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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Chuck Berry (1926-2017)


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#1 Sepiatone

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Posted 27 March 2017 - 10:18 AM

At near a foot taller and what seemed 100lbs. heavier, McIntire was HORRIBLY miscast as Freed.  And I thought MOOSIE DRIER put in a better performance.  The only thing in common with Freed that McIntire had was the alcoholism.

 

 

Sepiatone


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#2 spence

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Posted 26 March 2017 - 09:52 PM

I've not seen a soul speak of 1978's terrific (***1/2) American Hot Wax?

Tim Mcintire excels as Alan Freed-(he died you of a heart ailment)

#3 Sepiatone

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 09:57 AM

..which proves that we can keep a thread going for an enormous number of posts.

:rolleyes:  :lol:  :lol:


I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#4 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 24 March 2017 - 08:14 AM

Although I don't think that's entirely true, MY point is wondering what does it matter?

 

A lot of black people didn't like CHARLIE PARKER either.....

 

OR CHUBBY CHECKER....

 

But, JIMI HENDRIX, TAJ MAHAL and RITCHIE HAVENS, all BLACK men, loved  both BOB DYLAN and JOHNNY WINTER( and they DON'T come much WHITER than Johnny Winter!)  ;)

 

Which proves........... what?

 

 

Sepiatone

..which proves that we can keep a thread going for an enormous number of posts.


  • Sepiatone and like this

#5 Sepiatone

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 04:40 PM

Thank you. You're HELPING my point. Just because the Billboard r&b charts in the '50s had Berry sometimes, as Philly DJs said, "up there where the air is rare", doesn't mean he was popular with black music fans. My point is that he wasn't.

Although I don't think that's entirely true, MY point is wondering what does it matter?

 

A lot of black people didn't like CHARLIE PARKER either.....

 

OR CHUBBY CHECKER....

 

But, JIMI HENDRIX, TAJ MAHAL and RITCHIE HAVENS, all BLACK men, loved  both BOB DYLAN and JOHNNY WINTER( and they DON'T come much WHITER than Johnny Winter!)  ;)

 

Which proves........... what?

 

 

Sepiatone


I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#6 Vautrin

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 03:31 PM

In the late '50s, there was very little going on in r&b that was particularly new and creative. That all changed in the '60s. That stuff would have buried Berry on the r&b charts.

All that may be true, but the fact remains that Berry was

more successful on the R&B chart than on the Hot 100 chart.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#7 Vautrin

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 03:24 PM

Regarding PRINCE:  From WIKIPEDIA-----

 

 

  

Prince's music synthesized a wide variety of influences,[213] and drew inspiration from a range of musicians, including James Brown,[226][227][228][223]George Clinton,[226][227][223]Joni Mitchell,[226]Duke Ellington,[229]Jimi Hendrix,[226][223]The Beatles,[226][223]Chuck Berry,[226]David Bowie,[226]Earth, Wind & Fire,[226]Mick Jagger,[226]Rick James,[226]Jerry Lee Lewis,[226] Little Richard,[226]Curtis Mayfield,[226][230]Elvis Presley,[226]Todd Rundgren,[231]Carlos Santana,[226]Sly Stone,[226][232][227][223][233]Jackie Wilson,[226] and Stevie Wonder.[233][234][235] Prince has been compared with jazz great Miles Davis in regard to the artistic changes throughout his career;[226][236] Davis himself regarded Prince as an uncanny blend of Brown, Hendrix, Marvin Gaye, Stone, Little Richard, Ellington, and Charlie Chaplin.[237][229][238]

 

 

 

 

Sepiatone

Don't forget the 1910 Fruitgum Company. And I really can't say I

hear too much of the Joni Mitchell influence, but maybe that's on

the CDs I don't own.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#8 Vautrin

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 03:21 PM

I was not in the age group to be a particular fan of Prince, but I was always overwhelmed by his consummate abilities in singing, playing the guitar, composing and dancing.

The highest compliment I can pay him was that I never turned off one of his songs on the car radio--I particularly liked 1999, Raspberry Beret and Little Red Corvette. Prince had a thorough grounding and understanding of Rock.

I think it's possible to have deep respect and admiration for an artist even though he/she is not one of your personal favorites. And that's the way I felt about Prince.

I think most music fans, even if they don't like his music, would agree

that he had a great amount of talent as a musician and songwriter.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#9 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 01:44 PM

DGF's problem is that he's laboring under the delusion that the Billboard R&B charts reflect African-American artists appeal  to African-American listeners.

 

In the 1950's the Billboard R&B charts were RIFE with artists that Billboard considered  R&B artists, but weren't necessarily black.

 

ELVIS, JERRY LEE LEWIS, BILL DOGGETT, The EVERLY BROTHERS, PAUL ANKA(yep!), JIMMY CLANTON, DANNY AND THE JUNIORS  and even the "Honeycomb" JIMMIE RODGERS all charted, and big on the Billboard R&B charts.

 

And many of the artists, both black AND white who found success on those R&B charts back then are now long considered ROCK'N'ROLL pioneers,  and the songs that hit #1 on those same charts are thought of as Rock'n'Roll trailblazers. 

 

WHY "fra" thinks that the color of some people's skin who MAKES the records, and the color of the skin of who BUYS them has ANY significance is something for him and his team of psychologists to iron out.  :wacko:

 

 

Sepiatone

Thank you. You're HELPING my point. Just because the Billboard r&b charts in the '50s had Berry sometimes, as Philly DJs said, "up there where the air is rare", doesn't mean he was popular with black music fans. My point is that he wasn't.



#10 Sepiatone

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 10:16 AM

DGF's problem is that he's laboring under the delusion that the Billboard R&B charts reflect African-American artists appeal  to African-American listeners.

 

In the 1950's the Billboard R&B charts were RIFE with artists that Billboard considered  R&B artists, but weren't necessarily black.

 

ELVIS, JERRY LEE LEWIS, BILL DOGGETT, The EVERLY BROTHERS, PAUL ANKA(yep!), JIMMY CLANTON, DANNY AND THE JUNIORS  and even the "Honeycomb" JIMMIE RODGERS all charted, and big on the Billboard R&B charts.

 

And many of the artists, both black AND white who found success on those R&B charts back then are now long considered ROCK'N'ROLL pioneers,  and the songs that hit #1 on those same charts are thought of as Rock'n'Roll trailblazers. 

 

WHY "fra" thinks that the color of some people's skin who MAKES the records, and the color of the skin of who BUYS them has ANY significance is something for him and his team of psychologists to iron out.  :wacko:

 

 

Sepiatone


I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#11 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 08:18 AM

It probably took sales of more records to have a high position on

the Hot 100 than on the R&B chart, but my point was that Berry

was pretty popular with black record buyers during his mid 1950s

to early 1960s heyday. 

In the late '50s, there was very little going on in r&b that was particularly new and creative. That all changed in the '60s. That stuff would have buried Berry on the r&b charts.



#12 Sepiatone

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 07:41 AM

Regarding PRINCE:  From WIKIPEDIA-----

 

 

  

Prince's music synthesized a wide variety of influences,[213] and drew inspiration from a range of musicians, including James Brown,[226][227][228][223]George Clinton,[226][227][223]Joni Mitchell,[226]Duke Ellington,[229]Jimi Hendrix,[226][223]The Beatles,[226][223]Chuck Berry,[226]David Bowie,[226]Earth, Wind & Fire,[226]Mick Jagger,[226]Rick James,[226]Jerry Lee Lewis,[226] Little Richard,[226]Curtis Mayfield,[226][230]Elvis Presley,[226]Todd Rundgren,[231]Carlos Santana,[226]Sly Stone,[226][232][227][223][233]Jackie Wilson,[226] and Stevie Wonder.[233][234][235] Prince has been compared with jazz great Miles Davis in regard to the artistic changes throughout his career;[226][236] Davis himself regarded Prince as an uncanny blend of Brown, Hendrix, Marvin Gaye, Stone, Little Richard, Ellington, and Charlie Chaplin.[237][229][238]

 

The saddest thing(possibly) about Prince is that most people( I suspect most y'all)  don't realize he released his FIRST album in 1978.

 

THREE YEARS before his "breakout" LP and single 1999, when EVERYBODY became familir with who he was.  And it's sad because THAT pre-1999 stuff was pretty good.  Same with GEORGE BENSON, who most people NEVER realized was a premier JAZZ guitarist LONG before hitting "pop" fame with "On Broadway".  Actually, I liked Benson BEFORE he turned into plastic.

 

I have an old friend who liked Prince, but STOPPED liking him AFTER "1999".  B)

 

 

Sepiatone


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#13 Princess of Tap

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 11:35 PM

I really like Prince. He put out some excellent records in
his prime. And even after that he was releasing one album
about every year.


I was not in the age group to be a particular fan of Prince, but I was always overwhelmed by his consummate abilities in singing, playing the guitar, composing and dancing.

The highest compliment I can pay him was that I never turned off one of his songs on the car radio--I particularly liked 1999, Raspberry Beret and Little Red Corvette. Prince had a thorough grounding and understanding of Rock.

I think it's possible to have deep respect and admiration for an artist even though he/she is not one of your personal favorites. And that's the way I felt about Prince.

#14 Vautrin

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 10:45 PM

Well, I did say "see".

 

As far as what I hear in Prince's music, it's not much I like, so I try to hear it as little as possible.

I really like Prince. He put out some excellent records in

his prime. And even after that he was releasing one album

about every year. 


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#15 slaytonf

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 06:22 PM

Your post totally failed to address my point. I'm talking about post-Maybellene., and I'll bet if you looked at the specialized Billboard charts from the later '50s (Top 40 race music, or whatever they were called back then), Berry's records didn't rank very high. At his appearances, there were mostly white faces in the crowd. 

 

 

Surprised white faces.



#16 LawrenceA

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 05:26 PM

In the visuals, presentation, and vocals I see that.

Not sure about the music.

 

Well, I did say "see".

 

As far as what I hear in Prince's music, it's not much I like, so I try to hear it as little as possible.



#17 Vautrin

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 05:16 PM

I see more of Little Richard in Prince, personally.

In the visuals, presentation, and vocals I see that.

Not sure about the music.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#18 Princess of Tap

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 05:16 PM

I see more of Little Richard in Prince, personally.


Yes, as well as James Brown - - but all that Beatlesque type Rock Stuff is channeling indirectly from Chuck Berry.

Prince was an artist who understood rock and roll profoundly.

#19 LawrenceA

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 04:51 PM

Maybe like degrees of separation. Not many

with the Beatles, and quite a few with Prince.

 

I see more of Little Richard in Prince, personally.



#20 Vautrin

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 04:49 PM

You may be trying to draw direct influence too much. Listen to the Beatles earliest stuff, and it's blues-based rave-up rockers, which if not directly influenced by Berry, were influenced indirectly. As in, they tried to sound like Eddie Cochran or Buddy Holly, who were trying to to sound like Chuck Berry.

 

Same with Prince. He listened to artists who were influenced by Berry. so the inspiration is there, even if not directly.

Maybe like degrees of separation. Not many

with the Beatles, and quite a few with Prince.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.





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