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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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"Moonlight" (2016)

A must see

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#1 jaragon

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 09:18 AM

 

What an Academy Award win will do for you...

 

"Moonlight," the 2016 Best Picture winner, was shot in 25 days for $1.5 million. It earned $27,854,932 during its domestic run, almost 20 times its original budget.

 

Since the film has been released overseas, it has more than doubled its financial receipts. According to boxofficemojo.com, "Moonlight" has earned $37,191,755 overseas, giving it a worldwide take of $65,046,687.  

 

Needless to say, the news pleased the movie's director, Barry Jenkins -- winner of an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay (shared with Tarell Alvin McCraney).

 

 

D8WSuB0Y_bigger.jpgBarry Jenkins@BandryBarry

 

Wow wow wow -- haven't checked in on this in a minute. That international number just puts me all in my feels 270a-1f3ff.png

 

Great news hopefully it will lead to more films like it


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#2 jakeem

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 10:49 AM

What an Academy Award win will do for you...

 

"Moonlight," the 2016 Best Picture winner, was shot in 25 days for $1.5 million. It earned $27,854,932 during its domestic run, almost 20 times its original budget.

 

Since the film has been released overseas, it has more than doubled its financial receipts. According to boxofficemojo.com, "Moonlight" has earned $37,191,755 overseas, giving it a worldwide take of $65,046,687.  

 

Needless to say, the news pleased the movie's director, Barry Jenkins -- winner of an Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay (shared with Tarell Alvin McCraney).

 

 

D8WSuB0Y_bigger.jpgBarry Jenkins@BandryBarry

 

Wow wow wow -- haven't checked in on this in a minute. That international number just puts me all in my feels 270a-1f3ff.png


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#3 jaragon

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Posted 07 March 2017 - 06:14 PM

The main character never actually comes out as gay- he obviously loves Kevin who he hopes to reconnect with- interesting we never see them make love as adults.


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#4 Swithin

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 08:35 PM

I recall TIME magazine's opinion piece after Crash defeated BM mentioning that the Academy had chosen the "safe" one for the Bush Era (since the election just over a year earlier involved Bush's battle against same sex marriage). My opinion of Moonlight is that it was the "safe" gay movie to choose since it was so subdued.

 

I thought that the thing that might have held Moonlight back would be its positive portrayal of drug dealers, more than anything to do with being gay.


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#5 Jlewis

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 07:39 PM

Great list - they gay content in "Moonlight" is very light compared to "Brokeback Mountain"  and yes you could say that "Midnight Cowboy" was the first gay film even though of course they never kiss or make love.

 

I recall TIME magazine's opinion piece after Crash defeated BM mentioning that the Academy had chosen the "safe" one for the Bush Era (since the election just over a year earlier involved Bush's battle against same sex marriage). My opinion of Moonlight is that it was the "safe" gay movie to choose since it was so subdued.


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#6 jaragon

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 06:30 PM

 

Was MOONLIGHT the first "gay" Best Pic?

 

  • WINGS (1927)... thanks to war, these guys are closer than close. Clara Bow is caught in a state of undress with one, but he is too drunk to rise to the occasion. Later he is passionately kissing his dying buddy. In the end, this is less gay than HELL'S ANGELS though. Now THAT movie is a piece of work!
  • BROADWAY MELODY (1929)... the female leads are more than just sisterly, even discussing sharing a bath. Unfortunately the stereotyped costume and set designer hasn't aged well, getting profiled in THE CELLULOID CLOSET.
  • ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT (1930)... war films with all of the soldier bonding are always more lenient since you only have starving French ladies interrupting bro-buddy bathing in the creek. Also these guys show a LOT of affection when their buddies are dying.
  • CAVALCADE (1933)... a bit homophobic in its roaring twenties sequence. The older folks don't understand all of the changes in society: like the two guys and the two girls sitting together at tables as they listen to "wild" jazz.
  • MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY (1935)... the ladies of the South Seas provide diversion, but Clark Gable and Franchot Tone are closer than close. Then there's Charles Laughton and his fetishes...
  • REBECCA (1940)... let's just say that Judith Anderson's "Mrs." Danvers appreciates great see-through ladies undergarments
  • CASABLANCA (1942, but '43 awards)... Bogie does not leave off in the fog with Bergman after all, but Rains instead
  • THE LOST WEEKEND (1945)... is it really "writers block" troubling Ray Milland?
  • THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (1946)... sure, one is happily married with two grown up kids, another engaged and another falls for Teresa Wright, but I agree with Myrna Loy that they often look cute together when drunk
  • HAMLET (1948)... Olivier is quite fabulous in his performance
  • ALL ABOUT EVE (1950)... I dunno... Eve is not chasing a MALE actor in this one. Also Phoebe has George Sanders' Addison quite amused in that final scene as well.
  • FROM HERE TO ETERNITY (1953)... don't trust Monty Clift when Liz Taylor is not around to distract him. Of Frankie, why did you make THE DETECTIVE some 15 years later? What were you worried about? Poor Donna Reed is really struggling to keep him to herself since he is "married" to the army (namely his bro-buddies). Ernest Borgnine has some very serious psycho-issues here. Fortunately he finds a girl by MARTY (1955).
  • BEN HUR (1959)... well, Charlton Heston saw nothing "gay" in his relationship with Stephen Boyd
  • WEST SIDE STORY (1961)... this was not a good year despite the British import VICTIM. Here we see one tough broad who wants to be part of the Jets gang, but she is unfortunately put in her place: "You're a girl! Be a girl and beat it!" The Officer Krupke song includes the lyrics "My sister wears a mustache. My brother wears a dress".
  • LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (1962)... they try not to address the issue of the real Lawrence except in one key scene with O'Toole being... surrounded
  • TOM JONES (1963)... a bit of letdown considering how much heterosexual hanky panky is going on all over the place
  • THE SOUND OF MUSIC (1965)... at least we've got Richard Haydn in it
  • OLIVER! (1968)... apparently Oliver Reed isn't, but there sure are an awful lot of boys in this one
  • MIDNIGHT COWBOY (1969)... released one month before Stonewall, this is the encyclopedia of gay life pre-Stonewall. You got it all: the hustler who wants women but must settle for the anybody who comes along (although Joe insists that John Wayne is not a "F" so there is nothing wrong with his cowboy get-up), a Warhol drag queen star who at least looks confident and sarcastic, the teenager with glasses lurking in Times Square theaters and the 60-ish businessman who is struggling with his Catholicism.
  • I guess all of the seventies films have some minor "reference", but only ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST (1975) has characters questioning their heterosexuality.
  • THE DEER HUNTER (1978)... why is it that Robert De Niro only gets naked with fellow dudes?
  • CHARIOTS OF FIRE (1981)... nothing here, but at least we see Brad Davis in the locker room
  • AMADEUS (1984)... just what is Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) really obsessing with? Amadeus' musical abilities?
  • OUT OF AFRICA (1985)... nothing here of importance, but imagine if THE COLOR PURPLE had won!
  • THE LAST EMPEROR (1987)... nothing here, but we sure get hopeful with all of the other kinky stuff going on
  • DANCES WITH WOLVES (1990)... pretty hetero, but Kevin Costner loves showing off his bare back end
  • SILENCE OF THE LAMBS (1991)... not too favorable transvestite character
  • BRAVEHEART (1995)... really bad stereotype here.
  • SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE (1998)... plenty of cross dressing, but we must be reminded they are straight!
  • AMERICAN BEAUTY (1999)... probably the most positive representation up to this time with two characters, excuse me, three if you count the homophobic ex-military man.
  • GLADIATOR (2000)... only for Russell Crowe enthusiasts
  • CHICAGO (2002)... pretty mild rather than wild in the ladies prison
  • SPOTLIGHT (2015)... yeah, but the whole priest thing... not favorable.

 

Great list - they gay content in "Moonlight" is very light compared to "Brokeback Mountain"  and yes you could say that "Midnight Cowboy" was the first gay film even though of course they never kiss or make love.


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#7 Jlewis

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 05:47 PM

Oh Switchin, you have me in stitches over that photo. Clara and her boys!

 

By the way, I like Out of Africa too (at least as equally as The Color Purple although I may favor that one ever so slightly more) and never understood all of the criticism of poor Robert Redford. Yeah, he should have worked on some sort of accent.


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#8 Swithin

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 05:33 PM

 

Was MOONLIGHT the first "gay" Best Pic?

 

  • WINGS (1927)... thanks to war, these guys are closer than close. Clara Bow is caught in a state of undress with one, but he is too drunk to rise to the occasion. Later he is passionately kissing his dying buddy. In the end, this is less gay than HELL'S ANGELS though. Now THAT movie is a piece of work!
  • OUT OF AFRICA (1985)... nothing here of importance, but imagine if THE COLOR PURPLE had won!

 

Out of Africa is one of my favorite films and contains I think Meryl Streep's best performance. Regarding gay content, there has been some speculation that Berkeley Cole, played brilliantly by Michael Kitchen, was intended to be gay (was he in love with Finch Hatton?); and that the real-life Berkeley Cole may have been gay. He died aged 43. Karen Blixen described him as drinking a bottle of champagne every morning at 11. With his death, she wrote,

 

“An epoch in the history of the Colony came to an end with him,”  “The yeast was out of the bread of the land."

 

Regarding Wings, of course it is the first gay epic. Poor Clara Bow.

 

Wings.jpg


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#9 rayban

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 01:03 PM

I think more can be added. Some films I haven't seen in two decades and can't remember all details.

It could be the blueprint for a very interesting article.


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#10 Jlewis

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 12:55 PM

I think more can be added. Some films I haven't seen in two decades and can't remember all details.


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#11 rayban

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 11:59 AM

Interesting list, in the book, "The Lost Weekend", the hero was struggling with his homosexuality.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#12 Jlewis

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 11:07 AM

Was MOONLIGHT the first "gay" Best Pic?

 

  • WINGS (1927)... thanks to war, these guys are closer than close. Clara Bow is caught in a state of undress with one, but he is too drunk to rise to the occasion. Later he is passionately kissing his dying buddy. In the end, this is less gay than HELL'S ANGELS though. Now THAT movie is a piece of work!
  • BROADWAY MELODY (1929)... the female leads are more than just sisterly, even discussing sharing a bath. Unfortunately the stereotyped costume and set designer hasn't aged well, getting profiled in THE CELLULOID CLOSET.
  • ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT (1930)... war films with all of the soldier bonding are always more lenient since you only have starving French ladies interrupting bro-buddy bathing in the creek. Also these guys show a LOT of affection when their buddies are dying.
  • CAVALCADE (1933)... a bit homophobic in its roaring twenties sequence. The older folks don't understand all of the changes in society: like the two guys and the two girls sitting together at tables as they listen to "wild" jazz.
  • MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY (1935)... the ladies of the South Seas provide diversion, but Clark Gable and Franchot Tone are closer than close. Then there's Charles Laughton and his fetishes...
  • REBECCA (1940)... let's just say that Judith Anderson's "Mrs." Danvers appreciates great see-through ladies undergarments
  • CASABLANCA (1942, but '43 awards)... Bogie does not leave off in the fog with Bergman after all, but Rains instead
  • THE LOST WEEKEND (1945)... is it really "writers block" troubling Ray Milland?
  • THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES (1946)... sure, one is happily married with two grown up kids, another engaged and another falls for Teresa Wright, but I agree with Myrna Loy that they often look cute together when drunk
  • HAMLET (1948)... Olivier is quite fabulous in his performance
  • ALL ABOUT EVE (1950)... I dunno... Eve is not chasing a MALE actor in this one. Also Phoebe has George Sanders' Addison quite amused in that final scene as well.
  • FROM HERE TO ETERNITY (1953)... don't trust Monty Clift when Liz Taylor is not around to distract him. Of Frankie, why did you make THE DETECTIVE some 15 years later? What were you worried about? Poor Donna Reed is really struggling to keep him to herself since he is "married" to the army (namely his bro-buddies). Ernest Borgnine has some very serious psycho-issues here. Fortunately he finds a girl by MARTY (1955).
  • BEN HUR (1959)... well, Charlton Heston saw nothing "gay" in his relationship with Stephen Boyd
  • WEST SIDE STORY (1961)... this was not a good year despite the British import VICTIM. Here we see one tough broad who wants to be part of the Jets gang, but she is unfortunately put in her place: "You're a girl! Be a girl and beat it!" The Officer Krupke song includes the lyrics "My sister wears a mustache. My brother wears a dress".
  • LAWRENCE OF ARABIA (1962)... they try not to address the issue of the real Lawrence except in one key scene with O'Toole being... surrounded
  • TOM JONES (1963)... a bit of letdown considering how much heterosexual hanky panky is going on all over the place
  • THE SOUND OF MUSIC (1965)... at least we've got Richard Haydn in it
  • OLIVER! (1968)... apparently Oliver Reed isn't, but there sure are an awful lot of boys in this one
  • MIDNIGHT COWBOY (1969)... released one month before Stonewall, this is the encyclopedia of gay life pre-Stonewall. You got it all: the hustler who wants women but must settle for the anybody who comes along (although Joe insists that John Wayne is not a "F" so there is nothing wrong with his cowboy get-up), a Warhol drag queen star who at least looks confident and sarcastic, the teenager with glasses lurking in Times Square theaters and the 60-ish businessman who is struggling with his Catholicism.
  • I guess all of the seventies films have some minor "reference", but only ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST (1975) has characters questioning their heterosexuality.
  • THE DEER HUNTER (1978)... why is it that Robert De Niro only gets naked with fellow dudes?
  • CHARIOTS OF FIRE (1981)... nothing here, but at least we see Brad Davis in the locker room
  • AMADEUS (1984)... just what is Antonio Salieri (F. Murray Abraham) really obsessing with? Amadeus' musical abilities?
  • OUT OF AFRICA (1985)... nothing here of importance, but imagine if THE COLOR PURPLE had won!
  • THE LAST EMPEROR (1987)... nothing here, but we sure get hopeful with all of the other kinky stuff going on
  • DANCES WITH WOLVES (1990)... pretty hetero, but Kevin Costner loves showing off his bare back end
  • SILENCE OF THE LAMBS (1991)... not too favorable transvestite character
  • BRAVEHEART (1995)... really bad stereotype here.
  • SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE (1998)... plenty of cross dressing, but we must be reminded they are straight!
  • AMERICAN BEAUTY (1999)... probably the most positive representation up to this time with two characters, excuse me, three if you count the homophobic ex-military man.
  • GLADIATOR (2000)... only for Russell Crowe enthusiasts
  • CHICAGO (2002)... pretty mild rather than wild in the ladies prison
  • SPOTLIGHT (2015)... yeah, but the whole priest thing... not favorable.

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#13 LawrenceA

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Posted 06 March 2017 - 01:11 AM

You are right. Hollywood grew up with Ron Howard. Yet I am not thinking "art house" in the same way as you, I guess. I am also trying to remember who all famous was featured in Slumdog Millionaire.

 

No one, although director Danny Boyle was well-known (Trainspotting28 Days LaterSunshine). I would probably call Slumdog arthouse, too. I remember going to my local Blockbuster to ask if they had any copies available and the crew working had never heard of it. And this was after it won Best Picture!


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#14 Jlewis

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 09:35 PM

You are right. Hollywood grew up with Ron Howard. Yet I am not thinking "art house" in the same way as you, I guess. I am also trying to remember who all famous was featured in Slumdog Millionaire.



#15 LawrenceA

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 09:33 PM

It may be an art house choice, but no more so than A Beautiful Mind or Birdman.

 

I agree with most of your points (although i haven't watched Moonlight yet; I do have it on disc, though, as I get all of the BP winners), but this line isn't exactly true. A Beautiful Mind and Birdman were both major studio films made by A-list directors and starring recognizable movies stars, none of which is true for Moonlight.


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#16 Jlewis

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 09:12 PM

The general theory discussed over and over is that the Best Pics these days tend to be everybody's second or third choice on their ballot because their first choices are too polarizing. Probably half of the Academy loved La La Land and half thought it was too over-rated and over-exposed, purposely listing it farther below in their ballots. Moonlight was fairly consistent in its rankings.

 

I am not too-too shocked by its win. At the time of the mix-up, I thought it was either planned in advance for ratings or to counter all of the anti-Trump jokes earlier so that Washington wouldn't declare war on Hollywood as long as the "oopsie" was discussed more by the media. It may be an art house choice, but no more so than A Beautiful Mind or Birdman.

 

The similarities to Boyhood are likely unintentional, but there are enough of them that it didn't feel as fresh to me. The former film lost to Birdman, something I never understood except that maybe the Academy voters weren't ready for that type of storytelling... until now, with Moonlight. Also Moonlight is a much more simple and straightforward film than Boyhood.

 

It got a lot of hoopty doo for being the first gay Best Pic and many in the Academy didn't want to make the same mistake as in the Brokeback Mountain vs. Crash battle, but it seems so much more prudish than that film and even previous Best Pics such as Wings (which had two soldiers more gaga for each other than Clara Bow and the dying one getting that one final kiss on the lips) and Midnight Cowboy ("I'm not a real cowboy but I'm one hellavah..."). I was critical of ABC's When We Rise for being too focused on the politics and not enough on the relationships because they wanted to please those viewers expecting all of their TV to be heteronormal, but there seemed less here to warrant an R rating than on primetime TV. Mostly we got a kiss on the beach and the impression of mutual fondling off camera. Otherwise Mike Pence, Mike Huckabee, Pat Robertson or Ted Cruz have little to be coiling in horror over here. (Then again, it is doubtful any of them watched either this or 1985's The Color Purple either, which lost to Out of Africa but still managed to get nominated despite same gender kissing and more dark skin than light on screen. Come to think of it, even American Beauty had a more prolonged kiss despite Kevin Spacey looking spacey.)

 

There is a lot to like. I thought Naomie Harris was more gung-ho in her performance than winner Mahershala Ali, although I also felt both should have been on screen longer. The cinematography was quite innovative with many hand-held shots moving along side the main characters in order to present the events from the child, then teenager's point of view. Sometimes the camera would purposely go out of focus, suggesting that you are looking through these characters' eyes. Again, I suspect the director also watched some Fassbinder material such as Ali: Fear Eats the Soul previously because those diner and earlier school cafeteria scenes had a similar choreography.


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#17 jaragon

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 07:10 PM

Finally saw it on DVD. It was... good. Perhaps over-rated, but aren't all Best Pictures?

 

It reminded me a little of Boyhood, but with three actors instead of the same one playing the different ages. Both films had stand out Mommy roles. Although Naomi Harris didn't score the prize like goody two-shoes Patricia Arquette (who wasn't addicted to drugs, just abusive men after dumping unemployed nice-guy Ethan Hawke), she does a great job not appearing too British in her Miami set role. Also both movies had groovy retro wheels: '68 Pontiac vs. '73 Chevy Impala. Little Mason grows up and winds up in the sack with his girlfriend at the dorm. Little "Little" morphs into Chiron (named after the astrological asteroid and Greek centaur symbolizing "healing") then "Black" before winding up in the sack with Kevin. (However this movie was ssssoooooo chaste that I am guessing the guys just gave each other a "good goin' bro" after the camera crew said "cut".) Also groovy '60s music updated to the modern era... and I liked Barbara Lewis' "Hello Stranger" in this one.

 

My only complaint is that there wasn't a whole lot of story. The best scenes were in the diner late in the movie, reminding me of Fassbinder stuff even though this movie was far less "gay" than Fox and His Friends or even Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (a heterosexual romance with a bit of gay feel). You know, a lot of looking with any talking restricted to topics that you aren't really thinking about.

It's an art house character study I'm still shocked that it won the best picture Oscar



#18 Jlewis

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 04:17 PM

Finally saw it on DVD. It was... good. Perhaps over-rated, but aren't all Best Pictures?

 

It reminded me a little of Boyhood, but with three actors instead of the same one playing the different ages. Both films had stand out Mommy roles. Although Naomi Harris didn't score the prize like goody two-shoes Patricia Arquette (who wasn't addicted to drugs, just abusive men after dumping unemployed nice-guy Ethan Hawke), she does a great job not appearing too British in her Miami set role. Also both movies had groovy retro wheels: '68 Pontiac vs. '73 Chevy Impala. Little Mason grows up and winds up in the sack with his girlfriend at the dorm. Little "Little" morphs into Chiron (named after the astrological asteroid and Greek centaur symbolizing "healing") then "Black" before winding up in the sack with Kevin. (However this movie was ssssoooooo chaste that I am guessing the guys just gave each other a "good goin' bro" after the camera crew said "cut".) Also groovy '60s music updated to the modern era... and I liked Barbara Lewis' "Hello Stranger" in this one.

 

My only complaint is that there wasn't a whole lot of story. The best scenes were in the diner late in the movie, reminding me of Fassbinder stuff even though this movie was far less "gay" than Fox and His Friends or even Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (a heterosexual romance with a bit of gay feel). You know, a lot of looking with any talking restricted to topics that you aren't really thinking about.


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#19 rayban

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Posted 01 March 2017 - 11:33 AM

Congratulations for winning Best Picture Oscar- the first gay theme movie to ever do so.

Yes, "Moonlight" is proving to be a groundbreaking film.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#20 jaragon

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Posted 28 February 2017 - 07:05 PM

Congratulations for winning Best Picture Oscar- the first gay theme movie to ever do so.


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