We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

Daily Dose #14: Here Lie the Broken Bones of L.B. Jefferies (Opening Scene of Rear Window)


  • Please log in to reply
211 replies to this topic

#1 MareyMac

MareyMac

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • LocationVancouver, Canada

Posted 12 August 2017 - 11:34 PM

Does anyone remember the Simpson's episode based on Rear Window?
 

https://www.youtube....h?v=s78FCvAw18A


I write cheap novelettes


#2 bansley

bansley

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 07 August 2017 - 04:02 PM

This is in response to the question asked during Fan Panel #1 during Chris Sturhann's presentation of "In-jokes in 'Rear Window'."  The question was "What does the 'L.B.' in Jimmy Stewart's character's name, L.B. Jefferies. Of course, we don't know since everybody calls him "Jeff." However, since Chris made the point that Hitchcock had Raymond Burr purposely made up to resemble David. O. Selznick as an in-joke, I would posit that the "L.B." stands for "Louis Burt" in another in-joke about Selznick's father-in-law, Louis B. Mayer. It would be yet another dig at another controlling studio head.



#3 dsanders

dsanders

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 07 August 2017 - 12:25 PM

Daily Dose #14: Here Lie the Broken Bones of L.B. Jeffries, Title Design Opening Scene of Rear Window (1954)

 

I love this movie. It’s a masterpiece, maybe his key work, but also competes with so many other masterpieces from the man. I’ve seen it many times, using it in a film club I teach to middle school students. They enjoy it every time, and lay aside their cell phones for two hours, with their social media, the logical progression of the world predicted in Rear Window.

 

The opening scene establishes the set as a real world, quotidian, natural, with a cat, not a dog, crossing the courtyard path below, going about its cat business. Birds swoop naturally across the camera’s path and over the courtyard. For a moment it feels like a slice of peaceful daily life in this New York compound. The camera swings around in one long, fluid shot that becomes increasingly dreamlike—there are only two cuts in the scene—and contains so much information. We get a preview of each of the characters and their stories that will be laid out over the course of the film, including the little dog in the alleyway, briefly, like a Hitchcock cameo.

 

The camera swings around to Jeff’s fevered brow, and the room temperature of 94 degrees, close to body temperature and the human condition, suggesting the summer swelter, but his eyes are closed, his back to the window, so also a fevered dream, then explores his psyche as it sweeps over objects that symbolically render his life and milieu. The car crashes and war photo reflect his penchant for danger and proximity to catastrophe, including the immediacy of an actual smashed camera. Was it damaged in the car crash? The photo of the atomic bomb is another reference, alluded to in other Hitchcock films, to the uneasy postwar world, which like the main character, has embraced the entire population and edged everyone next to apocalypse.

 

And the magazines, with the woman on the cover. I don’t quite get that. Who is she? Is it Europe in some way?

 

So we learn much about Jeff, with little dialogue. It’s not his point of view, since he is asleep with his back to the window, but more like the viewpoint of his sleeping brain. The opening scene encapsulates so much, all visually, and thus portends the most cinematic of Hitchcock’s movies, which will utilize the camera to it’s fullest potential. One of the few un-cinematic statements in this scene is the inscription on the cast: “Here lie the broken bones of L.B. Jeffries, a perfect title for the strewn images of his psyche and the way the director intends to smash the bone structure of cinema in the film to come.



#4 Rejana Raj

Rejana Raj

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 71 posts
  • LocationDubai, United Arab Emirates

Posted 06 August 2017 - 03:03 PM

1.) The opening camera shot introduces us with the introduction of the tenants in apartments. They are 

Miss Lonelyhearts, the songwriter, Miss Torso, the husband and wife with their dog, sculptor neighbor with hearing aid and the newlywed couple. It is evident that one does not either know them personally  but they are nicknamed so that the audience could know them. The camera then focuses on Jeff and it is through his apartment that we get to know his neighbors.  

 

2.) It is through by camera panning that we come to know how Jeff had his leg injured. At first, we see the sight of his leg cast, then we see the broken camera, along with the photograph of race accident and other photos, a framed negative photograph of a model and finally a pack of fashion magazines with the original photograph from the negative.

 

3.) Well, I was more anxious to know about the hero's leg injury. Yes, by seeing the opposite neighbors doing their routine chores, I felt that I was prying a little bit in others' affairs. (Thanks to this daily dose)*

 

4.) I have to admit it that this is one of the best Hitchcock films. This film had its own share of closeup shots, Point-of-View shots and the Magnum Opus film set. Even, some of its scenes had elements of Silent Film Era.

 

https://media.giphy....IUDXq/giphy.gif



#5 MagdaK83

MagdaK83

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 30 posts
  • LocationSkopelos Island, Greece

Posted 06 August 2017 - 02:06 PM

We just wear his eyes! We are his lens even though he is relaxing...the interesting part is that we feel that we actually witness what is going on in those apartments!



#6 Suj

Suj

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts

Posted 06 August 2017 - 10:05 AM

Forgot to add point 4!

 

4. I definitely think this is Hitch's best film and his most cinematic.His attention to visual detail, the props to convey information about the character, all visual with no dialogue in the opening scene, the POV shots of the room as he did in Mr and Mrs Smith tells the audience a lot about the character and the setting.



#7 Suj

Suj

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 21 posts

Posted 06 August 2017 - 10:02 AM

1. That there is a whole world out there with many little sub-plots: the composer shaving in his apartment, the couple sleeping in the balcony, Miss Torso having a shower, the cat in the courtyard, the milkman leading us into the main street. Hitch pans the camera across the whole scene and thereby introduces us to what is going to be Jeff's world for the next few hours.

 

2. The camera shots show the audience where Jeff lives, in a New York apartment facing a courtyard and another building in front full of neighbours in residence. It also informs us without any dialogue that he's a photographer as it shows the war and action photography around his room. It then also shows us a negative of a lady's photo with some fashion magazines next to it implying that he doesn't just take gritty photos but does some fashion shoots too or has some connection to someone who is involved in the fashion world. Hitch also shows us that something has gone wrong with the broken camera, that Jeff has had an accident and is in a cast and that it's extremely hot in his apartment. Perfect visual design in this scene!

 

3. Yes, you feel as if you're in the room watching these people carrying out their most intimate business (eg Miss Torso having a shower), It's almost creepy but arouses your curiosity. However it's surprising that Hitch has Jeff lying down sleeping with his back to the window because at first you think that the opening scene is the character's POV. Hitch makes us think it's just where he lives and when you first see the film you have no idea that this scene is going to offer us so much excitement in the next few hours, which in itself makes what follows that much more thrilling. Hitch lulls you into a false sense of security.


  • Rejana Raj likes this

#8 Bgeorgeteacher

Bgeorgeteacher

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 66 posts

Posted 05 August 2017 - 08:01 AM

1.  How would you describe the opening camera shot of this film? What is Hitchcock seeking to establish in this single shot that opens the film? Whose vantage point is being expressed in this shot, given that Jeff has his back to the window?

 

This establishing camera shot opens up a contained world of apartments all backing up on an interior courtyard.  In the Hitchcock world of film, it is a "slice of life", being lived by the various inhabitants with their own joys, problems, and, idiosyncrasies.  Most of them are concerned with their own lives and routines, but we, as the audience, are peering through the rear window of an apartment, and no one  can see us - or, our own problems and peccadilloes.  What an advantage the Peeping Tom has! No one else knows you are looking in at them.  That must be the hook that keeps them Peeping.  I took this opening shot to be the "every man's" vantage point.

 

2   What do we learn about Jeff in this scene without any pertinent lines of dialogue (other than what is written on Jeff’s leg cast)? How does Hitchcock gives us Jeff’s backstory simply through visual design?  

 

We learn that Jeff is incapacitated with a broken leg (hip?) and it pretty much confined to a wheelchair.  As the camera pans around the room/apartment, we observe a smashed up camera; simply framed black and white photos of a car racing accident, a tanker fire, a terrible car accident, and, a bomb explosion; assorted camera/photography paraphernalia;  and, finally, the cover to a fashion magazine with a beautiful model on it - as well as a framed negative of that model shot.  With that non-verbal opening, we can deduce that it's a really hot and muggy day and Jeff is a world class news photographer who is currently not on the job due to injuries.

 

3.  Does this opening scene make you feel like a voyeur or, at a minimum, remind you of being a an immobile spectator? What feelings does Hitchcock elicit from you as his camera peers into these other people’s apartments?  

 

I'm not sure what a voyeur feels, but this opening scene made me very curious about what's behind the curtains.  I will admit, that when I'm walking in my neighborhood, or, anywhere, really, I will look in the windows and think I can learn something about the people who live behind the front doors.  In my mind, it's like window shopping.  This is maybe a common feeling among all humans, or most of us, anyway.  Hitchcock elicits interest and curiosity in me, but not prurient interest.  I think that feeling would be more like that of a voyeur.  Also, I couldn't help but notice the cat that's prancing up the stairs.  Was he/she also a curious?

 

4.  Bonus question: if you have seen the entire film before, do you agree with Hitchcock that this film is his most cinematic?

  

I have seen the entire film, and would wholeheartedly agree that this film is his most cinematic.  He pulls out all the stops with the cast, story, music, color, wide-screen format, and lush cinematography. He takes advantage of the medium - to the best effect.

Hitchcock certainly does pull out all the stops.  How can you not be drawn in immediately from the very opening scene?


  • Rejana Raj likes this

#9 Bgeorgeteacher

Bgeorgeteacher

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 66 posts

Posted 05 August 2017 - 07:58 AM

In the opening scene of Rear Window, I definitely feel like a voyeur!  You are looking into the private lives (even though their windows are wide open and they are right in front of those windows) of neighbors.  Even when the camera pans to Stewart sleeping in his wheelchair, you feel as though you are imposing, watching something very private as the camera sweeps around to his photographs.  It's like a train wreck, though.  You feel like you are watching something very private, but yet you can't seem to turn away, wanting to see more.  This is a film I've seen dozens of times, my absolute favorite...probably because it's the first Hitchcock film I saw, and I've been a huge fan ever since.  I totally agree that this is his most cinematic film.  It's very big and grand, including the audience in this voyeuristic experience right from the opening scene!



#10 Tiger1318

Tiger1318

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts

Posted 03 August 2017 - 06:16 PM

Does this opening scene make you feel like a voyeur or, at a minimum, remind you of being a an immobile spectator? What feelings does Hitchcock elicit from you as his camera peers into these other people’s apartments?

 

Yes I feel like a immobile spectator since we have no control over what direction to look at in the scene.  There are different things to look at in scene as the camera peers into the apartments but generally we will notice any action that is going on (ie the cat walking, the man shaving etc.)  Hitch elicits a feeling of curiosity as he peers into the windows and makes me wonder about the different stories of all these different people. 



#11 pumatamer

pumatamer

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 67 posts

Posted 02 August 2017 - 02:17 PM

Does this opening scene make you feel like a voyeur or, at a minimum, remind you of being a an immobile spectator? What feelings does Hitchcock elicit from you as his camera peers into these other people’s apartments? I think Hitchcock is addressing the fact that we are all voyeurs. It is fascinating to watch others go about their daily lives. We the spectator feel that we shouldn't be spying or watching others but we can't help ourselves. 

 

 

 

Bonus question: if you have seen the entire film before, do you agree with Hitchcock that this film is his most cinematic? Visually there aren't any landscapes and I think people tend to associate cinematic with sweeping landscape shots. This film for me, is a visual feast. The colors, the attention to detail, the shots within a shot (binoculars) all just add to how awesome this film is. I do believe it is his most cinematic. 



#12 SherriW

SherriW

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts

Posted 02 August 2017 - 01:12 PM

  1. How would you describe the opening camera shot of this film? What is Hitchcock seeking to establish in this single shot that opens the film? Whose vantage point is being expressed in this shot, given that Jeff has his back to the window?

The opening shot seems like a 

 

 

2. What do we learn about Jeff in this scene without any pertinent lines of dialogue (other than what is written on Jeff’s leg cast)? How does Hitchcock gives us Jeff’s backstory simply through visual design?

 

He's  sweating from the extreme heat. The smashed camera could have something to do with his broken leg. He likes action photos but also seems to shoot fashion.

 

3.Does this opening scene make you feel like a voyeur or, at a minimum, remind you of being a an immobile spectator? What feelings does Hitchcock elicit from you as his camera peers into these other people’s apartments?

 

Not really. It just looks like normal activity for a neighborhood.



#13 cynthiag

cynthiag

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 01 August 2017 - 11:35 PM

Hitchcock immediately brings us into the film as voyeurs with the opening sequence. We're in Jeff's apartment, and what we see would be his POV, were he looking...but while we initially assume we're seeing what some main character is seeing, we soon find out Jeff's asleep, and in a sense we're seeing for him. This happens at other points in the film as well, when we see things he isn't. It's also similar to the opening of Rebecca, when the POV switches around from one character to another on the cliff, playing with our assumptions after initially being clearly the POV of the narrator. 

 

Hitchcock pretty much tells us all the exposition we need in the opening...there's a heat wave, we're in a city, Jeff's incapacitated, he appears to be a professional action photographer who clearly has nine lives. 

 

At first, I'm led innocently by the cat to just check out my surroundings, but soon, in another Hitchcock twist using public places, I realize I'm seeing many intimate moments...a couple waking up from bed, albeit on the fire escape, a woman getting dressed...and I'm a voyeur. I'm even watching Jeff sleep, utterly vulnerable. 

 

I find it difficult to choose a most cinematic Hitchcock, because to me he is one of the most cinematic of filmmakers, but this certainly has to be a top candidate. 



#14 Reegstar

Reegstar

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • LocationNorthern California

Posted 01 August 2017 - 05:41 PM

1.  How would you describe the opening camera shot of this film? What is Hitchcock seeking to establish in this single shot that opens the film? Whose vantage point is being expressed in this shot, given that Jeff has his back to the window?

 

This establishing camera shot opens up a contained world of apartments all backing up on an interior courtyard.  In the Hitchcock world of film, it is a "slice of life", being lived by the various inhabitants with their own joys, problems, and, idiosyncrasies.  Most of them are concerned with their own lives and routines, but we, as the audience, are peering through the rear window of an apartment, and no one  can see us - or, our own problems and peccadilloes.  What an advantage the Peeping Tom has! No one else knows you are looking in at them.  That must be the hook that keeps them Peeping.  I took this opening shot to be the "every man's" vantage point.

 

2   What do we learn about Jeff in this scene without any pertinent lines of dialogue (other than what is written on Jeff’s leg cast)? How does Hitchcock gives us Jeff’s backstory simply through visual design?  

 

We learn that Jeff is incapacitated with a broken leg (hip?) and it pretty much confined to a wheelchair.  As the camera pans around the room/apartment, we observe a smashed up camera; simply framed black and white photos of a car racing accident, a tanker fire, a terrible car accident, and, a bomb explosion; assorted camera/photography paraphernalia;  and, finally, the cover to a fashion magazine with a beautiful model on it - as well as a framed negative of that model shot.  With that non-verbal opening, we can deduce that it's a really hot and muggy day and Jeff is a world class news photographer who is currently not on the job due to injuries.

 

3.  Does this opening scene make you feel like a voyeur or, at a minimum, remind you of being a an immobile spectator? What feelings does Hitchcock elicit from you as his camera peers into these other people’s apartments?  

 

I'm not sure what a voyeur feels, but this opening scene made me very curious about what's behind the curtains.  I will admit, that when I'm walking in my neighborhood, or, anywhere, really, I will look in the windows and think I can learn something about the people who live behind the front doors.  In my mind, it's like window shopping.  This is maybe a common feeling among all humans, or most of us, anyway.  Hitchcock elicits interest and curiosity in me, but not prurient interest.  I think that feeling would be more like that of a voyeur.  Also, I couldn't help but notice the cat that's prancing up the stairs.  Was he/she also a curious?

 

4.  Bonus question: if you have seen the entire film before, do you agree with Hitchcock that this film is his most cinematic?

  

I have seen the entire film, and would wholeheartedly agree that this film is his most cinematic.  He pulls out all the stops with the cast, story, music, color, wide-screen format, and lush cinematography. He takes advantage of the medium - to the best effect.



#15 iceiceblondie

iceiceblondie

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 18 posts

Posted 31 July 2017 - 12:10 AM

One thing that stuck out to me with the opening shot is how we are introduced to characters who are important throughout the film. So many of Hitchcock's earlier films gave us background on characters we would never hear from again, but with this movie it's more purposeful. It also threw me looking at the POV shot and then noticing that Jimmy Stewart is actually asleep. We're the only ones seeing the scene.

 

We can see that Jeff is a risk-taker, someone who always has action or something going on in his life. He seems exciting, due to the exciting photographs. But then of course he's stagnant since he can't go anywhere in his cast.



#16 FilmFan39

FilmFan39

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 20 posts

Posted 30 July 2017 - 03:29 PM

1. The opening shot of Rear Window is a view into the surrounding of Mr. Jefferies as the camera pans to the action in each individual apartment. We are voyers along with the main character.

 

2. With the pan through his apartment we can tell that Mr. Jefferies is a photographer who is sent on very high action, high adrenaline assignments that should have gotten him injured ten times over. 

 

3. The opened shot gives the viewer a feeling of being just as much of a peeping tom a the main character peeping right along with him.



#17 filmcat

filmcat

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts

Posted 30 July 2017 - 04:39 AM

The opening camera shot is a slow pan around the entire courtyard to introduce the environment or "world" of this film from the audience's vantage point.  Then, we go "in" one apartment and see Jeff in a cast and wheelchair.  So, we assume he will be a main character and, of course, we realize the view from his window will be the courtyard. 

 

This opening scene provides a great deal of information about Jeff.  We see that it is very hot and they don't have air conditioning.  Then we see this character that we will know as Jeff has a broken leg and his name is L.B. Jeffries.  From the smashed camera (a professional-looking camera) and pictures in the room, we can conclude that he takes pictures in very dangerous settings and his most recent assignment (since this is the only unframed picture) was at a racecourse where he got a picture standing in the middle of the course as one of the cars crashed and overturned.  We can also deduce that this is how he got the broken leg and broken camera.  We  then see a number of other professional-looking cameras and camera equipment.  As the camera continues to pan around the room, we see a picture of a woman in a frame, but it is a "negative" of the picture and the "positive" view is seen on the cover of a magazine.  From this we can assume that he may have had a negative experience with this woman, or perhaps, women in general.  The magazine is on top of a large pile of the same magazine (and more beside it), so it would appear that he probably works for this magazine and has had a lot of pictures featured on the covers or within the magazine.  All of this information is obtained through the visual design (no dialogue) by seeing Jeff in his cast and wheelchair, his broken camera, and the pictures in his apartment.

 

Yes, this opening scene makes me feel slightly like a voyeur (only slightly since I am aware that I'm in my living room watching a movie).  My main feeling from this scene is curiosity as to how all of these people will fit into the story.

 

Yes, I agree this is probably Hitchcock's most "cinematic" film.  I wasn't clear exactly how to interpret the word "cinematic," so I looked it up and found the definition is "of or relating to a motion picture."  As the camera pans around the courtyard in this scene, it is impossible not to notice that the windows, with different people and actions in each, resemble small movie or TV screens with different "movies" in each.  So, in my opinion, that would make this film fit that definition of "cinematic" very well (and much better than the other Hitchcock films I've seen.)



#18 karenod1

karenod1

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
  • LocationLaurence Harbor, NJ

Posted 29 July 2017 - 11:27 AM

I watched Rear Window last night and it was interesting. As I sat down to watch it with my husband I said "I already have seen this a few times but I guess I'll watch it again for the course". Well, watching it this way as a student of Hitchcock was like watching it for the first time. I noticed so many more things than ever before. So here are my answers to the questions

 

1. a.   The opening camera shot is a POV shot, panning across the courtyard from the distance of the window and then into Jeffries apartment and then back out to the courtyard but moving in close to see inside the apartments. It's much like it would look if you were standing at the window yourself and observing the apartment complex as a visitor would. 

b.  The opening scene establishes life in a small apartment complex with a common courtyard. We see the everyday existence of people we don't know, the isolation and quietness of the courtyard and get a peek at what is happening in the street in front of those buildings too...where it is a much noisier and busier world. 

c.  We are seeing all this through our eyes as though we are sitting at the window....showing us what Jeffries sees all day every day. 

 

2.  a.  In this opening scene we lear that Jeff is injured, immobile, sleepy because of the heat, he is a photographer who has had some dangerous assignments, his favorite photos are hanging on the wall and they look like action photos, his fashion photography is not given such prestige. 

b.  Hitchcock gives us this background by slowly showing us his sweaty brow, his cast on his leg, his camera equipment, his wall of favorite photos (showing action or war shots), and the framed negative. 

 

3. a.  Actually the opening doesn't make me feel like a voyeur at all....I feel like a visitor to the apartment. 

b.  I get a feeling of curiosity looking out of the apartment not of guilt or of doing something wrong. Perhaps because I am a photographer I do not look at what Jeff is doing as voyeurism. Everywhere I look, I am always looking for a photograph, I need to be visually stimulated and I believe that Jeff is the same. Ask any photographer, I would imagine all of them are looking for more than what the eye can see. 

 

4.  This is an interesting question....I have not seen all of Hitchcocks films so it's hard to compare. But it is more interesting because I'm not sure what Hitchcock is talking about when he says the film is his most cinematic. The dictionary defines cinematic as "relating to motion pictures" or a "movie adaptation of a novel". That makes it difficult to say whether this film is more cinematic than another. However I recently heard cinematic described as film that makes you ask questions. If that's the definition we are using then I would say yes this is one of Hitchcocks most cinematic or maybe the most cinematic film.  From the first shot we have questions....where are we, who are these people, who is the man in the wheelchair, and as the film continues we have more...why does she love him so much, why is he so against marriage.....etc. etc. I do have to add one thing....I love how the peeking is through people's back windows....because we all know the facade of a house hides what goes on in the back rooms....great movie. 


  • Reegstar likes this

#19 lovebirding54

lovebirding54

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 28 July 2017 - 05:02 PM

The opening shot of this film is a voyeuristic POV shot, Jeff's point of view out of his window and inside his apartment. It is what Jeff's sees if he was awake.

 

It is interesting that the camera takes us out Jeff's window and pans around the courtyard first at a distance from the windows. Then it comes inside for a close up of Jeff's apartment and background information on Jeff who is hot as we know by his sweat and the thermometer over 90. The camera takes us around the room to show us that he has a broken leg and to a broken camera, like his leg and then photos and a magazine cover to let us know what he does for a living. Then the camera goes back outside a second time for a closer look at what is going on with the people in those rooms across the way. It seems to be one or two long continuous shots

 

This opening scene does make me feel like a voyeur. I feel like I am doing something inappropriate by looking into people's apartment windows.

 

I agree this is Hitchcock's most cinematic film because first, the set is magnificent. The idea that it is an accurate, functioning set is amazing. Next, we have a wonderful view through each window enough to feel like we are doing something very wrong in looking. He uses his secondary characters fully and the tension keeps building throughout the film.  The best, of course, is how the story keeps us hanging throughout although we are sure that Raymond Burr killed his wife.  He doesn't miss a detail and the Hitchcock Touch is easy to identify.

 

Rear Window typifies his masterful use of controlling information to create suspense as well as putting the audience in the movie. We see through a voyeuristic point of view the events that Jeffery is seeing.   



#20 melissasimock

melissasimock

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 28 July 2017 - 03:04 PM

How would you describe the opening camera shot of this film? What is Hitchcock seeking to establish in this single shot that opens the film? Whose vantage point is being expressed in this shot, given that Jeff has his back to the window?

 

He's seeking to establish the environment where the story will take place, the characters of the story, our point of view for the story, and helps us to feel what it is like to be living there.  He also lets us know what time of year it is, thru the temperature and open windows.

The viewers vantage point.  We are as much a voyeur in this as Jeff is.

 

 

What do we learn about Jeff in this scene without any pertinent lines of dialogue (other than what is written on Jeff’s leg cast)? How does Hitchcock gives us Jeff’s backstory simply through visual design?

 

We learn he is a photographer, an action photographer.

He lives in an apartment complex in a city.

He's recently broken his leg.

We learn his broken leg was the result of a work related accident, by the broken camera.

He's also done some fashion photography, or has someone in his life who's interested in fashion.

 

 

Does this opening scene make you feel like a voyeur or, at a minimum, remind you of being a an immobile spectator? What feelings does Hitchcock elicit from you as his camera peers into these other people’s apartments?

 

It makes me feel more like an immobile spectator.  Your eye naturally gravitates towards movement.  No one sits at home and stares at the walls when they have a huge window to look out of.  It's human nature to watch what's going on around you. 

 

 

Bonus question: if you have seen the entire film before, do you agree with Hitchcock that this film is his most cinematic?

 

I have seen this film many times, but I have not seen all of Hitchcock's films yet.  I do agree with it being quite cinematic tho.  

 

 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users