stratolaunch—the world's largest airplane by wingspan—rolled out of its hangar in California's Mojave Desert for the first time ever on Wednesday, ready to begin fueling tests. "This marks the completion of the initial aircraft construction phase and transition into the aircraft ground and flight testing phase," the Stratolaunch team wrote in a news release.

 

The company said it's on track to carry out Stratolaunch's first launch demonstration "as early as 2019."

********************************************************

I hope the pilots wear parachutes, this aircraft doesn't look very stable for some reason. Maybe it's the small wing holding it all together and all of those tires.

 

636319049018303463-stratolaunch1.jpg

does it need two cockpit crews? :lol:


"okay, so we're moving right along, folks" -al pacino, dog day afternoon


#38 MovieMadness

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 12:01 PM

Paul Allen's Massive Stratolaunch Aircraft Emerges From Hangar

We already knew that Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's company Stratolaunch was building an enormous airplane to "make access to space more convenient, reliable, and routine."

 

Now we finally have a look at the first complete version of the Stratolaunch aircraft.

 

Stratolaunch—the world's largest airplane by wingspan—rolled out of its hangar in California's Mojave Desert for the first time ever on Wednesday, ready to begin fueling tests. "This marks the completion of the initial aircraft construction phase and transition into the aircraft ground and flight testing phase," the Stratolaunch team wrote in a news release.

 

The company said it's on track to carry out Stratolaunch's first launch demonstration "as early as 2019."

********************************************************

I hope the pilots wear parachutes, this aircraft doesn't look very stable for some reason. Maybe it's the small wing holding it all together and all of those tires.

 

636319049018303463-stratolaunch1.jpg


Things are never so bad they can't be made worse.


#39 MovieMadness

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 11:52 AM

Is Noise Pollution Making Desert Bugs Disappear?

In the San Juan Basin of New Mexico, far from human habitation, there is a cacophony of man-made noise. The Basin is the nation’s second-largest natural gas field, and for miles in every direction, gas compressors are running more or less constantly, filling the desert with their eerie, broadband roar.

When compressors are built near where people live, the machines, which can range from the size of a pickup truck to the size of a house, are surrounded by walls to help dampen the sound. But creatures that live in the desert are not so lucky. Research has already shown that bats and birds behave differently in areas with loud noise, including where compressors are running. Now a team of ecologists has found that bugs are shaken up by compressors, too—and by high decibel levels of noise in general.

For the study, the researchers buried small ethanol-filled containers in 10 sites around the gas field: five with compressors and five without.

 

The louder the plot was, regardless of the presence or absence of a compressor, the fewer velvet ants and wolf spiders there were. 

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I can already see them pushing for environmental noise pollution regulations for bugs out in the desert. Bugs don't like to be bugged by noise.


Things are never so bad they can't be made worse.


#40 LawrenceA

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 11:20 AM

The only extra CO2 released now are from the globalist hyperventilating.

 

You guys are producing plenty of methane with this thread, though.






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