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Daily Dose #12: Why Do You Care How I Feel? (Early Scene from Notorious)

#Notorious #Hitchcock50 Ingrid Bergman Cary Grant

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#1 Emma D.

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Posted 24 August 2017 - 07:39 PM

1. What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?
 
Clear indications in this scene from Notorious that directly point to Hitchcock are as follows:

  • camerawork (ex: rotating camera angle on Grant, quarter shot of record player spinning)
  • black and white outfits
  • shadows (ex: lines/crosses cast onto wall in immediate beginning)
  • close-ups on faces

2. How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?
As Bergman wakes up, she and Grant are contrasted by opposing camera angles.  The swirling camera only stresses this.  Yet, the first connection we see is their attire, both dressing strictly in black and white.  The two standing in the doorway as they listen to Bergman's speech on patriotism tie them both together, even though they have differing feelings.  

 

3. Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

As both actors express suave and charismatic entities, the two seem fitting in their respective roles.  However, something here makes me feel that Cary Grant is slightly out of place.  The pairing of the two, while it seems appropriate, does not convey a certain authenticity.



#2 savannahhope5

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 10:20 AM

Hitchcock's touches are spread throughout the film. One of the most Hitchcockian shots is the POV shot when a very drunk Ingrid Bergman is lying on the bed as Cary Grant comes into view. Lighting has always been very important to Hitchcock. One of the ways we can distinguish Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman's personalities in the film is through the lighting alone. Ingrid has a very soft glow that is always on her: it signifies her innocence. Cary Grant, on the other hand, always wears very dark clothes and has dark shadows either cast on him or he is hiding in the shadows. It shows how his character is not trustworthy. This movie definitely changed people's views of these actors. Cary Grant was the charismatic hero who would never do anything wrong. Although he is not the villain, he is not exactly a good guy. He is fueled by jealousy and is blinded by it throughout the film to the point where Ingrid's safety is compromised. Ingrid played a very scandalous role. In the first act we see that she is drunk driving and very flirtatious. This was not the typical role that a female of that time would play. Hitchcock always defied gender roles in his films by creating female characters that are more than just sidekicks or the "housewife" type or the ditzy blonde. He created females with a mind of her own, and Ingrid's character of Alicia is one of those examples. 



#3 dsanders

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 02:36 AM

Daily Dose #12: Why Do You Care How I Feel? Early Scene from Hitchcock’s Notorious (1946)

 

In the opening of this scene, Cary Grant stands in shadow, framed by the doorway, his darkness a reflection of the agency he works for and his role working for them, as well as his emotional state toward Alicia. He is frozen inside, choked up, unable to respond to her love at first, and when he does, only to pull back, because ‘they have a job to do’.

 

He’s jealous and insecure and shies away from her with the least little suspicion. She is lit in the scene, even though covered in blankets and hung over, the top edge of her hair glowing like gold. The camera zooms in on one eye, from which she regards him, a duplicate of the scene in Mr. and Mrs. Smith, where Carole Lombard spies on her husband, while feigning sleep. As Alicia recalls the evening she remembers he is a copper, and he can only want her for one thing, to be a stool pigeon. She wears a striped blouse, like a convict, the bars of shadows law in complex structures around the walls, but unlike the harsh shadows of Shadow of A Doubt, these shadows are soft and light, and the lighting all around is in soft focus.

 

As Devlin advances toward her bedside and the camera swings around to cast him upside down from her point of view, another duplicate scene, this from The Lodger, recalls the uncertainty of that character’s moral nature, and suggests a topsy-turvy world that Alicia is entering.

 

Cary Grant gives her a glass of medicine for her hangover, acting doctor to her sickness, in contrast to the way Claude Rains will later be poisoning her with an innocuous cup of tea.

 

When Alicia stands framed in the doorway now, her blouse has sequins on it, but only one or two glint into the camera at a time, like stars twinkling in a hazy heaven. The close-up of a record spinning, as we have seen in previous works, also foreshadows here a mechanistic fate and surreal turn of events.

 

In many ways, the casting of this movie is all. Cary Grant plays against type, as a humorless cog in the espionage establishment, only redeemed late in the film when he finally decides to act on his own and question his agency’s judgment, to go check on Alicia. And Bergman plays a depth and melancholy that makes you hurt for her. Together their chemistry is fantastic.



#4 visball

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 06:01 PM

What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?

 

The upside-down viewpoint shot of Cary Grant.​
 

How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?

 

His framing is close on his stars most of this scene. The background becomes unimportant. Devlin is dressed sharply in a tailored suit. Alicia is frumpy with bed head and wearing yesterday's dress.​
 

B​ased on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

The scene fits them from what I have seen so far.



#5 MagdaK83

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 01:53 PM

The way the camera goes upside down is so Hitchcockian that I love! These two actors matched so great together!!! A must watch! And what about the question she makes: "what's your angle?" you could frame me." is it a reference to the cinematic style? Hitchcock is here!



#6 Rejana Raj

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 08:37 AM

1.) The Hitchcock touches to me are the twirling shot of Devlin (played by Cary Grant), the closeup shots of Alicia (Ingrid Bergman), Alicia's unkempt hair, a glass of unknown drink and the record playing the recording.

2.) We can see that Hitchcock uses the shadow technique where one wonders about the appearance of the stranger who we come to know later as Devlin. Alicia appears in misty light as she is on the bed with unkempt hair and disheveled dress.

3.) I feel that Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant were the power stars of Hollywood at that time. Miss Bergman was at high height with success of Casablanca in 1942 along with the "King of Noir" Humphrey Bogart. On the other hand, Mr. Grant was the reigning prince of Hollywood (thanks to a string of box-office hits like Bringing Up Baby, The Awful Truth, The Philadelphia Story etc.). Hitchcock said at the first place that he was eager to work in Hollywood because of the wonderful stars. Coming on to this scene, we could see that Devlin was a spy whose behaviour is dark and mysterious and Alicia is disoriented and strong-willed woman who finally takes the offer to become a spy.

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#7 Bgeorgeteacher

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 09:11 PM

1. Definitive Hitchcock. First, look at the camera work - close-ups, odd angles establishing the power structure between the actors, Bergman looking into and through the glass of bicarbonate, hair down in her face. Again, all you need to know about where this is headed. The dialogue fills in the details, but it's the camera work that establishes all context of the main idea of this film. Time and again, through the focus of these Daily Doses, I can't help but reflect on comments in earlier classes about Hitchcock never straying far from his silent film roots. There is, to me, nothing more Hitchcockian than this.
 

By the way, here's that damn figure of a person laid out across a bed. Again.

 

2. In this scene, the initial shot of Bergman in bed, hand hanging from the bed, is brightly lit. All is dependent on her wonderful acting skills within the set design. Her eyes reflect her doubt and concern, hazily through the fog of her hangover (and the restorative bicarbonate) as they slowly focus on the shadowy figure of Cary Grant, backlit in the doorway.

 

She's framed tightly, so it is required that her face express her underlying doubt and confusion. Grant, framed in the doorway, cloaked in shadow, walks toward the bed and his image is turned upside down as he speaks to her with a seemingly dispassionate voice. The set is de-emphasized through shallow depth-of-focus, with the exception of the bed. 

 

She's dressed in yesterday's clothes, he's dapper (as usual). One's life in shambles, one's life in seemingly total control. His voice controlling. Her voice rebellious. 

 

Is there any aspect to this scene that doesn't hit it on every single level?

 

3. First, Cary Grant, because his casting is so much easier to discuss for me. There is the basic structure of his persona - suave and cool. Yet, rather than the charm we've come to expect from him, he's cynical, manipulative, hard, dispassionate. 

Ms. Bergman, on the other hand, plays very much to her traits. Vulnerable. Confused. Seeking to understand her situation and how best to work through it, but with little confidence. She does what many of us would do in a similarly unbalanced relationship - become rebellious. Defiant. Dismissive. All to protect herself from her own vulnerability. 

 

This is my favorite scene of all the Daily Doses seen to date.

No kidding!!  That figure lying on the bed again... makes you wonder, doesn't it?



#8 Bgeorgeteacher

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 09:10 PM

Whoa!  Classic Hitchcock in this early scene of Notorious!  There's the mysterious figure in the doorway, and he's telling her to "drink it".  Gosh... with that creepy looking figure in the doorway, even if it is a harmless Cary Grant, I wouldn't have done it!  There's the POV shot, with Bergman looking up at Grant from the bed, his figure essentially turning upside down to reflect what she is actually seeing.  The dark/light contrast could lead you to knowing this was a Hitchcock film, even if you didn't know the title of what you were watching.  



#9 mavfan4life

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 10:25 AM

1. Definitive Hitchcock. First, look at the camera work - close-ups, odd angles establishing the power structure between the actors, Bergman looking into and through the glass of bicarbonate, hair down in her face. Again, all you need to know about where this is headed. The dialogue fills in the details, but it's the camera work that establishes all context of the main idea of this film. Time and again, through the focus of these Daily Doses, I can't help but reflect on comments in earlier classes about Hitchcock never straying far from his silent film roots. There is, to me, nothing more Hitchcockian than this.
 

By the way, here's that damn figure of a person laid out across a bed. Again.

 

2. In this scene, the initial shot of Bergman in bed, hand hanging from the bed, is brightly lit. All is dependent on her wonderful acting skills within the set design. Her eyes reflect her doubt and concern, hazily through the fog of her hangover (and the restorative bicarbonate) as they slowly focus on the shadowy figure of Cary Grant, backlit in the doorway.

 

She's framed tightly, so it is required that her face express her underlying doubt and confusion. Grant, framed in the doorway, cloaked in shadow, walks toward the bed and his image is turned upside down as he speaks to her with a seemingly dispassionate voice. The set is de-emphasized through shallow depth-of-focus, with the exception of the bed. 

 

She's dressed in yesterday's clothes, he's dapper (as usual). One's life in shambles, one's life in seemingly total control. His voice controlling. Her voice rebellious. 

 

Is there any aspect to this scene that doesn't hit it on every single level?

 

3. First, Cary Grant, because his casting is so much easier to discuss for me. There is the basic structure of his persona - suave and cool. Yet, rather than the charm we've come to expect from him, he's cynical, manipulative, hard, dispassionate. 

Ms. Bergman, on the other hand, plays very much to her traits. Vulnerable. Confused. Seeking to understand her situation and how best to work through it, but with little confidence. She does what many of us would do in a similarly unbalanced relationship - become rebellious. Defiant. Dismissive. All to protect herself from her own vulnerability. 

 

This is my favorite scene of all the Daily Doses seen to date.


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#10 Suj

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 01:40 PM

1. The Hitchcock touches are very obvious in this scene. The close-ups of Grant  as he approaches Bergman and of Bergman on the bed; the POV shot of Cary Grant upside down and rotating as Bergman wakes up; the actress on the bed (as Carole Lombard in Mr & Mrs Smith and Joseph Cotten in Shadow of a Doubt). In this film he adds another way to offer information to the audience. Instead of having 2 other characters (as in The Lady Vanishes or Mr & Mrs Smith) doing so, he has the 2 stars having a conversation about what is going on and filling us in.

 

2. Hitch uses dark and light. Initially we see Grant in almost complete darkness as he speaks harshly to Bergman and as he approaches her, he casts a shadow hinting at the danger he is trying to embroil her in. There is a definite contrast between the way the 2 stars are shot one in the light and the other in the shade. When they listen to the wired conversation, Bergman emerges from the dark into light. The spotlight is shun more on her and Cary Grant is back in relative darkness.

 

The shots of Bergman are in soft-focus whereas those of Grant are very sharp and defined. She is on a soft messy bed and her hair is falling apart but Grant is dressed in a sharp suit and has lots of angles around him - the doorframe for example. We definitely see Grant here as a dominating character trying to attract Bergman into his web and seeing Bergman helpless, drugged or hungover, makes her seem more vulnerable.

 

The art direction and cinematography are superb and all the visual effects here make the audience realise how powerless Bergman feels as Grant manipulates her into spying for him.

 

3. I think this scene does challenge the well-known star personas of Bergman and Grant. Just as he did with his casting of Cotten as a villain in Shadow of a Doubt, he shows both Grant and Bergman in ambiguous, mysterious roles. We don't know who is wrong or right: Grant because he is coercing Bergman into spying or Bergman for trying to resist spying for Grant. We first think that Bergman is completely innocent but we see that she has a tainted past - her father was a traitor. The cinema audience at the time would perhaps have found both roles shocking if they were used to seeing them in glamorous roles.



#11 Reegstar

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Posted 30 July 2017 - 08:03 PM

Before I go into detail on the numbered topics for this sequence, I want to say that Notorious is far and away my favorite Hitchcock movie.  I've seen it many times over the years and I never get tired of it. Sometimes I find a scene or shot that I never took notice of in prior viewings.  All of the things Prof. Edwards mentions in the Lecture Video are true for me as well.  The casting is perfect, the acting is perfect, the costumes are awesome, and the cinematography is outstanding.  In the movie, I want to point out a sequence in which Hitchcock builds suspense by just the merest effort.  He doesn't need to bang this into our heads, it's just there.  While Grant/Bergman are snooping around for the wine, Hitchcock sets up the disappearing champagne bottles as a reason for them to get caught.  When Alicia first looks at the ice chest, there are ten bottles, then Devlin looks at the ice chest and counts only seven,  Pretty soon they see there are only three bottles left and they must act before Claude Rains goes down to the wine cellar for more champagne.  Alicia and Devlin walk across the room and out to the patio to get to the cellar.  What really hooked me in this scene is everyone at the party is drinking champagne!  The people standing around and chatting, all the guests on the patio are drinking glasses of champagne.  It is a small thing, but it manages to ratchet up the suspense just that much and more. This is genius.

 

1.  What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie? 

 

Opens with a party scene with lots of drinking.  We have a mysterious man in shadow, we can't quite get a grasp of what Devlin's all about.  There is a beautiful woman in bed, peering over the covers, and then we see the odd angled POV shot that spins around.  We also have 'modern' gadgets in the phonograph player and secret recording.  I'm not sure people knew all about that in those times.  And then we see a budding romance, or at least some interest.  There is also a shot of the light streaming in through the window with strong shadows.  Of course, the close up of the glass of bromo-seltzer (?) next to Alicia, with Devlin urging her to drink it, foreshadows the end of the movie when Alicia is being poisoned and Alex and his mother are constantly urging Alicia to "drink her coffee", which is laced with poison.  Nice!!!

 

2.   How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?  

 

Hitchcock just uses his genius to show how remarkably beautiful Ingrid Bergman, the star, is; despite waking up with a raging hangover.  He shines a light on her in a very beguiling way, with her hair piece falling off, yet she's luminous.  She has a fabulous outfit on, that seems very fashion forward for the times.  Grant's character, Devlin, is shown as kind of mysterious.  We aren't sure how it's going to go with him - hard or easy? - and Hitchcock brings this out by having him standing in the shadows and only lastly coming into the light when he reveals his motivation for getting together with Alicia. Hitchcock has the initial view of him, through Bergman's bleary eyes, beautifully shot with him going from standing in the doorway shadow and then turning upside down as Alicia turns over.  She's established as a party girl, trying to forget her father's treason and trial, and her anger that Devlin is bringing that all back by taking advantage of it.

 

3. Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

 

This movie could do nothing but put extra polish on these two stars.  It shows a fabulous, gorgeous, couple falling in love and spying for the good of the "country" thrown in as hot sauce.  I believe this might have been a bit of a departure for Grant, in that it is not a light comedy, or war movie, but Grant does very well in this ambivalent role - much as he did in Suspicion.  He is the perfect romantic lead, handsome and sophisticated, yet possibly dangerous.  I don't care who they cast as James Bond, Grant was the best at this kind of character, and Hitchcock puts that part of Cary Grant to work in this film.  I cannot say anything bad about Bergman - her acting is superb!  She says more with the **** of her eye or the angle of her head than many actresses say with pages of dialogue.



#12 cynthiag

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 08:51 PM

The Dutched angle on Devlin in the doorway is reminiscent of the houses in Shadow of a Doubt, followed by the spinning-upside-down camera work giving us a POV of Alicia's literal view as well as her hungover state. Keeping Devlin initially in silhouette carries through the ominous introductory shot of him in the party scene. We're initially seeing close-ups of Alicia and longer shots of Devlin...we're getting to know Alicia, while Devlin remains more of a cypher, and of course we can appreciate her beauty. Hitchcock uses the star quality of both actors and twists their personas to help tell his story. Bergman usually played "nice girls," and here she keeps her typical warmth and vulnerability while playing a girl who hasn't been living a very nice life...her persona helps keep the audience on her side until we get to know her character better and appreciate her underlying honesty and patriotism, and we believe in her change even though Devlin doesn't. Grant is playing a character much darker, crueler, and more humorless than his usual persona, but that persona helps us understand why Alicia is drawn to him and falls for him so hard, and draws us in to pull for their relationship.



#13 FilmFan39

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 03:25 PM

1. There are several Hitchcock touches from the light and shadow play of Alicia and Devlin, the topsy turvy move of the camera as Alicia becomes more focused and the record playing in the background.

 

2. I think that Hitchcock's direction shows us the characters fairly well. Bergman's Alicia as the drunk weary party girl who was looking to go straight and Grant as the mysterious shadowy Devlin who we are uncertain of throughout the entire film.

 

3. I think that this is some of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman's best work. Cary Grant comes across as suave and sophisticated while mysterious and menacing at the same time while Bergman is both strong yet world weary at the same time. 



#14 filmcat

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 03:10 PM

This entire scene illustrates the "Hitchcock Touch."  The main "touch" has to be the camera shots - the long shot of Alicia's bedroom, then moving in to an extreme close-up of her face half covered by her hair, the quilt, and the glass of "hangover tonic."  I love how we see her through the glass and how disheveled she looks with hair over her eyes and in her mouth!  Then we see Devlin from Alicia's POV, framed in the doorway with the light behind him, so he appears in shadow (mysterious and menacing) and at an angle (not being straight with her).  When he walks toward her, again from her POV, we see him spin completely upside down!  That is definitely a "Hitchcock Touch."  I also love the way Hitchcock uses light and shadow (in the first shot of Devlin and in the way the morning light is apparently coming through the windows).  Hitchcock makes us feel sympathy for Alicia because she is so hung over and Devlin is being so cold and uncaring.  The shot of the spinning record is a technique we have seen in a couple of the other openings.  Finally, we see a little humor in the scene as Alicia is such a hot mess and so confused (when she looks at her hair piece in the bed like she has never seen it before and then when she looks at her clothes like "Why am I wearing this to bed?")

 

In this scene, I believe Hitchcock is trying to show the total contrast between the two characters.  Everything is opposites!  First we see her all soft, sleepy, rumpled bedding, hair down and in her eyes and mouth, sun shining on her hair, still wearing her "party" clothes from the night before.  Then we flash to him -- framed in the doorway, stiff and straight (although at an angle), all buttoned-up in a dark suit, groomed to perfection with the light behind him so he is in shadow.  Hitchcock keeps them completely apart (in our view), even when Devlin is standing close to Alicia.  We never see them together in the same frame until the last few seconds.  We see them turning their backs to each other as they are talking (again emphasizing the contrast between the two characters).  Then, as Devlin walks to the record player, Hitchcock emphasizes the distance between them.  The doorway is used to frame Devlin, but it is also used to show their separation in different rooms.  When he puts the record on and then we cut back to Alicia, we don't see her at first as she is in the darkened hall.  Then, she slowly appears out of the darkness and into the light, framed in the doorway.  Devlin walks across the room to her and joins her in the doorway shot.  This is where you know they are coming together.  This whole scene is Hitchcock at his best!

 

This is my favorite Hitchcock movie and I believe the casting is perfect!  I think Hitchcock conforms to some aspects of their personas and challenges other aspects.  I always think of Cary Grant as suave, handsome, perfectly dressed, charming, and sexy.  He is often slightly cynical, but with a sense of humor, like he is laughing at the world, but he is also laughing at himself.  Hitchcock gives him the visual aspects of his usual persona (and the sex appeal), but not the charming behavior.  In this role, Grant is unusually cruel, condescending, and "right below the belt everytime" (as Alicia says).  He also doesn't display the sense of humor that is usually so prevalent in his roles.  Ingrid Bergman seems harder to define.  When I think of her, I think she usually seems vulnerable, but strong in spirit, faith, and determination.  She usually plays a nice "good" girl.  I'm reminded of her role in "Spellbound" and I think that is much closer to her usual persona.  In "Notorious" (especially the beginning), you see the vulnerability, but Alicia is trying to hide it and I think she has lost faith, trust, and spirit.  She drinks too much, parties too much, is promiscuous, sulky, cynical, and rude.  I think she sums it up when she says that she remembers when her father was nice, "when we both were."  Of course, we see how love quickly turns those unpleasant qualities back toward "nice" ones!



#15 SherriW

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 10:25 PM

1.What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?

 

The topsy-turvy  shot of Cary Grant entering the room. The record playing,  which we've seen in several of his movies. All used differently in every scene but representative of is German influence.

 

2.How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography

 

The vulnerability of Ingrid Bergman's character laying **** on the bed is greatly contrasted by Cary Grant standing over her with a very menacing look on his face. His clothes come across as very plain but stark in the black and white coloring. I realize it's a b&w film but you can see shade variations. I have to add, I cracked up when her hair piece fell off.

 

Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

 

Having seen both in other films, I would have a hard time thinking there could be a bad performance. Cary Grant could play menacing, romantic and comedic roles. Ingrid Bergman could play smart, brave, vulnerable and tempermental.



#16 melissasimock

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 02:28 PM

What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?

 

Ingrid Bergman viewing Cary Grant from an upside down perspective.

The use of light and shadow.

The close up of the record on the record player.

 

 

How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?

 

Cary coming out of the shadows, gives you the feeling there's something sinister about him.

They both have close-ups, in individual frames.  They are both important in star quality, and as characters in the film.

Contrast - Cary is very put together, stylish, composed, and in control.  Ingrid is a bit of a hot mess.

Cary is standing up very straight, walking confidently.  Ingrid is rolling around in the bed, not wanting to deal with him, or anything else.

 

 

 

Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

 

Confirms.  They both have many close ups.  They are well dressed.  Even tho Ingrid is disheveled in this scene, there is still an elegance to you.  You can tell by her dress and surroundings that she is living a high society life.

 

 


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#17 Ihopetheresice

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Posted 26 July 2017 - 08:39 AM

1. Some Hitchcock touches I noticed initially were the skewed camera angle and shadow that Grant seems to step out of as he walks closer to Bergman until he is seen upside down from Bergman's POV.

Upon seeing Bergman peek out from her disheveled hair, I was reminded of the the previous Daily Dose where Lombard similarly peeks out from her bed covers. 

 

2. Again, Hitch uses shadows effectively with Grant, at first covering him in them until he reveals his intentions and purpose of his visit. Upon seeing the top half of Bergman's outfit as she is lying in bed, I couldn't help but imagine prison stripes, which would be fitting considering she is about to be coerced into an imprisonment of sorts while spying on Rains' character. 

 

3. I believe that Cary Grant both conforms and challenges his persona in that, while retaining the charm we have come to associate with Grant, he is blackmailing Bergman's Alicia into helping him, after all. As for Bergman, her haggard and hungover state plays against the elegant type for which she was so well-known.


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#18 devin05

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:48 PM

What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?
 

The use of objects, the glass (the "hangover" cure) in the foreground, a subtle foreshadowing of what really is happening to Alicia. Delvin emerging from the shadow to reveal his intention, seen from as angle, Alicia's perspective.  More use of objects, the album that contradicts Alicia's contradiction of patriotism.  As Alicia enters the shot in the door way, the frame surrounds her, our focus is clearly Alicia as the truth that she is patriotic even to oppose her father.  The Delvin enters the shot and the focus shared as Alicia reacts to the recording.  Reminds of a scene from Downhill where characters enter frame and the focus is changed.

 

How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?
 

Alicia hair a mess, clothes a mess, Delvin's hair neat clothes perfect (But it's Cary Grant, I bet he woke up like that/)  Alicia laying the bet vulnerable, hurt, Devlin upright dominate.

 

Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

 

I think it part of casting is to bring in star power to sell tickets.  I also think it the in this case, the contrast was also complimentary.



#19 karenod1

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 08:14 PM

In Daily Dose #12 "Notorious", 

 

1.  The most obvious Hitchcock touch is the pot shot of Grant where he becomes upside down in Bergmans view...but also the play of shadows and then camera angles...the view through doorways and the closeups.

 

2. The way the film treats the stars in evidenced with all the close ups...how frame is almost filled with the actor....and when it's not, the actor is in focus but the background is blurred. Also the movement into and out of light. The contrasts I see are that Grant is dressed in dark clothes and presents in shadow, he is always in focus which indicates a solidity, he knows what to do, a lot of the time Bergman is well lit and for the beginning of the scene covered in light colored sheets when she is up she is dressed in black and white perhaps a sign of her difficulty in doing the right thing and her lack of definition. Also, when she first hears the recording she is in shadow and as we hear her go stand up for her country and deny her father she comes into the light. 

 

3.  I do believe that Grant and Bergman are well cast and that this scene and in fact the entire movie challenges their persona....Grant is known for hid debonair, classy, lighthearted persona and here he plays a cold hearted spy. The camera depicts his this way too. Bergman, on the other hand, has a good girl persona, to see her drinking and refusing to do the right thing is a bit jarring for the audience. 



#20 pumatamer

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 01:19 PM

  1. What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie? Two things stand out to me. The shadowy view of Grant as he enters the room and the extreme close up on Bergman as she comes to. 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: #Notorious, #Hitchcock50, Ingrid Bergman, Cary Grant

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