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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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The 100+ Club


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#21 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 12:10 PM

Hmm...  Edward Brophy.  Can't think of a better character actor myself!

 

Yes,  you loveable rat,  you.


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#22 MovieCollectorOH

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 07:32 PM

Hmm...  Edward Brophy.  Can't think of a better character actor myself!


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#23 lydecker

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 06:49 PM

Thanks for the tip!



#24 calvinnme

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 05:46 PM

There is an article in today's Washington Post about Philip Baker Hall who has 175 film and TV acting credits. I can't get the link to work properly.

 

Born in 1931, and still alive, his first acting credit is in 1970's Zabriskie Point. He is still acting today at age 85.



#25 lydecker

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Posted 02 April 2017 - 09:45 AM

Attached File  Unknown-1.jpeg   4.72KB   0 downloadsEdward Brophy

 

There was nobody quite like Edward Brophy --  Small of stature with a face simply made for comedy, from the minute he walked into a scene you just knew you were in for a very good time.

 

Edward S. Brophy was born on February 27, 1895 in New York City and educated at the University of Virginia. He intended to study law but decided he was more interested in acting as a career.  In 1918 he began showing up at Norma Talmadge’s New York film studio in the hopes of picking up some acting work. He managed to get some bit parts (his first film appearance was in 1920 in “Yes Or No”) but eventually switched to behind the scenes work, believing he could not make a living as an actor. He made his way to Hollywood and, while serving as a prop master for Buster Keaton’s MGM production unit, Brophy appeared in Keaton’s classic “The Cameraman.” Impressed by Brophy’s performance, Keaton cast Brophy in larger parts in two of Keaton’s talkies and by 1934, Edward Brophy abandoned production work to become a full-time actor.

 

Possessed of a chubby face with pop-eyes and a high-pitched voice, Brophy was a natural for comedies and appeared in over 130 films including:  “The Thin Man,” “A Slight Case of Murder,” “Evelyn Prentice,” “Tripoli,” and “The Last Hurrah.” Doing voice work as well as on-screen appearances, he was the voice of Timothy Mouse in Walt Disney’s “Dumbo,” was a frequent contributor to the popular radio series, “True Detective Mysteries” and also was the uncredited voice of Harry The Horse on radio’s "Damon Runyon Theater."  

 

In the 1950’s and 1960’s Edward Brophy, like so many other character actors, began appearing on television in such shows as:  “The Ann Sothern Show,” “The Millionaire” and “Mr. & Mrs. North." His last role was in John Ford’s “Two Rode Together,” dying during the production in 1960.

 

In an interesting bit of trivia, the sidekick character that Ron Carey played in Mel Brooks’ “High Anxiety” is named Brophy in tribute to Edward Brophy, who played dozens of sidekick roles during his long career. Doiby Dickles, sidekick to DC Comics hero Green Lantern, was also modeled after Edward Brophy.

 

Coming up next:  Emma Dunn



#26 lydecker

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Posted 30 March 2017 - 09:10 AM

Attached File  dorislloyd.jpg   32.98KB   0 downloadsDoris Lloyd

 

Doris Lloyd was an English actress who was born in Liverpool in 1896.  She first appeared on stage with the Liverpool Repertory Theatre Company in 1914.  In 1915 Lloyd went to America to visit with her sister and ended up staying in the US permanently. For the next 10 years she appeared in a variety of plays on Broadway, most notably the Ziegfield Follies, and also acted in several touring companies. She appeared in her first film in 1925, “The Lady,” and from then on, concentrated on her film career, only appearing one more time on Broadway. She appeared in over 154 films over her long career, most often appearing as landladies, char women and society matrons.  Some of her more notable films included:  “Oliver Twist” (where she starred as Nancy,) “The Time Machine,” “Disraeli,” “Sound of Music,” “Midnight Lace” and “Mary Poppins.”  She appeared in several of the Tarzan films with Johnny Weissmuller and also voiced “The Rose” in “Alice in Wonderland” Doris Lloyd was very active in television in the 1950’s and 1960’s and was often cast in “Alfred Hitchcock Presents” along with other shows such as “Maverick” and “The Rogues.”  She retired in 1967 and died a year later at the age of 71. 

 

Coming up next:  Edward Brophy



#27 overeasy

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 07:24 PM

attachicon.gifUnknown.jpegAddison Richards

 

When it comes to being a member of the 100+ club, Addison Richards, with his good looks and his deep, “Voice of God” baritone was in a class by himself with 262 film credits and dozens upon dozens of TV credits.

 

Addison Whitaker Richards, Jr. was born in 1902 in Zanesville, Ohio where his grandfather was mayor.  He received degrees from both Washington State University and Pomona College and it was at college where he first discovered his love of acting. In 1931 Richards joined the Pasadena Playhouse where he worked his way up from being “simply an actor” to being its Artistic Director. 

 

His first film appearance was in “Riot Squad” in 1933 and he quickly became a reliable, indispensable character actor who could play everything from authority figures to amoral villains with ease.  He worked non-stop at all of the studios and did 17 films in 1935 alone.  Some of his films included: “Black Fury,” “Front Page Woman,” “Boys Town,” “Smart Blonde,” “Northwest Passage” and “The Pride of the Yankees.” Richards appeared in many of the mystery films series which were produced in the 1930’s and 1940’s such as Torchy Blane, Charlie Chan, The Lone Wolf, Ellery Queen and the Maisie series.  He had a recurring role in the Andy Hardy film series as “Mr. Benedict.” 

 

Starting in the 1950’s, Addison Richards was a frequent guest star on television (while concurrently appearing in films) and appeared on “Zane Gray Theatre,” “Kraft Theatre,”  “The Adventures of Jim Bowie” among many other shows. As the 1960’s came along, Addison Richards continued to act in both film and TV. Some of his TV appearances included: “Lassie,” “My Three Sons,” Bonanza” and “The Beverly Hillbillies.”  His last film appearance was in 1964 in “For Those Who Think Young” and he died of a heart attack that same year at the age of 61.

 

 

Coming Up Next:  Doris Lloyd

 

 

Addison Richards is one of those guys who was just "there," always.  That insanely wonderful voice and impressive stature.  He had that presence that made him important and often "serious," but also very approachable.  Thanks for highlighting this great actor who is too often overlooked!  PS:  Having been brought up in upstate New York, I always connected with "Northwest Passage," one of his great roles! 


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#28 lydecker

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Posted 28 March 2017 - 07:47 AM

Attached File  Unknown.jpeg   6.46KB   0 downloadsAddison Richards

 

When it comes to being a member of the 100+ club, Addison Richards, with his good looks and his deep, “Voice of God” baritone was in a class by himself with 262 film credits and dozens upon dozens of TV credits.

 

Addison Whitaker Richards, Jr. was born in 1902 in Zanesville, Ohio where his grandfather was mayor.  He received degrees from both Washington State University and Pomona College and it was at college where he first discovered his love of acting. In 1931 Richards joined the Pasadena Playhouse where he worked his way up from being “simply an actor” to being its Artistic Director. 

 

His first film appearance was in “Riot Squad” in 1933 and he quickly became a reliable, indispensable character actor who could play everything from authority figures to amoral villains with ease.  He worked non-stop at all of the studios and did 17 films in 1935 alone.  Some of his films included: “Black Fury,” “Front Page Woman,” “Boys Town,” “Smart Blonde,” “Northwest Passage” and “The Pride of the Yankees.” Richards appeared in many of the mystery films series which were produced in the 1930’s and 1940’s such as Torchy Blane, Charlie Chan, The Lone Wolf, Ellery Queen and the Maisie series.  He had a recurring role in the Andy Hardy film series as “Mr. Benedict.” 

 

Starting in the 1950’s, Addison Richards was a frequent guest star on television (while concurrently appearing in films) and appeared on “Zane Gray Theatre,” “Kraft Theatre,”  “The Adventures of Jim Bowie” among many other shows. As the 1960’s came along, Addison Richards continued to act in both film and TV. Some of his TV appearances included: “Lassie,” “My Three Sons,” Bonanza” and “The Beverly Hillbillies.”  His last film appearance was in 1964 in “For Those Who Think Young” and he died of a heart attack that same year at the age of 61.

 

 

Coming Up Next:  Doris Lloyd



#29 lydecker

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 03:22 PM

MovieCollectorOH:

 

Great info.  Thanks!



#30 MovieCollectorOH

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 01:41 PM



Yep.  Men seem to have a huge advantage when it comes to film credits.  I can find literally dozens of male character actors who have 100+ but even the busiest female character actors fall short most of the time.  Which leads me to wonder . . . were  more men generally cast in a typical picture?  Certainly some genres (gangster, western, etc.) would be male dominated but not sure why others would be this way.

 

From going over the IMDB data the past 2-3 years, just some observations off the top of my head:

 

All the movies from all countries and time periods (episodic TV removed) came to about 75% men and 25% women (one entry per appearance per actor/actress).  Everything combined (TV episodes added back in) is 60% men and and 40% women. 

 

[I didn't learn this out of any interest for this metric, but rather I learned this out of pruning down the size of the giant data tables in the beginning - and the actors and actresses are in separate tables.  Later on when I refreshed them with newer IMDB data I didn't prune them.  So I had a chance to see this both ways.]

 

Just from a quick look at the list of IMDB titles, 67% are episodic TV (one entry for each TV episode), the remaining 33% being movies, made-for-TV movies, or something else.  Again this is for all countries and all time periods combined.  I could also change the ratio to show one entry per TV series (instead of one per every episode), but that would require a bit more time.

 

update:  quicker than I thought.  One entry per TV series (and other one-time TV shows) brings that ratio down to about 9.8% TV, versus 90.2% movies, made-for-tv movies, etc.


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#31 lydecker

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 10:49 AM

Marie Windsor is one of my favorites.  Has 170 credits, but a lot of them were for TV.

Would seem that it is more likely for men to make it to 100+ than women simply because fewer roles for "older" women than for older men.

 

Yep.  Men seem to have a huge advantage when it comes to film credits.  I can find literally dozens of male character actors who have 100+ but even the busiest female character actors fall short most of the time.  Which leads me to wonder . . . were  more men generally cast in a typical picture?  Certainly some genres (gangster, western, etc.) would be male dominated but not sure why others would be this way.



#32 TheCid

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 10:12 AM

Marie Windsor is one of my favorites.  Has 170 credits, but a lot of them were for TV.

Would seem that it is more likely for men to make it to 100+ than women simply because fewer roles for "older" women than for older men.



#33 lydecker

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 06:45 PM

Attached File  591bc65327464eae475fc279ff86a8f7.jpg   126.64KB   0 downloadsClara Blandick

 
Clara Blandick’s life began and ended in dramatic fashion but in the intervening years she was a much sought after character actress who made every one of the 108 films she appeared in so much richer.
 
The year of Clara Blandick’s birth varies, as 1876, 1880 or 1881, depending upon the source material.  She was born on an American ship, harbored in Hong Kong, which was captained by her father, Issac Dickey.  She was delivered by a Captain Blanchard whose ship was anchored nearby and, to thank and honor him, her parents named her Clara Blanchard Dickey.  When it came time to devise a stage name, Clara chose the first syllables of her middle and last names to become Clara Blandick.
 
Clara was raised in Massachusetts but moved to New York to pursue an acting career in 1900. She received acclaim for one of her early stage appearances in “The Christian" with critics noting that she was "a dainty, petite and graceful heroine.”  She soon advanced to a number of lead roles in Broadway productions such as “Raffles, The Amateur Cracksman” and "Madame Butterfly.”
 
Though she made her first film in 1914, like many other actors of the time, she returned to her first love, the theatre, where she remained until moving to Hollywood in 1929.  She was a busy actress, right from the start, making 9 films in 1930 and 13 films in 1931.  Her characters varied from mothers to socialites to even murderers, appearing in such films as:  "Three On A Match,” “Life Begins,” “The Bitter Tea of General Yen,” “Anthony Adverse,” “DuBarry Was A Lady,” and, of course, “The Wizard of Oz.” Blandick was not the first choice for the role (May Robson was) and completed all of her scenes in a single week.  Though the role was not large, “Auntie Em” is considered a key figure in the film since the heroine Dorothy constantly reiterates her desire to go home to “Auntie Em.”
 
Blandick performed constantly through the 1930’s and 1940’s working at all of the studios though she eventually signed a contract at 20th Century Fox.  In the 1950’s, however, she worked in only 2 films, "Key To The City” and “Love That Brute.”  “Love That Brute” (1950) was her final film appearance and, in 1951, she retired.  Failing health became an on-going problem for Clara Blandick  —  she was going blind and suffered greatly from arthritis.  In April, 1962, after going to church on Palm Sunday, Clara Blandick methodically laid out her resume, some of her movie memorabilia, favorite photos and her collection of press clippings and then committed suicide leaving a note which said:  “I am now about to make the great adventure.”
 
Next up:  Addison Richards


#34 lydecker

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 05:00 PM

imdb credits generally include TV credits. That is probably true for Angie.

 

Yes, that's true.  The 100+ Club means 100 or more feature FILMS.  TV credits don't count.



#35 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 09:04 AM

JOHN LITEL was 79, not 77, when he died in Feb. 1972.     

 

     Actor WILL WRIGHT (1894-1962) had well over 100 credits; his last appearance in a theatrical film was the recently-aired '62 release "Cape Fear". 

 

     ANGIE DICKINSON (1931-      ) has well over one hundred credits; the IMDb has her slated with 146.  She stayed busy for a long time.  I very much enjoyed watching "Point Blank" last night, I might add.     

imdb credits generally include TV credits. That is probably true for Angie.



#36 lydecker

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 06:38 AM

Mr. Gorman:

 

Thanks for the age correction.  It's been made.

 

Lydecker



#37 Mr. Gorman

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 03:12 AM

JOHN LITEL was 79, not 77, when he died in Feb. 1972.     

 

     Actor WILL WRIGHT (1894-1962) had well over 100 credits; his last appearance in a theatrical film was the recently-aired '62 release "Cape Fear". 

 

     ANGIE DICKINSON (1931-      ) has well over one hundred credits; the IMDb has her slated with 146.  She stayed busy for a long time.  I very much enjoyed watching "Point Blank" last night, I might add.     



#38 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 06:39 PM

attachicon.gifUnknown.jpegJohn Litel

 

I've got to say it  -  I love this guy!  When I see his name come up in the credits, it just makes me smile.

 

John Litel was born in Wisconsin in 1892. When World War I broke out, he enlisted in the French Army, not wanting to wait until America joined the war.  He was decorated twice for bravery, so, John Litel didn't just play heroes, he really was one.

 

He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and upon his return from service in WWI he enrolled in the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. He toured with with stock companies and played opposite such actresses as Ann Harding and future Warner Brother's co-star, Joan Blondell.  Though his first film appearance was in "The Sleeping Porch" in 1929, he continued to work primarily on stage for the next few years, receiving many critical accolades, particularly for his performance as Dizzy Davis in the 1932 stage stage play, "Ceiling Zero."

 

Once John Litel became part of what was informally known as "The Warner Brothers Stock Company" in the mid 1930's, he never stopped working.  Sometimes the lead, but more often than not, playing in support, he was cast as authority figures such as police officers, business executives and attorneys.  Litel appeared in over 154 films including"  "Black Legion," "The Life of Emile Zola," "They Died With Their Boots On, "Comet Over Broadway," "Castle On The Hudson," "Crime Doctor" (where he played against type as the film's villain) and in the Nancy Drew and Henry Aldrich film series.  As television came along, John Litel continued to be an in-demand actor in such series as:  "Zorro," "Have Gun Will Travel," "Bonanza" and "77 Sunset Strip." Litel worked up until nearly the end of his life, dying in 1972 at the age of 77.

 

Coming up next:  Clara Blandick

 

Yes,  John Litel made an impact in the many fine films he was featured in.    One WB picture that is an unsung hero (well because it is a Davis picture that isn't often mentioned as much as her other films are),  is Marked Women.    Here Litel plays a lawyer for a mobster.     He plays the role with just the right amount of detachment;  Yea he is working for the mob but he isn't one of them. 

 

Always a treat to see John in a role regardless of the size of said role.    The type of supporting player that made the golden era what it is.

 

PS:  keep up the fine work.  LOVE this thread!


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#39 lydecker

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 05:22 PM

Attached File  Unknown.jpeg   5.09KB   0 downloadsJohn Litel

 

I've got to say it  -  I love this guy!  When I see his name come up in the credits, it just makes me smile.

 

John Litel was born in Wisconsin in 1892. When World War I broke out, he enlisted in the French Army, not wanting to wait until America joined the war.  He was decorated twice for bravery, so, John Litel didn't just play heroes, he really was one.

 

He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and upon his return from service in WWI he enrolled in the American Academy of Dramatic Arts. He toured with stock companies and played opposite such actresses as Ann Harding and future Warner Brother's co-star, Joan Blondell.  Though his first film appearance was in "The Sleeping Porch" in 1929, he continued to work primarily on stage for the next few years, receiving many critical accolades, particularly for his performance as Dizzy Davis in the 1932 stage play, "Ceiling Zero."

 

Once John Litel became part of what was informally known as "The Warner Brothers Stock Company" in the mid 1930's, he never stopped working.  Sometimes the lead, but more often than not, playing in support, he was cast as authority figures such as police officers, business executives and attorneys.  Litel appeared in over 154 films including:  "Black Legion," "The Life of Emile Zola," "They Died With Their Boots On," "Comet Over Broadway," "Castle On The Hudson," "Crime Doctor" (where he played against type as the film's villain) and in the Nancy Drew and Henry Aldrich film series.  As television came along, John Litel continued to be an in-demand actor in such series as:  "Zorro," "Have Gun Will Travel," "Bonanza" and "77 Sunset Strip." Litel worked up until nearly the end of his life, dying in 1972 at the age of 79.

 

Coming up next:  Clara Blandick


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#40 calvinnme

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 10:12 AM

J. Pat O'Malley (1904–1985) had 235 film and TV acting credits over forty years starting in 1943 in "Lassie Come Home". However, he primarily did small parts in television rather than film.






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