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Daily Dose #10: Nothing on Me (Opening Scene of Shadow of a Doubt)


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#21 lovebirding54

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 04:37 PM

In the opening scene, we learn that Uncle Charlie is living in a rented room in a city. By the way, he reacts to the landlady telling him about the two strangers looking for him, we know it angers him. Whatever they are looking for him about, he is defiant as he boldly walks past them as he leaves.

 

The opening reminds me of film noir because the use of light and shadow as the camera moves in closer to Joseph Cotten on the bed and then pans to money on the bedside table and strewn on the floor. The noir atmosphere lets the audience know there is something already sinister going on.

 

Tiomkin's score goes from light with the children playing in the street to a subdued darker music as he lays on the bed. It ends with again quicker, faster-paced music when Uncle Charlie leaves and defiantly walks past the men who were looking for him.  It is as if the music was leading us to a climatic scene when he walks towards them.    



#22 GeeWiz

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 07:24 PM

1. Uncle Charlie is in a not-too-seedy boarding house. He's well dressed, surrounded by cash which he ignores, smoking a cigar. When the landlady tells him about the two friends who visited, he is calm in front of her (almost charming)...but shows his anger (defiance) when he is alone.  

 

2. I agree it had noir qualities--location, grit, dark persona, hint of a crime (money, men following the MC). The opening includes the long shot, then pushes in to reveal the bank roll.  Darkness is created when the blinds are lowered. 

 

3. The initial sounds are sinister and foreshadow trouble. The score then races...increasing the tension. Finally, the music crescendoes when Uncle Charlie is seemingly going to confront the two men after him...but he passes them by and the music sounds like footsteps.



#23 iceiceblondie

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 05:44 PM

We learn that Charlie really is a bad character. At first you kind of wonder if he got into some trouble, but the breaking of the glass indicated an anger instead of a desperation.

 

I paid much closer attention to the music while watching this clip than I did watching the movie when it aired, and it added so much to the scene. First it was playful with showing the kids in the street, then it got much more sinister showing the money on Charlie's table. The last thing I noticed was it played in time with the walking of the two detectives. I thought that really helped emphasize how they were closing in on Charlie.



#24 SCGuppy

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 03:16 PM

Daily Dose #10
1) The opening scene enters one of the main characters, Uncle Charlie Oakley. Boys playing ball outside--a normal day, possibly a Saturday. Uncle Charlie lying on a bed...the audience learns he is in trouble, serious trouble. In a frantic, half planned idea, he clears out of his rented room and lures the two men away...in a desperate attempt to lose him. Key question- "He has money slipped out onto the floor." And why "Break the glass."? What does this all mean?
2) An innocent setting: children playing, a tentative landlady, all in a quiet neighborhood. Yet, not all things are innocent and good...there's bad, evil things that could be happening behind closed doors...no one knows really. I have yet to watch Siodneck's "The Killers". I hope TCM will air it. Comparing "Shadow of a Doubt" to "Rebecca"...their opening scene...one being wholesome, bright, happy, joyous and there's a chase and the other, is dark, dreary, empty, eerie, and both movies--the music that is attached to each of these scenes gives the audience a sense of "fight or flight", "stay or go". We have questions and we need answers...so, we stay tune, sitting on the edge of our seats...
3)

#25 slp515

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 10:39 PM

Daily Dose #10: Nothing on Me
Opening Scene from Hitchcock's Shadow of a Doubt (1943)

1. As mentioned in the curator's note, this scene operates as a prelude to the main story. What do you learn about the character of Uncle Charlie in this prelude? Be specific. 

Uncle Charlie appears to be waiting for something to happen or thinking about what to do. His landlord seems to be aggravating him with the information she has about his visitors. He appears angry when she leaves when he smashes his glass against the wall. But then he seems to be confident that the men cannot recognize him. The suspense begins as the men follow him.

2. In what ways does this opening remind you of watching a film noir?

If it doesn't remind you of a film noir, what makes the opening here different from the opening of a noir film like Siodmak's The Killers? (Note: If you haven't seen The Killers, it is fine to answer this question in general terms about your own personal expectations.

This opening reminds me of watching a genre and style film noir because of the darkest of the room, the mysterious character of Uncle Charlie and the sound of the music leading up to the suspense. This movie was similar to The Killers with its dark lightning, sound affects and mysterious beginning. 


3. As we move into Hitchcock's Hollywood years, his scores will take on more importance than they did during the British years. Music will play a big role in Shadow of a Doubt. The film's score is by Dimitri Tiomkin, the first of four film scores that the composer will create for Hitchcock. What effect does the Tiomkin score have on the mood, atmosphere, and even the pace of this opening scene? 

The effect that Tiomkin's score had on the mood, atmosphere, and even the pace of this opening scene was varying. First the music was playful as the children played in the street but changed when the camera went to the window creating a subtle attitude as if something was about to happen. Then the music changed for a few seconds to a pleasant sound as Uncle Charley lay in the bed and then back to the subtle sound when the camera focused on the money. When Uncle Charley smashed his glass the music became mysterious and eerie adding a dark and scary atmosphere. As Uncle Charley left the room the score got louder, more dangerous, fast, exciting and mysterious, even as the men followed him down the street my heart skipped a beat - the music frightened me.
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#26 Shannon.H

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 05:30 PM

As mentioned in the curator's note, this scene operates as a prelude to the main story. What do learn about the character of Uncle Charlie in this prelude? Be specific. 

 

​We learn in the opening that there must be something that these men know are suspect and that Uncle Charlie has done something.  Clues the money, the fact that when he sees them he says to himself "you've got nothing on me". 
 

In what ways does this opening remind you of watching a film noir? If it doesn't remind you of a film noir, what makes the opening here different from the opening of a noir film like Siodmak's The Killers? (Note: If you haven't seen The Killers, it is fine to answer this question in general terms about your own personal expectations)

 

​It does have a film noir feel that is slowly shows us that something bad or sinister must have happened.
 

As we move into Hitchcock's Hollywood years, his scores will take on more importance than they did during the British years. Music will play a big role in Shadow of a Doubt. The film's score is by Dimitri Tiomkin, the first of four film scores that the composer will create for Hitchcock. What effect does the Tiomkin score have on the mood, atmosphere, and even the pace of this opening scene?

 

​It created a relaxing mood that slowly built up to the quick walk away from the two men.



#27 Pop Leibel

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 11:31 AM

I DVR'd this film and watched it last night.

 

Someone else on here pointed this out, and I agree, that Uncle Charlie was not the widow murderer. Were there tons of circumstantial evidence? Yes, loads of it, but we never see Uncle Charlie do anything until the end, and then, I think he's finally at rope's end. Reluctantly, he must dispose of "Girl Charlie". He could never have a moment's peace if he allows her to live. He knows that only too well. 

 

Remember, Uncle Charlie is kind of insane anyway (although, no murderer). There was the scene at the bank where he shows his a$$, and then the other times when he goes on one of his tirades.

 

Hitchcock goes to great lengths to NOT show Uncle Charlie doing anything wrong. We never see him lock the garage door or turn the car on. We never see him put the key back in the ignition. We never see the entire inscription on the ring. We never see him booby-trap the back stairs. (Yes, we see a figure from the back that may be Uncle Charlie, but we're not sure.) The only bad thing we see Uncle Charlie do is throw a glass against the wall. Big deal. Why was the other suspect back east "running from the police". Maybe he was the murderer.

 

I believe Uncle Charlie got a raw deal getting crushed by the oncoming locomotive. Let him get missed by the train and then sneak away unnoticed. Then, we never know whether he kills again or if he was innocent. The ambiguous ending is always better. I wish I could have consulted Hitch on some of these things.

 

Remember at the beginning on the film how cynical Girl Charlie was? Before her uncle even showed up? Maybe Girl Charlie is on her way to becoming just like Uncle Charlie? Especially now that she's become so embittered from that ordeal.

 

One thing I'd like to add is, I don't like the romance angle with the detective. Unnecessary, underdeveloped, and completely unrealistic. Not a good move by Hitch and the writers. This fault keeps 'Shadow' from getting into my Top 5 Hitchcock pictures. Which is:

 

5) The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)

4) Rear Window

3) Vertigo

2) Psycho

1) North By Northwest


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#28 GSPegger

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 05:04 PM

I don't know if this Daily Dose is the appropriate place for this, but I had a question about Shadow of a Doubt. Am I correct in thinking that this is the only Hitchcock film that features a teenager as the protagonist?

 

It seems entirely appropriate that young Charlie is, well, young, as opposed to other Hitchcock leading actresses. The theme that runs through the movie about the journey from innocence to experience is especially well-suited for a teen. She is not just learning about the existence of evil in people and places she previously thought were bright and good; there is also a creepy undercurrent of awakening sexual awareness between her and her uncle. He gives her a ring and tells her they share the same blood.

 

The signature scene for me in this film (which is probably my favorite of all Hitchcock's films) is when Uncle Charlie forces her into the bar. As they descend the stairs she says "I've never been to a place like this before." She has a ginger ale and Uncle Charlie has a double brandy; she looks like she's going to be sick while Uncle Charlie expounds at length about his disgust with the world she thinks she is part of. Young Charlie and Uncle Charlie are doubles, but there is also Young Charlie's double in the part of the bar maid she knows from school. The bar maid's performance seems jaded and disillusioned with life, as if maybe she had an Uncle Charlie of her own.

 

Joseph Cotten's speech in the bar and his earlier speech at the dinner table as so completely bleak, and it is that dark, dark world view that I think makes this the most noirish of Hitchcock's films.

Actually, Young and Innocent (1937) also features a teenage protagonist (Nova Pilbeam) and is very much also a coming-of-age, going from innocent to experience story.  It is not as dark as Shadow of a Doubt, and is quite delightful.  I highly recommend it.  It is very much in the vein of 39 Steps.  A wrongfully-accused man on the run, and the daughter of the chief constable falling into helping him.  It features a very famous crane shot cited in all the texts about Hitchcock, but is much more than that. 

 

You could also say Stage Fright (1950) has similar themes, too.


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#29 morrison94114

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 04:37 PM

I don't know if this Daily Dose is the appropriate place for this, but I had a question about Shadow of a Doubt. Am I correct in thinking that this is the only Hitchcock film that features a teenager as the protagonist?

 

It seems entirely appropriate that young Charlie is, well, young, as opposed to other Hitchcock leading actresses. The theme that runs through the movie about the journey from innocence to experience is especially well-suited for a teen. She is not just learning about the existence of evil in people and places she previously thought were bright and good; there is also a creepy undercurrent of awakening sexual awareness between her and her uncle. He gives her a ring and tells her they share the same blood.

 

The signature scene for me in this film (which is probably my favorite of all Hitchcock's films) is when Uncle Charlie forces her into the bar. As they descend the stairs she says "I've never been to a place like this before." She has a ginger ale and Uncle Charlie has a double brandy; she looks like she's going to be sick while Uncle Charlie expounds at length about his disgust with the world she thinks she is part of. Young Charlie and Uncle Charlie are doubles, but there is also Young Charlie's double in the part of the bar maid she knows from school. The bar maid's performance seems jaded and disillusioned with life, as if maybe she had an Uncle Charlie of her own.

 

Joseph Cotten's speech in the bar and his earlier speech at the dinner table as so completely bleak, and it is that dark, dark world view that I think makes this the most noirish of Hitchcock's films.


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#30 Ann56

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 11:19 PM

1.    As mentioned in the curator's note, this scene operates as a prelude to the main story. What do learn about the character of Uncle Charlie in this prelude? Be specific.  We learn that he is a solitary person who is preoccupied with a problem of some sort. When the landlady comes in and informs him that the two men had stopped by, he did not tell her what he was going to do, but mentions the things that he might do…not giving a straight answer, but skirting around the answer. We also see that even though his clothes are nice and he has money on the table, he is living in a lower-class area and is renting a room rather than living in an upper-class area and owning a home.  Thus giving us a picture of a duality that is mentioned in the video.

2.    In what ways does this opening remind you of watching a film noir? If it doesn't remind you of a film noir, what makes the opening here different from the opening of a noir film like Siodmak's The Killers? (Note: If you haven't seen The Killers, it is fine to answer this question in general terms about your own personal expectations)  Detectives, seedy apartment, evasion of questions, the conversation between the landlady and Uncle Charlie regarding the men stopping by to see him and the fact that they don’t want her to tell him…secrets, the way the detectives look away from Uncle Charlie as he walks by but that their heads turn and watch him walk down the road and then they follow him, the way they both put their hands into their pockets to infer that a gun might be there.

As we move into Hitchcock's Hollywood years, his scores will take on more importance than they did during the British years. Music will play a big role in Shadow of a Doubt. The film's score is by Dimitri Tiomkin, the first of four film scores that the composer will create for Hitchcock. What effect does the Tiomkin score have on the mood, atmosphere, and even the pace of this opening scene?  The moody sounds that start the scene where Uncle Charlie is on his bed and then how the music changes as the different events happen in the scene and the music fits what Uncle Charlie is thinking and what he is going to do.  …1.  The discussion with the landlady. 2. When he walks to the window to look for the detectives. 3. The change in music to The Merry Widow Waltz when Uncle Charlie is thinking about the murder.  4. The crescendo when Uncle Charlie decides to get his things and lead the detectives on a merry chase. 



#31 Tiger1318

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 07:35 PM

  1. As mentioned in the curator's note, this scene operates as a prelude to the main story. What do learn about the character of Uncle Charlie in this prelude? Be specific. 

You actual don't learn much about Uncle Charlie other than he looks like he has money but why would he be in a run down boarding house.  From the way he is acting you know something has happened and it has something to do with all the money laying around.  He is almost rude to the woman that runs the boarding house like he thinks he is better then her.  

 

2.  In what ways does this opening remind you of watching a film noir? If it doesn't remind you of a film noir, what makes the opening here different from the opening of a noir film like Siodmak's The Killers? (Note: If you haven't seen The Killers, it is fine to answer this question in general terms about your own personal expectations)

 

The opening (after the shot with the children playing) does remind me of film noir.  The lighting how there is enough light to see what is around but not enough to maybe see all the details and the darkness of the mood that matches the lighting.
 

3. As we move into Hitchcock's Hollywood years, his scores will take on more importance than they did during the British years. Music will play a big role in Shadow of a Doubt. The film's score is by Dimitri Tiomkin, the first of four film scores that the composer will create for Hitchcock. What effect does the Tiomkin score have on the mood, atmosphere, and even the pace of this opening scene?

 

The music starts off very light when you see the children playing but as soon as it starts to approach the house and into Uncle Charlie's room it starts to get very dark and heavy, again like the lighting and mood of the room.  At first in the room the music is soft for the speaking rolls and slower.  As soon as Uncle Charlie decides he is going to go out past the gentleman that were looking for him it speeds up to match his walk.  It very much moves the story and makes it feel more exciting.



#32 T-Newton

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 09:25 PM

1. Our good ol' Uncle Charlie is calm, collected, and above all direct. He's basically the equivalent of a snob, but with an added sense of mystery and intimidation. He may be wearing a fancy suit with a lot of cash on hand, but he is well aware that reality is catching up to him and is about to lose it all.

 

2. When the film begins, I immediately get the feeling that a murder had taken place beforehand. As soon as we see our main character in his get-up, cigar and all, he clearly has a story to tell. We also don't know who the two men that were brought up are, but as soon as the story begins, we are eventually going to find out who, and why they are after this man.

 

3. What I noticed is that when we see the children play, the music is all happy, but as we transition further and further into the hotel room where our main character resides, the music starts getting darker and darker in tone until we finally enter the room, where it's all quiet and suspenseful. In a way, film composition and musical composition aren't too different from one another, because they both set the overall mood. 



#33 dmaxedon

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 01:58 AM

1. He's in a boarding house, that provides some insight as to who he might be right there, he's well dressed, surrounded by cash, smoking a cigar, relaxed about what's to come, and even what may have happened the night before. In his reaction to the landlady telling him about the two men who visited, he seems well spoken, opinionated, but also mysterious, cutting and on edge. Surprisingly, we learn a lot about his true nature in just a few moments. I like how others pointed out the landlady is willing to protect him, as a nod to his ability to charm women, women who might not otherwise garner attention, something I missed on multiple watchings.

2. It's gritty, and while there's no inner dialogue, we're introduced to a potentially dark character, who is both intelligent and calculating, and also about to go through an ordeal. The two gentlemen on the corner are no doubt detectives, and they begin to follow him, the chase is on.

3. There's an urgency, and also a rhythm, that sort of sets the pace, something is foreboding, and he's rushed / pressured to make the next move. It also fits the backdrop of big city, and possibly crime.



#34 Robinv

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 06:15 PM

1. We find out Uncle Charlie is living on the low side of town renting a room. He is neatly dressed in a suit and he has a lot of money that he doesn't seem to care about. You wonder why is he living in this room when has money. Then the landlady tells him 2 men were looking for him. So now you figure Uncle Charlie is in some kind of trouble, he's hiding out. Landlady closes the shade and cut to shadows covering his face. Something sinister about him. I never noticed this before but in the opening the women dancing seemed to be older and more mature than the men. The men look younger.

2. Uncle Charlie seems to have a feeling of dread. As if nothing matters. His mood is dark. He knows they will eventually catch him. He is pressing his luck doesn't have much time. This movie reminds me of The Killers. Men asking questions and looking for him. Laying in the bed waiting. The 2 men walking down the street to the sound of music that signifies to me a determined purpose.


3. The music is The Merry Widow Waltz. We don't know that in the beginning so we might think this may be a lighthearted little picture. But this is a Hitchcock movie. You know something's coming a twist.

#35 Kim.Farrell

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 05:02 PM

1. His response to the landlady regarding the 2 men, seem an odd way to respond to the fact that they may or may not be his friends - you see an under lying anger. When the camera pans to the loose moneyI felt it showed a reckless attitude an I do not care, is he possible a psycopath?  He then confidently walks towards the 2 men as if to test them and show his fearlessness.

 

2. I find two film noir elements.  Film Noir as a style and as a movement or cycle.

 

3. Once sound entered the film industry, I can't imagine a film without great music!  In the opening scene we see some children playing ball in any hometown in America, music is easy and light it quickly changes once the camera cuts to Uncle Charlie lying on his bed, it becomes softer but odd.  If we jump to the scene when Uncle Charlie is leaving the rooming house, the music seems to become a warning



#36 aoohara

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 03:41 PM

I think Uncle Charlie is a new kind of leading character...a pathologically, evil person. There are no hobbies for this person, no activities beyond whatever evil doings he's engaged in.  He's a criminal who wants or steals money, yet doesn't value it. He's running from something yet doesn't seem to be hiding. He's waiting. Waiting for the next opportunity. For Uncle Charlie, neither legal, nor moral laws exist. For this reason it's film noir at it's scariest. For the innocent there is no honesty or integrity that will prevent Uncle Charlie from changing course.... there is no moral high ground to run to.

 

I think the room itself also sets this squarely in the film noir camp....it's a hot, stuffy, smoky rooming house....used by many. The pace, Charlie's voice, his thought process...it's all slow, like smoke or haze personified. The he picks up his things...maybe even everything he needs to disappear for good and heads out the door. The bullet hole in his jacket confirm all of our fears.....he's bad...but what exactly has he done?

 

For me this music does to us what some of Hitchcock's earlier film work does....throws us off kilter, and tell us something is not right. It's the lilting, slightly off key, waltzy tune...like a pendulum swinging wildly from one side to another....dragging us between good and evil.



#37 hussardo

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 03:25 PM

1. As mentioned in the curator's note, this scene operates as a prelude to the main story. What do learn about the character of Uncle Charlie in this prelude? Be specific.
You can see that something has happened an that Charlie is doubt of how to proceed. As more information unfolds, the character takes action to keep the audience wondering what will happen next.


2. In what ways does this opening remind you of watching a film noir? If it doesn't remind you of a film noir, what makes the opening here different from the opening of a noir film like Siodmak's The Killers? (Note: If you haven't seen The Killers, it is fine to answer this question in general terms about your own personal expectations)

The use of melodic mood mixed with frame shots, the use of light contrast, gives in the Film Noir atmosphere.


3. As we move into Hitchcock's Hollywood years, his scores will take on more importance than they did during the British years. Music will play a big role in Shadow of a Doubt. The film's score is by Dimitri Tiomkin, the first of four film scores that the composer will create for Hitchcock. What effect does the Tiomkin score have on the mood, atmosphere, and even the pace of this opening scene?
The music does indeed set the tone of what's going on and what possibly might happen next. The soundtrack gives you information where there's no dialogue.

#38 Soonya

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 10:58 AM

  1. As mentioned in the curator's note, this scene operates as a prelude to the main story. What do learn about the character of Uncle Charlie in this prelude? Be specific.

The character of Uncle Charlie appears to be a charmer (the landlady fawns over him), rude (he doesn’t connect with her politely), a loafer (lying in bed instead of working industriously at some important task), unappreciative of the value of money (perhaps did not come by it honestly). Doesn’t show his cards - we are left to infer what he is thinking - toying with an unlit cigar, hurling a glass across the the room, siding up to the window to look out at the guys scoping his room… And concluding that he is not someone you want to “take home to Mother.”

 

  1. In what ways does this opening remind you of watching a film noir? If it doesn't remind you of a film noir, what makes the opening here different from the opening of a noir film like Siodmak's The Killers? (Note: If you haven't seen The Killers, it is fine to answer this question in general terms about your own personal expectations)

I will again state the obvious - what I know about film noir I just learned from reading the Professor’s notes. So the list will be seedy hotel, dubious characters, the hint of a crime, thugs or detectives watching the place, loaner - not a family scene, blase air the protagonist has towards the others in the scene.

 

  1. As we move into Hitchcock's Hollywood years, his scores will take on more importance than they did during the British years. Music will play a big role in Shadow of a Doubt. The film's score is by Dimitri Tiomkin, the first of four film scores that the composer will create for Hitchcock. What effect does the Tiomkin score have on the mood, atmosphere, and even the pace of this opening scene?

For my more modern sensibilities, the scoring seems to be over the top - like the Jaws sound track - coaching me on how to respond. I prefer more subtle leading though I do like the reference to the Merry Widow that would be a clue for more astute listeners.


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#39 Soonya

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 10:45 AM

I noticed the hole in his suit jacket as well and as the rest of his suit looked pretty good, was this a bullet hole? Many people have commented that he may be in hiding and from the nonchalant attitude with the money, perhaps it is not his focus. There are also a number of comments about the landlady looking out for him as a sign he charms older women. I offer a slightly different view; Let's assume we don't know anything about the rest of the film as if we are seeing it in the theater in it's first release. He is in a low rent boarding house yet he has money, he is lying on the bed but fully dressed like he may be resting momentarily but he is planning to be on the move soon, he is completely at ease with the landlady looking out for him almost as if he expects to be treated that way, and he is interested that the men are looking for him but is not intimidated as he tells the landlady to invite them up and then decides to go to them. I offer that all of these are signs that although he may be lying low while he plots his next move, he is such a narcissist that he feels he does not need to care about the dangers. He feels he has the ability to handle anything that comes as he is the smartest, smoothest, and slickest guy around. He may steal others money but he does not worry about his own. The landlady fawns over him but why shouldn't she, everyone should because he is just that amazing. The guys outside may be after him but why worry, they can't have figured anything out because I am too smart for them. He is so confident, he walks right by them, taunting them to do something and knows he can get away any time he feels like it. The score sets this tone as well.

I too wondered about what appeared to be a hole in the jacket. 



#40 Jennifer Anne

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 10:43 AM

1.
-He is careless with his money as we see large amounts lying on the table and floor of a public boarding house;
-He cares about his appearance--his tailored suit fits perfectly and is pressed even after lying down;
-He has a temper (smashes glass in frustration over the police being outside);
-He has no respect for the law, believing himself smarter than the two detectives following him (he brazenly walks past them instead of hiding; also by his words "What do you know. You're bluffing. You've got nothing on me.");

-He seems to make unnecessary trouble for himself. He easily confesses to the landlady about not knowing his male callers, explaining they don't know him either, as opposed to simply agreeing with the landlady's assumption of the men being his friends.

-For a person who has likely done something illegal, he doesn't seem very concerned about hiding or pretending to be someone that he is not; he has an uneasy confidence.

2. I haven't seen The Killers, so I will answer generally. The setting is a city boarding house (most noirs are in gritty, urban settings) and we meet a lone troubled man resting (or trapped?) in his room contemplating his next move. What stands out the most to me as noir is the expressionistic lighting: the shadows of the curtains billowing across Charlie's face and the bed echo his unease; the shadow of the blind comes down over Charlie's face like a curtain at the end of a play foreshadowing his death while Charlie lies still with closed eyes, immaculately dressed as if for his own funeral. The mood is also uneasy and the scene "pregnant with possibilities". The presence of detectives watching, waiting, and following this lone man is also very noir-ish.

3. The rhythm of the waltz is echoed in the cuts to Joseph Cotten in the rooming house: from the shot of the children playing in the street, to the rooming house (which is unlucky number 13!), to the window, to the room, all happen to the beat of the music. It sets up what will eventually be a "dance" between Cotten and Wright. The waltz also does not match the urban setting, establishing the well-dressed Cotten as a man who does not fit in with his surroundings.
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