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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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#1 jakeem

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Posted Yesterday, 10:59 PM

...the actress Marsha Hunt (born Marcia Virginia Hunt on October 17, 1917), who celebrates her 100th birthday today.
 
Said to be the runnerup for the role of Melanie Wilkes in "Gone With the Wind," she experienced a low point iwhen she was blacklisted in the 1950s. She and her husband, the screenwriter Robert Presnell, Jr., had been vocal in their opposition to government "witch hunts" for Communists. As a result, both of their careers suffered. She turned her attention to humanitarian work and eventually rebounded with appearances in numerous television productions.
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Born in Chicago, Hunt moved with her family to New York when she was a child. Although she became a teen model, her interest was in becoming a professional actress. At the age of 17, she was signed to a contact by Paramount Pictures. Her debut film was "The Virginia Judge" (1935), which starred Walter C. Kelly -- the uncle of actress Grace Kelly -- Robert Cummings and Stepin Fetchit.
 
She co-starred with John Wayne in the Western "Born to the West" (1937) -- two years before the actor became a major star in John Ford's "Stagecoach." 
 
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In the 1940 screen version of Jane Austen's 19th-century novel "Pride and Prejudice," Hunt (pictured at the top left) played Mary, one of the five unmarried Bennet sisters. Greer Garson (in the center) played the movie's central character, Jane Bennet. The others (going clockwise from the top right): Heather Angel (as Kitty), Maureen O'Sullivan (as Jane) and Ann Rutherford (as Lydia). Directed by Robert Z. Leonard ("The Great Ziegfeld"), the film also starred Sir Laurence Olivier, Mary Boland, Frieda Inescort, Edmund Gwenn, Melville Cooper, Karen Morley, Bruce Lester and E.E. Clive. The film won the Academy Award for Best Art Direction, Black and White (Cedric Gibbons and Paul Groesse). It won the award over 12 other nominated films, including the one that was named Best Picture -- "Rebecca."
 
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James Craig and Hunt played a couple whose relationship was affected by World War II in "The Human Comedy." Directed by Clarence Brown, the film received Academy Award nominations for Best Picture of 1943, Best Director, Best Actor (Mickey Rooney) and Best Black-and-White Cinematography (Harry Stradling, Sr.). It won an Oscar for Best Writing, Original Story (William Saroyan). 
 
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Hunt (top right) co-starred in the World War II drama "Cry 'Havoc' " (1944) with a large female cast that also included the actresses Margaret Sullavan, Joan Blondell, Ann Sothern and Fay Bainter. They played U.S. Army nurses working at a military hospital in the Philippines. Directed by Richard Thorpe, the drama was based on the play by Allan Kenward.
 
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"The Valley of Decision" (1945) was Hunt's third film with Garson. After "Pride and Prejudice," they also starred in "Blossoms in the Dust" (1941). Directed by Tay Garnett, the film starred Garson as a housemaid who falls in love with her employer's son (Gregory Peck). Hunt played Peck's headstrong sister.  
 
 
In Carnegie Hall" (1947), Hunt played a widowed Irish immigrant who pushed her talented son (played as an adult by William Prince) to become a classical pianist and performer at the hallowed New York concert hall. Hunt considers this one of her favorite films because it features great performances of great compositions by great artists. Among the performers: Arthur Rubinstein, Leopold Stokowski, Lily Pons, Jascha Heifetz, Jan Peerce, Ezio Pinza and Risë Stevens. The picture was directed by Edgar G. Ulmer.
 
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Directed by Anthony Mann, the 1948 film noir effort "Raw Deal" starred Hunt, Claire Trevor and Dennis O'Keefe in a unusual love triangle after a prison break. Hunt has said she found Trevor to be aloof -- until she realized the Oscar-winning actress was staying in character.
 
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Hunt co-starred with Wendell Corey and Patty McCormack in the CBS sitcom "Peck's Bad Girl," which ran for 14 episodes in 1959. Hunt and  Corey played the parents of the title character, schoolgirl Torey Peck (McCormack). Ray Ferrell played Torey's younger brother.
 
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In the Season 5 episode of "The Twilight Zone" titled "Spur of the Moment," Hunt played the mother of a young heiress and horsewoman (Diana Hyland) haunted by her encounters with another woman on horseback. The episode, whch originally aired on February 21, 1964, was written by Richard Matheson and Rod Serling.
 
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In the 1988 episode of "Star Trek: The Next Generation titled "Too Short a Season," Hunt guest starred as the wife of a de-aging admiral (Clayton Rohner) who was being transported by the Enterprise crew to a planet involved in a hostage situation.
 
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#2 jakeem

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Posted 15 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Dame Angela Lansbury (born October 16, 1925), the multi-talented British actress who is as comfortable on the stage as she is on television and the big screen. She was presented an honorary Academy Award in 2013. Several months later, she received a damehood from Queen Elizabeth II.
 
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She has been nominated for competitive Academy Awards three times. Her recognized roles and movies are as follows:
  • Nancy in "Gaslight" (1944). Best Supporting Actress.
  • Sibyl Vane in "The Picture of Dorian Gray" (1945). Best Supporting Actress).
  • Mrs. Eleanor Shaw Iselin in "The Manchurian Candidate" (1962). Best Supporting Actress.
Her paternal grandfather, George Lansbury, was leader of the Labour Party during the 1930s. Her father Edgar, who died when she was 9, was a socialist politician. Her mother was the Irish actress Moyna Macgill (1895-1975). She and Angela emigrated to America at the outbreak of World War II in 1940..
 
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At the age of 17, Lansbury appeared in her first movie -- director George Cukor's 1944 thriller "Gaslight" -- as a Cockney maid in the household of a married couple played by Charles Boyer and Ingrid Bergman. For her efforts, the blossoming star received an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actress.
 
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In "National Velvet" (1944), Lansbury played farm girl Edwina Brown, older sister of the title character played by Elizabeth Taylor. Based on British author Enid Bagnold's 1935 novel, the film -- set in the 1920s -- focused on Velvet's attempt to ride the racehorse she won in a raffle in the Grand National Steeplechase. Directed by Clarence Brown, the film starred Mickey Rooney as Mi Taylor, the jockey turned trainer who assisted Velvetl, who rode disguised as a boy. Anne Revere, who played the girls' mother, won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance. 
 
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Lansbury received a second Academy Award nomination before the age of 21 for her supporting performance in the 1946 drama "The Picture of Dorian Gray." Based on the story by Oscar Wilde, the film starred Hurd Hatfield as the title character -- a man who enjoyed seemingly endless youth while his portrait aged. In her role as Sibyl Vane, Lansbury sang for the first time in a motion picture, performing "The Little Yellow Bird.'' Her mother appeared in the film as the Duchess.
 
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Lansbury's third Academy Award nomination was for her performance as the politically ambitious mother of a brainwashed Korean war veteran (Laurence Harvey) in John Frankenheimer's "The Manchurian Candidate" (1962). The film was produced by its star, Frank Sinatra.
 
 
Lansbury has won five Tony Awards for her stage performances -- a total exceeded by the six won by Audra McDonald. Julie Harris also had five competitive wins and a Special Achievement Award. Her awards were in the following categories:
  • 1966 -- Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical  -- "Mame" (pictured below with Beatrice Arthur)
  • 1969 -- Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical -- "Dear World"
  • 1975 -- Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a  Musical  -- "Gypsy: A Musical Fable"
  • 1979 -- Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical -- "Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street"  
  • 2009 -- Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play -- "Blithe Spirit" (revival)      
 
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In Disney's "Bedknobs and Broomsticks" (1971) -- which combined live action with animation -- Lansbury played Miss Eglantine Price, who used witchcraft to battle invading Nazis in Britain during The Blitz. The film earned an Oscar for Best Special Visual Effects (Alan Maley, Eustace Lycett and Danny Lee). 
 
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From 1984 to 1996, Lansbury starred in the CBS mystery/drama series "Murder, She Wrote," in which she played Jessica Fletcher -- a professional novelist and amateur sleuth  from the fictional town of Cabot Cove, Maine. She was nominated for Primetime Emmy Awards for 12 consecutive seasons, but never won. The series reunited Lansbury with many actors with whom she had appeared in films. During the 1980s, for example, Hatfield from "The Picture of Dorian Gray" appeared in three episodes of "Murder, She Wrote." 
 
 
On November 16, 2013, Lansbury received an honorary Academy Award as "an entertainment icon who has created some of cinema's most memorable characters, inspiring generations of actors." The award was presented to her by Turner Classic Movies host Robert Osborne. Lansbury said she asked him because he was the only person who really knew her career.
 
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She was presented her damehood by the Queen  in April 2004 at a ceremony at Windsor Castle
 
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In 2014 and 2015, Lansbury starred as the medium Madame Arcati in a revival of Sir Noël Coward's comedy/fantasy "Blithe Spirit." The veteran actress appeared in the play in London's West End before embarking on a four-city U.S. tour. She announced that it would be her final tour. .
 
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#3 jakeem

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Posted 14 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Penny Marshall (born Carole Penny Marshall on October 15, 1943), the TV sitcom star who became an A-list feature film director in the 1980s.
 
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Her older brother was Garry Marshall (1934-2016) a comedy writer and sometime actor who became a hitmaking machine as a director and producer. Among his television hits during the 1970s: "The Odd Couple," "Happy Days," "Mork and Mindy" and "Laverne & Shirley." 
 
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From 1971 to 1981, Penny Marshall was married to the Emmy Award-winning actor turned director Rob Reiner, who became a household name as Mike Stivic in the landmark television sitcom "All in the Family." Reiner adopted Marshall's daughter Tracy from a first marriage.
 
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Marshall played Oscar Madison’s secretary, Myrna Turner, on “The Odd Couple,” the ABC sitcom based on Neil Simon's stage play.
 
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From 1976 to 1983, Marshall starred in "Laverne & Shirley," a "Happy Days" spinoff that became the No. 1 show in the nation.
 
 
Marshall made her feature film debut as a director with the 1985 comedy "Jumping Jack Flash," which starred Whoopi Goldberg as an office worker who became embroiled in espionage. The film also starred Jonathan Pryce, Stephen Collins, John Wood, Jeroen Krabbé, Jim Belushi and Carol Kane.
 
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In Marshall's 1998 fantasy/comedy "Big," Tom Hanks starred as a preteen boy magically transformed into an adult. Hanks earned his first Academy Award nomination for his performance. One of the film's highlights was the big keyboard duet at FAO Schwarz between the characters played by Robert Loggia and Hanks.
 
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The 1990 drama "Awakenings" was based on the 1973 non-fiction book by the British-born New York neurologist Oliver Sacks (1933-2015). Robin Williams starred as a character based on Sacks involved with experiments using the drug L-DOPA on catatonic patients. Robert De Niro played one such patient, Leonard Lowe -- who made a remarkable recovery. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, including Best Picture. But Marshall became an addition to the list of female directors not nominated for a Best Picture contender. The movie's other nominations were for Best Actor (De Niro) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Steven Zaillian). 
 
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Marshall and Hanks reunited for the 1992 comedy "A League of Their Own," in which he played Jimmy Dugan, manager of the Rockford Peaches -- a 1940s all-women's baseball team. Dugan's unforgettable line -- "There's no crying in baseball!" -- was ranked No. 54 in the American Film Institute's 2005 survey of the 100 top movie quotes of all time.
 
 
The 1994 military comedy "Renaissance Man" starred Danny De Vito as Bill Rago -- a onetime ad exec hired by the U.S. Army to teach an English during basic training in Michigan. Directed and co-produced by Marshall, the film also starred Gregory Hines, James Remar, Cliff Robertson, Ed Begley, Jr., Richard T. Jones, Mark Wahlberg, Stacey Dash, Lillo Brancato, Jr. and Kadeem Hardison.
 
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Marshall's holiday-themed fantasy "The Preacher's Wife" (1996) -- which starred Denzel Washington, Whitney Houston and Courtney B. Vance -- was a remake of the 1947 Christmas classic "The Bishop's Wife." Directed by Henry Koster, the original film starred Cary Grant as a guardian angel sent to Earth to provide guidance for an Episcopalian bishop (Niven) struggling to find funds for a new cathedral. Meanwhile, he established a connection with the bishop's spouse (Young).
 
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Based on the autobiography by Beverly D'Onofrio, Marshall's film "Riding in Cars with Boys" (2001) starred Drew Barrymore as a single mother who never lost sight of her goal for a better life. The drama also starred Steve Zahn, Adam Garcia (pictured below with Barrymore), Brittany Murphy, James Woods, Lorraine Bracco, Rosie Perez, 
 
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If you don't count the transgendered siblings Lana and Lilly Wachowski -- who have grossed $714.6 million with such films as "The Matrix" and its sequels -- then Marshall is No. 6 on the all-time list of top-grossing women directors. Here are the Top 10 people on the list, according to boxofficemojo.com:
 
1. Nancy Meyers ("What Women Want," "Something's Gotta Give") -- $625.6 million.
2. Betty Thomas ("The Brady Bunch Movie," "Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel") -- $563.3 million.
3. Nora Ephron ("Sleepless in Seattle," "You've Got Mail") -- $515.0 million.
4. Patty Jenkins ("Monster," "Wonder Woman") -- $446.9 million.
5. Vicky Jenson ("Shrek," "Shark Tale," "Post Grad") -- $434.9 million.
6. Marshall -- $407.0 million.
7. Jennifer Lee ("Frozen") -- $400.7 million.
8. Amy Heckerling ("Look Who's Talking," "Clueless") -- $384.0 million.
9. Anne Fletcher ("Step Up," "The Proposal") -- $377.8 million.
10. Brenda Chapman ("Brave") -- $338.7 million.
 

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#4 jakeem

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Mia Wasikowska (born October 14, 1989), the Australian actress of Polish ancestry and daughter of two artists/photographers (her surname is pronounced VAH-shee-KOF-skə). She began acting at the age of 15. Several years later, Time magazine included her as an "emerging star" on its list of the 100 Most Influential People for 2011.
 
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In 2008, Wasikowska first became familiar to American audiences in Season 1 episodes of the HBO series "In Treatment." She played Sophie, a troubled teen gymnast who had Wednesday sessions with a psychotherapist (Gabriel Byrne). The drama was based on an Israeli television series.
 
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Also in 2008, she co-starred with Jamie Bell in the World War II drama "Defiance," which was headlined by Daniel Craig and Liev Schreiber. Directed by Edward Zwick ("Glory," "Legends of the Fall"), the film -- based on a true story -- featured Wasikowska as Chaya Dziencielsky, a member of a band of Jewish rebels battling Nazis in Belarus.
 
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In Mia Nair's 2009 biopic "Amelia," Wasikowska portrayed Elinor Smith (1911-2010), a budding pilot inspired by the accomplished aviator Amelia Earhart. The film starred the two-time Academy Award winner Hilary Swank as Earhart and Richard Gere as her husband George Putnam.
 
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Wasikowska played the title character in Tim Burton's screen version of "Alice in Wonderland" (2010), which blended live action with digital animation. The film, which also starred Johnny Depp as The Mad Hatter, Helena Bonham Carter as The Red Queen, Anne Hathaway as The White Queen and Matt Lucas as Tweedledum and Tweedledee, earned $1,025.5 billion worldwide.
 
 
"The Kids Are All Right," a 2010 Best Picture nominee directed by Lisa Cholodenko, starred Annette Bening and Julianne Moore as a married Southern California couple with teen children (played by Wasikowska and Josh Hutcherson). Complications ensued when the youngsters met their biological father -- a sperm_donor played by Mark Ruffalo -- and he caused a rift between the parents. The film also received Oscar nominations for Best Actress (Bening), Best Supporting Actor (Ruffalo) and Best Original Screenplay (Cholodenko and Stuart Blumberg). 
 
 
In 2011, Wasikowska co-starred with Michael Fassbender in a new screen verion of Charlotte Brontë's novel "Jane Eyre." The actress played the title heroine, the resilient young woman who became the governess at Thornfield Hall, the mansion owned by the moody Edward Rochester (Fassbender).Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga -- an Emmy Award winner for Season 1 of "True Detective" -- the drama also starred Bell and Sally Hawkins.
 
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In the 2011 genderbending drama "Albert Nobbs," Glenn Close played the title character -- a woman who posed as a man in 19th-century Dublin, Ireland. Wasikowska co-starred as Helen Dawes, a housemaid at the hotel where Nobbs worked as a butler. Close received a Best Actress Oscar nomination for her performance. Janet McTeer, who played another woman passing as a man, was nominated in the Best Supporting Actress category. 
 
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Close paid tribute to Wasikowska in a piece written for Time when the young actress was selected to the magazine's 100 list. "Mia will be many things in life and will defy expectation because she's brilliant and curious and not fooled by what most people define as success." Close wrote. "I will relish her journey and only hope she will be in my life for a very long time."
 
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Ryan Pfluger for TIME
 
Wasikowska reprised the role of Lewis Carroll's heroine in the 2016 screen version of "Alice Through the Looking Glass." Directed by James Bobin (co-creator of HBO's "Flight of the Conchords"), the sequel was co-produced by Burton. The film also featured Depp, Bonham Carter, Hathaway, Lucas and Sasha Baron Cohen.
 
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#5 jakeem

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

 
...Paul Simon (born October 13, 1941), the Grammy Award-winning singer and songwriter who has excelled as a solo act -- years after his successful partnership with singer Art Garfunkel in the 1950s and 1960s. 
 
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Simon became friends with Garfunkel when they were 11-year-old schoolboys. They went on to became teen performers under the names Tom and Jerry. Garfunkel used the stage name "Tommy Graph"; Simon was "Jerry Landis." As recording artists, they had an early hit in 1957 titled "Hey, Schoolgirl," which reached No. 49 on the Billboard pop chart.
 
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The duo began using their real names in the 1960s and became top-selling recording artists. In 1982, Simon was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 1990, Simon and Garfunkel were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and, in 2001, Simon was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a solo artist. In 2003, he was given a Grammy lifetime achievement award.
 
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Simon and Garfunkel provided songs for the soundtrack of the 1967 movie "The Graduate." One contribution, "Mrs. Robinson," became a No. 1 hit on the Billboard pop chart and won 1968-69 Grammy Awards for Record of the Year and Best Contemporary-Pop Performance by a Vocal Duo or Group. In a 2004 AFI survey of the Top 100 movie songs of all time, the tune came in at No. 6, behind the following: "Over the Rainbow" from "The Wizard of Oz" (1939); "As Time Goes By" from "Casablanca" (1943); the title song from "Singin' in the Rain" (1952); "Moon River" from "Breakfast at Tiffany's" (1961); and "White Christmas" from "Holiday Inn" (1942). 
 
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Written by Simon, "Mrs. Robinson"  has resonated through the decades, with its memorable lines: "Where have you gone, Joe DiMaggio?/A nation turns its lonely eyes to you."
 
The reference to DiMaggio apparently irritated the Baseball Hall of Famer himself. The day after the Yankees great died in 1999, The New York Times published an op-ed piece written by Simon, who revealed that he once met DiMaggio at an Italian restaurant in the city. The singer-songwriter wrote that they discussed "Mrs. Robinson," and DiMaggio couldn't understand why Simon and Garfunkel had asked where he had gone.
 
Simon's response: "I said that I didn't mean the lines literally, that I thought of him as an American hero and that genuine heroes were in short supply. He accepted the explanation and thanked me. We shook hands and said good night."
 
On April 25, 1999, Simon performed the song in centerfield at Yankee Stadium as a tribute to DiMaggio.
 
 
Simon and Garfunkel broke up their musical partnership in 1970, not long after the release of the album "Bridge Over Troubled Water." A year later, the LP won six awards -- including Album of the Year -- at the 13th annual Grammys. The title song, written by Simon, was named Record of the Year and Song of the Year. It was the first of three Album of the Year Grammys for which Simon would be associated. The others: His solo efforts "Still Crazy After All These Years" (1976) and "Graceland" (1987).   
 
Two other songs from the "Bridge Over Troubled Water" album -- "Baby Driver" and "The Only Living Boy in New York" -- influenced the titles of two movies released in 2017.
 
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Simon has served as guest host of NBC's "Saturday Night Live" four times -- just shy of true membership in SNL's "Five-Timers Club. But he also has appeared on the late-night sketch comedy show eight times as a musical guest and five as a special guest. Perhaps his most memorable moment as a guest host was on November 20, 1976 -- five days before Thanksgiving -- when he briefly sang "Still Crazy After All These Years" while wearing a turkey costume.
 
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Simon was supposed to appear with Garfunkel in director Nichols' 1970 film version of "Catch-22," but his role was dropped. He didn't make his screen debut until seven years later, when he appeared as record producer Tony Lacey in Woody Allen‘s 1977 Oscar-winning film "Annie Hall." The following year, he made a cameo appearance as himself in "All You Need Is Cash," a mockumentary about a Beatles-like group called The Rutles. 
 
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Three years later, Simon came up with his own movie project. He wrote, scored and starred in "One Trick Pony," the story of a famous singer trying to come to terms with the music scene at the beginning of the new decade. Directed by Robert M. Young, the film also starred Blair Brown, Rip Torn, Joan Hackett, Michael Pearlman, Allen Garfield, Harry Shearer and Lou Reed.. The film produced Simon's chart hit "Late in the Evening."
 
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In August 1981, Simon and Garfunkel reunited for a concert at New York City's Central Park, At one point, Simon was performing his song "The Late Great Johnny Ace" when a spectator rushed the stage. After security removed the intruder, Simon continued singing -- almost without missing a beat.
 
 
Simon, who has been married three times, was wed to the actress Carrie Fisher from August 1983 to July 1984. When she died after a massive heart attack on December 27, 2016, Simon marked her passing on Twitter the next day. "Yesterday was a horrible day," he wrote. "Carrie was a special, wonderful girl. It’s too soon." Simon was married to Peggy Harper from 1969 to 1976. Since 1992, his wife has been singer Edie Brickell 
 
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In May 2007, Simon became the first recipient of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. Presented in honor of the songwriting brothers George and Ira Gershwin, the award also has gone to Stevie Wonder (2008), Paul McCartney (2010), Burt Bacharach and Hal David (2011), Carole King (2012), Billy Joel (2014), Willie Nelson (2015), Smokey Robinson (2016) and Tony Bennett (2017).
 
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In a CBS This Morning interview last month, Garfunkel said his rocky relationship with Simon is like a marriage. "It has summers and winters," he said. "It waxes and wanes. It is best not talked about. You leave it alone. Sometimes you get a call from Paul...and out of nowhere, something funny goes on and you laugh and you go, 'I miss him.' And then you hang out, you have a dinner." 
 
Will the off-and-on music partners ever reunite musically? "It's standard to be asked," Garfunkel said. "I've always said 'Who knows?' "Life is a surprise. We don't know what comes next. Nowadays, I'd say no we won't."

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#6 sagebrush

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 06:04 AM

Hugh Jackman is one of my favorite modern day actors. He can do it all, and is a really nice dude, to boot!



#7 jakeem

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Posted 11 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Hugh Jackman (born October 12, 1968), the versatile Australian actor who not only receives nominations for awards -- he also hosts the televised ceremonies from time to time. 
 
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Jackman won the role of the mutant hero Wolverine in the 2000 film "X-Men" when the original choice, the Scottish actor Dougray Scott, couldn't get free of shooting scenes for "Mission Impossible 2." Jackman became an international star as a result of the picture's success. Directed by Bryan Singer, the film earned almost $300 million worldwide. Jackman reprised the character of Wolverine in several sequels, standalone projects and prequels.
 
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In the 2001 romantic fantasy "Kate and Leopold," Jackman played a 19th-century English duke who found himself transported to New York in the 21st century. Meg Ryan was a very modern American woman who fell for him.
 
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In 2003 and 2004, Jackman dazzled Broadway audiences with his starring role as the Aussie performer Peter Allen (1944-1992) in the musical "The Boy from Oz." Jackman won the Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical. 
 
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The 2004 horror film "Van Helsing" starred Jackman as the notorious nemesis of vampires and other undead things. Kate Beckinsale co-starred as Anna Valerious, a member of a Transylvanian family with a longtime hatred of Count Dracula.
 
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Based on a 1995 novel by the British author Christopher Priest, "The Prestige" (2006) starred Christian Bale and Jackman as dueling magicians from London during the late 1800s. Directed by Christopher Nolan, the drama also starred Sir Michael Caine, Piper Perabo, Rebecca Hall, Scarlett Johansson, David Bowie, Andy Serkis, Roger Rees and Ricky Jay.
 
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"Australia" (2008) was a big-budget epic (with a price tag said to be between $130 and $160 million). Set during World War II, the production starred Aussies Nicole Kidman and Jackman (whose role was intended for Russell Crowe). The film, which earmed $211 million worldwide, ranks as the No. 3 highest-grossing Australian film in history (behind "Crocodile Dundee" and "Mad Max: Fury Road").
 
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On February 22, 2009, Jackman served as host of the 81st Academy Awards ceremony and began things with a production number.that Entertainment Weekly.com praised as "simply the best opening sequence in recent Oscars history."
 
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Jackman won a 2012 Academy Award nomination for his performance as Jean Valjean, the escaped 18th-century convict in the screen version of the musical "Les Misérables." Both the film and the stage production were based on the novel by Victor Hugo.
 
 
At the 2012 Tony Awards, Jackman received a special statuette for his work with charitable organizations and his contributions to the Broadway community. It was presented to him by his wife Deborra-Lee Furness.
 
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On June 8, 2014 Jackman hosted the Tonys ceremony for the second time (his first stint had been 10 years earlier). For the show's opening segment, he re-created actor-dancer Bobby Van's "Take Me to Broadway" jumping sequence in the 1953 film musical "Small Town Girl."
 
 
Jackman has declared that the 2017 film "Logan" was his last appearance as Wolverine after 17 years. His co-star was the preteen British actress Dafne Keen, daughter of actor Will Keen ("The Crown"). 
 
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#8 jakeem

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Joan Cusack (born October 11, 1962), the Primetime Emmy Award winning actress -- and two-time Oscar nominee -- who specializes in comic roles.
 
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Her Academy Award-nominated roles and movies are as follows: 
  • Cyn in "Working Girl" (1988). Best Supporting Actress.
  • Emily Montgomery in "In & Out" (1997). Best Supporting Actress.
Cusack is from a family of actors. Her father Dick Cusack (1925-2003) left the advertising business in middle age to start a film production company. He also was an actor and playwright who wrote the 1999 HBO Western "The Jack Bull," which starred younger brother John Cusack, L.Q. Jones and John Goodman. The tale was derived from a 19th-century novel by the German author Heinrich von Kleist. In addition to Joan and John, the elder Cusack's other children -- Susan, Ann and William -- also became actors.
 
Joan's screen debut was in the 1980 movie "My Bodyguard," in which she played a schoolgirl named Shelley. It was her first co-starring role with another young screen presence, actor Matt Dillon. They would appear in the comedy "In & Out" 17 years later.
 
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In John Hughes' "Sixteen Candles" (1984) Cusack was billed as "Geek Girl #1," a neck brace-wearing student who had trouble negotiating a water fountain.
 
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During the 1985-1986 season, Cusack was a regular on the NBC late-night series "Saturday Night Live." Among her castmates that season: Robert Downey, Jr. (pictured below with Cusack), Anthony Michael Hall and Randy Quaid. One of her recurring characters on the sketch comedy show was Brooke Shields.
 
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Cusack co-starred with Melanie Griffith, Harrison Ford and Sigourney Weaver in the 1988 romantic comedy/drama "Working Girl." Directed by Mike Nichols, the film received six Academy Award nominations: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress (Griffith), Best Supporting Actress (Cusack and Weaver) and Best Original Song ("Let the River Run" by Carly Simon, who won).
 
 
Cusack has appeared with her brother John in several films, including 1997's "Grosse Pointe Blank" (pictured below), directed by George Armitage. John played a professional hitman who returned to his Michigan hometown for a high school reunion. Joan co-starred as his secretary Marcella.
 
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Cusack received her second Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for her performance in the 1997 comedy "In & Out," in which Kevin Kline played her longtime fiancé. Her hopes for a wedding fell apart after actor Cameron Drake (Dillon) caused ripples back home in Indiana by outing her boyfriend as gay on a worldwide telecast. He wasn't. Or was he? 
 
 
Since "Toy Story 2" in 1999, Cusack has provided the voice of Jessie the Yodeling Cowgirl ifor various projects, including sequels, TV specials and video games. The fourth Toy Story" movie is expected to be released in 2019.
 
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During the 2000-2001 season Cusack headlined her own ABC television sitcom, "What About Joan?" She played Joan Gallagher, a Chicago high school teacher, and the series focused on her relationships with her friends and her boyfriend Jake Evans (Kyle Chandler). The series was canceled during its second season.
 
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In September 2015, she won a Primetime Emmy Award for her performances as Sheila Jackson -- mother of the manipulative Karen Jackson (Laura Wiggins) -- on Showtime's "Shameless." Cusack had been nominated four times previously for the award as Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series.
 

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#9 jakeem

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Posted 10 October 2017 - 05:47 AM

...Peter Coyote (born Robert Peter Cohon on October 10, 1941), the veteran actor who has become an in-demand narrator of documentary films. "The Vietnam War," his latest collaboration with filmmaker Ken Burns, premiered on PBS last month.
 
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One of Coyote's first films was Walter Hill's 1981 drama "Southern Comfort" -- viewed by many as the director's metaphor for the Vietnam conflict. Coyote played Staff Sergeant Crawford Poole, the leader of a nine-member Louisiana Army National Guard squad that became lost while on maneuvers in a bayou area. They soon ran afoul of hostile local residents. The movie also starred Keith Carradine, Powers Boothe and Fred Ward.
 
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In Steven Spielberg's 1982 box-office sensation "E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial," Coyote (pictured below with Dee Wallace Stone and Henry Thomas) played Keys, the sympathetic government agent who envied young Elliott (Thomas) and his connection to the title alien. Spielberg hired Coyote after remembering the actor's disastrous audition for the role of Indiana Jones in "Raiders of the Lost Ark" (1981).
 
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Coyote co-starred with Mary Steenburgen in "Cross Creek" -- director Martin Ritt's 1983 screen biography of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (1896-1953), the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "The Yearling." The film produced Academy Award nominations for Rip Torn (Best Supporting Actor) and Alfre Woodard (Best Supporting Actress). 
 
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In "Jagged Edge" (1985), Coyote appeared as Thomas Krasny -- the district attorney who matched wits with the high-powered defense attorney Teddy Barnes (Glenn Close) in a high-profile murder case. Barnes later made the mistake of becoming involved with the murder suspect (Jeff Bridges) she successfully defended. Robert Loggia, who played Barnes' crusty investigator, received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actor.
 
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Coyote played a terminally ill patient in the 1998 film "Patch Adams," which starred Robin Williams as a real-life physician who really believed in laughter as the best medicine. Although the film largely was panned by critics, it earned $202 million worldwide.
 
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Coyote's growing reputation as a voiceover specialist earned him a stint as the announcer for ABC's telecast of the 72nd annual Academy Awards on March 26, 2000. The actor (pictured below with executive producer Michael B. Seligman) was tapped for the role of "Voice of the Oscars" by producers Richard and Lili Fini Zanuck. The host of the telecast for the seventh time was Billy Crystal.
 
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In Steven Soderbergh's 2000 biopic "Erin Brockovich," Coyote played Kurt Potter -- the attorney provided key information by the title character (Julia Roberts) and personal injury lawyer Ed Masry (Albert Finney) in an environmental contamination case. Potter -- the fictional version of the real-life attorney Thomas Girardi -- went on win a $333 million settlement from Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PGE) for more than 600 residents in Hinkley, California. Roberts won a Best Actress Oscar for her performance in the film, which was nominated for Best Picture and three other awards.
 
 
Based on the 1999 novel by Nicholas Sparks, "A Walk to Remember" (2002) starred Mandy Moore and Shane West as North Carolina teens who marry despite obstacles. Coyote played the ailing heroine's father, a minister who not only walked his daughter down the aisle, but also performed the wedding ceremony. 
 
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Coyote narrated Burns' "The Roosevelts: An Intimate History" (2014), an acclaimed seven-part series about Theodore Roosevelt and his cousins Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt. "He's extraordinary," said Burns about Coyote. "A great deal of the power of our films comes from the authority his voice brings to the proceedings."
 
 
On September 12, 2015, Coyote won a Primetime Emmy Award for his narration in "The Roosevelts." "I think of it first and foremost as being authentic," Coyote told the San Francisco Chronicle in 2014. "My gift seems to be that I am able to tell a story in a comprehensible and engaging way."
 
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#10 jakeem

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 06:16 AM

...Guillermo del Toro (born Guillermo del Toro Gómez on October 9, 1964), the Mexican-born director with a penchant for featuring strange and wondrous creatures in his films. 

 
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Del Toro is friends with two other noteworthy Mexican filmmakers -- Alfonso Cuarón and Alejandro G. Iñárritu. Cuarón won Academy Awards for directing and co-editing the 2013 hit "Gravity." Iñárritu has won four Oscars, including back-to-back Best Director awards for the films "Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)" and "The Revenant." Is Del Toro destined for the Oscar stage, too?
 
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Del Toro's first feature film was the 1993 horror tale "Cronos," about a mysterious device that supposedly could provide eternal life to its owner. After being missing for 400 years, the device was discovered by the elderly antiques dealer Jesús Gris (played by Del Toro regular Federico Luppi, pictured below with Tamara Shanath as Gris' grandaughter). Trouble ensued with the arrival of the menacing Angel De La Guardia (Ron Perlman, another frequent Del Toro collaborator). who was looking for the device.
 
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In Del Toro's 1997 thriller "Mimic," Oscar winner Mira Sorvino played Dr. Susan Tyler, an entomologist who genetically created an insect designed to destroy disease-ridden cockroaches. The plan backfired when the new creations became a bigger threat to humans. The film also starred Jeremy Northam, Josh Brolin, Charles S. Dutton, Giancarlo Giannini, F. Murray Abraham, Norman Reedus and Doug Jones (another Del Toro regular).
 
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Set during the Spanish Civil War, "The Devil's Backbone" (2001) featured Fernando Tielve as an orphaned boy sent to a school for the children of antifacists. He became haunted by the ghost of a boy named Santi (Junio Valverde) who reportedly was killed at the school during a bombing attack. Carlos soon discovered some of the school's unsavory secrets. Also starring in the film: Marisa Paredes, Eduardo Noriega and Luppi.
 
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The first Marvel Universe character to get a feature film series was Blade, the vampire hunter who received special powers when his pregnant mother was bitten by a bloodsucker.. Wesley Snipes previously starred as the heroic figure in the 1998 movie "Blade." Del Toro directed the 2002 sequel "Blade II," which also starred Perlman. Snipes appeared as the character in a third installment: "Blade: Trinity" (2004).
 
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In 2004, Del Toro directed another film based on a popular comic book character. In "Hellboy," based on Mike Mignola's comics series, Perlman played the title character -- a half-demon turned paranormal investigator and superhero. The movie also starred Sir John Hurt, Selma Blair, Rupert Evans, Karel Roden, Jeffrey Tambor and Jones.
 
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Del Toro and Perlman collaborated again for the 2008 sequel titled "Hellboy II: The Golden Army." The film earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Makeup.
 
 
The 2008 Spanish-Mexican fantasy film "El laberinto del fauno" (English title: "Pan's Labyrinth") -- set in the years after the Spanish Civil War -- earned Del Toro an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay. It also was nominated for five other Oscars, including Best Foreign Language Film and Best Original Score. It won in the categories of Best Art Direction (Eugenio Caballero and Pilar Revuelta), Best Cinematography (Guillermo Navarro) and Best Makeup (David Marti and Montse Ribé). The film starred the young Spanish actress Ivana Baquero -- now 23 and star of TV's "The Shannara Chronicles" -- as a fanciful girl named Ofelia. Jones appeared as two characters -- the Faun and the grotesque Pale Man.
 
 
In Del Toro's 2013 sci-fi tale "Pacific Rim," Idris Elba played Stacker Pentecost -- a warrior in Earth's battle against gigantic monsters from another dimension. Also starring in the film: Charlie Hunnam, Rinko Kikuchi, Charlie Day, Robert Kazinsky (pictured below with Elba) and Perlman.
 
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Del Toro was a co-creator (with author and filmmaker Chuck Hogan) of "The Strain," the FX television horror series that ended last month after four seasons. The drama starred Corey Stoll as Dr. Ephraim "Eph" Goodweather, an epidemiologist who battled vampires in New York City.
 
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Del Toro's latest effort -- scheduled to be released nationwide in December -- is "The Shape of Water." The film won the Golden Lion Award at the 74th Venice International Film Festival last month. It also was screened -- and much-talked about -- at the recent Toronto International Film Festival. The movie's key character -- played by the British actress Sally Hawkins -- is a mute woman who bonds with a strange aquatic creature held in captivity at the government lab where she works. Also starring in the Cold War era tale: Oscar winner Octavia Spencer (pictured below with Hawkins), Michael Shannon, Richard Jenkins, Michael Stuhlbarg and Jones.

 

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#11 sagebrush

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Posted 08 October 2017 - 11:15 AM

Also, Happy Birthday today to:

 

Matt Damon-  47

Chevy Chase-  74

Paul Hogan-  78



#12 jakeem

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Posted 07 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

 
 
...Sigourney Weaver (born Susan Alexandra Weaver on October 8, 1949), the 6-foot tall actress celebrated for playing one of filmdom's formidable action heroines -- Ellen Ripley in the "Alien" series. When she was 14, she changed her name from Susan to Sigourney, after a character in F. Scott Fitzgerald's classic novel "The Great Gatsby." "It was an act of desperation, because I didn't like being called Susie," she told The Guardian in 2010. "Now I'm 'Siggy,' so it doesn't matter."
 
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She has been nominated for Academy Awards three times. Her recognized roles and movies are as follows: 
  • Ripley in "Aliens" (1986). Best Actress.
  • Dian Fossey in "Gorillas in the Mist" (1988). Best Actress.
  • Katharine Parker in "Working Girll" (1988). Best Supporting Actress.
Her father was the NBC executive Sylvester "Pat" Weaver (1908-2002), who created the morning news program "Today" and "The Tonight Show." Her mother, Elizabeth Inglis (1913-2007), was a British actress who appeared in Sir Alfred Hitchcock's "The 39 Steps" (1935) and the 1940 Bette Davis drama "The Letter." Her father's brother was the comedian and actor Doodles Weaver (1911-1983), who was a member of Spike Jones' colorful radio programs in the 1940s. 
 
Her screen debut was as Alvy Singer's very tall movie date near the end of Woody Allen's comedy "Annie Hall" (1977). Not a bad movie to put for a young actress to put on her résumé. The film won Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Director (Allen), Best Actress (Diane Keaton) and Best Original Screenplay (Allen and Marshall Brickman).
 
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Weaver zoomed to stardom in "Alien" (1979), Sir Ridley Scott's sci-fi/horror classic "Alien" and winner of an Oscar for Best Visual Effects. She played Ripley, the warrant officer of the commercial vessel Nostromo -- and the only crew member to outlast the menacing title creature. 
 
 
In the 1981 thriller "Eyewitness," (1979), Weaver played a television news reporter who receives assistance in a murder investigation from one of her avid viewers -- a Manhattan janitor played by William Hurt. Directed by Peter Yates. the drama also starred Christopher Plummer, Morgan Freeman, Steven Hill, James Woods and Pamela Reed. The screenplay was written by Steve Tesich, an Oscar winner for his original script for "Breaking Away" (1978).
 
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In Peter Weir's "The Year of Living Dangerously" (1982), Mel Gibson played an Australian journalist covering political unrest in Indonesia in 1965. Weaver co-starred as a British Embassy aide -- perhaps a spy -- who became a romantic partner for Gibson's character. Linda Hunt, who played the Asian photographer Billy Kwan, became the first person to win an Academy Award for playing a member of the opposite sex. She received the 1983 Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. 
 
 
In the 1984 hit "Ghostbusters," Weaver's character Dana Barrett became possessed by the ancient demon Zuul. The reaction of her budding boyfriend, the parapsychologist Dr. Peter Venkman (Bill Murray): "What a lovely singing voice you must have!" Weaver and Murray reprised their roles in the 1989 sequel "Ghostbusters II." Weaver later appeared as another character in the 2016 "Ghostbusters" reboot.
 
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"Aliens" was James Cameron's 1986 sequel to Scott's space thriller from seven years earlier. The film starred Weaver (pictured below with young actress) who reprised her role of Ripley -- the only human survivor of the first film. For her efforts, she received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress -- a rarity for the star of a sci-fi/horror film. She would play Ripley in the sequel "Alien 3" (1992), as well as a Ripley clone in a fourth installment of the series -- "Alien Resurrection" (1997).
 
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Weaver is one of 11 performers who have been nominated for two acting Academy Awards in the same year. She was honored in the Best Actress category for her portrayal of the doomed naturalist Fossey in the 1988 biopic "Gorillas in the Mist." The real-life Fossey, who studied the mountain gorillas of central Africa, was murdered by an unidentified assailant the day after Christmas in 1985. She was 53. The film, which also starred Bryan Brown, was directed by Michael Apted ("Coal Miner's Daughter"). 
 
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Weaver also received a 1988 Oscar nomination for her supporting role as Melanie Grifith's duplicitous boss in "Working Girl," the romantic comedy/drama directed by Mike Nichols. The film, which also starred Harrison Ford, received five other Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress (Griffith), Best Supporting Actress (Joan Cusack) and Best Original Song ("Let the River Run" by Carly Simon, who won).
 
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In the Capraesque political comedy "Dave" (1993), Kevin Kline played a POTUS lookalike secretly pressed into service by the White House when his high-profile doppelgänger suffered a stroke. Weaver played the First Lady, who becames attracted to the man so unlike her callous husband. The film earned Gary Ross an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay. Directed by Ivan Reitman, the production also starred Frank Langella, Kevin Dunn, Ving Rhames and Sir Ben Kingsley.
 
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In the 1999 comedy "Galaxy Quest," Tim Allen, Alan Rickman and Weaver played the onetime stars of a popular "Star Trek"-like sci-fi television show. At a fan convention, the actors wind up becoming real-life heroes when aliens enlist their help on a special space mission. Directed by Dean Parisot, the film also starred Tony Shalhoub, Sam Rockwell, Daryl Mitchell and Enrico Colantoni.
 
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James Cameron's "Titanic" was the top-grossing movie in history for more than a decade with a worldwide take of about $2 billion. But he topped himself with the 2009 special-effects extravaganza "Avatar." The film -- about a space mission to the distant planet Pandora -- surpassed the box-office total of "Titanic," and it remains in the No. 1 spot with $2.788.0 billion. The production received nine Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture and Best Director. It won for Best Cinematography, Best Art Direction and Best Visual Effects. Weaver, who played Dr. Grace Augustine in the movie, will appear in the sequels that Cameron plans to make in the years ahead
 
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#13 jakeem

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Mary Badham (born October 7, 1952), who was the youngest person nominated for a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for 11 years. She was recognized for her performance as Jean Louise "Scout" Finch in "To Kill a Mockingbird" (1962).
 
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The movie business runs in Badham's family. Her older brother John is a director best known for such films as "Saturday Night Fever" (1977), "Blue Thunder" (1983), "WarGames" (1983), "Short Circuit" (1986) and "Stakeout" (1987). In 2017, he has directed episodes of the long-running television series "Supernatural."
 
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Mary Badham's first professional acting role was in "To Kill a Mockingbird," based on the 1960 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee, The young actress, whose character Scout was a fictional version of Lee, became lifelong friends with the author while filming the movie. 
 
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The film version of "To Kill a Mockingbird" starred Gregory Peck as Atticus Finch -- a gentlemanly lawyer who took on a controversial case in his Alabama hometown. The widower father of two children -- Jem (Philip Alford) and Scout (Badham) -- defended Tom Robinson (Brock Peters), a black man falsely accused of assaulting a white woman (Collin Wilcox). Produced by Alan J. Pakula and directed by Robert Mulligan, the film won Oscars for Best Actor (Peck), Best Adapted Screenplay (Horton Foote) and Best Black-and-White Art Direction-Set Decoration (Alexander Golitzen, Henry Bumstead and Oliver Emert). 
 
 
Badham has said that her hardest scene involved Scout's role in stopping potential mob violence at the town jail. It was the final scene shot for the movie. "The reason it was hard was because I knew when that scene was finished, I would have to say goodbye to all these people I had grown to love," she recalled. "I had real trouble getting through it. There were lots of tears because I thought I'd never see any of them again, but as it turned out we stayed in touch."
 
 
On February 25, 1963, Badham was 10 years and 141 days when she received a Best Supporting Actress nomination for her performance as Scout.  She held the record until February 19, 1974, when Tatum O'Neal was nominated in the category at the age of 10 years, 110 days old. O'Neal went on to win the Oscar for her performance in "Paper Moon" (1973) and remains the youngest winner in any category. Badham lost to another young actor -- Patty Duke, who won at the age of 16 years and 11 days old. Badham helped Peck and his wife Veronique celebrate his Oscar win at after party (pictured below). 
 
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Badham appeared with Jeffrey Byron in "The Bewitchin' Pool," the final episode of Rod Serling's long-running anthology series "The Twilight Zone." The episode -- written by Earl Hamner, Jr., who later created "The Waltons" -- was about siblings who discovered they could get escape from their difficult parents by diving into their swimming pool. It aired on CBS on June 19, 1964.
 
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In the Depression era drama "This Property Is Condemned" (1966), Badham played Willie -- the younger sister of central character Alva Starr (Natalie Wood). Robert Redford (pictured below with Badham) co-starred as Owen Legate, a railroad representative who came to their Mississippi town with bad news. Directed by Sydney Pollack, the film -- based on a one-act play by Tennessee Williams -- also starred Charles Bronson, Kate Reid, Robert Blake, Dabney Coleman and Jon Provost. 
 
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Also in 1966, Badham starred in "Let's Kill Uncle," produced and directed by William Castle -- the man responsible for such popular screamfests as "House on Haunted Hill" (1959), "The Tingler" (1959) and "13 Ghosts" (1960). Based on the 1963 novel by Rohan O'Grady, the film revolved around a 12-year-old boy (Pat Cardi) who inherited a fortune from his late father. But his covetous uncle (Nigel Green) schemed to kill the youngster on an island. The boy's ally was his friend Chrissie (played by Badham). After the film, Badham (pictured below with actress Linda Lawson) retired from acting at the age of 14.
 
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Almost 40 years after "Let's Kill Uncle," Badham made a cameo appearance in the 2005 drama "Our Very Own." The film's writer-director, Cameron Watson, made it a personal mission to coax her out of retirement for the picture, which starred David Carradine, Allison Janney, Jason Ritter, Hilarie Burton and Cheryl Hines. Badham is pictured below at the movie's premiere in Shelbyville, Tennessee on Aug. 13, 2005.
 
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#14 jakeem

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Britt Ekland (born Britt-Marie Eklund on October 6, 1942), the Swedish sex symbol -- and onetime Bond Girl -- who appeared in comedies with her first husband Peter Sellers.
 
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In 1964, Ekland married Sellers. the British actor-comedian Sellers who was 16 years her senior. They met during the filming of Rod Serling's holiday-themed made-for-television movie "A Carol for Another Christmas." The marriage lasted four years. Their daughter Victoria was born in January 1965.
 
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In the 1966 comedy "After the Fox," Ekland played aspiring actress Gina  Romantica, the younger sister of master thief Aldo Vanucci (played by Sellers) -- alias "The Fox." After being contacted by smugglers who wanted stolen Cairo gold moved to Italy, Vanucci -- a master of disguise -- posed as a movie director. The film was directed by Vittorio De Sica and co-written by Neil Simon.
 
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Sellers and Ekland co-starred again in the 1967 comedy "The Bobo," based on the 1959 novel "Olimpia" by Burt Cole. Sellers played a down-on-his-luck singing bullfighter who was promised a gig if he could spend an evening with the beautiful but difficult Olimpia Segura (Ekland).
 
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In "The Night They Raided Minsky's" (1968), Ekland starred as a demure Pennsylvania Amish woman named Rachel Elizabeth Schpitendavel. She arrived in New York in 1925 with the dream of becoming a dancer at the Winter Garden Theatre. Instead, she wound up as a noteworthy performer at the racy Minsky's burlesque house on the Lower East Side. She made history when she inadvertently invented the striptease. Directed by William Friedkin ("The French Connection," "The Exorcist"), the film also starred Jason Robards, Elliott Gould, Denholm Elliott and Burt Lahr (in his final screen appearance).
 
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In "Get Carter," British director Mike Hodges' gritty 1971 revenge tale starring Sir Michael Caine, Ekland played the wife of a mob syndicate boss in London. She also was involved with Carter (Caine) and participated in some steamy phone sex with him at one point in the film. 
 
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Ekland appeared as Willow, a landlord's seductive daughter in the 1973 cult classic "The Wicker Man." The picture starred Edward Woodward as a straight-arrow Scottish policeman lured a remote island to investigate a young girl's disappearance. The film, which was remade in 2006 as a vehicle for Nicolas Cage, also starred horror veterans Sir Christopher Lee and Ingrid Pitt.
 
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In "The Man with the Golden Gun" (1974) -- Sir Roger Moore's second outing as 007 -- Ekland played Mary Goodnight, an inexperienced Secret Service staff operative. She was tapped to assist Bond in Hong Kong as he trailed the movements of Andrea Anders (Maud Adams) -- mistress of the assassin Francisco Scaramanga (Sir Christopher Lee).
 
 
Ekland, who was involved with singer Rod Stewart from 1975 to 1977, inspired his hit song "Tonight's the Night (Gonna Be Alright)."  The song, which featured spoken words in French by Ekland, was a No. 1 hit in the United States from November 13, 1976 to January 1, 1977. Ekland appeared with Stewart in the music video, although her face was never shown.
 
 
Ekland was portrayed by actress Charlize Theron in the 2004 made-for-television movie "The Life and Death of Peter Sellers." Geoffrey Rush, who played Sellers, won a Primetime Emmy Award for his performance. The biopic received eight other awards, including Outstanding Miniseries or Movie. Made for HBO, the film was released theatrically abroad and competed for the Palme d'Or (or Golden Palm) at the 2004 Cannes Film Festival. Ekland accompanied Theron to Cannes, where she reportedly became emotional when she saw the film.
 
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#15 sagebrush

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Posted 05 October 2017 - 05:55 AM

I love Glynis Johns and her strange voice!

Also, Happy Birthday to Kate Winslet-  41


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#16 jakeem

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Posted 04 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Glynis Johns (born October 5, 1923), the South African-born actress from Wales who had a distinctive voice -- and a long career in motion pictures and on stage and television. 
 
As a teen, Johns appeared in the World War II thriller "49th Parallel" (1941), directed by Micbael Powell and Emeric Pressburger. 
 
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Her father was the distinguished Welsh character actor Mervyn Johns (1899-1992). They played a father and daughter in the 1944 British drama "The Halfway House." They also appeared together in the 1960 film "The Sundowners."
 
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The 1948 fantasy film "Miranda" starred Johns as a mermaid who rescued the vacationing Dr. Paul Martin (Griffith Jones) after a boating accident. She persuaded him to take her with him and show her the sights on land. As a result, she posed as an invalid while being squired around in a wheelchair. The black-and-white film was directed by Ken Annakin ("Swiss Family Robinson," "Third Man on the Mountain") from Peter Blackmore's screen adaptation of his play. 
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Johns played a flight attendant who married an aerospace engineer (James Stewart) in the 1951 thriller "No Highway in the Sky," which also starred Marlene Dietrich and child actress Janette Scott. Stewart's character had concerns that a certain model of airplane would develop problems because of stress.
 
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In the medieval comedy "The Court Jester" (1954), Johns and Mildred Natwick played straight women to Danny Kaye's hilarious character Hubert Hawkins.
 
 
Johns was one of the many stars who made cameos in "Around the World in Eighty Days," producer Mike Todd's Academy Award winner for Best Picture of 1956.
 
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In the 1957 drama "All Mine to Give," Johns played the matriarch of a 19th-century family faced with a bleak situation. Aware of her own mortality after the death of her husband (Cameron Mitchell), she charged her 12-year-old son (Rex Thompson) with the responsibility of finding good families for his two brothers and three sisters. Directed by Allen Reisner ("St. Louis Blues"), the film was based on the true story of the Eunsons, an immigrant Scot family that settled in 1850s Wisconsin.
 
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Johns received an Academy Award nomination for her supporting performance in the 1960 film "The Sundowners," Fred Zinnemann's tale of an itinerant Australian family starring Deborah Kerr and Robert Mitchum. The drama picked up four other Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress (Kerr) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Isobel Lennart). The picture was based on the 1952 novel by Jon Cleary.
 
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During the 1963-1964 season, Johns starred in her own American television series -- the CBS sitcom "Glynis." She was cast as a mystery writer with a tendency to become involved in the legal cases of her attorney husband (played by Keith Andes). Created and produced by Jess Oppenheimer, a veteran writer for "I Love Lucy" in the 1950s, the series lasted only 13 weeks.  
 
 
In Walt Disney's "Mary Poppins" (1964), Johns and David Tomlinson  starred as the parents of Jane and Michael Banks (Karen Dotrice, Matthew Garber).
 
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In 1967,  Johns played Lady Penelope Peasoup -- the sister and partner of Lord Marmaduke Ffogg (Rudy Vallée) -- in episodes of the ABC TV hit "Batman." The actress is one of the last living performers who appeared as villains in the series.
 
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Johns' performance in Stephen Sondheim's Broadway production "A Little Night Music" earned her the 1973 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical. She introduced the song "Send in the Clowns," which she said in her acceptance speech she adored singing.
 
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#17 jakeem

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Susan Sarandon (born Susan Abigail Tomalin on October 4, 1946), the Academy Award-winning actress who's become well known for her political activism. Her last name is pronounced Sa-RAN-don.
 
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She has been nominated for Academy Awards five times. Her recognized roles and movies are as follows (Oscar win in bold): 
  • Sally Matthews in "Atlantic City" (1980). Best Actress.
  • Louise in "Thelma and Louise" (1991). Best Actress.
  • Michaela Odone in "Lorenzo's Oil" (1992). Best Actress.
  • Reggie Love in "The Client" (1994). Best Actress.
  • Sister Helen Prejean in "Dead Man Walking" (1995). Best Actress.
From 1967 to 1979, she was married to actor Chris Sarandon, probably best remembered for his Oscar-nominated role as Al Pacino's lover in "Dog Day Afternoon" (1974). When the marriage ended, she kept the last name -- which she had been using professionally for years.
 
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Her screen debut was in the 1970 film "Joe," which starred Peter Boyle as the title character -- a hippie-hating New York factory worker. The drama was directed by John G. Avildsen, who later won a Best Director Oscar for "Rocky."
 
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Barry Bostwick and Sarandon sang and danced as the couple Brad and Janet in "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" (1975). The movie -- based on Richard O'Brien's 1973 musical stage production "The Rocky Horror Show" -- became a cult classic frequently shown at midnight at many theaters during the decade.
 
 
Sarandon and Brooke Shields played mother-and-daughter prostitutes in Louis Malle's "Pretty Baby" (1978), set in New Orleans' red-light district in 1906. Keith Carradine co-starred as the real-life photographer E. J. Bellocq (1873-1949), known for his pictures of Storyville residents
 
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Sarandon received her first Academy Award nomination for Malle's "Atlantic City." She played an oyster-bar waitress who sponged off nightly with lemons  -- and dreamed of becoming a casino worker abroad. Her life changed when she became better acquainted with Lou (Burt Lancaster), an aging numbers runner nostalgic about the good old days in Atlantic City. The film received four other Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Lancaster) and Best Original Screenplay (John Guare). 
 
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Tony Scott's stylish 1983 vampire film "The Hunger" is probably best remembered for its steamy romantic scene between the characters played by Sarandon and Catherine Deneuve, The film also starred David Bowie as Deneuve's husband -- a 200 year old bloodsucker who began to age.  
 
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Sarandon played the ultimate baseball groupie in Ron Shelton's "Bull Durham," which also starred Kevin Costner and Tim Robbins as two of her favorite minor-league players. Sarandon and Robbins became a couple while filming the movie. Their relationship -- which produced two sons -- lasted until 2009. They both became known for their political activism.
 
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Both Sarandon and Geena Davis received 1991 Best Actress Oscar nominations for their performances in "Thelma and Louise" -- sort of a feminist buddy film in the style of "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance  Kid." Directed by Sir Ridley Scott, the film received a Best Original Screenplay award (Callie Khouri).
 
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Robbins wrote, co-produced and directed the 1995 drama "Dead Man Walking," based on the true story of Sister Helen Prejean -- a Catholic nun and anti-death penalty advocate. In the film -- based on Prejean's 1993 book of the same title -- Sarandon portrayed the nun as she tried to help a convicted murderer ( Sean Penn) with an appeal. The production received four Academy Award nominations: Best Director, Best Actor (Penn), Best Actress (Sarandon) and Best Original Song ("Dead Man Walkin' " by Bruce Springsteen).
 
 
At the 68th Academy Awards ceremony on March 25, 1996, Sarandon won an Academy Award after four previous nominations for Best Actress. She ended her acceptance speech with a thoughtful message: "May all of us find in our hearts and in our homes and in our world a way to non-violently end violence -- and heal."
 
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Sarandon portrayed Bette Davis in the 2017 FX miniseries "Feud: Bette and Joan" -- the story of the rocky relationship between the two-time Oscar winner and another movie legend, Joan Crawford (Jessica Lange). Both Sarandon and Lange received Primetime Emmy Award nominations for their performances.
 
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#18 athomed

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Posted 03 October 2017 - 12:09 AM

 

 
...Clive Owen (born October 3, 1964), the British actor long touted as a future James Bond. He's done very nicely without ever playing 007, thank you.

 

Owen is one of the few working actors today that reminds me of classic film leading men. By that I mean he's one of the few working actors today I actually like. He brings style, authority, an air of mystery, and many more qualities to the roles that he plays. Happy birthday to him.



#19 jakeem

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Posted 02 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

 
...Clive Owen (born October 3, 1964), the British actor long touted as a future James Bond. He's done very nicely without ever playing 007, thank you.
 
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Owen starred in the 1998 drama "Croupier" as a would-be writer who took a job as a casino worker. He soon became involved in unexpected intrigue as a result of his romantic dalliance with a gambler (Alex Kingston). The film was directed by Mike Hodges ("Get Carter," "Flash Gordon").
 
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In Robert Altman's 2001 murder mystery "Gosford Park" -- noteworthy because of its all-star cast -- Owen played Robert Parks, a visiting valet who became involved with a new maid (played by Kelly Macdonald). The film, set during a weekend gathering at a British country estate, was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director.
 
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Owen starred with Keira Knightley in "King Arthur" (2004), a less glamorous tale about the title character than previous films such as 1967's "Camelot." Directed by Antoine Fuqua ("Training Day"), the picture depicted Arthur as a Roman officer in Britain determined to defend the Empire's territory against Saxon invaders. Knightley played an action-heroine version of Guinevere who became Arthur's ally and romantic interest. Ioan Gruffudd co-starred as Lancelot, although there was no romantic triangle in this version.
 
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Owen and Natalie Portman received supporting Academy Award nominations for the 2004 drama "Closer," directed by Mike Nichols. Based on the 1997 play by Britain's Patrick Marber, the film featured Owen as a man drawn to an American stripper in London. They both became part of a romantic quadrangle that also involved characters played by Julia Roberts and Jude Law. Both Owen and Portman won Golden Globes for their performances. Owen had starred in the original London stage production, but his character was the one played by Law in the film version.
 
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Owen co-starred with Rosario Dawson in "Sin City" (2005), the Frank Miller/Robert Rodriguez film based on Miller's graphic novel. The actor played Dwight McCarthy, who found himself enmeshed in a conflict between street prostitutes in a red-light district and a brutal undercover cop (Benicio del Toro).Dawson played McCarthy's sometime lover, who ran the street trade in Old Town.
 
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Set in the bleak world of 2027, Alfonso Cuarón's dystopian tale "Children of Men" (2006) starred Owen as a reluctant British hero with a chance to change the course of the future. 
 
 
In Spike Lee's 2006 heist film "Inside Man," Owen played a key actor in a brilliantly staged bank robbery in New York City. The crime drama also starred Denzel Washington as one of the police detectives who tried to piece together the puzzle. In addition, the picture featured appearances by Jodie Foster, Christopher Plummer, Willem Dafoe and Chiwetel Ejiofor.
 
 
Owen and Nicole Kidman received Primetime Emmy nominations for their performances in the 2012 HBO made-for-television movie "Hemingway and Gellhorn," The film focused on the relationship between author Ernest Hemingway and his third wife, the journalist and war correspondent Martha Gellhorn (1908-1998).
 
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In 2014 and 2015, Owen starred in the Cinemax series "The Knick," the story of an early 20th-century New York hospital on the cutting edge of modern medical and surgical practices. He played Dr. John W. Thackery, the brilliant, cocaine-addicted chief surgeon of the Knickerbocker Hospital in 1900. Among the executive producers of the program was Steven Soderbergh, who won a Primetime Emmy Award for directing the pilot episode. The series also received a Peabody Award for "providing a historical drama that mirrors (and sheds new light on) so many modern problems...". The series also starred André Holland, Jeremy Bobb, Juliet Rylance, Eve Hewson (daughter of U2's lead singer Bono), Michael Angarano, Chris Sullivan, Cara Seymour and Eric Johnson.
 
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This month, Owen will headline a Broadway revival of David Henry Hwang's play "M. Butterfly." The original stage production -- which starred John Lithgow and B.D. Wong -- won the 1988 Tony Award for Best Play. The story is about the relationship between a French diplomat (played by Owen) and a mysterious Chinese opera singer (Jin Ha). The revival's director is Tony winner Julie Taymor ("The Lion King").
 
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#20 jakeem

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Posted 01 October 2017 - 10:59 PM

...Sting (born Gordon Matthew Thomas Sumner on October 2, 1951), a sometime actor, 17-time Grammy Award winner and one of the world's preeminent singer-songwriters. 
 
He earned his stage name because he frequently wore a striped gold and black sweater that looked like a bee. "Trudie [his wife] calls me Sting. I was never called Gordon," he told Time magazine in 2011. "You could shout Gordon in the street and I would just move out of your way. My children call me Dad."
 
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He has been nominated for Academy Awards four times for Best Original Song: 
  • "My Funny Friend and Me" from "The Emperor's New Groove" (2000, shared with David Hartley). 
  • "Until" from "Kate & Leopold" (2001). 
  • "You Will Be My Ain True Love" from "Cold Mountain" (2003).
  • "The Empty Chair" from the documentary "Jim: The James Foley Story" (2016, shared with J. Ralph).
In 1977, Sting joined forces with drummer Stewart Copeland and guitarist Andy Summers to form The Police, a London-based post-punk band whose influences included reggae. Among the group's early music videos was one for "Every Little Thing She Does Is Magic."
 
 
Sting made his screen debut in the 1979 drama "Quadrophenia," derived from the '70s album and rock opera by The Who. He played the "Ace Face," the popular leader of a gang of scooter-loving London Mods. The film was directed and co-written by Franc Roddam.
 
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In the 1982 film "Brimstone & Treacle" -- based on a controversial 1970s BBC television program written by Dennis Potter -- Sting played Martin Taylor, a mysterious young man who became a sinister house guest of the Bateses (Denholm Elliott and Dame Joan Plowright). The television production was banned on religious grounds by the BBC for 11 years after its original showing in 1976.
 
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Released in 1983, the album "Synchronicity" was a major commercial success worldwide. It produced three top 10 songs on the Billboard pop chart -- "Every Breath You Take," "King of Pain" and "Wrapped Around Your Finger." It received a Grammy nomination for Album of the Year. 
 
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"Every Breath You Take" was Billboard's No. 1 song for 1983. It won Grammys for Song of the Year (presented to songwriter Sting) and Best Pop Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. The black-and-white music video was directed by Kevin Godley and Lol Creme. 
 
 
In David Lynch's 1984 film version of the sci-fi novel "Dune," Sting appeared as House Harkonnen's Feyd-Rautha -- the loser in a pivotal duel with the messianic Paul Atreides (Kyle MacLachlan). The film was based on Frank Herbert's 1965 book.
 
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In the 1985 screen version of David Hare's play "Plenty." Sting played one of the men in the life of Susan Traherne (Meryl Streep) -- a World War II resistance fighter coping with peacetime in postwar Britain. Directed by Fred Schepisi ("A Cry in the Dark"), the movie's screenplay was adapted by Hare from his play.
 
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In 1985, Sting became a solo act and scored with such albums as "The Dream of the Blue Turtles," "Nothing Like the Sun," "Ten Summoner's Tales" and "Brand New Day."
 
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In the 1992 episode of "The Simpsons" titled "Radio Bart," Sting and Krusty the Clown collaborated on a song to rally support for a young boy believed to have fallen down a well. Actually, the well disaster was a practical joke by Bart Simpson.
 
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In 2007, Sting reteamed with Copeland and Summers for The Police Reunion Tour during the 30th anniversary of the group's founding. The tour, which ended at Madison Square Garden in New York, earned almost $400 million.
 
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In December 2014, Sting's career was celebrated at the annual Kennedy Center Honors in Washington, D.C. The other honorees: the actor Tom Hanks, the actress-comedienne Lily Tomlin, the soul and gospel singer Al Green and the ballerina Patricia McBride. Sting's wife, the British actress Trudie Styler, sat in the honorees' section with him.
 
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