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Ben can't pronounce Italian names

luchino visconti

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24 replies to this topic

#1 Fedya

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 02:42 PM

Arturo:

I probably should have included a smiley.
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#2 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 01:12 PM

I am a great believer in local language variations, which may rise to the level of full-blown dialects. I understand the need to know the standard "correct" form of a language, but I don't think locals should give up their mother tongue totally.

 

I agree.   As long as one has good enough knowledge of the 'standard' language,  also knowing various dialects is great and adds a local color.   


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#3 Arturo

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 10:39 AM

My wife is from Italy and many of the southern Italians she knows,  like her godmother,  need to brush-up on their pronunciations.  Instead all we hear are the local dialects.     Her mom wouldn't allow the local dialect (Bari), to be used in their household.


I am a great believer in local language variations, which may rise to the level of full-blown dialects. I understand the need to know the standard "correct" form of a language, but I don't think locals should give up their mother tongue totally.

#4 Arturo

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 10:35 AM

The Z is pronounced like an English TH (unvoiced), as any Castilian would tell you.

Actually, since the name usually refers to Mexican president Benito Juárez, a Zapotec Indian, or the Mexican border town named in his honor, Ciudad Juárez, the Castilian 'th' pronunciation of the Z would not apply, and would be pronounced as the S is pronounced in many parts of Latin America, although not in Spain. This is similar the ss in hiss.

I've heard that one pronounced both "WAH-rez" and more correctly( to me) "Hu-arez" (kind of a silent hyphen: two syllables)

Sepiatone

Sepia,

Neither is correct, although the first rendering at least correctly identifies the two syllables; the second actually pronounces three syllables.

It is something like "HUAH rehss". The initial H is similar to the English H, but more guttural, and with much less aspiration; the second is silent and is there only to make the A a short A; the A is part of a dipthong with the U, and roughly pronounced Wah. The R has a bit of a trill, but not full-on. And of course, no Z sound, but as I mentioned elsewhere, the S is like the ss in hiss. The E is the short E as in English, without any dipthong component

#5 Arturo

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 10:22 AM

The Z is pronounced like an English TH (unvoiced), as any Castilian would tell you.


Actually, since the name usually refers to Mexican president Benito Juárez, a Zapotec Indian, or the Mexican border town named in his honor, Ciudad Juárez, the Castilian 'th' pronunciation of the Z would not apply, and would be pronounced as the S is pronounced in many parts of Latin America, although not in Spain. This is similar the ss in hiss.

#6 Vautrin

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 03:58 PM

I've never eaten even one strand of Prince Spaghetti, but

it's Prince Spaghetti Day.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#7 NipkowDisc

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 03:52 PM

he can't pick winning presidential candidates too well either.

:lol:


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#8 marcar

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 03:40 PM

Please pronounce, Abbracciavento, Monterubbianesi and  Canavacciuolo.

 

A-BRA-CHEEA-VENTO, MONTEH-ROOB-YAH-NE-ZEE, and KA-NAH-VA-CHEE-OLO. As close as I can come phonetically without using sounds. Hope it helps. Marisa G.



#9 scsu1975

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 02:22 PM

That is because, in Italian, the title of prince is not limited to royalty,

Correct. In fact, in some parts of Boston, Wednesday is still Prince Spaghetti night.


I'm a big boy.


#10 hamradio

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 11:40 AM

Please pronounce, Abbracciavento, Monterubbianesi and  Canavacciuolo.



#11 marcar

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 11:24 AM

And HEY Marisa...one'a more thing here...

 

Now, being an avid motorcyclist for 50 years, among my fellow American motorcycle aficionados there's always been a little difference of opinion about how to properly pronounce the name of this brand of Italian machine...

 

img_0127.jpg

 

And so tell me here Signorina Giannetti...is this marque correctly pronounced as "Moto GOOZ-zee " or "Moto GOOT-zee"?

 

(...and seein' as how you might seem to know about this sort'a thing)

 

It's Moto-GOOT-Zee. There's a slight T before the Z and the accent is on the middle syllable. Hope that helps MG


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#12 Sepiatone

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:33 AM

Well, let's start talking again about how to pronounce Juarez. It's been a few years since we've had that discussion.

 

I've heard that one pronounced both "WAH-rez"  and more correctly( to me) "Hu-arez"  (kind of a silent hyphen: two syllables)

 

Sepiatone


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#13 Palmerin

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:20 AM

The Italian poster for Keighley's THE MASTER OF BALLANTRAE rendered its title as THE PRINCE OF SCOTLAND. That is because, in Italian, the title of prince is not limited to royalty, but instead applies to members of eminent families such as the Derrys of Stevenson's story and the most illustrious House of Visconti.



#14 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 06:24 PM

Sorry guys, but Ben M. has to brush-up on his pronunciations of Italian films and filmmakers. Most recently, it was Luchino Visconti. Luchino is pronounced Loo-Kee-No NOT Lu-CHEE-No. It doesn't take someone named Marisa Giannetti like me to know that...just get on YouTube and ask how to pronounce it. I remember poor Ben got muddled up by Fellini's "I Vitelloni" and I previously commented on that. Just call me Mr. M. if you have any doubts about your Italian...I'll be glad to help.

Doesn't this bother anybody else?

 

My wife is from Italy and many of the southern Italians she knows,  like her godmother,  need to brush-up on their pronunciations.  Instead all we hear are the local dialects.     Her mom wouldn't allow the local dialect (Bari), to be used in their household. 



#15 Fedya

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 06:03 PM

Well, let's start talking again about how to pronounce Juarez. It's been a few years since we've had that discussion.


The Z is pronounced like an English TH (unvoiced), as any Castilian would tell you.

#16 LawrenceA

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 05:37 PM

Well, let's start talking again about how to pronounce Juarez. It's been a few years since we've had that discussion.

 

It's JEW-uh-reez, right?

 

I once heard someone pronounce Phoenix as pa-HO-nicks.


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#17 laffite

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 05:31 PM

With respect, our Mr Robert Osborne never seemed to get any coaching on French words. Jean Gabin was Gabeen. There were other wince-worthy examples.



#18 Dargo

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 04:40 PM

 

 

 

 

But, in a society that screws up even the most SIMPLE ENGLISH words, like "Sherbet" (Sher-BERT)  and "horseradish"( many saying HORSH-radish), You really can't expect very many HENRY HIGGINS' among us, can you?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

I dunno, Sepia. But I DO hear Canadians call that particular hot and spicy condiment...wait for it...

 

"hoser-radish".

 

(...especially after a few too many Molsons)


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#19 Sepiatone

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 04:33 PM

Sorry guys, but Ben M. has to brush-up on his pronunciations of Italian films and filmmakers. Most recently, it was Luchino Visconti. Luchino is pronounced Loo-Kee-No NOT Lu-CHEE-No. It doesn't take someone named Marisa Giannetti like me to know that...just get on YouTube and ask how to pronounce it. I remember poor Ben got muddled up by Fellini's "I Vitelloni" and I previously commented on that. Just call me Mr. M. if you have any doubts about your Italian...I'll be glad to help.

Doesn't this bother anybody else?

 

Bother ME?  Hell, I'm POLISH.  I have my  OWN name troubles.  ;)

 

 

I do recall however, a Detroit Red Wing player named ALEX DELVECCHIO, whom the announcers always pronounced  Del-VECK-ee-o.  and years later, I worrked with a guy named Jim DEVECCIO, who said HIS name was pronounced De-VECH-ee-o( the "cc" in HIS name said like  "ch" in Charlie).  So if I'm mixed about this, I apologize and please set me straight.

 

But, in a society that screws up even the most SIMPLE ENGLISH words, like "Sherbet" (Sher-BERT)  and "horseradish"( many saying HORSH-radish), You really can't expect very many HENRY HIGGINS' among us, can you?

 

 

Sepiatone


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#20 EricJ

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 04:32 PM

Sorry guys, but Ben M. has to brush-up on his pronunciations of Italian films and filmmakers. Most recently, it was Luchino Visconti. Luchino is pronounced Loo-Kee-No NOT Lu-CHEE-No. 

 

Even Inspector Leopard of Scotland Yard got it wrong.


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