We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

The Woman in the Window: the ending (spoilers!!!)


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 cinemaspeak59

cinemaspeak59

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 136 posts

Posted 05 May 2017 - 08:53 AM

Yes,  Joan was beautiful and very stylish during the 40s,  but in 1949 she was 39 and that was often the kiss of death for an actress as it relates to being a romantic lead \ love interest of the leading male (who was often in his late 40s or even 50s!).    So I can hear the studio suits saying she should feel lucky that James Mason (who was 40) was sexually interested in her in The Reckless Moment.  I.e. if you don't get these mother roles you get no work at all. 

 

Love that hairdo line.   Yea,  many of those 50s hairstyles made the women look dowdy.   E.g. Jane Wyman.   She was featured yesterday in a film released in 1944 and she was very beautiful (and what legs),  but while she was a big star during the 50s her look was a lot less appealing.

Yes, I agree with your point about 1950s hairstyles.  Women's fashions changed in general, with longer and sleeker dresses. 



#2 ChristineHoard

ChristineHoard

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,524 posts
  • LocationGA

Posted 26 April 2017 - 11:52 PM

Not only did Stanwyck (one of my personal favs as well) dive head first into Colbert Poodle Chop Hell, but she took it a step further & allowed herself to go prematurely gray. But you're right, Stanwyck's talent always came first. She still made some wonderful movies in the 1950's. Too many to name in even just her 1950's period alone!

 

And even with the premature gray & poodle chop, Stanwyck remained a very handsome woman who could still pulled off femme fatale roles. Jane Wyman on the other hand, (who had previously been quite attractive) looked downright homely from the early 1950's on.

 

On a side note, has anyone else seen Stanwyck & Joan Bennett together in 'There's Always Tomorrow' (1956)? It's been several years for me but from what I remember it was quite an entertaining film. Stanwyck (gray poodle cut & all) took on the shady lady/other woman lead role, and Bennett supported as a conventional wife. 

 

 

Yes!  I love "There's Always Tomorrow" and I've seen it on TCM a couple of times.  It would have been a good choice for the Postwar Melodrama theme TCM has going this month.  I said in another post that there seems to be always something going on underneath the surface of 1950's era domestic dramas.  That's how it was in the "real world", too, in the 1950's.  Art imitates life, or is it the other way around (rhetorical question)?


  • Rodmann2 likes this

#3 Rodmann2

Rodmann2

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • LocationDMV

Posted 26 April 2017 - 11:00 PM

I was not a happy camper when I first saw my favorite Barbara Stanwyck in that hairdo.  I loved her hair in the 1940's before then.  Fortunately her acting skills overcome the hair.

 

Not only did Stanwyck (one of my personal favs as well) dive head first into Colbert Poodle Chop Hell, but she took it a step further & allowed herself to go prematurely gray. But you're right, Stanwyck's talent always came first. She still made some wonderful movies in the 1950's. Too many to name in even just her 1950's period alone!

 

And even with the premature gray & poodle chop, Stanwyck remained a very handsome woman who could still pull off femme fatale roles. Jane Wyman on the other hand, (who had previously been quite attractive) looked downright homely from the early 1950's on.

 

On a side note, has anyone else seen Stanwyck & Joan Bennett together in 'There's Always Tomorrow' (1956)? It's been several years for me but from what I remember it was quite an entertaining film. Stanwyck (gray poodle cut & all) took on the shady lady/other woman lead role, and Bennett supported as a conventional wife. 


Don't talk to me about self-respect! That's something you tell yourself you got when you got nothing else.


#4 kjrwe

kjrwe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 188 posts

Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:58 PM

I liked the film and the ending.  It captured the doldrums of middle-aged men with the caution that adventure can lead to big trouble.

Excellent way of putting it.  :)

 

This sort of ending was put in with a purpose.



#5 ChristineHoard

ChristineHoard

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,524 posts
  • LocationGA

Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:19 PM

I was not a happy camper when I first saw my favorite Barbara Stanwyck in that hairdo.  I loved her hair in the 1940's before then.  Fortunately her acting skills overcome the hair.



#6 Rodmann2

Rodmann2

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • LocationDMV

Posted 26 April 2017 - 08:56 PM

Yes,  Joan was beautiful and very stylish during the 40s,  but in 1949 she was 39 and that was often the kiss of death for an actress as it relates to being a romantic lead \ love interest of the leading male (who was often in his late 40s or even 50s!).    So I can hear the studio suits saying she should feel lucky that James Mason (who was 40) was sexually interested in her in The Reckless Moment.  I.e. if you don't get these mother roles you get no work at all. 

 

Love that hairdo line.   Yea,  many of those 50s hairstyles made the women look dowdy.   E.g. Jane Wyman.   She was featured yesterday in a film released in 1944 and she was very beautiful (and what legs),  but while she was a big star during the 50s her look was a lot less appealing.

 

Jane Wyman (the worst casualty), Barbara Stanwyck, Lucille Ball and countless other 1930's / 40's cutie-pies & sex sirens all fell victim to the dreaded "Colbert Poodle Chop" in 1949 and never regained their sex-appeal.

 

Lucy at least was still able to show flashes of her former glory during the occasional skit on I Love Lucy. :D  


Don't talk to me about self-respect! That's something you tell yourself you got when you got nothing else.


#7 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 18,489 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 26 April 2017 - 01:13 PM

Love this movie (one of my all time personal favs) and love the ending. A large portion of the film is dark & gritty; so the twist ending comes as a welcome relief. And the way it's handled is completely believable! 

 

Off topic....I'm always amused at what a fox Joan Bennett still was in her Mid to Late 1940's Film Noir Vixen period. Her beautiful long brunette locks, fashionable clothes, bare midriffs, etc were very becoming. Shocking that only 5 years later (starting with the excellent The Reckless Moment in 1949) she was playing the mothers of young adults in dowdy peter pan collared blouses and that damn Claudette Colbert Poodle Haircut that many an actress fell victim to in the 1950's. *sigh*  :rolleyes:

 

Yes,  Joan was beautiful and very stylish during the 40s,  but in 1949 she was 39 and that was often the kiss of death for an actress as it relates to being a romantic lead \ love interest of the leading male (who was often in his late 40s or even 50s!).    So I can hear the studio suits saying she should feel lucky that James Mason (who was 40) was sexually interested in her in The Reckless Moment.  I.e. if you don't get these mother roles you get no work at all. 

 

Love that hairdo line.   Yea,  many of those 50s hairstyles made the women look dowdy.   E.g. Jane Wyman.   She was featured yesterday in a film released in 1944 and she was very beautiful (and what legs),  but while she was a big star during the 50s her look was a lot less appealing.


  • cinemaspeak59 likes this

#8 Rodmann2

Rodmann2

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • LocationDMV

Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:25 AM

Love this movie (one of my all time personal favs) and love the ending. A large portion of the film is dark & gritty; so the twist ending comes as a welcome relief. And the way it's handled is completely believable! 

 

Off topic....I'm always amused at what a fox Joan Bennett still was in her Mid to Late 1940's Film Noir Vixen period. Her beautiful long brunette locks, fashionable clothes, bare midriffs, etc were very becoming. Shocking that only 5 years later (starting with the excellent The Reckless Moment in 1949) she was playing the mothers of young adults in dowdy peter pan collared blouses and that damn Claudette Colbert Poodle Haircut that many an actress fell victim to in the 1950's. *sigh*  :rolleyes:


  • ChristineHoard likes this

Don't talk to me about self-respect! That's something you tell yourself you got when you got nothing else.


#9 cinemaspeak59

cinemaspeak59

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 136 posts

Posted 26 April 2017 - 08:06 AM

Obvious spoilers ahead...

 

I'm just wondering what others think of the ending of The Woman in the Window (1944)?

 

SPOILERS....

 

The ending is basically an "it's all a dream" ending. 

 

Generally I'm not a huge fan of this sort of ending, but the storyline was completed before the professor wakes up and I think that he learned a lesson from his dream about answering the "call of adventure" (or however he put it).

 

What are your opinions of the ending?

I liked the film and the ending.  It captured the doldrums of middle-aged men with the caution that adventure can lead to big trouble.



#10 kjrwe

kjrwe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 188 posts

Posted 03 March 2017 - 11:47 PM

Obvious spoilers ahead...

 

I'm just wondering what others think of the ending of The Woman in the Window (1944)?

 

SPOILERS....

 

The ending is basically an "it's all a dream" ending. 

 

Generally I'm not a huge fan of this sort of ending, but the storyline was completed before the professor wakes up and I think that he learned a lesson from his dream about answering the "call of adventure" (or however he put it).

 

What are your opinions of the ending?






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users