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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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The 100+ Club


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#41 EricJ

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 08:15 PM

Has anyone actually bothered to count Michael Caine's roles?  I'm afraid to look on IMDb.


Let's start a revolution:  http://movieactivist.blogspot.com


#42 shutoo

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 07:59 PM

Including shorts, Mary Pickford has 251 film credits and Oliver Hardy has 416.  Michael Caine, 156 films, Donald Sutherland, 172; Christopher Lee, 276, Bette Davis had 124 including tv movies. Keye Luke has around 150 if you take out the tv spots. According to my old Guiness movie fact book, the US record for appearing in most films goes to Tom London, who started in 1903s ​The Great Train Robbery​ with over 2000 appearances.



#43 Mr. Gorman

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 07:30 PM

I think JOHN WAYNE has the record of *starring* in the most movies all-time.  He started piling up his starring credit list in 1930 with "The Big Trail" and subsequently featuring in all those '30s "B"-pictures, 95% of which were "B"-Westerns. 

 

     Wayne's 1937 quickie "California Straight Ahead" looks interesting enough.  It's in the Leonard Maltin Classic Video Guide and read the lil' review on it.  Does not appear to be available on homevideo in any format, however.  Bummer!  Seems like most all of Wayne's '30s low-budgeters have been made available on some homevideo format or other, but not that one.         



#44 calvinnme

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 06:27 PM

John Wayne had 178 acting credits to his name, 19 of them in uncredited roles in silent films.

 

Ward Bond has 271 credits, but I think that includes his 133 episodes of Wagon Train and all of his uncredited roles. I don't know if he would get to 100 if you took those out.

 

Grant Withers has 201 TV and film appearances over just 29 years. Many of those were uncredited roles.


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#45 Mr. Gorman

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 05:38 PM

More actors who have over 100 credits:

 

     SHATNER, William (1931-     ).  Over 200 credits. 

 

     ROONEY, Mickey, 93 (1920-2014).  Never stopped working.   

 

     McDOWALL, Roddy, 70 (1928-1998)  Busy. 

 

      THOMPSON, Marshall, 66 (1925-1992)  He started out in films very young and amassed bunches of credits by age 35. 

 

     I looked up KIRK DOUGLAS on the IMDb and noted he didn't have 100 credits.  He was close, but no cigar. 

 

     HONOURABLE MENTION: 

 

DAVID JANSSEN had 98 credits according to the IMDb.  He died Feb. 13, 1980 at age 48 just after starting to film the TVM "Damien:  The Leper Priest" (he was replaced by Ken Howard).  I think it's a certainty had Janssen died, say, five years later on Feb. 13, 1985 he'd have had 110-115 credits by then given the pace with which he was working.  He was a workaholic, to be sure. 

 

     SAMMY DAVIS Jr. and 'The Godfather of Soul' JAMES BROWN also were workaholics.  Sammy once said he just couldn't sit still. 

 

    


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#46 TheCid

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 02:05 PM

I can think of a few actors offhand who appeared frequently.  Sometimes they received a screen credit, but darn sure not always.  No matter, they racked up over 100 credits whether billed or not. 

 

     HELTON, Percy, 77 (1894-1971).  I watched 'RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY' the other day and there was Percy as the bank owner who hired Joel McCrea.  Unbilled.  He was a nightclub owner in 'JAILHOUSE ROCK', which I also watched on TCM recently.  Again unbilled.  But easily noticeable. 

 

     FLAVIN, James, 69 (1906-1976)

 

     KIBBEE, Guy, 74 (1882-1956)

 

     RAINEY, Ford, 96 (1908-2005)

 

     LANE, Charles, 102 (1905-2007)

 

     WOODS, Harry, 79 (1889-1968)  Appeared in a lot of "B"-Westerns where an actor can rack up the credits in a hurry!

 

     BEST, Willie (1913 or 1916  - 1962).  I believe he racked up over 100 credits before his death in '62.  

 

      HANKIN, Larry, 76 (b. 1940)  The biggest part I've seen him in so far was as 'Charley Butts' in ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ (1979) where he was a prisoner in the next cell wanting to escape with Clint Eastwood.  He got some good lines in the 1980 Tv movie "The Great American Traffic Jam" where he played 'Sill' (part of Lisa Hartman's band).    

 

     With KIRK DOUGLAS turning 100 back in December I wonder if he has 100+ credits?  I reckon I'll go to the IMDb and have a look.  

Willie Best is one of our favorites.  In some movies he was either uncredited or credited as Sleep 'N Eat.



#47 Mr. Gorman

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 01:48 PM

I can think of a few actors offhand who appeared frequently.  Sometimes they received a screen credit, but darn sure not always.  No matter, they racked up over 100 credits whether billed or not. 

 

     HELTON, Percy, 77 (1894-1971).  I watched 'RIDE THE HIGH COUNTRY' the other day and there was Percy as the bank owner who hired Joel McCrea.  Unbilled.  He was a nightclub owner in 'JAILHOUSE ROCK', which I also watched on TCM recently.  Again unbilled.  But easily noticeable. 

 

     FLAVIN, James, 69 (1906-1976)

 

     KIBBEE, Guy, 74 (1882-1956)

 

     RAINEY, Ford, 96 (1908-2005)

 

     LANE, Charles, 102 (1905-2007)

 

     WOODS, Harry, 79 (1889-1968)  Appeared in a lot of "B"-Westerns where an actor can rack up the credits in a hurry!

 

     BEST, Willie (1913 or 1916  - 1962).  I believe he racked up over 100 credits before his death in '62.  

 

      HANKIN, Larry, 76 (b. 1940)  The biggest part I've seen him in so far was as 'Charley Butts' in ESCAPE FROM ALCATRAZ (1979) where he was a prisoner in the next cell wanting to escape with Clint Eastwood.  He got some good lines in the 1980 Tv movie "The Great American Traffic Jam" where he played 'Sill' (part of Lisa Hartman's band).    

 

     With KIRK DOUGLAS turning 100 back in December I wonder if he has 100+ credits?  I reckon I'll go to the IMDb and have a look.  



#48 calvinnme

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 12:54 PM

One of the challenges of TCM Programming Challenge #35, "The Long And The Short Of It"  asks participants to select as their SOTM, an actor or actress who has appeared in 100 or more feature films.  In concert with that challenge, I thought I would start this thread, honoring some of those often unheralded actors whose names seldom, if ever, appeared above the credits but whose 100+ performances rang true every single time. 

 

Regis Toomey

 

Regis Toomey has a special connection to me since he was not only born in Pittsburgh, PA (my home town) but also attended the University of Pittsburgh and was a great friend of my grandfather who attended Pitt at the same time.  At the end of their college careers, my grandfather moved on to dental school, while Regis Toomey went to Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon) to study drama.  In 1928 he appeared in his first film which, coincidentally was the first all-talking gangster melodrama, "Alibi." Toomey appeared in over 150 films from 1929 to 1987.  With his Irish "tough guy" looks, he generally appeared in mysteries and gangster films and was often the victim of a violent death   --  to his way of thinking  -- way too early in the film! Toomey once noted that he was killed on film so often that he should be voted the "Morticians' Man Of The Year."  His film credits include:  "Other Men's Women," "G-Men,""Murder On The Blackboard," "Meet John Doe" and "The Bishop's Wife." Regis Toomey worked in film and television up to nearly the end of his life, dying in 1991 at the age of 93.

 

Tomorrow Saluting Mary Treen.

 

I always liked Regis Toomey in "Graft", a little known Universal from 1931. It also stars Boris Karloff as a gangster.


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#49 lydecker

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 11:32 AM

One of the challenges of TCM Programming Challenge #35, "The Long And The Short Of It"  asks participants to select as their SOTM, an actor or actress who has appeared in 100 or more feature films.  In concert with that challenge, I thought I would start this thread, honoring some of those often unheralded actors whose names seldom, if ever, appeared above the credits but whose 100+ performances rang true every single time. 

 

Attached File  regis_toomey.jpg   66.49KB   0 downloadsRegis Toomey

 

Regis Toomey has a special connection to me since he was not only born in Pittsburgh, PA (my home town) but also attended the University of Pittsburgh and was a great friend of my grandfather who attended Pitt at the same time.  At the end of their college careers, my grandfather moved on to dental school, while Regis Toomey went to Carnegie Institute of Technology (now Carnegie Mellon) to study drama.  In 1928 he appeared in his first film which, coincidentally was the first all-talking gangster melodrama, "Alibi." Toomey appeared in over 150 films from 1929 to 1987.  With his Irish "tough guy" looks, he generally appeared in mysteries and gangster films and was often the victim of a violent death   --  to his way of thinking  -- way too early in the film! Toomey once noted that he was killed on film so often that he should be voted the "Morticians' Man Of The Year."  His film credits include:  "Other Men's Women," "G-Men,""Murder On The Blackboard," "Meet John Doe" and "The Bishop's Wife." Regis Toomey worked in film and television up to nearly the end of his life, dying in 1991 at the age of 93.

 

Tomorrow Saluting Mary Treen.


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