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Is this how rape was treated in the 50s & 60s?


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#1 ChristineHoard

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 09:14 PM

Your original list of films also got me thinking about Anatomy of a Murder but in some ways the plot justifies the rape;  I.e. that a wife like that deserves to be raped and that the husband did commit murder (and therefore it wasn't justified homicide).   Yea, the husband is found not guilty but that is because of the sound legal defense by the Stewart character,  but to me the vibe given is that the husband did commit murder and it wasn't justified because the wife lead the other man on (ok that other man was presented as a creep and thus it could be said the film offers no straight forward view of what occurred that night).

 

I have always wondered how the film got away with using murder in the title instead of An Anatomy of a Killing.    

 

Well, that is the title of the book.  And it's a better title.



#2 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:36 PM

I would first direct you to a film about rape that was actually directed by a woman. The great actress Ida Lupino directed the film called Outrage in 1950.

Other films that are better known would be:

Anatomy of a Murder directed by Otto Preminger starring James Stewart and

Town Without Pity starring Kirk Douglas.


One film that is truly remarkable stars Carroll Baker and it's called
Something Wild, 1961; this is an independent film that is extraordinarily modern in scope.

I would check some of those films out before you come to any conclusions.

 

Your original list of films also got me thinking about Anatomy of a Murder but in some ways the plot justifies the rape;  I.e. that a wife like that deserves to be raped and that the husband did commit murder (and therefore it wasn't justified homicide).   Yea, the husband is found not guilty but that is because of the sound legal defense by the Stewart character,  but to me the vibe given is that the husband did commit murder and it wasn't justified because the wife lead the other man on (ok that other man was presented as a creep and thus it could be said the film offers no straight forward view of what occurred that night).

 

I have always wondered how the film got away with using murder in the title instead of An Anatomy of a Killing.    



#3 Debra Johnson

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:08 PM

I would first direct you to a film about rape that was actually directed by a woman. The great actress Ida Lupino directed the film called Outrage in 1950.

Other films that are better known would be:

Anatomy of a Murder directed by Otto Preminger starring James Stewart and

Town Without Pity starring Kirk Douglas.


One film that is truly remarkable stars Carroll Baker and it's called
Something Wild, 1961; this is an independent film that is extraordinarily modern in scope.

I would check some of those films out before you come to any conclusions.

Thanks will do.  But have you seen the two films I mentioned in the original post?  Do you agree that rape in both of these films was treated very cavalierly.....to say the least?



#4 Princess of Tap

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 04:21 PM

I would first direct you to a film about rape that was actually directed by a woman. The great actress Ida Lupino directed the film called Outrage in 1950.

Other films that are better known would be:

Anatomy of a Murder directed by Otto Preminger starring James Stewart and

Town Without Pity starring Kirk Douglas.


One film that is truly remarkable stars Carroll Baker and it's called
Something Wild, 1961; this is an independent film that is extraordinarily modern in scope.

I would check some of those films out before you come to any conclusions.
  • jamesjazzguitar and ChristineHoard like this

#5 Debra Johnson

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 03:21 AM

So I just finished watching two great movies from. "A Rage To Live" (1965) starring Suzanne Pleshette, Peter Graves and Ben Gazarro .  "No Down Payment" (1957) with Tony Randall and Joanne Woodward.  In BOTH movies....a rape occurs.

 

In one movie, the rape literally occurs within the first 15 minutes of the movie....nothing at all happens to the attacker and in fact the scene is written to make it seem like "the woman's MOUTH was saying no but her BODY was saying yes"  :(    In the second movie, a woman tells neighbors one of their mutual friends raped her the night before and it's like.....not THAT big of a deal.

 

Was rape REALLY treated this casually during this era?  :blink: 






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