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Martin Scorsese: 'Cinema is gone'


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#1 GordonCole

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 01:25 PM

Marty is a little late since Jean-Luc Godard said cinema was over quite a while ago.
 

www.theguardian.com/film/2011/jul/12/jean-luc-godard-film-socialisme



#2 Sepiatone

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 07:35 AM

Well TIKI, you're fortunate to live in an area where there's opportunities like that.  Any theaters around here that show "classic" films are far and few between.  The closest to ME being the recently( well 20 or so years ago) FOX THEATER in downtown Detroit.  But it's also used as a "multi-purpose" venue, also having events like the RADIO CITY ROCKETTES every Christmas season, THE NUTCRACKER, and one year they had THE LORD OF THE DANCE.

 

My wife and I( when she was better and before her health and mobility troubles)  Did go there for "special" presentations of BEN HUR (for it's 30th anniversary and with her sister who died a short year later), THE WIZARD OF OZ, GONE WITH THE WIND and CITIZEN KANE and CASABLANCA. 

 

Sure, then at those times the familiar "hush" was present.  But in today's multiplexes?  Forget it.

 

 

Sepiatone


I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#3 TikiSoo

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 05:22 AM

Well, even the movie going "experience" has changed so much it's clear it's not(to me) as enjoyable as it used to be....

 

Like your observations there Sepia.

Our film group does the "big hush" thing, never noticed it until you mentioned it. It IS a sign of people "into" movies.

 

But I do believe our current society's inability to respect others is a huge part of the failure of the theatergoing experience. Too many in the audience think they're in their own living room.

Hearing an occasional whisper between people discussing "what did she just say?" or "I don't understand..." doesn't bother me. But loud discussion or someone looking up something on their phone, light glaring on their face DOES bother me. 

I've heard people ANSWER a call and hold up their phones to RECORD sections of the movie! Whaa?

 

Luckily, there's theaters that still show classic movies and for the most part the audience is interested & respectful. But current movies attract the general public, not real movie fans. And it shows in their behaviour.


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#4 Vautrin

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 03:55 PM

The girls at the concession stand allowed us to eat all the popcorn

we wanted, as long as we were discreet about it. But the candy we

had to pay for. I remember they'd go to their locked storage room 

and get out a big plastic bag of popcorn. It still tasted pretty good

and I ate all I could and I still like popcorn today. I sneak in a big

candy bar, but that's all. I guess one could have a flask filled with

soda, but that seems a bit of a chore. I'm not that desperate. 


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#5 Sepiatone

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 07:40 AM

Well, even the movie going "experience" has changed so much it's clear it's not(to me) as enjoyable as it used to be....

 

Like how you'd hear people(grown-ups and kids) chattering in conversation all over the theater until the lights went down, then there'd be a big "hush".  (now, the "hush" of the patrons has been replaced by the "chirp" of various CELL PHONES)

 

Walking in and looking at a dark, blank big screen.  No advertisements "slide show" flashing by.

 

Popcorn and soft drinks in boxes and cups.  Not either in BARRELS. (Jay Leno once joked that in movie theaters you now get popcorn in such huge containers that, "When you get THAT much corn, it's no longer "food", it's FEED!" )

 

In the old single screen theaters, the longest walk to the restroom was from your seat to the end of the aisle.  NOW after you reach the end of the aisle, the trip to the restroom is to the OTHER END of the building housing the 20 screen "multiplex".  You might make it, you might NOT.  And after polishing off that 2 litre "cup" of soft drink, it does become a challenge.  Especially if you have a 1 LITRE bladder!

 

And now, you're sometimes forced to make a decision as to whether to buy the candy at the concession stand, or save the money to get a steak dinner AFTER the movie.

 

Still like comedian STEVEN WRIGHT's gag about----

 

"I once got kicked out of a movie theater for bringing in my own food.  MY argument was that the prices at the concession stand were outrageous.  And besides, it's been YEARS since I had a good BARBEQUE!"   :P

 

 

Sepiatone


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#6 TikiSoo

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 06:40 AM

Indeed, the classic era was a glorious time for filmmaking. Even the B-pictures of the era have a soecial glow about them. To look back at any year from the 20s through the 60s is to see an embarrassment of riches.

 

Really? You might be a tad overreacting there.

 

But I do agree, even "B" movies from the golden/silver ages are more watchable than many big franchise blockbuster movies of today. The beauty of the studio system was, shorts and then B's were often a training ground for talent before trusted on an "A" picture. Later, TV would be training for major movie directors/writers/actors.

 

Nowadays, the earliest hands on experience kids get is in "film" school or self-funded projects.

 

I think golden age shorts & B's were written very well. I really think that is the weak link in todays films, not such great writing. Writing sets the pace of the story and editing defines it further.

 

It is dead, ever seen the mausoleums they call a projection room?

 

Funny you'd say that. I just received an email from a friend whose on the road traveling 2000 miles to pick up a new (1964) set of 35mm projectors. His projection room was just upgraded with a private bathroom last year, no crickets chirping there.

 

Like vinyl is to music, I think there will always be film geeks.


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#7 Vautrin

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 10:54 PM

Marty sounds like an old curmudgeon yelling at the

kids to stay out of the editing room.

 

I remember the projection booth at the movie theater

where I worked in high school. It looked like it would

be right at home in a plant or the hold of a ship. 


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#8 hamradio

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 10:39 PM

It is dead, ever seen the mausoleums they call a projection room? :(

 

[ chirp...chirp...chirp..chirp..]

130530162151-projection-room-horizontal-



#9 CinemaInternational

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 09:20 PM

Cinema, you might have to figure some of us "geezers" grew up going to the show when EVERY movie practically was fine cinema.  By the time I was old enough to be in that "key" demographic you mention, I had already seen at the show, in weekend matinees, movies like "The Birdman Of Alcatraz",  "Pressure Point",  "Raisin In The Sun",  "Lillies Of The Field",  "Seven Days In May",  "Rio Bravo",  "The Manchurian Candidate",  and a host of others that were wonderful movies, but at the time were also considered "par for the course". 
 
These days it DOES seem that "the bigger the hype, the bigger the draw" when it comes to movie releases.  There ARE gems out there.  You just have to have the time and patience to dig them out.
 
 
Sepiatone


Indeed, the classic era was a glorious time for filmmaking. Even the B-pictures of the era have a soecial glow about them. To look back at any year from the 20s through the 60s is to see an embarrassment of riches. They are no longer just par for the course. :)
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#10 Sepiatone

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:16 PM

Cinema, you might have to figure some of us "geezers" grew up going to the show when EVERY movie practically was fine cinema.  By the time I was old enough to be in that "key" demographic you mention, I had already seen at the show, in weekend matinees, movies like "The Birdman Of Alcatraz",  "Pressure Point",  "Raisin In The Sun",  "Lillies Of The Field",  "Seven Days In May",  "Rio Bravo",  "The Manchurian Candidate",  and a host of others that were wonderful movies, but at the time were also considered "par for the course". 

 

These days it DOES seem that "the bigger the hype, the bigger the draw" when it comes to movie releases.  There ARE gems out there.  You just have to have the time and patience to dig them out.

 

 

Sepiatone


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I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#11 CinemaInternational

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 05:49 PM

I wouldn't say that the cinema is dead, but rather the main life signs are coming from smaller films. I'm young, part of Hollywood's key demographic (15-30), but for the most part, blockbusters just don't appeal to me. Some of the best films of recent years that were not Oscar films arrived with very little fanfare, films like About Time, Sing Street, Denial, Testament of Youth,  Eddie the Eagle, The End of the Tour, Far from the Madding Crowd, Labor Day, I'll See You in my Dreams etc. I think that if you look for those types of smaller films and also look for the usually wonderful Oscar films, one can see that cinema is still alive. It just takes a little hunting.


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#12 Sepiatone

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 07:27 AM

Sure!

 

Like I usually say to ALL the "armchair quarterbacks" I know....

 

"So shut up and go to the stadium and SHOW them how it's done instead of yelling at the TV."   ;)

 

 

Sepiatone


I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#13 TikiSoo

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 06:38 AM

"Cinema is gone," Scorsese says. "The cinema I grew up with and that I'm making, it's gone."
Scorsese points to the proliferation of images and the overreliance on superficial techniques as trends that have diminished the power of cinema to younger audiences.

 

It's amazing when I walk the halls behind the mall's megaplex, all I hear is bombs and explosions coming from the theater doors. A major portion of the movies that are playing are "the same" in that they are either geared towards teen boys (those explosions) or little kids (Trolls/Minions/etc)

 

This is nothing new...look how many low budget "clones" of space & alien movies geared to teens were made in the two decades after the success of Lucas & Speilberg's space/alien movies. (you can see them on COMET TV & at VHS festivals)

 

There are still romantic "date" comedies and adult themed movies made, they just don't get the mega hype and therefore box office of the kid's fare. Those who do attend are often annoyed by talking/cel phone glare from rude audience members, so they wait until they can stream or watch the DVD at home next time. Only a kid falls for the hype of seeing a new movie.

 

"It should matter to your life," he says. "Unfortunately the latest generations don't know that it mattered so much."

 

There is a distinct separation between generations due to their parents values. Those who were brought up by parents with "adults rule" values opposed to those brought up by parents with "kids rule" values. 

The 50's was the first generation of acknowledging teenagers in the first place, and the 60's "youth" was heralded. By the 70's, children were brought up as the center of the universe. 

 

So these are the kind of "arts" that come from children's entitlement.

 

I only wish Scorsese made more good movies. Stop complaining & take action.


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#14 EricJ

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 06:42 PM

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST(LaBELLE et la  Bete) was a novel length French fairy tale  penned in 1740 by GABRIELLE-SUZANNE BARBOT VILLENEUVE  that over the years took on some minor changes, but none of the story infers or promotes what we now consider feminist  elements.  To suggest so  is possibly indicative of some men's irrational fear and illogical ability to accept and deal with strong willed and independent women.

 

In the original French tale--which Disney, Trousdale/Wise and Wooverton openly ADMITTED in press interviews that they had to screw around with just to pad out to 90 minutes, like Jean Cocteau didn't--the Beast is gracious and generous from the minute Beauty walks in, even if he seems a little too hard on his own self-esteem...Y'know, appearance issues.

 

In the end, it's Beauty who learns the lesson not to judge, ahem, books by their covers, and that maybe sometimes ugliness is only skin deep.

And why is she so surprised to learn he was a nice guy all along?  The story has some excuse, eg. the "fairy not invited to the christening", etc., etc. for why (DINGDING!  BRRTT!!  MESSAGE INCOMING!!) it wasn't his fault he was cursed, and that maybe being wedding-propositioned every night at a banquet table wasn't such a "scary" thing all along once you see the bigger picture.

And not, of course, that he was a "selfish male jerk" who had to be "punished" for his ego, until he could finish his community-service course in Sensitivity Training.

 

But that tale, of course, would involve the female character learning a lesson, which might impart the dangerous subtext that she wasn't perfect at the beginning of the story...Shh, heresy.  

Remember, if a heroine dreamily has her head in a fairytale book, she's actually fighting for literacy, world women's-education and empowerment. :rolleyes:

 

(Hence the previously posted Ron Perlman/Linda Hamilton clip, where Vincent reciting Shakespeare's sonnets would rather suggest he already DID know how to read when he and Catherine first met...)


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#15 Sepiatone

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 03:54 PM

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST(LaBELLE et la  Bete) was a novel length French fairy tale  penned in 1740 by GABRIELLE-SUZANNE BARBOT VILLENEUVE  that over the years took on some minor changes, but none of the story infers or promotes what we now consider feminist  elements.  To suggest so  is possibly indicative of some men's irrational fear and illogical ability to accept and deal with strong willed and independent women.

 

They would also have to believe that such fairy tales such as LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD and GOLDILOCKS AND THE THREE BEARS are feminist propaganda as well.

 

 

Sepiatone


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I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#16 EricJ

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 01:11 PM

  No offence, but you guysreally took me baswck t these tioi.article. Hre's akmost a **** to earn his 9th bD nomninastionfor:Silence" & for those that out himdownfirawys

 

9NOTR:Beside' my ever decresing helth &hed trauma my friends, my new comuter isiw startngupo withsoethig. Main reasoinfir allthe cleruical screw-upsonhere & atopicI sure wuldlike to join in on!?

 

 

Have yiu seen :The lastWalt:"Age ofInnocence: "{Alice Doiesn't Live Here Anyre:&others tet>

 

Sepiatone 

What's that in ENGLISH?     ;)

 

karlofffan

Could someone on the Starship Enterprise please reboot the Universal Translator?

 

Well, we DID, only it came out as:
"Darmok, at Tanagra, when the walls fell...Yeah, definitely, very bad when the walls fell--Who's on first, Darmok, I mean the guy on first base, Darmok, I'm an excellent bridge navigator, today on the Federation's Court..."

:wacko:


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#17 EricJ

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 12:09 PM

Good news for the lovely Emma Watson! She stands to earn at least $15 million because of the blockbuster success of Disney's live-action version of "Beauty and the Beast." The feminist fairy tale becomes a feminist reality.

 

 

B&B is a "feminist" fairytale?  Ron Perlman wishes to differ.

(It somehow seems to have become one since 1991, after Linda Woolverton threw the story into her same Maleficent/Alice screenwriting blender and turned the setting on Chick-Whip.)

 

And as for the "Gasp, horrors, did our culture suddenly implode??" reactions to the headlines, Disney learned about seven years ago that "March Geek-Week" (as I recently blogged on two weeks ago, and I'm now trying to think of this week's topic) has become more of a fangirl thing, post-Alice/Hunger Games, than a fanboy thing.  Also, that in real-world practice, it's more one week than an entire month, and they've learned to pick their fangirl dates appropriately.

At least, that's what Warner's finding out, now that we're not talking about "Kong: Skull Island" anymore.


Let's start a revolution:  http://movieactivist.blogspot.com


#18 jakeem

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 11:54 AM

Box Office: 'Beauty and the Beast' Waltzes to Record $170M in U.S., $350M Globally

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER >> http://www.hollywood...thursday-986898

 

Good news for the lovely Emma Watson! She stands to earn at least $15 million because of the blockbuster success of Disney's live-action version of "Beauty and the Beast." The feminist fairy tale becomes a feminist reality.

 

belle-gold-dress-emma-watson-beauty-and-

 

http://www.huffingto...4b00705db4fe82c


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#19 JakeHolman

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 11:11 AM

Box Office: 'Beauty and the Beast' Waltzes to Record $170M in U.S., $350M Globally

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER >> http://www.hollywood...thursday-986898

 


I don't think the intelligence reports are all that hot. Some days I get more out of the New York Times. JFK

 

The American people, North and South, went into the war as citizens of their respective states, they came out as subjects. What they thus lost they have never got back.  H.L. Mencken
 
Tis Well. President George Washington
 
Socialism is the philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance and the gospel of envy. Sir Winston Churchill 
 
Movies are written in sand: applauded today, forgotten tomorrow. D.W Griffith
 
I would rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on earth. Steve McQueen
 
People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf. George Orwell
 
Perfect freedom has no existence. The grown man knows the world he lives in, and for the present, the world is Rome. Ben Hur
 
Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. President Ronald Reagan
 
A man's got to know his limitations. Dirty Harry Callahan
 
A man's got to have a code, a creed to live by, no matter his job. The Immortal John Wayne


#20 Fedya

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Posted 22 December 2016 - 03:08 PM

On my blog, I always to place the historical cutoff date at which point studios stopped looking for original scripts and started selling marketing "franchises"--

This would be when they made the second Philo Vance movie, I presume.
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