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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Neglected Films With Gay Favorites


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#1 rayban

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 06:38 AM

Whatever you may think of Josef von Sternberg's version of "An American Tragedy" - too "politically-motivated" - too "dry" - too "cerebral" - the lead performance by Phillips Holmes wafts through it like a breath of fresh air.  

 

However, based on von Sternberg's direction and Holmes' performance, the hero is both a tainted personality and guilty, too.

 

American-Tragedy-1.jpg


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#2 rayban

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 11:07 AM

"Her Cardboard Lover" - Norma Shearer and Robert Taylor - directed by George Cukor - 1942

 

It's a rather thin piece of entertainment with a very sophisticated veneer, which I am attributing to George Cukor himself.

 

Both Shearer and Taylor are extremely "magnetic" in terms of physical beauty and sexual allure.

 

It's also interesting to see how one gay man - the director, George Cukor - treated another man who's been reputed to be gay - Robert Taylor himself.

 

Lots of adoring close-ups, putting him in a negligee, building TWO comic scenes around his derriere,

awarding him the girl at the end.

 

But then that is the "problem" with the film - how could Shearer prefer George Sanders to Taylor - when the movie is so smitten with Taylor himself.

 

Taylor is a gift from the gods - wake up, girl!

 

582f95056138857bed19d17a1a4111d5.jpg


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#3 jaragon

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Posted 04 May 2017 - 05:18 PM

"Susan Lenox - Her Fall and Rise" - Robert Z. Leonard - 1931

 

With Greta Garbo and Clark Gable -

 

Greta Garbo is, I think, a screen icon for gay men -

 

she was such a unique creation - her own? - or MGM's? - probably more her than them -

 

she was both beautiful and remote -

 

accessible and NOT accessible -

 

BUT THE WOMAN MADE A LOT OF TRASH -

 

this film is so "trashy" that it almost seems to be mocking itself -

 

and, so, it is a most fascinating "curio" -

 

and Greta Garbo makes it watchable -

 

her "presence" elevates the material -

 

and a young Clark Gable, in a realm of his own, almost a little too real for her universe, makes it watchable, too

 

proving, I guess, that, in the right hands, trash can work its' spell!

 

 

One man's trash is another man's classic


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#4 rayban

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Posted 04 May 2017 - 11:29 AM

"Susan Lenox - Her Fall and Rise" - Robert Z. Leonard - 1931

 

With Greta Garbo and Clark Gable -

 

Greta Garbo is, I think, a screen icon for gay men -

 

she was such a unique creation - her own? - or MGM's? - probably more her than them -

 

she was both beautiful and remote -

 

accessible and NOT accessible -

 

BUT THE WOMAN MADE A LOT OF TRASH -

 

this film is so "trashy" that it almost seems to be mocking itself -

 

and, so, it is a most fascinating "curio" -

 

and Greta Garbo makes it watchable -

 

her "presence" elevates the material -

 

and a young Clark Gable, in a realm of his own, almost a little too real for her universe, makes it watchable, too

 

proving, I guess, that, in the right hands, trash can work its' spell!

 

annex-garbo-greta-susan-lenox-her-fall-a


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#5 jaragon

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 06:22 PM

Jack Clayton, who was such a talented filmmaker, made only a few films in his lifetime.

 

He was often uncertain about whether or not to do a film.

 

He also suffered a stroke, which took him five years to recover from.

 

But the film that I was talking about - "Our Mother's House" - has such similarities to his most famous film, "The Innocents".

I saw the trailer and it looks creepy and disturbing


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#6 rayban

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 11:34 AM

Jack Clayton, who was such a talented filmmaker, made only a few films in his lifetime.

 

He was often uncertain about whether or not to do a film.

 

He also suffered a stroke, which took him five years to recover from.

 

But the film that I was talking about - "Our Mother's House" - has such similarities to his most famous film, "The Innocents".


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#7 Jlewis

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 10:50 AM

There were definite "gay vibes" in the  DiCaprio-Maguire " Gatsby"

 

That vibe generally starts when two guys get into the front seat of the car one wants to impress the other with. You know... "look how big the controls are".


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#8 jaragon

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 10:25 AM

It has been a long time since I have seen Ladd's version. I didn't really like it at the time. Can't explain why exactly. I remember he was good enough, but it was set up too much like other Paramount films of the forties with the story moving too fast like a standard murder/drama.

 

Also have mixed feelings for the 2013 version (Leonardo DiCapio), done too much in the styles of the past decade or two with insistent talk-talk-talk and cgi-influenced image overkill. Too many ridiculous high-up pan shots. Granted, it is still quite well-made and you must congratulate all of the hard work put into all of the period detail-work. None of the previous versions were obsessive about this.

 

In fact, one weakness with the seventies version is that some music is a few years too early for the early twenties setting and some of the fashions are a bit off. However this one is probably the best of the bunch. It is done in the style of Robert Redford's earlier The Way We Were with an overdose of soft focus, but that is something I actually like in that decade of cinema following the landmark family gathering scenes of Bonnie & Clyde. The trademark nostalgic "haze" was consistent with other memorable period pieces like Summer of '42, The Garden of Finzi Continis up through parts of Julia. Redford's Gatsby is nostalgic for something he can't have, trying to hold on to a "vision" of whom he loves but doesn't really love him back. I especially like the final climax on the pool with him in a dream state, ready to be killed when he is his happiest.

 

Both that version and the most recent do have that nice "gay" vibe, probably because DiCaprio and Tobey Maguire are bro-buddies and Sam Waterston and Redford certainly have a "chemistry" in the way they look at each other. I think Waterston has the best, very understated, performance. He observes with his facial expressions, not unlike the infamous eye glass billboard.

 

We only have the below trailer to get an idea for the '26 version.

 

There were definite "gay vibes" in the  DiCaprio-Maguire " Gatsby"


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#9 Jlewis

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 07:03 AM

It has been a long time since I have seen Ladd's version. I didn't really like it at the time. Can't explain why exactly. I remember he was good enough, but it was set up too much like other Paramount films of the forties with the story moving too fast like a standard murder/drama.

 

Also have mixed feelings for the 2013 version (Leonardo DiCapio), done too much in the styles of the past decade or two with insistent talk-talk-talk and cgi-influenced image overkill. Too many ridiculous high-up pan shots. Granted, it is still quite well-made and you must congratulate all of the hard work put into all of the period detail-work. None of the previous versions were obsessive about this.

 

In fact, one weakness with the seventies version is that some music is a few years too early for the early twenties setting and some of the fashions are a bit off. However this one is probably the best of the bunch. It is done in the style of Robert Redford's earlier The Way We Were with an overdose of soft focus, but that is something I actually like in that decade of cinema following the landmark family gathering scenes of Bonnie & Clyde. The trademark nostalgic "haze" was consistent with other memorable period pieces like Summer of '42, The Garden of Finzi Continis up through parts of Julia. Redford's Gatsby is nostalgic for something he can't have, trying to hold on to a "vision" of whom he loves but doesn't really love him back. I especially like the final climax on the pool with him in a dream state, ready to be killed when he is his happiest.

 

Both that version and the most recent do have that nice "gay" vibe, probably because DiCaprio and Tobey Maguire are bro-buddies and Sam Waterston and Redford certainly have a "chemistry" in the way they look at each other. I think Waterston has the best, very understated, performance. He observes with his facial expressions, not unlike the infamous eye glass billboard.

 

We only have the below trailer to get an idea for the '26 version.

 


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#10 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 02:42 PM

The 1974 version according to Rayban's list (the Robert Redford-Mia Farrow version).  I'd like to see the Alan Ladd version from 1949..

 

I would also like to see the Ladd version.   I have only seen the Redford version.    


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#11 ChristineHoard

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 11:55 AM

Which version are you referring too?   

 

The 1974 version according to Rayban's list (the Robert Redford-Mia Farrow version).  I'd like to see the Alan Ladd version from 1949..


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#12 rayban

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 11:52 AM

Which version are you referring too?   

The Jack Clayton version - with Robert Redford and Mia Farrow.


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#13 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 11:24 AM

Contrary to popular opinion, "The Great Gatsby" was a box-office success.

 

It was a very effective realization of the famous novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

 

It also delved into the homoerotic nature of the relationship of Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby.

 

And it, of course, materialized - gradually - the hopelessness of the relationship between Daisy and Jay.

 

Which version are you referring too?   


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#14 rayban

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Posted 29 April 2017 - 11:09 AM

Contrary to popular opinion, "The Great Gatsby" was a box-office success.

 

It was a very effective realization of the famous novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald.

 

It also delved into the homoerotic nature of the relationship of Nick Carraway and Jay Gatsby.

 

And it, of course, materialized - gradually - the hopelessness of the relationship between Daisy and Jay.


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#15 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 28 April 2017 - 03:16 PM

????????????????????

 

Sorry,  silly joke related to the use of body.    I have body on my mind because last night I went to my bro-in-law B-Day party and one of his friends shows up.  This guy has been posting on social media and showing his body since he is taking supplements and going to the gym.

 

Well to most people I have talked to his 'before' much thinner \ trim look is more attractive than his current, buff pumped up look.   He meet people that haven't seen him in years and all of them made comments,  the best one being  'wow,  I could fit the old you into the new you'.    But he took all of these as complements.   



#16 rayban

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Posted 28 April 2017 - 01:13 PM

What a body of work?   Hey, try to be more subtle with gay subtext.    :D  

????????????????????


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#17 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 28 April 2017 - 12:19 PM

Jack Clayton - only seven films - but what a body of work -

 

1. "Room At The Top" - 1959

 

2. "The Innocents" - 1961

 

3. "The Pumpkin Eater" - 1964

 

4. "Our Mother's House" - 1967

 

5. "The Great Gatsby" - 1974

 

6. "Something Wicked This Way Comes" - 1983

 

7. "The Lonely Passion Of Judith Hearn" - 1987

 

 

 

What a body of work?   Hey, try to be more subtle with gay subtext.    :D  



#18 rayban

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Posted 28 April 2017 - 12:08 PM

Jack Clayton - only seven films - but what a body of work -

 

1. "Room At The Top" - 1959

 

2. "The Innocents" - 1961

 

3. "The Pumpkin Eater" - 1964

 

4. "Our Mother's House" - 1967

 

5. "The Great Gatsby" - 1974

 

6. "Something Wicked This Way Comes" - 1983

 

7. "The Lonely Passion Of Judith Hearn" - 1987

 

cccfa76df32b634c02657a437eb9be96.jpg


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#19 rayban

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Posted 27 April 2017 - 11:20 AM

The shooting script for "Our Mother's House" was written by Mr. Clayton's third wife, the Israeli-born actress, famous for her role in "Ben Hur", Haya Harareet.


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#20 rayban

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:34 PM

"Our Mother's House" - Jack Clayton - 1967

 

This one is a terrific film about seven children, who bury their dead mother in the garden, because they do not want to be sent to an orphanage.

 

It has very effective performances from all of the children, the most famous of whom are Pamela Franklin and Mark Lester.

 

It also has a superb performance by Dirk Bogarde as the supposed father of the children.

 

Long-lost, he re-appears when the oldest boy writes to him.

 

The film itself is an intriguing mixture of darkness and light.

 

But the fact that the father does not turn out to be the children's deliverer is quite an unexpected surprise.

 

It deserves a better reputation.

 

186bece97ac2351d46cf4946b689af18.jpg


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".





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