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Hitchcok's " Rope "


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#1 DougieB

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 08:22 AM

Hitchcock liked to explore sexuality in films such as ROPE, STRANGERS ON A TRAIN and others, as much as censors would allow.  No judgement, no preaching, just part of humanity.  I watched SUSPICION the other night and there's a scene at a dinner party at the mystery writer's house and one of the guests is a blonde lady with very short hair wearing a man's suit and tie.  No deal is made out it, which is nice, and I thought maybe she was the mystery writer's girlfriend because, at one point, she gets up and pours a drink for the hostess as everyone is discussing ways to poison someone that can't be traced.  The bird "expert" in THE BIRDS wears a man's suit and tie, too.

 

He could use sexuality for humor too. The newlywed couple in Rear Window ​are mostly unseen but it's pretty clear they're holed up in their bedroom non-stop. Any time the poor guy tries to take a breather at the window, she calls him back with that plaintive wail. It's surprisingly explicit without being really explicit at all. It's a clever way to "go there" in a family film. The train-in-the-tunnel ending of ​North By Northwest ​is actually laugh out loud funny, since even casual moviegoers would recognize the significance of such a well-used cliché coming on the heels of the two stars climbing into bed. In Rope​ there's a lot of giddy wink-wink between the two men as they savor the irony of being so charming to their guests after having murdered a previous guest, but it's a creepy humor that makes the movie audience feel complicit, which seems to have been Hitchcock's whole approach to the film.


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#2 ChristineHoard

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 07:21 PM

Hitchcock liked to explore sexuality in films such as ROPE, STRANGERS ON A TRAIN and others, as much as censors would allow.  No judgement, no preaching, just part of humanity.  I watched SUSPICION the other night and there's a scene at a dinner party at the mystery writer's house and one of the guests is a blonde lady with very short hair wearing a man's suit and tie.  No deal is made out it, which is nice, and I thought maybe she was the mystery writer's girlfriend because, at one point, she gets up and pours a drink for the hostess as everyone is discussing ways to poison someone that can't be traced.  The bird "expert" in THE BIRDS wears a man's suit and tie, too.


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#3 rayban

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 06:53 AM

In addition to being a suspenseful mystery, Rope is a Noel Cowardesque portrait of Upper East Side elegance.  The men wear sharp suits.  Joan Chandler, as the sophisticated Janet, has some of the film’s wittiest lines.  The apartment, more like a penthouse, in which the film takes place has a scenic view of New York’s skyline, which changes color according to the passing time: morning, afternoon, twilight, and evening.  Throw in a discussion of the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche, and you have one of Hitchcock’s most heady and stylish thrillers.  

I would love to see a production of the original play.


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#4 cinemaspeak59

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 11:23 AM

In addition to being a suspenseful mystery, Rope is a Noel Cowardesque portrait of Upper East Side elegance.  The men wear sharp suits.  Joan Chandler, as the sophisticated Janet, has some of the film’s wittiest lines.  The apartment, more like a penthouse, in which the film takes place has a scenic view of New York’s skyline, which changes color according to the passing time: morning, afternoon, twilight, and evening.  Throw in a discussion of the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche, and you have one of Hitchcock’s most heady and stylish thrillers.  


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#5 jaragon

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 07:33 PM

I don't know if audiences got it on it's original release but now it's obvious the killers are a demented gay couple. One can even imagine  Bradon using that rope to tie up Philip during sex.

Hitchcock was smart about keeping the story in the apartment; it increases the suspense and sense of claustrophobia.  http://r.search.yaho...K2Do_4d.FzXCOg-

the modern case that made me think about "Rope"


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#6 TopBilled

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 08:59 AM

Jarrod -

 

For a no-holds-barred look at the case, please read "For The Thrill Of It": Leopold, Loeb and the Murder That Shocked Jazz Age Chicago by Simon Baatz. 

 

And, yes, Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb were lovers.

 

Thanks. Speaking of true crime, another one worth reading is Truman Capote's 'In Cold Blood.'


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#7 rayban

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 08:49 AM

ROPE (like COMPULSION) is based on the Leopold & Loeb case. Those guys were said to have had a homosexual relationship.

 

screen.jpg

Jarrod -

 

For a no-holds-barred look at the case, please read "For The Thrill Of It": Leopold, Loeb and the Murder That Shocked Jazz Age Chicago by Simon Baatz. 

 

And, yes, Nathan Leopold and Richard Loeb were lovers.


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#8 TopBilled

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 08:19 AM

A recent true crime event made me think and re-watch  Hitchcock's classic thriller about gay murderers. 

 

ROPE (like COMPULSION) is based on the Leopold & Loeb case. Those guys were said to have had a homosexual relationship.

 

screen.jpg


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#9 rayban

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Posted 19 November 2016 - 07:55 AM

A recent true crime event made me think and re-watch  Hitchcock's classic thriller about gay murderers. 

I really like the play of the same name by Patrick Hamilton.

 

It is far more open about its' subject matter than the famous Hitchcock film.

 

And, of course, the teacher (whom Jimmy Stewart plays in the movie) is gay in the play.


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#10 jaragon

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Posted 18 November 2016 - 09:53 PM

A recent true crime event made me think and re-watch  Hitchcock's classic thriller about gay murderers. 






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