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Happy Birthday to...


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#1 FletcherChristian

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Posted Today, 12:34 PM

Happy Birthday Jessica Alba.

 

 



#2 Sepiatone

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Posted Today, 09:41 AM

I don't think there's a red-blooded American male "Baby Boomer" alive who never at least once had a "thing" for Ann-Margaret. (You don't think we flocked to the theaters to see CARNAL KNOWLEDGE  because of Nicholson or Candice Bergen, do ya?).

 

Great singer, excellent dancer and talented actress, all while being easy on the eyes and a person of admirable character, I can't but wish her the happiest of birthdays.

 

 

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I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#3 sagebrush

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Posted Today, 06:32 AM

I love the scene from Bye Bye Birdie when Ann-Margaret, trying to convine her parents she is grown up and their equal, comes downstairs in a sweatshirt and fuzzy slippers. Then, when she receives the telephone call that she was chosen to be on TV with Conrad Birdie, she gradually becomes hysterical, calling to her mom "Doris? Mother? Mom? Mommy?"

I always love that scene!

 

Also, Happy Birthday to the lovely Penelope Cruz- 43



#4 jakeem

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Posted Yesterday, 11:00 PM

...the versatile singer-dancer-actress Ann-Margret (born Ann-Margret Olsson in Sweden on April 28, 1941), who went from screen sex kitten in the 1960s to status as a two-time Academy Award nominee in the 1970s.
 
Her first major picture was director Frank Capra's last. "Pocketful of Miracles" (1961) was a remake of Capra's 1933 comedy/drama "Lady for a Day." In the film, Glenn Ford plays a a bootlegger who helps a New York City street peddler named Apple Annie (Bette Davis) save face when her daughter (Ann-Margret) -- who has been abroad for years -- comes to town.  
 
Two years later, Ann-Margret starred in the screen version of the Broadway musical "Bye Bye Birdie." Directed by George Sidney ("Anchors Aweigh," "The Harvey Girls"), the film featured the starlet as a teen Ohio schoolgirl selected to give drafted rock 'n' roll idol Conrad Birdie (Jesse Pearson) a live goodbye kiss on "The Ed Sullivan Show." Although it was only Ann-Margret's third film, her performance made her a star -- and launched her career as a screen sex symbol. 
 
Her charisma in "Birdie" was the subject of a Season 3 episode of TV's "Mad Men.
 
 
Sidney directed Ann-Margret again in the 1964 Elvis Presley musical "Viva Las Vegas" (pictured below) in which the two stars sizzled onscreen (and off). In her 1994 autobiography "Ann-Margret: My Story," the actress referred to Elvis as her "soulmate." They wound up with other people, however. Elvis married Priscilla Beaulieu on May 1, 1967. Seven days later, Ann-Margret was wed to actor Roger Smith ("77 Sunset Strip"), who became her manager.
 
tumblr_mw9yslXxwJ1rw0nn4o1_1280.jpg
 
Ann-Margret became appreciated as a serious actress in Mike Nichols' 1971 comedy/drama "Carnal Knowledge" (pictured below) -- written by Jules Feiffer -- in which she co-starred with Jack Nicholson, Art Garfunkel and Candice Bergen. She played Bobbie, who becomes suicidal when her relationship with Jonathan Fuerst (Nicholson) deteriorates over time. For her performance, Ann-Margret received an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress.
 
Carnal-Knowledge-Ann-Margret-and-Jack-Ni
 

After recovering from a horrific 1972 accident in which she fell 22-feet from a stage in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, Ann-Margret received her second Oscar nomination -- this time for Best Actress. In Ken Russell's 1975 production of The Who's groundbreaking 1969 rock opera "Tommy," she appeared as the mother of the title character (played by Roger Daltrey, the rock group's lead singer) -- a "deaf, dumb and blind kid" who becomes a renowned pinball player and something of a cult figure. 

 
 
In 2010, Ann-Margret won a Primetime Emmy Award for a guest appearance in an episode of NBC's "Law & Order: SVU." She had been nominated for Emmys six other times.
 
2010+Creative+Arts+Emmy+Awards+Press+Roo
 
Her latest film is the bank heist comedy "Going in Style," in which she co-stars with Morgan Freeman, Sir Michael Caine and Alan Arkin.

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#5 jakeem

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 11:00 PM

...France's Anouk Aimée (born Nicole Françoise Florence Dreyfus in Paris on April 27, 1932), whose credits include "Un homme et une femme" (or "A Man and a Woman") for which she received a 1966 Academy Award nomination as Best Actress.
 
The daughter of actress Geneviève Sorya, young Nicole studied dance and theater. She made her screen debut at the age of 14 in "La maison sous la mer" (or "Home under the Sea"), a 1947 drama by director Henri Calef. In the film, the budding actress played a character named Anouk. The name stuck when everyone began calling her that.
 
She later received her professional surname Aimée from the French poet and writer Jacques Prévert, who wrote the screenplay for her second film, "The Lovers of Verona" (1949).
 
"It just means 'love,' " she explained to Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert in 1986. "Prévert told me I needed a second name. When you're 40, he said, you'll feel silly with only one name."
 
In the 1960s, Aimée starred in two films directed by the great Italian director Federico Fellini. In "La Dolce Vita" (or "The Sweet Life"), she played a glamorous society woman named Maddalena who spends a memorable evening with Italian journalist Marcello Rubini (Marcello Mastroianni).
 
 
The actress reunited with Fellini and Mastrioianni for "8 1/2" (1963), which won the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film. She played Luisa Anselmi, estranged wife of the philandering film director played by Mastroianni.
 
Aimée played the title character in "Lola" (1961, pictured below) -- the debut effort for writer-director Jacques Demy, who later filmed "Les Parapluies de Cherbourg" (or "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg") -- released in 1964 -- and "Les Demoiselles de Rochefort" (or "The Young Girls of Rochefort") -- which opened in 1967. She appeared as Lola, a French cabaret performer, a second time in Demy's first American-made feature, "Model Shop" (1969).
 
Lola-Aim%C3%A9e.jpg
 
Aimée co-starred with Jean-Louis Trintignant in director Claude Lelouch's "Un homme et une femme," the story of a widow and a widower who fall in love. The romantic drama -- featuring catchy thematic music by Francis Lai -- won the Palme d'Or ("Golden Palm"), the top prize at the 1966 Cannes Film Festival.
 
The film also won the 1966 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and an Oscar for Best Original Screenplay (shared by Lelouch and Pierre Uytterhoeven). In addition to Aimée's Best Actress nomination -- she lost to Elizabeth Taylor of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" -- Lelouch was recognized in the Best Director category.
 
 
Two decades later, Aimée, Trintignant and Lelouch reteamed for a sequel, titled "Un homme et une femme, 20 ans déjà" (or "A Man and a Woman...20 Years After"). 
 
AFP_131108_o036x_aed_anouk_aimee_sn635.j

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#6 midwestan

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 10:11 AM

I too enjoyed the Carol Burnett Show when it was on.  Some of her classic movie spoofs were incredibly funny.  Besides "Went With the Wind", I remember "Torchy Song", "Mildred Fierce", and "Rebecky" as comic genius.

 

If memory serves, Carol Burnett was the first celebrity to sue the "National Enquirer" and win over a story it printed about her relationship with her daughter.  A jury awarded Carol a million bucks, and she donated the award to the University of Hawaii's School of Journalism.



#7 Sepiatone

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 07:58 AM

I loved Carol since I was a kid seeing her on Moore's show.  NEVER missed an episode of her long running variety show, and now MeTV shows(although not entire ones) half-hour  "abridged" versions of them.  I don't CARE that I've seen most of those sketches a hundred times, I STILL tune in every night!

 

Carol is one true American treasure.  I do wish her the happiest of birthdays.

 

 

Sepiatone


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I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#8 sagebrush

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Posted 26 April 2017 - 06:27 AM

Carol Burnett's variety show in the 1970's was my Saturday night babysitter. Her show was appropriate for all ages= just REALLY funny!


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#9 jakeem

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 11:00 PM

...actress Carol Burnett (born April 26, 1933), the great television comedienne whose long career also included appearances in stage productions and feature films.
 
The UCLA drama school grad got her start in show business thanks to a benefactor who gave her a $1,000 check to get started in New York City. His only stipulations required her to repay the money without interest in five years, keep his identity a secret and perform a similar good dead for someone else. Burnett has said she met all three conditions.
 
Her first success was a starring role in the original 1959 Broadway production of "Once Upon a Mattress" -- a musical version of Hans Christian Andersen' fairy tale "The Princess and the Pea." Burnett, who played Princess Winnifred, earned a Tony nomination for her efforts.
 
From 1959 to 1962, Burnett was a regular on "The Garry Moore Show," a weekly television variety hour aired by CBS. It was there that she introduced the Charwoman, the cleaning lady who would become her signature character for years to come.
 
 
On June 11, 1962, teamed with another stage veteran, Julie Andrews, for a musical comedy special. The program, titled "Julie and Carol at Carnegie Hall," won the 1962-63 Primetime Emmy Award as Outstanding Program Achievement in the Field of Music. Burnett won an Emmy for it and the 1963 CBS special, "An Evening with Carol Burnett."
 
Burnett and Andrews continued to make public appearances together throughout the years. The last time was on February 1, 2017 when they paid tribute to CBS chairman Les Moonves and his dedication to the arts at a special event at New York’s Lincoln Center. 
 
In September 1967, "The Carol Burnett Show" made its debut on CBS. Unlike the irreverent Smothers Brothers, whose CBS comedy show was rife with political satire, Burnett's program avoided topical humor. She surrounded herself with comedy veterans Harvey Korman and Tim Conway -- and a newcomer named Vicki Lawrence who evolved into a skilled performer.
 
"The Smothers Brothers were terrific—they were doing it, and that was their thing," Burnett said in a 2016 interview with Austin Way magazine."But I’m more of a clown and a comedic actor, that’s what all of us were. I wanted a true rep company where I would not necessarily be the star of every sketch. I would be supporting Harvey and Vicki and Tim in certain sketches, and they would support me. Even though my name was at the top of the show, we were a true rep company. I wanted everybody to shine and have their moment because it only made our show better."
 
The show became known for its parodies of classic movies. One of the most-remembered sketches was "Went With the Wind" (from 1976), in which Burnett as Starlet O'Hara cleverly made a gown out of drapes and a curtain rod. 
 
 
"The Carol Burnett Show" earned 25 Primetime Emmy Awards during its 11-year run The show ended in March 1978.
 
Burnett appeared in motion pictures before, during and after her long-running television show. Her screen debut was in the 1963 comedy "Who's Been Sleeping in My Bed?" (starring Dean Martin and Elizabeth Montgomery). Among her other feature films: "Pete 'n' Tillie" (1972, with Walter Matthau); Robert Altman's "A Wedding" (1978); "The Four Seasons" (1981, written and directed by her co-star Alan Alda); "Chu Chu and the Philly Flash" (1981, with Alan Arkin); John Huston's adaptation of the musical "Annie" (1982, as Miss Hannigan); and "Noises Off" (1992).
 
carol-burnett-sag-lifetime-acheivement-a
Aileen Queen and Burnett co-starred in the 1982 movie version of the musical "Annie"
 
She earned critical acclaim and a 1979 Primetime Emmy Award nomination for her performance in the ABC made-for-television movie "Friendly Fire." The drama, based on a true story, starred Burnett and Ned Beatty as an Iowa couple horrified by the discovery that their son was killed in Vietnam by American artillery fire. ABC estimated that 64 million viewers watched all or part of the program. It won the Emmy for Outstanding Drama or Comedy Special of 1978-79.
 
Burnett has won six Emmys, five Golden Globes, a Peabody Award, the Screen Actors Guild's Life Achievement Award and the Presidential Medal of Freedom (bestowed on her in 2005 by President George W. Bush.)
 
In October 2013 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Burnett became the 16th person to receive the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor (pictured below). 
 
CarolBurnett_MTP2013_lead_t614.jpg?a3ca5
 
In February, Burnett received a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album. She won for the audio version of her 2016 memoir "In Such Good Company: Eleven Years of Laughter, Mayhem, and Fun in the Sandbox."

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#10 FletcherChristian

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 07:18 AM

Happy Birthday Renee Zellweger

 

 



#11 sagebrush

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Posted 25 April 2017 - 06:25 AM

I wish I had Al Pachino's hair! :D

Also, Happy Birthday to

Renee Zellweger- 48

Hank Azaria- 53



#12 jakeem

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Posted 24 April 2017 - 10:59 PM

...Academy Award winner Al Pacino (born April 25, 1940), who became a screen superstar thanks to his performances in such 1970s films as "The Godfather," "The Godfather Part II," "Serpico," "Dog Day Afternoon" and "...And Justice for All."
 
Pacino's only Oscar win was the 1992 Best Actor award for his performance as a blind Army veteran in "Scent of a Woman." He had been nominated for seven other Oscars without success.
 
His nominated roles and movies are as follows (Oscar win in bold): 
  • Michael Corleone in "The Godfather" (1972). Best Supporting Actor.
  • Frank Serpico in "Serpico" (1973). Best Actor.
  • Michael Corleone in "The Godfather Part II" (1974). Best Actor.
  • Sonny Wortzik in "Dog Day Afternoon" (1975). Best Actor.
  • Arthur Kirkland in "...And Justice for All" (1979). Best Actor.
  • Alphonse "Big Boy" Caprice in "Dick Tracy" (1990). Best Supporting Actor.
  • Ricky Roma in "Glengarry Glen Ross" (1992). Best Supporting Actor.
  • Lt. Col. (ret.) Frank Slade in "Scent of a Woman" (1992). Best Actor.
 
 
His two Oscar nominations for performances as Michael Corleone made Pacino one of the few actors to be recognized twice for playing the same character. The others who have done it: 
  • Bing Crosby (as Father O'Malley): "Going My Way" (won Best Actor, 1944); "The Bells of St. Mary's" (nominated for Best Actor, 1945).
  • Peter O'Toole (as King Henry II of England): "Becket" (nominated for Best Actor, 1964); "The Lion in Winter" (nominated for Best Actor, 1968).
  • Paul Newman (as Fast Eddie Felson): "The Hustler" (nominated for Best Actor, 1961); "The Color of Money" (won Best Actor, 1986).
  • Cate Blanchett (as Queen Elizabeth I of England): "Elizabeth" (nominated for Best Actress, 1998); "Elizabeth: The Golden Age" (nominated for Best Actress, 2007).
  • Sylvester Stallone (as Rocky Balboa): "Rocky" (nominated for Best Actor, 1976); "Creed" (nominated for Best Supporting Actor, 2015).

Before his film career took off, Pacino won two Tony Awards for excellence on the Broadway stage. He was named Best Supporting Actor in a Play for "Does a Tiger Wear a Necktie?" (1969). A decade later, he won the 1977 Best Leading Actor in a Play award for David Rabe's "The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel."

 

He also won Primetime Emmy Awards as Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Movie for the HBO productions "Angels in America" (2004, as Roy Cohn) and "You Don't Know Jack" (2010. as Dr. Jack Kevorkian, the advocate for physician-assisted suicide).

 
In June 2012, Pacino became the 35th recipient of the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award. He accepted the trophy from Sean Penn, his co-star in the 1993 drama "Carlito's Way."
 
 
He was among the performers recognized in December 2016 at the annual Kennedy Center Honors in Washington, D.C. Also named as honorees: singer-songwriter James Taylor, gospel/soul singer Mavis Staples, Argentine pianist Martha Argerich and the rock band The Eagles.
 
Al+Pacino+39th+Annual+Kennedy+Center+Hon

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#13 jakeem

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Posted 23 April 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Academy Award winner Shirley MacLaine (born April 24, 1934), who has gained a legendary reputation as an actress, dancer, singer, filmmaker, author, political activist, member of "The Rat Pack" and reincarnated soul. 
 
She was born Shirley MacLean Beaty in Richmond, Virginia (she doctored her middle name and used it as her professional surname; her younger brother Warren added another 't' to the family's last name when he followed her into acting).
 
"Both my parents came to think of themselves as failures," she once recalled. "Mum wanted to act and my dad wanted to join the circus. My parents put aside their own interests for our family. 
 
"It was a house of longings and disappointment, and my brother and I felt that." 
 
1101590622_400.jpg
                                                  
Cover Credit: BORIS CHALIAPIN   
 
MacLaine's ascent to stardom was right out of the 1933 film musical "42nd Street." She was a chorus girl and the understudy for actress Carol Haney as Gladys Hotchkiss in the original 1954 Broadway production of "The Pajama Game." When Haney sustained a broken ankle, the promising MacLaine took over the role of Gladys for several months. Meanwhile, the movie producer Hal B. Wallis attended one of her performances and liked what he saw. He signed her to a contract with Paramount Pictures.
 
Her first film was Sir Alfred Hitchcock's black comedy "The Trouble with Harry" (1955). She would go on to star in three films that won the Academy Award for Best Picture ("Around the World in Eighty Days," "The Apartment" and "Terms of Endearment"). She also appeared in a fourth film that was nominated for the top Oscar ("The Turning Point").
 
She also received five Academy Award nominations for acting. Her nominated roles and movies are as follows (Oscar win in bold): 
  • Ginnie Moorehead in "Some Came Running" (1958). Best Actress.
  • Fran Kubelik in "The Apartment" (1960). Best Actress.
  • Irma la Douce in "Irma la Douce" (1963). Best Actress.
  • Deedee Rodgers in "The Turning Point" (1977). Best Actress.
  • Aurora Greenway in "Terms of Endearment" (1983). Best Actress.
In addition, she received a 1975 Academy Award nomination in the Best Documentary Feature category for her film "The Other Half of the Sky: A China Memoir." She shared the honor with co-director Claudia Weill.
 
 
On June 7, 2012, MacLaine became the seventh woman to be presented the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award. She accepted the honor four years after her brother received it.
 
shirley.news_.article.jpg
 
She also was among the performers recognized in December 2013 at the annual Kennedy Center Honors in Washington, D.C. 
 
Her latest film is "The Last Word," in which she stars as retired businesswoman Harriett Lauler, who is determined to write her own obituary. The film, which also stars Amanda Seyfried, was released last month.
 
 
She is one of two Academy Award-winning actresses who were named for Oscar recipient Shirley Temple. The other: Shirley Jones.
 

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#14 jakeem

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Dev Patel, the British actor of Indian heritage (born April 23, 1990), who earned an Academy Award nomination for his performance in the 2016 Best Picture contender "Lion."
 
The London-born actor first made an impression as Anwar Kharral in the first two seasons of the teen-oriented British television series "Skins." The irreverent comedy/drama (2007-2013) featured several other young stars -- including Nicholas Hoult, Daniel Kaluuya, Kaya Scodelario, Hannah Murray, Joe Dempsie and Jack O'Connell -- who have begun making an impact in film and television productions.
 
Patel's first feature film was the 2008 rags-to-riches story "Slumdog Millionaire," in which he played an unlikely teen contestant in India's version of the TV game show "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?" The movie was a worldwide hit and earned eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director (Danny Boyle) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Simon Beaufoy). Patel picked up several awards from critics' groups and won a Screen Actors Guild trophy when the movie received honors for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture,  
 
 
Among his films after "Slumdog Millionaire": M. Night Shyamalan's "The Last Airbender" (2010, based on the animated series "Avatar: The Last Airbender"); "The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel" (2011, a comedy/drama starring Dame Judi Dench, Dame Maggie Smith, Tom Wilkinson, Bill Nighy and Penelope Wilton); and its 2015 sequel "The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel."
 
Patel also appeared in all 25 episodes of "The Newsroom" -- Aaron Sorkin's drama for HBO about a cable news network based in New York. The played British product Neal Sampat, an electronic media whiz responsible for the blog of the news anchor played by Jeff Daniels. The series ran three seasons, from 2012 to 2014.
 
In 2017, Patel received a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination for his portrayal in "Lion" of Australian Saroo Brierley (Sunny Pawar appeared as the young Saroo). The drama, which also starred Nicole Kidman (a 2016 Best Supporting Actress nominee), Rooney Mara and David Wenham, was based on Brierly's 2013 book "A Long Way Home" -- the story of the author's search for the family he lost as a child in India.
 
 
Patel's next film is "Hotel Mumbai," based on the real-life terrorist attacks in India's most populous city in November 2008. The drama, which also stars Armie Hammer, John Boyega and Jason Isaacs, will be released later in the year.
 
medium_e1pgPJm7x_SH4iVowSQRE2sHwU4OUGz9m
 

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#15 jakeem

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:00 PM

...the three-time Academy Award-winning actor Jack Nicholson (born April 22, 1937), the man once celebrated in an August 1974 Time magazine cover story as "The Star with the Killer Smile." Nicholson holds the Academy Awards record as the most-nominated male performer with 12 nods (Meryl Streep has had 20). He is tied for most Oscar wins by an actor with Sir Daniel Day-Lewis and Walter Brennan.
 
1101740812_400.jpg
Cover Credit: TONY KORODY/SYGMA
 
Nicholson's nominated roles and movies are as follows (Oscar wins in bold): 
  • George Hanson in "Easy Rider" (1969). Best Supporting Actor.
  • Bobby Dupea in "Five Easy Pieces" (1970). Best Actor.
  • Signalman 1st Class Billy Buddusky in "The Last Detail" (1973). Best Actor.
  • J.J. Gittes in "Chinatown" (1974). Best Actor.
  • Randle P. McMurphy in "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" (1975). Best Actor.
  • Eugene O'Neill in "Reds" (1981). Best Supporting Actor.
  • Garrett Breedlove in "Terms of Endearment" (1983). Best Supporting Actor.
  • Charley Partanna in "Prizzi's Honor" (1985). Best Actor.
  • Francis Phelan in "Ironweed" (1987). Best Actor.
  • Colonel Nathan R. Jessep in "A Few Good Men" (1992). Best Supporting Actor.
  • Melvin Udall in "As Good As It Gets" (1997). Best Actor.
  • Warren R. Schmidt in "About Schmidt" (2002). Best Actor.
During the 1970s, Nicholson struck a chord with movie enthusiasts through his many iconic, anti-authority characters. One of the first was Dupea in "Five Easy Pieces," who tangled with a waitress (Lorna Thayer) over a menu order. 
 

His last film was the romantic comedy "How Do You Know?" (2010), which reunited him with "Terms of Endearment" producer-director James L. Brooks. The picture also starred Reese Witherspoon, Paul Rudd and Owen Wilson.
 
In February, Variety reported that Nicholson will return to acting -- after a seven-year absence fron the screen -- in a remake of the acclaimed 2016 German film "Toni Erdmann." His co-star will be actress Kristen Wiig.
 
Celebrities+At+The+Lakers+Game+IZEm6IORx

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#16 jakeem

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Andie MacDowell (born April 21, 1958), the South Carolina model turned actress who overcame a bumpy introduction to motion pictures. Her screen debut was as Jane Porter in the 1984 drama "Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes." The movie's director, Hugh Hudson ("Chariots of Fire"), selected her for the role after seeing her face on the cover of a magazine. But MacDowell's Southern accent wasn't considered appropriate for the aristocratic British character she played, so her voice was dubbed by actress Glenn Close.
 
 "She didn’t like it. Oh, a terrible blow it was," Hudson said, recalling MacDowell's humiliating experience. "But as a result she went and took acting lessons. And she became who she became."
 
Greystoke-Andie-MacDowell.jpg
MacDowell sounded a lot like Glenn Close in the 1984 Tarzan tale "Greystoke"
 
After MacDowell began studying at The Actors Studio, her film credits increased. She appeared in the 1985 hit "St. Elmo's Fire" with several members of "The Brat Pack." She went on to win acclaim and several awards for her performance in Steven Soderbergh's debut effort "sex, lies, and videotape" (1989). She also starred in Peter Weir's romantic comedy "Green Card" (1990, with Gérard Depardieu), followed by appearances in two Robert Altman movies: "The Player" (1992) and "Short Cuts" (1993).
 
In 1993, MacDowell attained major stardom in the Bill Murray comedy "Groundhog Day," which was directed, co-produced and co-written by Harold Ramis. The film starred Murray as a TV weatherman from Pittsburgh who re-lives the same 24 hours again and again and again. MacDowell played the news producer who falls in love with him. The picture has become a holiday classic of sorts. In June 2000, the American Film Institute ranked it at No. 34 on its list of the 100 funniest American films of all time. Eight years later, the AFI's survey of Top 10 films by genre ranked it as the No. 8 comedy.
 
 
In 1994, MacDowell co-starred with Hugh Grant in the British romantic comedy "Four Weddings and a Funeral," written by Richard Curtis ("Love Actually") and directed by Mike Newell ("Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire"). The film was a major hit and earned Academy Award nominations for Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay (Curtis).
 
 
MacDowell, who has been a spokesmodel for L'Oréal Paris during the past three decades, continues to work in various projects for film and television. She has two daughters (from her 1986 to 1999 first marriage to ex-model Paul Qualley) who are following in her footsteps. Rainey Qualley, 27, is an actress and a budding country singer whose seven-song EP titled "Turn Down The Lights" was released in 2015. Sarah Qualley, 22, is a model and a regular in the HBO drama series "The Leftovers" (she plays Jill Garvey).    
 

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#17 Dargo

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 12:19 PM

AND    RYAN O'NEAL--76

 

GEORGE TAKEI--80

 

 

Sepiatone

 

And so, and in honor of birthday boy Ryan's brilliant career in films...

 


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#18 Sepiatone

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 07:29 AM

I don't know why, but that sentence made me laugh. :lol:

 

Also, Happy Birthday to the always lovely Jessica Lange- 68 and Mr. Golem himself, Andy Serkis- 53.

 

AND    RYAN O'NEAL--76

 

GEORGE TAKEI--80

 

 

Sepiatone


I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#19 sagebrush

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 06:27 AM

... Later, Cathy, her brother (Rod Taylor), her mother (Jessica Tandy) and socialite Melanie Daniels ('Tippi' Hedren) survived an attack by seagulls and other fowl at the Brenner home. 

 

I don't know why, but that sentence made me laugh. :lol:

 

Also, Happy Birthday to the always lovely Jessica Lange- 68 and Mr. Golem himself, Andy Serkis- 53.


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#20 jakeem

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Veronica Cartwright (born April 20, 1949), the former child star who played victims in some of the greatest horror films. The British-born actress is the older sister of Angela Cartwright, who was a member of the Von Trapp family in "The Sound of Music" (1965) and a regular in the TV series "The Danny Thomas Show" and "Lost in Space." Veronica also appeared on television in "Leave It to Beaver" (as Violet Rutherford) and "Daniel Boone" (as the legendary frontiersman's daughter Jemima).
 
At the age of 12, Cartwright played a student at a private school in "The Children's Hour" (1961), William Wyler's remake of his 1936 film "These Three" -- based on Lillian Hellman's 1934 play about teachers dogged by a vicious rumor of a lesbian relationship. The film starred Audrey Hepburn, Shirley MacLaine and James Garner.
 
In Sir Alfred Hitchcock's "The Birds" (1963), Cartwright played Cathy Brenner, one of the Northern California schoolchildren attacked by crows in a memorable scene. Later, Cathy, her brother (Rod Taylor), her mother (Jessica Tandy) and socialite Melanie Daniels ('Tippi' Hedren) survived an attack by seagulls and other fowl at the Brenner home. 
 
 
Cartwright became a bona fide scream queen in Philip Kaufman's 1978 remake of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers." At the end of the movie, her character Nancy Bellicec discovers the fate of a human ally -- and realizes that all hope may be lost. The actress also appeared in a 2007 remake, "The Invasion," which starred Daniel Craig and Nicole Kidman.
 
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Cartwright faces a grim realization at the end of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers"
 
In Sir Ridley Scott's original release of the space horror classic "Alien" (1979), Cartwright played J.M. Lambert, the navigator of the commercial vessel Nostromo and the last crew member who died after being menaced by the title creature. 
 
 
Among Cartwright's other film roles through the years: "Spencer's Mountain" (1963, as a member of Henry Fonda and Maureen O'Hara's large brood); "The Right Stuff" (1983, as astronaut Gus Grissom's wife, Betty); "The Witches of Eastwick" (1987, as the ill-fated Felicia Alden); "Scary Movie 2" (2001, as the mother of a possessed girl); and "Kinsey" (2004, as the mother of the famed sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, played by Liam Neeson).
 
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