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Daily Dose #12: Why Do You Care How I Feel? (Early Scene from Notorious)

#Notorious #Hitchcock50 Ingrid Bergman Cary Grant

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#21 shamus46

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 08:09 PM

1. What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?  The camera angles..tilted to upside down.  Grant framed by the doorway and Bergman close-up in the bed.  The ominous feeling of the scene.

 

2. How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?  Grant is ominous in the shadow, framed by the doorway, well dressed.  Bergman is disheveled in the bed, nauseated with slept-in clothes and hair a mess.

 

3. Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas?  The casting of both is brilliant / perfect.  I don't understand the question of their character parts to their star personas.  They're actors...it's a part.  These parts conform (Grant) and challenge (Bergman) their personas.  They are both symbols of class and fashion...



#22 lovebirding54

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 06:36 PM

The Hitchcock touches I see in this scene is first the main one mentioned in the lecture video. Hitchcock uses the same great POV cantered shot or upside down angle that he used in "Downhill". It is a great shot. He uses a shadowy shot of Grant framed in the doorway. The lighting gives the audience a feeling of a darker character in Grant. 

 

Hitchcock seems to set Devlin to appear in the shadows standing in the doorway which sets him up to be not the nice guy we normally might expect in Cary Grant. Bergman has the close-up shots in the light to see her reactions, how ill she is feeling from the night before's drinking. The upside down shot again lets us know how she is feeling. The medium shots of Devlin show the disdain Grant appears to have for Alicia until after playing the recording of her patriotic conversation with her traitor father.

 

I think the scene does not conform to the characters as Grant is not the debonair charismatic character I think of when I think of Grant. Bergman is the always serious actress and she is wonderful at conveying the character of whoever she is playing.   



#23 Catherine.g.ens

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Posted 24 July 2017 - 06:17 PM

In this early scene from Notorious, Hitchcock is choosing to show a contrast between his two characters, played by Ingrid Bergman and Cary Grant. Bergman's face is shown in close up, and she is lying on a bed, while Grant is standing upright framed by a door and we see his whole body. Hitchcock then uses the camera to playfully tilt our view of Grant until he is upside down. The two actors are not shown together in the same frame, thereby emphasizing the fact that they do not see eye to eye. The way Hitchcock chooses to photograph these two stars is not accidental, as each had their own persona known to the public. While Bergman was relatable for women, and therefore shown in a natural position and in close-up, Grant was the epitome of a debonair leading man, so it makes sense for him to presented as "the whole package" dressed "like Cary Grant". In this scene, Hitchcock is capitalizing on the special appeal of each of the two stars.

#24 iceiceblondie

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 11:18 PM

The obvious Hitchcock touch is the POV with the camera tilting on Cary Grant, showing Ingrid Bergman's view. There was a contrast between the two stars, with of course seeing Bergman is feeling awful, while Grant is put together and has the upper hand in the scene.



#25 GeeWiz

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 05:57 PM

1. Hitch touch:

 

The obvious tilted camera angle of Cary Grant to reflect Bergman's drunkenness. There is a distant train whistle and musical theme once the hook has been set.

 

 

2. Contrast the design for the two stars:

 

They never appear in the same frame until he plays the recording of her to set the hook for her involvement with his scheme. Constant cuts back and forth, then push-in for the medium range close-ups of each. The lighting differences between characters is dramatic. As he stands in the doorway, the light is behind him, casting his face in shadow--very intimidating. However, the lighting on Ingrid Bergman is brighter--an awakening. He is very well dressed (important), she is more casual (common).

 

3.  Casting to persona?

 

Not entirely. This scene challenges Cary Grant, who usually plays a suave/debonair character rather than the intimidating heavy. Ingrid Bergman is not playing the glamorous "nice lady."

 



#26 Robinv

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 07:48 PM

1. The Hitchcock touched I see are POV shots, odd camera angles, survey the room and framing of Grant in the door frame. He is also using shadows on Grant giving him a sense of there being something not disclosed.


2. He frames Grant in the doorway. He is using the camera to show Bergman as being confused.

3. Grant and Bergman have instant chemistry. You can se it when he looks at her. He has already started to like her. They play extremely well together. You can see an instant attraction when they look at each other.

#27 ChristyKelly

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 02:55 PM

  1. What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie? As the camera focuses on Cary Grant in the doorway - you're suddenly in Ingrid Bergman's aching head and seeing what she sees. Then begins the ultimate tracking shot of Grant moving toward the bed which pitches him upside down to Ingrid's eyes - oooh, my head! Fabulous shot.  Seeing Grant in shadow is also a Hitch touch, as he doesn't want us to know who it is right away, because Ingrid isn't fully awake yet. Also, the extreme closeup of Ingrid's face and her agony at being awakened after a night of drinking puts us in her POV as well.
     
  2. How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?
    When we first see Cary Grant, it's the back of his head, all in shadow - just like a spy. Likewise, he's impeccably dressed and fully in control of himself, as a handler, (unlike Leo G. Carroll in North By Northwest!). Ingrid is far from a spy-type person because of her dishevelment, or so you think, until she and Cary connect. She is filmed in extreme closeup in all her hungover glory, and even in the driving scene, she is the one you can't keep your eyes off of. She is dressed simply and stylishly without a lot of frills as someone who is vulnerable, not hidden down below so many layers (accessories). What you see is what you get.  In the later scenes in the home of Sebastian, Ingrid has become the woman in control, calmly calculating how to complete the mission and provide the U.S. (Dev) exactly what it asks for.
  3. Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? Definitely the scene conforms to their personas - Cary Grant - the consummate male-in-charge, with a tender spot in his heart for a beautiful and vulnerable woman, and Ingrid, beautiful but doesn't know it - seeking approval for everything she does. Willingly tries to please the man she loves, even it it means taking a huge risk.

 


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#28 Jennifer Anne

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 02:17 PM

1. What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie? Definitely the creativity with the POV shots showing Grant from Bergman's perspective as he menacingly approaches her in bed. Grant is shot full-figure to look darker and more menacing, reminiscent of the Novello sequence in Downhill. These angles serve to bring the viewer into the mind of Ingrid Bergman's character, heightening emotion. The use of the record player to fill in background details of Bergman's character was innovative as well; instead of music, we get to watch Bergman react to the sound of her own voice exposing her true inner feelings.
 
2. How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography? Cary Grant is constantly active in his movements, yet retains a stiff, sinister poise echoed in his dark, crisply tailored suit. He is shown either from behind, in full figure, or in shadow. In contrast, Bergman is more passive, reacting to Grant, but her striped top and scarf tied around her waist, her dishevelled hair, mimic her inner turmoil. The scene is almost dreamlike--as if the two are engaging in a complicated dance to a record not playing music. 


3. Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? I believe it challenges their personas and subverts the expectations of the audience. Although Grant looks his usual suave, debonair and well dressed self, his character is more subdued and serious than usual; he is missing his smooth, wisecracking, easy-going nature. Similarly, Bergman is shown dishevelled, with a hangover, lacking the poise, grace, and glamour of her image. She is vulnerable, reminiscent of when she played a prostitute against Spencer Tracy's Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.
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#29 roblevy

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:55 AM

What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?

I think his use of sound and lighting are similar to other films. Bit i did notice how he uses the camera as a tool to convey feelings, emotion etc..You can tell thee is a hangover going on because of the way the camera is moving. Also his use of close ups. 

 

How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?

Well here we see a sense coif fashion coming in. We see a very straight laced fashion for the men and a very comfortable and relaxed fashion for the ladies. he uses fashion as a n accessory to develop character. The framing also converts emotions and attitudes of the characters on screen and the lighting helps establish atmosphere.

 

Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

I thin it really helped Begman cement her star status while also helping take grant into a new direction as a leading man. He has  a shade of grey to his characters in hitch films that are not food in some of his other parts.



#30 terranightangel

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 04:25 PM

  1. What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?

The camera angle is Hitchcock trying to show Alice's hangover. The fact he uses the record to do back story, the male lead is a cop and the female is in trouble is like many of Hitchcock's other films' opening scenes. 

 

 

 

  1. How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?

​The male is in a suit and there on business while the female is wearing a party outfit and suffers from a hangover. This sets up the male to be the no nonsense guy while the female is the misguided out of control woman. 

  1. Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

​For him, I think it confirms him as a steady, in control male who woman at the time loved.  As far as Ingrid went, this wasn't the actress who goes straight home to her husband.  It might have been a shock to her fans if her other work was less 'bad girl' roles. 



#31 Ann56

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Posted 21 July 2017 - 10:07 AM

1.    What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie? The POV shot and tracking of Grant first in shadow and then walking toward Bergman. Since she is watching him, the angle changes since she is looking upside down at him.  Before playing the record, Grant is as far away from Bergman as he can get; but as the record is played, he moves toward her and stands next to her, showing that he has gone from distancing himself from her to supporting her because of what she says regarding patriotism to her father.
 

2.    How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?  What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography? I mentioned the shot of Grant going from distance to support in question #1. In addition, the close up of her face as she watches him walking toward her and the upside-down shot.  As to lighting, Grant is shown in darkness and silhouette, implying that we don’t know yet whether he is a man who can be trusted.  Regarding costume, Grant is impeccably dressed giving the impression that he is above her whether in status or class. Whereas Bergman has on a flashy, provocative dress which implies that she is a “party girl” and looks at life from the bottom of a bottle. Her appearance is also marred by the way she keeps her hair and her demeanor during the previous scene and this one.

3.    Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas?  Grant was known for his debonair and suave sophistication in the movies, which he continues in this film.  I agree with the lecture video that she has a underlying melancholy, or I would say fragility  or vulnerability, that lets the audience know that underneath this brazen party girl is a more sensitive woman who is confused and alone.



#32 slp515

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 10:31 PM

Daily Dose #12: Why Do You Care How I Feel? 
Early Scene from Hitchcock's Notorious (1946)


1. What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?



Hitchcock touches were seen in this early scene by very few sounds- first footsteps as Delvin walks through the other room until he reaches the door where Alicia is lying in the bed and the train whistle blows in the background. The upside down angle of the camera as seen in the film Downhill - I thought that was a clever camera move. Both high angle and low angle shots of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman were similar to his earlier works. As Delvin walks back into the other room, the camera is following him through the two rooms. I saw that camera pan in The Ring.

2. How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?

What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock is trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?

At first it appears dark in the room where Alicia was lying in the bed. It might had been to set the mood or atmosphere but as Delvin starts to walk into room his presence seem to lighten up the place. There seem to be a few frames used for both stars as they moved about the two rooms. He places Delvin in a suit and Alicia in a beautiful yet plain looking sparkling strip blouse with a dark skirt. They do not appear to be a couple by their dress. By the close up shots of both characters, Hitchcock seemed to have forced me into the scene. 


3. Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

Both stars played their parts in the beginning of this film. By their conversation it was well known that some kind of espionage was going on or about to happen. Cary Grant has always been my favorite classic actor because of his distinguished manner as he displayed in the first part of this film. Ingrid Bergman is one of my favorite female actress. She is always refined and classy even as she appeared hung over from the night before. Even as she combed her hair (listening to the high tech recorder -for that time period) she displayed an elegance like no other. And a plain Jane beauty at that. Hitchcock knew exactly how the audience (me) was going to respond to these two great distinguished stars.

#33 Shannon.H

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 06:09 PM

What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?

 

​The amazing shot of Cary Grant walking towards Ingrid Bergman.  It is so great and very distinct and a great Hitchcock touch!.  The other is the slow set up in the early scene of giving us a hint of what could happen.
 

How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene? What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?

 

​When watching this film I really did notice the use of close ups.  I felt it really helped draw me in to the love that both characters had, it showed passion.  The entire look and feel felt grant when it needed to, sinister and chilling when it needed to.  The costumes were also simple but beautiful.

 

 

Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

 

I have to say after re-watching I really think this is a great film.  It wasn't on my radar before as a top Hitchcock film but this re-watching made me appreciate it so much more.  The cast was just perfect!!!

I have to say Cary Grant fits in so well in this and any film for that matter, Ingrid Bergman is believable in all that her character goes through in this film. Claude Rains is great going from someone so in love, showing his feelings of betrayal, and defeat in the end.  These are strong actors with well know personas but I just saw there characters in this film!  They don't make them like this anymore! 


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#34 fediukc1991

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 10:01 PM

From the start of the scene to the end of the scene, it was totally Hichcock. Devlin is a nice, well dressed man, whereas Alicia is in bed all messy and not feeling well. I think for both of the actors it was a challenge for both of them.



#35 Thief12

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 09:49 PM

1. What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?

 

I thought this scene was pure Hitchcock from start to finish, to the point that I immediately commented about it on Twitter. The skewed angle when Alicia wakes up and sees Devlin, and how the camera rotates as he approaches her, lots of POV shots, focus on the character's faces, as well as the cynical view of love; the use of a strong female lead, everything is Hitchcock here.

 

Attached File  not2.jpg   58.81KB   0 downloads

 

2. How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene? What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock is trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?

 

At first, Devlin is in the shadows, while Alicia is in the light. Devlin is trying to pull Alicia to do a dark job. Devlin is the epitome of suaveness, cool, calm and collected, well dressed, hair combed, while Alicia is just waking up with a hangover, she is a mess, hair is all over. Devlin has the upper hand on her.

 

3. Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas?

 

One thing that caught my attention was the glass of milk. I don't know how intentional it was, but I thought it was a subtle nod to Grant's role in Suspicion.

 

Attached File  notmilk.jpg   57.85KB   0 downloads

 

A subtle way to keep us on our toes and guessing about him. Other than that, he is just suave and he uses that to perfection in his role. Wes Gehring mentioned in the Lecture Video that Bergman had a "European vulnerability" or something to that extent and I agree. It also reminds me of something that was said in the first modules about the audience being more worried about the characters if they are played by stars, so I suppose that is true as well.


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#36 dmaxedon

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 07:07 PM

1. He starts with a great rotating POV shot (I can watch it over and over), Cary Grant is Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman is Ingrid Bergman, they're two of my favorites, and they're perfect together. The light and dark contrasts are very Hitch / noir. He sets up the story early, letting you know they're spies, rough around the edges, but experienced and capable. There will be intrigue, and most certainly romance.

2. As briefly mentioned above, the lighting, shadows and contrast are just great, it's very noir and very rich, there's a depth to the scene, I mean how is it just black and white? They're dressed for their parts too, she's rough, but looks incredible, and he's sharply dressed, he's good at what he does, spying, getting (reluctant) people to do what he needs them to do, he's intelligent, and larger than life (really they both are). When we think spies and secret government missions, we think of them, they are the mold for where I mind goes when constructing these characters in our imaginations.

3. Most certainly, they are who they are, Cary and Ingrid, and they bring every bit of it to the screen, they're just so good at what they do, they truly become they're characters, and take us with them on this very believable and exciting journey.



#37 hussardo

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 06:54 PM

1. What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?
 Close up shots and camera angles used in specific ways brings the Hitchcock touch about.

2. How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene?What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?
light and soft against hard and edgy in terms of light, frame photograph, art direction, and costume were used in favor, to show the contrasts of a well put together man and a semi messy woman, both with similar outspoken and strong attitudes.


3. Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 
Two different types of people that came into the picture in perfect synch. Cast was just right with no apparent challenges.

#38 D'Arcy

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 05:10 PM

Hitch sets the mood and tone of the movie once again early on giving us information so the viewer is able to focus on the characters and relationships drawn together of seemimgly ordinary patriotic citizens as so unveiling the villain is the end result. Grant domimates and gives orders immediately to Bergman who then will have to use her own resources and we sympathize and know she is a pon in a much bigger objective. The POV demonstrates this with her having a hangover but also conveys the character as distortion: looking through the glass as confusion, life being turned upside down with circuimstance and demands with Grants rotating scene and the costume of confinement/chain-gang against her will. Yet, she is to be the hero and evil has been lurking around her even though she fights to have a normal unthreatening life. The harm is also going to take place in public as she is asked to go to Brazil and infiltrate. The close ups are on Bergman allowing the viewers to be intimate with her character and her personal attachment to country and pain from betrayal of family. Grant is portrayed as a ordinary agent on a mission with no personal attachment, stiff with no regards to her mental state reeling her in on an emotional level, the recording. He is shown as the bigger picture. Both actors are a canvas for Hitch to tell a story and he has once again molded their talents into perfection getting them out of comfort zones, developing and reveling their ability to captivate an audience on Hitchcock time.....suspense genius.
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#39 startspreading

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 04:22 PM

1.     What Hitchcock "touches" do you see in this early scene from the movie?

I see that Alicia is a heroine left to fight with her own resources. The same goes for Devlin, even him being a spy! As a narrative, this scene doesn’t have much of the Hitchcock touch.

Also, Devlin sounds like devil. A word play, perhaps?
 

2.     How does Hitchcock choose to light, frame, and photograph his two stars in this scene? What are some of the contrasts that Hitchcock  trying to set up between these two characters through art direction, costume, and cinematography?

The first thing I noticed were the shadows above Bergman’s bed – I’ll have to look up how the scene compares to the one involving milk in Suspicion.

She is a clear figure, in her white nightgown and sheets, her almost blonde hair. He is a darker figure, with black hair and black suit, and he is first seen as in the shadows. He is more serious person than she is. But she can be serious – she’s not wearing an all-white outfit, but a striped blouse. She can be a mix of serious and non-serious.

 

 

3.     Based on this scene (or the entire film if you have seen it already), reflect on the casting of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman. Does this scene conform to or challenge their well-known star personas? 

In this film, Cary Grant is once again a reluctant character, something he played in other of his most famous films, like “Arsenic and Old Lace”. Here, he is reluctant to accept that he has feelings for Alicia (Bergman) – he is focused on the mission, and doubts a little of Alicia’s seriousness.

Bergman is great – as the lesson told, she is a mix of pure and bold. I think she’s perfect for the role, and can be more mundane than Grant.


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#40 Mrs. Archie Leach

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Posted 18 July 2017 - 12:03 AM

The Hitchcock "touches" I notice are the creative camera angles ... the famous upside-down POV shot of Cary Grant walking towards her as she lays on the bed ... subtle humor as when she finds her hair piece/bun. She is slightly comical in her hangover state which makes her more likable and sympathetic. I've always remembered the gown she wears in this scene ... the stripes might imply she is a prisoner; trapped in her party-girl life, daughter of a traitor, etc.

 

Cary Grant is low-lit in the beginning of the scene.  His face is slightly obscured. He is framed nicely in the doorway but on an angle. She isn't sure of him yet and neither are we. Ingrid Bergman is lit very brightly early on ... almost as if she is being interrogated under a bright light. I liked how when Devlin is playing the recording that proves her patriotism, she steps from shadow into light.

 

Cary Grant is calm and commanding in the scene. He's dressed neatly and is in control of himself and his environment. Ingrid Bergman is a bit of a mess in this scene, albeit a beautiful one. A strange man is in her bedroom, she is hungover and disheveled, still wearing her crumpled gown with a bandana tied around her waist from the night before. Her hair is a mess. She is shot from close up. Grant is part of a wider shot usually. I love this movie and I've always liked their chemistry together. I think this film conforms to their star personas for the most part. Perhaps some feel Grant is less likable in this, perceived as hard and using Bergman as a means to an end. I've always looked at the character as protecting himself from someone he doesn't trust yet. He feels a fool for falling in love with her, particularly given his line of work and her lifestyle and background. Maybe the party-girl image was a departure for Ingrid Bergman but I think this character is likable and sympathetic as almost all of her characters are. She is sweet and funny and we know from the recording she has integrity and good intentions.


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