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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Happy Birthday to...


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#1 jakeem

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Posted Yesterday, 11:01 PM

...Illeana Douglas (born Illeana Hesselberg on July 25, 1965), the granddaughter of the two-time Academy Award-winning actor Melvyn Douglas. Since 2015, she has served as the host of TCM Spotlight: Trailblazing Women -- Turner Classic Movies' special October series on the contributions of women in film.
 
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Illeana Douglas at the 2012 TCM Classic Film Festival             KATY WINN / The Associated Press
 
Douglas appeared in the 1989 anthology film "New York Stories" with Rosanna Arquette and Steve Buscemi. Their segment, titled "Life Lessons," was directed by Martin Scorsese -- Douglas' love interest from 1988 to 1997. The two other segments were filmed by Francis Ford Coppola and Woody Allen.
 
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In Scorsese's "Goodfellas" (1990), Lorraine Bracco and Douglas played women who loved wiseguys in the drama based on the experiences of a mobster-turned-informant named Henry Hill (1943-2012).
 
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Scorsese's 1992 remake of the 1962 thriller "Cape Fear" featured Douglas as a law clerk seduced and beaten by ex-con Max Cady (Robert De Niro) because of her connection to an attorney (Nick Nolte) despised by Cady. Douglas took a beating in real life during the two days the scenes were shot.
 
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In "Alive" (1993) -- based on the true story of a Uruguayan rugby team whose plane crashed in the Andes Mountains in 1972 -- Douglas played the only female survivor of the mishap. Directed by Frank Marshall, a frequent Steven Spielberg collaborator, the movie's scenes were filmed in British Columbia in minus-30 degree temperatures.
 
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In director Gus Van Sant's 1995 comedy/drama "To Die For," Nicole Kidman played an aspiring TV news anchor who became involved with a high school student (Joaquin Phoenix) -- and persuaded him and his friends to murder her husband (Matt Dillon). Douglas played Janice Maretto, the sister of Dillon's character as well as an ice-skating enthusiast who practiced on a frozen lake.
 
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Douglas' favorite movie role was as a Carole King-like singer-songwriter of the 1960s and early 1970s in "Grace of My Heart" (1996). The film was directed by Allison Anders and featured songs by Burt Bacharach, Elvis Costello, Joni Mitchell and Gerry Goffin, King's early collaborator and ex-husband. Douglas' vocals were provided by the actress-singer Kristen Vigard.
 
 
Douglas co-starred with Jennifer Aniston in the 1997 romantic comedy "Picture Perfect," which was Aniston's first leading role in a film since she attained stardom on the NBC hit sitcom "Friends."
 
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In Terry Zwigoff's 2001 black comedy "Ghost World" -- based on the comic book by Daniel Clowes -- Douglas appeared as Roberta Allsworth, a performance artist turned high school art teacher. The film starred Thora Birch and Scarlett Johansson as high schoolers Enid and Rebecca, respectively.
 
 
Douglas received a 2002 Primetime Emmy Award nomination for her work in two episodes of HBO's acclaimed series "Six Feet Under." She was nominated as Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series for her stint as a newly hired funeral home embalmer.
 
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Douglas portrayed the fashion writer and icon Diana Vreeland (1903-1989) in the 2006 biopic "Factory Girl," which starred Sienna Miller as Edie Sedgwick -- Andy Warhoil's protégée during his days as a filmmaker. Warhol was portrayed in the film by Guy Pearce.
 
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#2 jakeem

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Anna Paquin (born July 24, 1982), the Canadian-born New Zealander who in 1994 became the second-youngest Academy Award winner in any category.
 
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On March 21, 1994, Paquin received the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress when she was 11 years and 240 days old. She won for her performance in the 1993 drama "The Piano" as Flora McGrath, the daughter of a mute Scotswoman (Holly Hunter) who moved to New Zealand for an arranged marriage. Paquin and her co-star Hunter (pictured above) were nominated in the same category. Hunter won the Best Actress Oscar for her performance in "The Piano." Only Tatum O'Neal, who won the 1973 Best Supporting Actress award for "Paper Moon," was a younger Oscar winner than Paquin. O'Neal still holds the record at 10 years and 148 days.
 
 
In "Fly Away Home" (1996), Jeff Daniels and Paquin played a Canadian father-and-daughter team that trained a group of orphaned geese to follow them in ultralight planes to a winter home in North Carolina. Directed by Carroll Ballard ("The Black Stallion"), the film -- based on a true story -- also starred Dany Delany and Terry Kinney.
 
 
In Steven Spielberg's historical drama "Amistad" (1997), Paquin portrayed Spain's Queen Isabella II -- the preteen monarch who took an official stance in favor of recovering her country's property in the La Amistad case. A group of enslaved Africans pulled off a mutiny on the Spanish ship in 1839. The U.S. Supreme Court ultimately made a decision on whether the mutineers should be set free in 1841.
 
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Paquin played the daughter of former child actress Diane Lane in "A Walk on the Moon" (1999), which was directed by Tony Goldwyn. The characters wound up separately at the Woodstock Music Festival in August 1969.
 
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In the 1999 teen-oriented hit "She's All That," Mackenzie "Mac" Siler (Paquin) gives Laney Boggs (Rachael Leigh Cook) a makeover for an upcoming party.
 
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Paquin has appeared as the mutant Rogue in four movies based on the "X-Men" comic books: "X-Men" (2000), "X2: X-Men United" (2003), "X-Men: The Last Stand" (2006) and "X-Men: Days of Future Past" (2014, although most of her scenes were cut). She is one of three Oscar winning actresses who have starred in the movie series. The others: Halle Berry as Storm and Jennifer Lawrence as the young Mystique. Rogue's mutant power was absorbing the memories, abilities, personality, and outward physical characteristics of other beings through skin-to-skin contact.
 
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In Cameron Crowe's "Almost Famous" (2000) Paquin, Fairuza Balk and Bijou Phillips played "band-aids" -- they didn't like the term "groupies" -- who socialized with members of the 1970s band Stillwater. Kate Hudson, who played another follower of the band, received an Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actress.
 
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In Gus Van Sant's "Finding Forrester" (2000), Paquin played Claire Spence, a well-to-do New York prep schooler who befriends the promising young scholar-athlete Jamal Wallace (Rob Brown,in his screen debut). Sir Sean Connery, in his penultimate film role, played the reclusive Pulitzer Prize-winning writer William Forrester, who developed an interest in Wallace.
 
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Paquin and her "Fly Away Home" co-star Daniels were reunited in Noah Baumbach's 2005 drama "The Squid and the Whale." This time, they played very different characters. In the film, set in the year 1986, he played a frustrated New York novelist going through a painful divorce and teaching literature at a local college. She had the role of a seductive student who moves in with the professor and his sons. Baumbach received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay.
 
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Paquin received a Primetime Emmy Award nomination for her performance in the 2007 HBO miniseries "Bury My Heart at Wonded Knee." She portrayed the New England reformer and teacher Elaine Goodale, who married the part-Sioux physician Charles Eastman (Adam Beach).
 
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From 2008 to 2014. Paquin starred in the supernatural HBO series "True Blood" as Sookie Stackhouse. In 2010, she married her co-star Stephen Moyer. They became the parents of fraternal twins -- a boy and a girl -- two years later.
 
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#3 sagebrush

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 09:59 AM

A fun side of Mr. Radcliffe, from The Tonight Show:

 



#4 jakeem

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Daniel Radcliffe (born July 23, 1989), who rose to fame as the star of eight "Harry Potter" movies between 2001 and 2011. By the way, Potter and his creator -- author J.K. Rowling -- share the same birthday, July 31.
 
One of Radcliffe's earliest roles was in a 1999 British television production of Charles Dickens' "David Copperfield." He played the young David; the Irish actor Ciarán McMenamin played Copperfield as a young adult. The production aired on American television in 2000 and earned a Peabody Award.
 
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He made his feature film debut as the son of Geoffrey Rush and Jamie Lee Curtis in "The Tailor of Panama" (2001), which starred Pierce Brosnan. Radcliffe's sister was played by Lola Boorman, daughter of the film's director John Boorman.
 
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Radcliffe's first film as Rowling's young wizard was "Harry Potter and the Sorceror's Stone" (released as "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone" in the United Kingdom).
 
 
The best of the "Harry Potter" films? Many critics expressed a preference for "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban" (2004), which was stylishly and spookily directed by Alfonso Cuarón -- a two-time Oscar winner for "Gravity" (2013).
 
 
In a 2006 episode of Ricky Gervais' British television series "Extras," Radcliffe played himself as a brash, sex-obsessed teen. He wound up apologizing to Dame Diana Rigg for an accident involving a prophylactic.
 
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Radcliffe received his first screen kiss from actress Teresa Palmer in the 2007 Australian drama "December Boys." The actor played one of four boys from an Outback orphanage who received a memorable joint birthday present -- a vacation at a beach town.
 
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The final showdown with the villainous Lord Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes) was in "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2" (2011). The movie series earned almost $7 billion woridwide.
 
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Radcliffe starred with Juno Temple in the 2014 supernatural drama "Horns." After his character was accused of his girlfriend's death, he discovered a pair of horns had grown onto his head.
 
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In "Victor Frankenstein" -- a 2015 retelling of Mary Shelley's 1818 tale about the scientist who tampers with the laws of nature -- Radcliffe played Igor opposite James McAvoy as the title character. Written by Max Landis, son of director John Landis, the film's action was seen from Igor's point of view. Directed by Paul McGuigan ("Lucky Number Slevin"), the drama also starred Jessica Brown Findlay, Charles Dance and Mark Gatiss. 
 
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In the critically acclaimed 2016 black comedy "Swiss Army Man," Paul Dano played a shipwreck victim who discovers a dead body (Radcliffe) on a deserted island. The film was directed by Dan Kwan and Daniel Scheinert.
 
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Radcliffe co-starred with Sir Michael Caine in "Now You See Me 2" (2016), the sequel to the 2013 film about a team of illusionists skilled at pulling off bank robberies during performances.
 
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The 2016 drama "Imperium" starred Radcliffe as an undercover FBI agent who infiltrated a radical right-wing terrorist group. 
 
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#5 sagebrush

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 06:43 AM

Happy Birthday, also, to :

 

Louise Fletcher- 83

 

Danny Glover- 71

 

John Leguizamo- 53

 



#6 jakeem

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 11:02 PM

...actor Willem Dafoe (born William J. Dafoe on July 22, 1955), who has appeared onscreen as Christ as well as an assortment of devilish characters.
 
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He has received Academy Award nominations twice. His nominated roles and movies are as follows:
  • Sgt. Gordon Elias in "Platoon" (1986). Best Supporting Actor.
  • Max Schreck in "Shadow of the Vampire" (2000). Best Supporting Actor.
Billed as "A Rock and Roll Fable," Walter Hill's "Streets of Fire" (1984) featured Dafoe as Raven Shaddock -- the leader of a motorcycle gang that kidnapped a popular singer (Diane Lane). Michael Paré played the ex-military man Tom Cody, who was hired to get her back.
 
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Dafoe appeared as a counterfeiting mastermind named Masters in William Friedkin's 1985 drama "To Live and Die in L.A." William Petersen, who later starred in the CBS police procedural "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation," played a Secret Service agent determined to bring Masters to justice. The movie's noteworthy soundtrack was composed and performed by the group Wang Chung. 
 
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In Oliver Stone's 1986 Academy Award-winning Vietnam war drama "Platoon," both Dafoe and Tom Berenger received Best Supporting Actor nominations for their performances as rival sergeants. Dafoe, memorable as the villain in "Streets of Fire," played the thoughtful Sgt. Elias. Berenger, known for playing good guys in such films as "The Big Chill" (1983), was the renegade Sgt. Barnes. Their rivalry played out before the eyes of a fresh recruit, PFC Chris Taylor (Charlie Sheen).
 
 
In Martin Scorsese's controversial "The Last Temptation of Christ" (1988), Dafoe portrayed Jesus of Nazareth as more human than divine. The film, for which Scorsese received an Academy Award nomination as Best Director, was based on the 1955 novel by Nikos Kazantzakis. The movie's screenplay was written by Paul Schrader, who would direct Dafoe in the films "Light Sleeper" (1992) and "Dog Eat Dog" (2016).
 
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Based on the true story of the murders of three civil rights activists in the Magnolia State in 1964, Alan Parker's 1988 drama "Mississippi Burning" starred Gene Hackman and Dafoe as FBI agents searching for clues about the case. The film was nominated for seven Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Hackman) and Best Supporting Actress (Frances McDormand). It won the Oscar for Best Cinematography (Peter Biziou).
 
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In Oliver Stone's "Born on the Fourth of July" (1989), paralyzed Vietnam vet Ron Kovic (Tom Cruise) became involved in a major argument in Mexico with a wheelchair bound comrade named Charlie (Dafoe).
 
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"Triumph of the Spirit" (1989) starred Dafoe (pictured below with actor Robert Loggia) as the real-life Greek boxer Salamo Arou (1923-2009), a Jew interned at Auschwitz during World War II. To ensure his own survival at the concentration camp, Arou had to fight other prisoners to the death for the entertainment of Nazi officers.
 
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Director E. Elias Merhige's "Shadow of the Vampire" was a 2000 fictional account of the making of German film pioneer F. W. Murnau's 1922 classic "Nosferatu." But Merhige's tale took the approach that actor Max Schreck, who played the title character, really was a vampire. Murnau was portrayed by John Malkovich.
 
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Dafoe appeared as the industrialist Norman Osborn -- and his evil alter ego The Green Goblin -- in director Sam Raimi's "Spider-Man" (2002) and its 2004 and 2007 sequels. All three films starred Tobey Maguire as Peter Parker.
 
 
He appeared as J.G. Jopling, the murderous henchman of the villainous Dmitri Desgoffe und Taxis (Adrian Brody) in Wes Anderson's "The Grand Budapest Hotel" (2014). The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director. It won for Best Costume Design (Milena Canonero), Best Original Score (Alexandre Desplat), Best Production Design (Adam Stockhausen and Anna Pinnock) and Best Makeup and Hairstyling (Frances Hannon and Mark Coulier). 
 
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Dafoe re-created one of the most famous scenes in movie history for a Snickers ad during Super Bowl 50 in February 2016. Directed by Jim Jenkins and produced by the New York ad agency BBDO, the TV spot earned a Primetime Emmy nomination for Outstanding Commercial. 
 
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#7 sagebrush

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 06:14 AM

I'm surprised to read that Mr Jewison wasn't nominated for best director for his Jesus Christ Superstar film. While definitely not the film Fiddler was, it was still a very good adaptation of the musical. Of course, that's just my opinion. ;)



#8 jakeem

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...the Canadian filmmaker Norman Jewison (born July 21, 1926), who directed "In the Heat of the Night" -- the Academy Award winner for Best Picture of 1967. Although he was nominated for Oscars seven times as a producer or director, Jewison never won a competitive award. On March 21, 1999, he was presented the Academy's Irving G. Thalberg Memorial Award, which goes to filmmakers "whose bodies of work reflect a consistently high quality of motion picture production." 
 
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Jewison's Academy Award nominations were as follows: 
  • 1966 -- Best Picture (for "The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming").
  • 1967 -- Best Director (for "In the Heat of the Night").
  • 1971 -- Best Picture (for "Fiddler on the Roof").
  • 1971 -- Best Director (for "Fiddler on the Roof").
  • 1984 -- Best Picture (for "A Soldier's Story," shared with Ronald L. Schwary and Patrick Palmer).
  • 1987 -- Best Picture (for "Moonstruck," shared with Patrick Palmer).
  • 1987 -- Best Director (for "Moonstruck").
His first film as a director was the comedy "40 Pounds of Trouble" (1962), which starred Tony Curtis, Suzanne Pleshette and young newcomer Claire Wilcox. The picture was based on Damon Runyon's story "Little Miss Marker," which has been filmed several times -- including a 1934 project starring Shirley Temple and Adophe Menjou.
 
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Jewison's first drama was "The Cincinnati Kid" (1965), which starred Steve McQueen (pictured on the set with co-stars Ann-Margret and Tuesday Weld) as the title character -- a hotshot poker player who hoped to win big during a high-stakes card game in 1930s New Orleans. The film also starred Edward G. Robinson, Karl Malden, Joan Blondell, Rip Torn, Jack Weston and Cab Calloway. 
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Jewison's Cold War-era comedy "The Russians Are Coming, The Russians Are Coming" received four 1966 Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture. Alan Arkin, who was nominated for Best Actor in his first appearance in a feature film, starred as an English-speaking crewman aboard a Soviet submarine that ran aground on an island on the New England coast. Once the news reached the townspeople of the island, panic -- as well as hilarity -- ensued. The film also received Oscar nominations for Best Adapted Screenplay (William Rose) and Best Film Editing (Hal Ashby and J. Terry Williams).
 
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"In the Heat of the Night," Jewison's racially tinged murder mystery set in a small Mississippi town, won five Academy Awards -- including Best Picture of 1967 and Best Actor (Rod Steiger). The drama, based on a 1965 novel by John Ball, also won Oscars for Best Adapted Screenplay (Sterling Silliphant), Best Film Editing (Hal Ashby) and Best Sound. Poitier, who did not receive an Oscar nomination, was the year's No. 1 box-office star since he also headlined "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" and "To Sir, With Love." Jewison lost the Best Director award to Mike Nichols of "The Graduate."
 
 
"The Thomas Crown Affair" (1968), Jewison's splashy, '60s-style cat-and-mouse game, starred McQueen as a polished thief who becomes involved with the skilled insurance investigator (Faye Dunaway) who becomes suspicious of him. The film won the Academy Award for Best Original Song -- "The Windmills of Your Mind" by Michel Legrand and Alan and Marilyn Bergman. A successful 1999 remake starred Pierce Brosnan, Rene Russo, Denis Leary and Dunaway. 
 
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Jewison served as director and co-producer of the 1971 screen version of "Fiddler on the Roof," based on the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical inspired by tales of the Yiddish author Sholem Aleichem (1859-1916). The film received Oscar nominations for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Israel's Topol), Best Supporting Actor (Leonard Frey) and Best Art Direction-Set Decoration (Robert F. Boyle, Michael Stringer and Peter Lamont). Composer John Williams, who has earned a whopping 50 Academy Award nominations during his prolific career, received his first of five Oscars for his Best Song Score Adaptation. Oscars also went to Oswald Morris for his cinematography and to Gordon McCallum and David Hildyard for Best Sound.  Set in early 20th-century Russia -- on the eve of repressive anti-Jewish pogroms -- the film starred Topol as Tevye the milkman, the role originated on Broadway by Zero Mostel in 1964. The movie's screenplay was adapted by Joseph Stein; the music was composed by Jerry Bock with lyrics by Sheldon Harnick. Among the familiar musical numbers featured in the film: "Tradition," "Matchmaker," "To Life," "Sunrise, Sunset," "Do You Love Me?" and "If I Were a Rich Man."
 
 
In Jewison's 1979 drama "...And Justice for All," Al Pacino starred as a cynical attorney dealing with a corrupt legal system. He received an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor, while a Best Original Screenplay nod went to Barry Levinson and Valerie Curtin.
 
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Based on Charles Fuller's 1981 stage drama "A Soldier's Play," Jewison's "A Soldier's Story" (1984) was about a murder probe involving an all-black military unit in Louisiana during World War II. The investigator (played by Howard E. Rollins, Jr.) was black. So was the victim. And most of the suspects. And the culprit. The film, which received nominations for Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor (Adolph Caesar, pictured below right) and Best Acapted Screenplay (Fuller), also provided a breakthrough screen role for Denzel Washington. Until then, he was mostly known for his work in the long-running NBC drama series "St. Elsewhere."

 

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Olivia Dukakis and Cher won 1987 Oscars for their performances in Jewison's romantic comedy "Moonstruck." Dukakis received the award as Best Supporting Actress for her role as Cher's mother. Cher was named Best Actress for her work as an Italian-American widow in Brooklyn who finds unexpected love with a baker (Nicolas Cage). An Oscar also went to John Patrick Shanley for Best Original Screenplay. The film also was nominated for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Supporting Actor (Vincent Gardenia).
 
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Jewison and Washington collaborated again for the controversial 1999 biopic "The Hurricane" (1999), based on the legal woes of former middleweight boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter (1937-2014). The fighter's promising career was cut short by a murder conviction in New Jersey in the 1960s. Carter -- portrayed by Washington in the movie -- always declared that he was innocent and his case became a worldwide cause célèbre (Bob Dylan even wrote a song about him). After serving 19 years in prison, Carter was released when the charges were dismissed in 1988. Washington received a Best Actor Oscar nomination and won the Golden Globe for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - Drama.
 
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At the 2017 TCM Classic Film Festival in April, Jewison was reunited with several collaborators after a 50th anniversary screening of "In the Heat of the Night." Pictured from left to right: producer Walter Mirisch, Jewison, actor Sidney Poitier, actress Lee Grant and composer Quincy Jones.
 
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#9 jakeem

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Dame Diana Rigg (born Enid Diana Elizabeth Rigg on July 20, 1938), an icon of 1960s television who is still at the top of her game 50 years later.

 
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When Honor Blackman left the British television series "The Avengers" to appear in the 1964 James Bond film "Goldfinger," Rigg succeeded her as the crime-solving partner of the debonair John Steed (Patrick Macnee). She played a new character named Emma Peel, who could handle herself on several levels. She also became known for her black leather catsuits, which she usually wore in action scenes that showed off her martial arts skills. In 1966, the series was exported to America, where it aired on ABC in black and white. Color episodes began airing in the United States in January 1967.
 
 
After leaving "The Avengers" in 1967, Rigg starred in "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" (1969), the sixth James Bond film -- and the first without Sir Sean Connery as 007. The Australian actor George Lazenby took over the role of Bond, and Rigg played Contessa Teresa "Tracy" di Vicenzo -- the only woman the British secret agent ever married for love. The relationship was short lived, as was Lazenby's tenure as Bond. Connery returned for the seventh installment of the series -- "Diamonds Are Forever" (1971).
 
 
One year after turning down an Oscar for "Patton," George C. Scott received another Best Actor nomination for his performance in Paddy Chayefsky's "The Hospital." Rigg co-starred as the daughter of a patient who falls in love with Scott's character. Directed by Arthur Hiller, the film won an Oscar for Chayefsky's original screenplay.
 
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Rigg co-starred with Vincent Price in the 1973 horror film "Theatre of Blood." She played the daughter of a veteran London stage actor who went to great lengths to settle old scores with critics.
 
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During the 1973-1974 season, Rigg starred in her own American television series -- a sitcom titled "Diana." The show -- about a British fashion coordinator who moved to a new life and career in New York City -- was canceled after 15 episodes in January 1974.
 
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Rigg (pictured below with Dame Maggie Smith) played murder victim Arlena Marshall in the 1982 screen version of Agatha Christie's "Evil Under the Sun. The film, which featured an all-star cast, was Peter Ustinov's second turn as the Belgian sleuth Hercule Poirot. 
 
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From 1989 to 2003, Rigg hosted "Mystery!" -- the PBS television anthology series featuring British detective stories. She replaced the original host, Vincent Price (1981-1989). The other hosts: Gene Shalit (1980) and Alan Cumming (2010-present). There was no host from 2004 to 2009. Rigg also appeared in two series showcased on "Mystery!": "Mother Love" and "The Mrs. Bradley Mysteries."
 
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Also known for her years of stage experience, Rigg received a 1994 Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play. She won for her work in a version of "Medea," the ancient Greek tragedy written by Euripides.
 
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She also won a 1997 Primetime Emmy Award for her performance as Mrs. Danvers -- housekeeper of the estate called Manderley -- in a British television adaptation of Dame Daphne du Maurier's novel "Rebecca." She won in the category of Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special. The production was aired in the United States on PBS' Masterpiece Theatre. Emilia Fox (pictured below with Rigg) co-starred as the second wife of Maxim de Winter (played by Charles Dance).
 
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Dame Diana's daughter, Rachael Stirling, also is an actress. They appeared together for the first time in a 2013 "Doctor Who" episode titled "The Crimson Horror." Stirling gave birth to her first child -- a son -- in April.
 
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Rigg will appear in her fifth season of the Primetime Emmy Award-winning drama series "Game of Thrones," in which she plays the formidable matriarch Lady Olenna Tyrell. She has been nominated for Emmys as Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series in 2013, 2014 and 2015.
 
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#10 jakeem

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...actor Benedict Cumberbatch (born July 19, 1976), the Primetime Emmy Award-winning star of the British television series "Sherlock." He received a 2014 Academy Award nomination as Best Actor in the biopic "The Imitation Game."
 
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The 2006 historical drama "Amazing Grace" featured the friendship between the two-time British Prime Minister William Pitt the Younger (played by Cumberbatch) and abolitionist William Wilberforce (Ioan Gruffudd). Directed by Michael Apted, the film focused on Wilberforce's efforts to end the slave trade in early 19th-century Britain.
 
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In "Atonement" (2007), Cumberbatch played Paul Marshall, whose attraction to Lola Quincey (Juno Temple) leads to a mistaken identification -- and a great tragedy. Directed by Joe Wright ("Darkest Hour"), the drama received seven Academy Award nominations -- including Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress (Saoirse Ronan) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Christopher Hampton). It won for Dario Marianelli's original music score.
 
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He co-starred with Gary Oldman in the 2011 screen adaptation of John John le Carré's 1974 espionage novel "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy." The film received three Academy Award nominations: Best Actor (Oldman), Best Adapted Screenplay (Bridget O'Connor, Peter Straughan) and Best Original Score (Alberto Iglesias).
 
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In Steven Spielberg's "War Horse" (2011), Cumberbatch appeared as British Army Major Jamie Stewart, who leads a costly World War I cavalry charge aboard a horse named Topthorn. Based on the 1982 novel by British author Michael Morpurgo, the film received six Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture.
 
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He provided the voices for the dragon Smaug and The Necromancer in Peter Jackson's films based on J.R.R. Tolkein's fantasy novel "The Hobbit." Cumberbatch also provided some stop-motion performances for the characters.
 
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In "Star Trek Into Darkness" (2013). Cumberbatch appeared as a familiar nemesis of the crew of the USS Enterprise. The film was the second of three "Star Trek" installments since Paramount Pictures' rebooted the space series in 2009.
 
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In the 2013 historical drama "12 Years a Slave," Cumberbatch portrayed William Prince Ford -- the first person to purchase the enslaved African-American Solomon Northrup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) after his abduction in 1841. The film received nine Oscar nominations and won for Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress (Lupita Nyong'o) and Best Adapted Screenplay (John Ridley). The production, directed and co-produced by the British filmmaker Steve McQueen, also starred Michael Fassbender, Sarah Paulson, Paul Dano and Alfre Woodard.
 
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Since 2010, Cumberbatch has played a modern-day Sherlock Holmes in London. His work in the Series 3 episode "Sherlock: The Last Vow" earned him a 2014 Primetime Emmy Award in the category Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie. He is nominated again this year for the 2017 episode "Sherlock: The Lying Detective."
 
 
His mother Wanda Ventham and his father Timothy Carlton (born Timothy Carlton Cumberbatch) play Sherlock Holmes' parents in episodes of the BBC's "Sherlock" series.
 
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In "The Imitation Game," Cumberbatch portrayed the British mathematician and computer whiz Alan Turing (1912-1954), a hero of the project that deciphered the German Enigma code during World War II. He later was criminally convicted of homosexuality and apparently died a suicide. He was pardoned posthumously by Queen Elizabeth II in 2013. In addition to Cumberbatch's Best Actor nomination, the film received seven other Oscar nods -- including Best Picture, Best Director (Morten Tyldum) and Best Supporting Actress (Keira Knightley). Graham Moore won the award for Best Adapted Screenplay.
 
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Cumberbatch reunited with Ejiofor for "Doctor Strange" (2016), based on the Marvel comic books about an American surgeon who becomes a powerful sorceror. The film was a worldwide hit, earning $677.7 million. 
 
 
He will appear as Strange in the upcoming Marvel release "Thor: Ragnarok."

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#11 jakeem

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Elizabeth McGovern (born July 18, 1961), the Academy Award-nominated actress who had early successes in the 1980s. She moved to London and began a new career phase as one of the stars of TV's Primetime Emmy Award-winning television series "Downton Abbey."
 
In Robert Redford's 1980 Oscar-winning drama "Ordinary People," McGovern made her screen debut as Jeannine Pratt -- who became the girlfriend of the troubled character played by Timothy Hutton.
 
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In only her second film, McGovern received an Academy Award nomination as Best Supporting Actress for her portrayal of Evelyn Nesbit in "Ragtime" (1981). The real-life Nesbit -- also portrayed by Dame Joan Collins in the 1955 film "The Girl in the Red Velvet Swing" -- was a model and stage performer at the center of a scandalous murder case in the early 20th-century. 
 
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McGovern co-starred with Dudley Moore in the 1983 romantic comedy "Lovesick," which was directed by Marshall Brickman -- Woody Allen's sometime writing partner. Sir Alec Guinness co-starred as the ghost of Sigmund Freud, which occasionally had conversations with Moore's psychologist character.
 
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In Sergio Leone's 1984 mob saga "Once Upon a Time in America," McGovern played Robert De Niro's love interest Deborah (a 12-year-old Jennifer Connelly played the character as a preteen girl). There were two versions of the film: Leone's uncut version and a truncated release. The late Chicago Tribune critic Gene Siskel put the shortened version of the film at No. 1 on his worst films list. His No. 1 entry on his best list: Leone's uncut version.
 
 
While filming the coming-of-age drama "Racing with the Moon" (1984) -- set in the 1940s -- McGovern became involved with her co-star Sean Penn. For a time, they were engaged to be married, but the relationship ended after two years.  
 
 
In the 1986 film "Native Son" -- based on the classic 1940 novel by Richard Wright -- McGovern played Mary, a well-to-do young woman who was accidentally smothered to death by Bigger Thomas (Victor Love), her family's chauffeur. Directed by Jerrold Freedman ("Kansas City Bomber"), the film also starred Matt Dillon, Oprah Winfrey, Carroll Baker and Geraldine Page.
 
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The 1987 thriller "The Bedroom Window" featured McGovern as a young woman menaced by a mysterious assailant (Brad Greenquist). Set in Washington, D.C., the drama also starred Steve Guttenberg and Isabelle Huppert.
 
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John Hughes wrote and directed the 1988 comedy "She's Having a Baby," which starred Kevin Bacon and McGovern as newlyweds who quickly become prospective parents. The film also starred Alec Baldwin as the best friend of Bacon's character.
 
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McGovern played the rebellious Moira in German director Volker Schlöndorff's 1990 film version of "The Handmaid's Tale," based on Margaret Atwood's 1985 novel about a dystopian North American society. The late Natasha Richardson (pictured below with McGovern) had the central role of Kate/ Offred. The film, written by Harold Pinter, also starred Faye Dunaway, Aidan Quinn, Victoria Tennant and Robert Duvall.
 
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In 1992, McGovern married the British filmmaker Simon Curtis, who directed the 2011 drama "My Week with Marilyn." The film received Academy Award nominations for Best Actress (Michelle Williams as Marilyn Monroe) and Best Supporting Actor (Sir Kenneth Branagh as Sir Laurence Olivier). The Curtises have two daughters.
 
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From 2011 to 2016, McGovern starred in the British television series "Downton Abbey." She played Cora Levinson Crawley, the American heiress who married Robert Crawley, the seventh Earl of Grantham (Hugh Bonneville). During its run, the series became a worldwide sensation and won 15 Primetime Emmy Awards in 69 overall nominations.
 
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In recent years, McGovern has headlined a rock band called Sadie and the Hotheads.
 
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#12 jakeem

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Donald Sutherland (born July 17, 1935), the solid veteran actor who, believe it or not, has never been nominated for an Academy Award.
 
In Robert Aldrich's World War II drama "The Dirty Dozen" (1967), Sutherland played  Vernon L. Pinkley -- one of 12 military convicts who faced either the death penalty or long prison sentences. The cons were offered a chance for pardons in exchange for their participation in a dangerous assignment, which involves a commando raid behind enemy lines. Also starring in the drama were Lee Marvin, Robert Ryan, Ernest Borgnine, Charles Bronson, Jim Brown, John Cassavetes, Richard Jaeckel, George Kennedy, Trini López, Ralph Meeker, Telly Savalas, Clint Walker and Robert Webber.
 
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The 1970 Clint Eastwood film "Kelly's Heroes" -- set in France during the final stages of World War II -- featured Sutherland as "Oddball," a scruffy, hippie-like American tank commander who was never at a loss for words. His most quotable line from the movie was said to an excitable tank mechanic played by Gavin MacLeod: "Why don't you knock it off with them negative waves? Why don't you dig how beautiful it is out here? Why don't you say something righteous and hopeful for a change?"
 
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In Robert Altman's 1970 black comedy "M*A*S*H" -- about a Korean War mobile Army surgical hospital -- Sutherland was Dr. Benjamin Franklin "Hawkeye" Pierce, while Elliott Gould played Dr. John Francis Xavier McIntyre (better known as "Trapper John"). The film -- which preceded the long-running television series by two years -- won the Palme d'Or (or Golden Palm award) at the 1970 Cannes Film Festival. It also won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay (Ring Lardner, Jr.). It was nominated for four other Oscars: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actress (Sally Kellerman) and Best Film Editing.
 
 
Sutherland played the title character in "Klute" (1971), director Alan J. Pakula's crime drama about a Pennsylvania detective's search for a missing man he knew personally. Jane Fonda, who starred as a hard-luck New York City call girl named Bree Daniels, won the first of her two Academy Awards for Best Actress (the second Oscar was for her performance in the 1978 drama "Coming Home"). Fonda and Sutherland, who became romantically involved before they worked together on the movie, teamed up again for a traveling political vaudeville show called "F.T.A" (slang for "Free the Army"). The tour was the subject of a 1972 documentary, also titled "F.T.A.," which was directed by Francine Parker.
 
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In "Don't Look Now," Nicolas Roeg's 1973 film about passion and death in Venice, Sutherland and Julie Christie played a married couple recovering from a family tragedy in Britain. The late Chicago Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert called it "one the great horror masterpieces, working not with fright, which is easy, but with dread, grief and apprehension." The film was based on a 1971 short story by Dame Daphne du Maurier.
 
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Sutherland and Brooke Adams starred in Philip Kaufman's 1978 remake of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers." The film featured one of the all-time great surprise endings -- and it involved Sutherland's character.
 
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In Robert Redford's Oscar-winning drama "Ordinary People," Sutherland played a family man who was forced to choose between his cold, insensitive wife (Mary Tyler Moore) and his troubled son (Timothy Hutton) who was hospitalized after a suicide attempt. Based on the best-selling novel by Judith Guest, the film earned four Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor (Hutton) and Best Adapted Screenplay (Alvin Sargent).
 
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In "Eye of the Needle" (1981), Sutherland played a German spy in Britain who tried to uncover plans for the Allied invasion of Normandy in 1944. He also romanced a British married woman (Kate Nelligan) who uncovered his true purpose. Directed by Richard Marquand ("Star Wars: Episode VI -- Return of the Jedi"), the drama was based on the 1978 best-selling novel by Ken Follett.
 
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Oliver Stone's 1991 drama "JFK" featured Sutherland as X, a "Deep Throat"-like figure with military and government connections. He provided crucial information to New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison (portrayed by Kevin Costner) about the conspiracy to assassinate President Kennedy.
 
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Sutherland returned to Venice for "The Italian Job," a 2003 remake of the 1969 heist film that starred Sir Michael Caine and featured some nifty Mini Coopers. Although Sutherland's character was only in the movie for the first 20 minutes or so, his presence was missed the rest of the way. Directed by F. Gary Gray ("Straight Outta Compton," "The Fate of the Furious"), the film also starred Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron, Edward Norton, Jason Statham, Seth Green and Mos Def.
 
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In "The Hunger Games" (2012) and its two sequels, Sutherland played President Coriolanus Snow -- leader of the futuristic North American nation of Panem. 
 
 
The 2015 Western "Forsaken" teamed Sutherland with his son, Kiefer, best known for his years of playing counterterrorism operative Jack Bauer on TV's "24." In the film, the younger Sutherland played a gunslinger who returned to his hometown in an attempt to reconcile with his estranged father.
 
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#13 jakeem

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Posted 15 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Will Ferrell (born July 16, 1967), whose goofball style and unrestrained humor have made him a favorite in motion picture comedies.
 
Ferrell rose to prominence on NBC's "Saturday Night Live" in the mid-1990s. Among his characters and sketches: George W. Bush, James Lipton (the host of TV's "Inside the Actors Studio") and "Jeopardy!" game show host Alex Trebek. He also appeared in recurring cheerleaders sketches with Cheri Oteri (pictured below). Since leaving SNL in 2002, Ferrell has hosted the late-night comedy show three times.
 
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Bruce McCulloch portrayed Carl Bernstein and Ferrell was Bob Woodward in The Washington Post segments of "Dick" (1999), which starred Kirsten Dunst and Michelle Williams as White House dog walkers with an upfront view of the 1970s' Watergate scandal.
 
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In the comedy "Old School" (2003), Ferrell's character tried to bring back the streaking fad of the 1970s. An unexpected encounter with his wife (Perrey Reeves) forced him to get into the back seat with a carload of her girlfriends.
 
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The holiday comedy "Elf" (2003) Ferrell starred as a displaced Santa's helper from the North Pole who searched for his biologiical family in New York City. During his adventures in the Big Apple, he met Jovie (Zooey Deschanel), a Gimbel's department store employee. 
 
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Ferrell co-wrote the 2004 comedy "Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy" -- which takes place in the 1970s -- with Adam McKay, who directed it. McKay subsequently teamed with Ferrell for the films "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby" (2006), "Step Brothers" (2008), "The Other Guys" (2010) and the sequel "Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues" (2013). 
 
The film revolved around Burgundy, the lead anchor for KVWN-TV, which has the No. 1-rated news operation in San Diego. His colleagues on the newscast: sportscaster Champ Kind (David Koechner), weatherman Brick Tamland (Steve Carell) and ace reporter Brian Fantana (Paul Rudd).
 
Trouble ensued when news director Ed Harken (Fred Willard) added the ambitious Veronica Corningstone (Christina Applegate) as Burgundy's co-anchor. It wasn't an ideal situation for the egotistical Burgundy, who already had a love-hate relationship with Corningstone after trying to hit on her at a party.
 
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In "Stranger Than Fiction" (2006), Ferrell played an IRS auditor who could hear a woman's voice narrating his life. It appeared that a well-known author (Emma Thompson) was in control of his fate. Ferrell received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture - Comedy or Musical
 
 
Ferrell starred as a NASCAR driver in "Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby," which featured a rare comedic performance by the five-time Academy Award nominee Amy Adams.
 
 
In the action comedy "The Other Guys," Mark Wahlberg and Ferrell starred as mismatched New York police detectives who aspire to be on the same level as No. 1 investigators Danson (Dwayne Johnson) and Highsmith (Samuel L. Jackson). Wahlberg and Ferrell also starred in "Daddy's Home" (2015), which will be followed by a sequel later this year.
 
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In October 2011 at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Ferrell became the 14th recipient of the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. He promptly dropped the award, which broke into pieces.
 
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On March 12, 2015, Ferrell showed up at five Cactus League spring training games in Arizona and played for 10 different Major League Baseball teams. When he showed up to catch for the world champion San Francisco Giants, manager Bruce Bochy instructed him to intentionally walk a batter. It was all for a worthy cause -- an HBO special dedicated to fighting cancer. 
 
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#14 jakeem

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...the ubiquitous Academy Award-winning actor Forest Whitaker (born July 15, 1961), who also has concentrated on directing and producing from time to time. 
 
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Whitaker first made an impression in the 1982 comedy "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," in which he played football star Charles Jefferson. When his prized 1979 Chevy Camaro Z28 was destroyed after an unauthorized spin by his younger brother and surfer dude Jeff Spicoli (Sean Penn), Jefferson was led to believe the opposing football team was at fault.  
 
 
Whitaker was a pool player named Amos in Martin Scorsese's "The Color of Money" (1986). The drama -- for which Paul Newman earned his only competitive Academy Award -- was a sequel to "The Hustler" (1961). 
 
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As "Big Harold" in Oliver Stone's 1986 Academy Award-winning Vietnam war drama "Platoon," Whitaker assisted Morehouse (Kevin Eshelman) in firing an M60. The film received four Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Director.
 
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In 1987, Whitaker appeared in a different kind of film about the Indochinese conflict. He co-starred with Robin Williams in "Good Morning, Vietnam," based on the experiences of Armed Forces Radio Service disc jockey Adrian Cronauer. For his performance as the DJ, Williams received an Academy Award nomination as Best Actor.
 
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Clint Eastwood's 1988 biopic "Bird" starred Whitaker as the brilliant but troubled jazz saxophonist Charlie Parker (1920–1955)Diane Venora's portrayal of Parker's wife Chan earned her the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Supporting Actress.
 
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In Neil Jordan's 1992 drama "The Crying Game," Whitaker played a British soldier marked for death by an Irish Republican Army group that includes Fergus (Stephen Rea). Jordan received the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for the film. It earned five other Oscar nominations: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Rea), Best Supporting Actor (Jaye Davidson) and Best Film Editing.
 
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Whitaker directed and narrated the 2004 film "First Daughter," which starred Katie Holmes as the college-bound Samantha MacKenzie -- whose father (Michael Keaton) happens to be President of the United States. The romantic comedy was not a hit during its theatrical run, but did well in the home video market.
 
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Whitaker won several awards -- including a Best Actor Oscar -- for his portrayal of the 1970s' Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in the 2006 historical drama "The Last King of Scotland." The film, directed by Kevin Macdonald ("State of Play"), also starred James McAvoy, Kerry Washington, Gillian Anderson and David Oyelowo.
 
 
In "Lee Daniels' The Butler" (2013), Whitaker portrayed a character based on Eugene Allen (1919-2010) -- who worked at the White House over a 34-year period. Among the presidents depicted during the historical drama: Dwight D. Eisenhower (Robin Williams), John F. Kennedy (James Marsden), Lyndon B. Johnson (Liev Schreiber), Richard M. Nixon (John Cusack) and Ronald Reagan (Alan Rickman). 
 
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The 2016 miniseries reboot of "Roots" featured Whitaker as Fiddler, the longtime enslaved African-American who became a mentor to young Kunta Kinte (Malachi Kirby). Louis Gossett, Jr. won a Primetime Emmy Award for his performance as Fiddler in the 1977 version of "Roots."
 
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In the 2016 blockbuster hit "Rogue One: A Star Wars Story," Whitaker appeared as Saw Gerrera, the mentor of the movie's central heroine Jyn Erso (played as a child by Dolly and Beau Gadsdon and as an adult by Felicity Jones).
 
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Whitaker will appear in the much-anticipated superhero film "Black Panther," based on the Marvel Comics character. The film's director is Ryan Coogler, who received acclaimed for his 2015 "Rocky" spinoff "Creed." Whitaker has the role of Zuri, an elder statesman of the African kingdom of Wakanda -- the land of the newly crowned ruler T'Challa (Chadwick Boseman).
 
 

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#15 Sepiatone

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 07:13 AM

I've seen Stanton in a few of those old TV westerns I watch credited as "Harry" as well as Dean on different occasions.

 

Let's not overlook PARIS,TEXAS('84) his only starring role(I think) and appearance as Van Meter in Dillinger  and the foul mouthed prison trustee "Toot-Toot" in THE GREEN MILE.  He does have an extensive filmography!

 

Yep, he's a favorite!  ;)

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I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#16 jakeem

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Posted 13 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...to the always reliable Harry Dean Stanton, who has had a prolific career in movies and television productions since the 1950s.
 
The actor was billed as Dean Stanton when he co-starred as Tramp, one of the inmates of a Southern prison farm in "Cool Hand Luke" (1967). The character sang a couple of songs in the drama, including "Just a Closer Walk With Thee."
 
 

In the 1978 drama "Straight Time," Dustin Hoffman starred as Max Dembo, a career criminal who hoped to go straight after being paroled from a California prison. But Dembo eventually reverted to his old ways. He even teamed with some friends (played by Stanton and Gary Busey) for an ill-fated daytime robbery of a Beverly Hills jewelry store.

 
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In Sir Ridley Scott's space horror classic "Alien" (1979), Stanton (pictured below with Sigourney Weaver and Yaphet Kotto) played Brett, the engineering technician of the commercial vessel Nostromo. The crew member encountered the title creature during a search for a cat named Jones in the engine room. 

 

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The 1980 hit comedy "Private Benjamin" featured Stanton as Sgt. Jim Ballard, the dubious recruiter who persuaded the pampered Judy Benjamin (Goldie Hawn) to sign up for the glamorous "new" Army.
 
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In John Carpenter's 1981 action-thriller "Escape from New York," Stanton's character Harold "Brain" Hellman was "persuaded" to assist "Snake" Plissken (Kurt Russell) in his attempt to rescue an endangered U.S. president.
 
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In the Cold War thriller "Red Dawn" (1984), Stanton had a memorable scene after his character was captured in Colorado by invading Communists. The drama was directed and co-written by John Milius. 
 
 
The 1984 cult film "Repo Man" starred Stanton as Bud, who recruits the young punk rocker Otto (Emilio Estevez) to work at a repossession agency. Directed by Alex Cox, the film follows Otto's adventures involving the government, UFO conspiracy theories and a search for a very special 1964 Chevy Malibu.
 
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Stanton's star turn in "Paris, Texas" (1984) was directed by the German director Wim Wenders ("Wings of Desire," "The Buena Vista Social Club." The film, based on the play by Sam Shepard (who wrote the movie's screenplay), won the Palme d'Or (or Golden Palm) at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival. Stanton starred as Travis Henderson who emerges from the Texas desert after years of wandering. He hooks up with his brother Walt (Dean Stockwell) and they head for Los Angeles to search for the young son (Hunter Carson) he hasn't seen in years. Travis also tried to track down his ex-wife Jane (played by the exquisite German-born Nastassja Kinski), who hadn't seen their son for a while although she continued to support him financially. The bittersweet reunion of the exes was a highlight of the film.
 
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In the 1985 Disney film "One Magic Christmas," Stanton played a mysterious angel who. The character creeped out the parents of some young moviegoers because the angel looked more like a derelict. But the picture has become something of a Christmas classic and a popular cable television selection during the holidays. The film also starred Mary Steenburgen and young actresses Sarah Polley (now an award-winning director) and Elisabeth Harnois, who played investigator Morgan Brody in the CBS police procedural series "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation." 
 
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Stanton portrayed Saul of Tarsus -- the apostle Paul -- in Martin Scorsese's "The Last Temptation of Christ." In a scene that cannot be found in any Bible, Saul has a confrontation with Christ (Willem Dafoe). The film was based on the 1955 novel by Nikos Kazantzakis.
 
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Stanton made a cameo appearance in "Marvel's The Avengers" (2012), in which his security guard character has a conversation with Bruce Banner (Mark Ruffalo). 
 
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#17 jakeem

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Posted 12 July 2017 - 11:01 PM

...actor Harrison Ford (born July 13, 1942), who forever will be remember for playing the screen icons Han Solo and Indiana Jones during the past 40 years or so. According to boxofficemojo.com,  he is second on the list of actors appearing in top-grossing films (behind Samuel L. Jackson at No. 1).
 
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Ford's first screen appearance was an uncredited moment as a bellhop paging a hotel guest named Ellis in the 1966 crime comedy/drama"Dead Heat on a Merry-Go-Round."
 
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His first collaboration with filmmaker George Lucas was in "American Graffiti" (1973), in which the actor played drag racer Bob Falfa -- and sang a bit of "Some Enchanted Evening."
 
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Four years later, Ford became a star as Han Solo in Lucas' blockbuster hit "Star Wars." He also reprised the character in three other films: "Star Wars: Episode V -- The Empire Strikes Back" (1980), "Star Wars: Episode VI -- Return of the Jedi" (1983) and "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" (2015).
 
 
Ford's first appearance as the intrepid archaeologist Indiana Jones was in "Raiders of the Lost Ark," a 1981 collaboration by George Lucas ans Steven Spielberg. He played the character again in the sequels "Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom" (1984), "Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade" (1989) and "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull" (2008). 
 
 
Set in a dystopian Los Angeles in the early 21st century, Sir Ridley Scott's 1982 sci-fi tale "Blade Runner" starred Ford as Rick Deckard -- a police officer skilled at chasing down artificial humans called "replicants." The film, which also had neo-noir and detective mystery elements, was based on the 1968 novel "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" by Philip K. Dick. Ford will reprise the character in the upcoming sequel "Blade Runner 2049," directed by Denis Villeneuve ("Arrival") and headlined by Ryan Gosling. The film is expected to be released in October.
 
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His only Academy Award nomination was a Best Actor bid for the 1985 drama "Witness," in which he played a targeted Philadelphia police detective who hides in an Amish community. His co-star was actress Kelly McGillis (pictured below), who would appear in the hit film "Top Gun" the following year.
 
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Ford co-starred with Melanie Griffith and Sigourney Weaver in the 1988 office-centric romantic comedy/drama "Working Girl." Directed by Mike Nichols, the film received six Academy Award nominations: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actress (Griffith), Best Supporting Actress (Joan Cusack and Weaver) and Best Original Song ("Let the River Run" by Carly Simon, who won).
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Ford starred as the wrongfully convicted murderer Dr. Richard Kimble in the 1993 big-screen version of "The Fugitive." Tommy Lee Jones received an Academy Award as Best Supporting Actor for his performance as the relentless pursuer, Chief Deputy Marshal Sam Gerard.
 
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In the 1997 thriller "Air Force One," Ford played U.S. President James Marshall, who was determined to get his hijacked airplane out of the clutches of a Russian terrorist (Gary Oldman).
 
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On February 17, 2000, Ford became the 28th recipient of the American Film Institute's Life Achievement Award. He accepted the award from Lucas (pictured below) and Spielberg.
 
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In the historical drama "42" (2013), Ford portrayed Brooklyn Dodgers president and general manager Branch Rickey (1881-1965), who broke baseball's color line in 1945 by signing Jackie Robinson to a minor contract with the team. Robinson (played in the film by Chadwick Boseman, pictured below right) played the 1946 season with Brooklyn's minor league affiliate in Montreal. In 1947, he became the first known African-American in the modern era to play in the major leagues.
 
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#18 jakeem

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...producer Brian Grazer (born July 12, 1951), who has had a longtime filmmaking partnership with director Ron Howard (pictured below right). Their Imagine Entertainment production company -- formed in 1986 -- has been reponsible for numerous motion picture and television productions.
 
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Grazer has been nominated for five Academy Awards (Oscar win in bold):
  • 1984 -- Best Original Screenplay (for "Splash," shared with Lowell Ganz, Babaloo Mandel and Bruce Jay Friedman). 
  • 1995 -- Best Picture ("Apollo 13").
  • 2001 -- Best Picture ("A Beautiful Mind," shared with Howard).
  • 2008 -- Best Picture ("Frost/Nixon," shared with Howard and Eric Fellner).
  • 2014 -- Best Adapted Screenplay ("Inherent Vice").
An early collaboration by Grazer and Howard was the 1982 comedy "Night Shift," which starred Henry Winkler and Michael Keaton as morgue attendants who made a financial killing as "love brokers." The film provided a boost to Keaton's career.
 
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Grazer and Howard's second film as a team was the 1984 hit "Splash" -- the first release from Disney's adult-oriented Touchstone Pictures -- starred Tom Hanks as a New Yorker who fell in love with a mermaid named Madison (Daryl Hannah, pictured below). The picture became the 10th highest-grossing film of the year with a domestic take of $69.8 million.
 
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The 1989 Imagine multi-generational comedy "Parenthood" starred Steve Martin, Dianne Wiest, Mary Steenburgen, Jason Robards, Rick Moranis, Tom Hulce, Martha Plimpton, Keanu Reaves, Harley Jane Kozak and Joaquin Phoenix. The film earned two Academy Award nominations: Best Supporting Actress (Wiest) and Best Original Song (the catchy "I Love to See You Smile" by Randy Newman).
 
 
Howard, who directed "Parenthood," served as the co-executive producer of a TV version that starred Ed Begley, Jr., Jayne Atkinson, William Windom, Maryedith Burrell, Sheila MacRae, David Arquette and child actors Thora Birch and Leonardo DiCaprio. It aired on NBC during the 1990-1991 season, but was canceled. Imagine Television tried another "Parenthood" series project in 2010 on NBC. Starring Peter Krause, Lauren Graham, Dax Shepard, Monica Potter, Erika Christensen, Bonnie Bedelia and Craig T. Nelson, the second TV version ran for six seasons.
 
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Grazer and Howard's 1995 drama "Apollo 13" -- the true story of the aborted 1970 manned mission to the moon -- starred Tom Hanks, Kevin Bacon, Bill Paxton, Gary Sinise and Ed Harris. The film earned nine Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor (Harris, pictured below), Best Supporting Actress (Kathleen Quinlan) and Best Adapted Screenplay (William Broyles Jr. and Al Reinert). It won for Best Film Editing (Mike Hill and Daniel Hanley) and Best Sound (Rick Dior, Steve Pederson, Scott Millan and David MacMillan). 
 
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The No. 1 domestic box-office hit of the year 2000 was "Dr. Seuss' 'How the Grinch Stole Christmas'," which Grazer co-produced with the director, Howard. The live-action version of the holiday tale starred Jim Carrey as The Grinch. The film earned $260 million domestically and $345 million worldwide.
 

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Grazer was one of the executive producers of Imagine Television's drama "24." which starred Kiefer Sutherland as Jack Bauer, a counter-terrorism operative. The series' premiere was delayed until November 6, 2001 because of the September 11th terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, D.C. Dennis Haysbert (pictured below left with Sutherland) co-starred as U.S. Senator David Palmer, a presidential candidate who served as POTUS in Seasons 2 and 3. In 2006, "24" won five Primetime Emmys, including Outstanding Drama Series and Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Sutherland).
 
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Academy Awards went to Grazer and Howard for the 2001 biopic "A Beautiful Mind." Russell Crowe portrayed the American mathematician John Forbes Nash Jr. (1928-2015), who won a Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences --- and battled mental illness. Jennifer Connelly won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance as Nash's wife Alicia.
 
 
A longtime surfing enthusiast, Grazer produced the 2002 movie "Blue Crush," which starred Kate Bosworth (pictured below center with Michelle Rodriguez and Sànoe Lake) as a teen who hoped to enter a surfing competition at Hawaii's North Shore. The film was directed by actor John Stockwell, who starred in the movies "Christine" (1983) and "Top Gun" (1986).
 
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Grazer teamed with another actor turned director -- Peter Berg -- in the 2004 screen adaptation of the non-fiction best seller "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. "Buzz" Bissinger. They also were instrumental in the development of the TV version, which ran on NBC from 2006 to 2011. Actor Kyle Chandler (pictured below), who played the hard-nosed but empathetic Texas high school football coach Eric Taylor, won a 2011 Primetime Emmy as Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series. 
 
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Grazer and Howard filmed a 2008 screen version of British author Peter Morgan's 2006 stage play "Frost/Nixon," based on the 1977 television interviews involving former U.S. President Richard M. Nixon and broadcaster David Frost. The movie earned five Academy Award nominations: Best Picture, Best Director (Howard), Best Actor (Frank Langella, reprising his Tony Award-winning portrayal of Nixon), Best Adapted Screenplay (Morgan) and Best Film Editing (Mike Hill and Daniel P. Hanley).
 
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#19 Dargo

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 11:52 PM

Thanks for spotlighting Sela Ward here, jakeem.

 

Always thought she possessed one of the most beautiful faces seen on both the big and small screen since the demise of the studio system, and is a pretty good actress to boot.

 

(...in fact, the only thing I never really liked about the big screen version of The Fugitive was that they killed her off so damn early in the film...ah, but such is the fate of the Helen Kimble character, I suppose) ;)


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#20 jakeem

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 11:00 PM

...Sela Ward (born July 11, 1956), the two-time Emmy Award-winning actress who also has been a fixture in motion pictures.
 
The Mississippi-born Ward's road to Hollywood stardom began at the University of Alabama, where she was a cheerleader and homecoming queen during the mid-1970s. As she recalled in the 2010 book "The Crimson Tide: An Illustrated History of Football at the University of Alabama" by Winston Groom (the author of "Forrest Gump"): "Because our games were so often on national television, cheerleaders actually got fan mail, and one letter never left my impressionable young head. A guy wrote, 'You are the next Mary Tyler Moore!' I had no idea what that meant --did I project comedy on the field? However, to me, of course, it meant that I could be in movies: the hubris of youth! And so when the cheerleaders were taken to New York City for the National Invitation Basketball Tournament, I was ready."
 
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She continued: "I fell immediately in love with New York and moved there shortly after I left college. Through a series of connect-the-dots I landed a TV commercial and went off into the land of entertainment. But I'll never forget where a lot of it came from: those green football fields all over the South and the grand enthusiastic crowds on magical Saturday afternoons with the Crimson Tide."
 
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Ward was a regular in the CBS drama series "Emerald Point, N.A.S.," which starred Dennis Weaver as the patriarch of a military family at a Southern naval air station. Ward played bad girl Hilary Adams. Also starring in the series, which aired during the 1983-1984 season: Richard Dean Anderson, Susan Dey, Andrew Stevens, Maud Adams, Charles Frank, Robert Loggia, Jill St. John and Robert Vaughn.
 
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She appeared with Tom Hanks in Garry Marshall's 1986 dramedy "Nothing in Common," which also starred Jackie Gleason and Eva Marie Saint. It was one of Hanks' earliest opportunities to show a dramatic flair. It also was Gleason's final film. He died on June 24, 1987 -- almost a year after the picture was released.
 
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From 1991 to 1996, Ward starred in the NBC series "Sisters," which teamed her with actresses Swoosie Kurtz, Patricia Kalember and Julianne Phillips. The drama about adult siblings in Illinois was created by Ron Cowen and Daniel Lipman, who won Emmys for writing the 1985 TV-movie about AIDS, "An Early Frost." For her performances as the second-oldest Reed sister, Teddy, Ward won the 1994 Primetime Emmy Award as Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series.
 
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In 2000, Ward won a second Primetime Emmy for Outstanding Performance by a Lead Actress in a Drama Series for her work in "Once and Again." The ABC series aired from 1999 to 2002.
 
 
In the 1993 film version of "The Fugitive," Ward played Helen Kimble, the doomed wife of Dr. Richard Kimble (Harrison Ford). Her murder was pinned on her husband, who declared that the true assailant was a one-armed man. Tommy Lee Jones won the Academy Award as Best Supporting Actor for his performance as Chief Deputy Marshal Sam Gerard, Dr. Kimble's relentless pursuer.
 
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During the 2007-2008 network television season, Ward joined the cast of the CBS police procedural "CSI: New York" as the veteran FBI agent Jo Danville. She appeared in 57 episodes of the series until its cancelation in 2013.
 
 
Ward was television talk show host Sharon Schieber, who interviews Nick Dunne (played by Ben Affleck) about his missing wife (Best Actress Oscar nominee Rosamund Pike) in "Gone Girl." The film, based on the 2012 best seller by Gillian Floyd, was directed by David Fincher.
 
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In the 2016 summer film "Independence Day: Resurgence" -- a sequel to the 1996 blockbuster hit "Independence Day" -- Ward played U.S. President Lanford, who was forced to contend with a new alien threat to Earth. 
 
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Since the 2016 season, Ward has starred with Nick Nolte in the Epix cable network's drama "Graves," in which Nolte plays a former U.S. president. Ward appears as his ex-wife and former First Lady who has political ambitions of her own. Season 2 will begin later in the year.
 
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