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Daily Dose #19: Real Identities (Opening Scene of Marnie)


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#1 Rejana Raj

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Posted 08 August 2017 - 09:49 AM

1.) We come to know that Marnie is a con-woman. Here are the facts: she removes her dyed black hair and she was revealed as a blonde woman, she possess many Identity Cards which she may use, she had with her the embezzled pack of money which means that she had stolen it, she has various attires in her suitcase. Not only that, she is a well- organised lady who keeps all her things in order and that is a good quality even though she is involved in a bad business.

2.) Yes, The music composition by Bernard Hermann has a classical touch. Maybe, it was to show the woman with class act. Only to be revealed that she's a con-artist.

3.) Here, Mr.Hitchcock was shown as seeing the young raven haired woman who goes along with her luggage. Then, he looks at the camera. He must be trying to tell us that this whole film is about her.

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#2 Reegstar

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 08:24 PM

1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

 

 As a character, Marnie is revealed to be a thief - all the money bundles in her handbag; deceptive - changing her hair color; and, kind of nonchalant about changing identities.   I'm guessing we will have these character traits explained or, at a minimum, explored further in the movie. She is mysterious.  Also, I noticed that while the musical score is kind of smooth and romantic, we don't see any man in this opening.  (Did everyone else notice the name, Marian Holland among the social security cards? Shades of Marion Crane in Psycho.)

 

2.  How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

 

The music is very romantic, at the outset, with mysterious overtones.  Then, it starts to swell as Marnie changes her persona and washes the dye out of her hair.  I loved that part.  She could have just had a wig (which she is obviously wearing) which she removes, or, cuts long hair short (ala Jason Bourne), but it's a great shot as the music swells and she flips her head back with her now blonde hair flying back.  (I could see a similarity between this scene and the scene in The Fugitive where Harrison Ford dyes his hair and the dye is all over the sink and his arms.)  

 

3.    Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means?

 

 Yes, Hitchcock looks directly at the camera.  I thought he was calling attention to the woman who had just walked past, with the bellman overloaded with packages.  Hitchcock has a sort of smirk or something on his face - like he's inviting us in on his huge joke.  That's what I took away from the brief glimpse we have of Hitchcock in this cameo.


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#3 dsanders

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 06:23 PM

Daily Dose #19: Real Identities Opening Scene from Marnie (1964)

Marnie is a very put together person, everything done with a click of the heel, a dressed-to-the-tee at all times personality. Her gloves are in plastic, her bills—gained criminally—bundled in neatly wrapped packages, her lingerie thrown on the chair, draped over by her topcoat. She keeps her alternate identities in the form of social security cards, easily available in a hidden compartment of her compact. She has a compartmentalized life, with a suitcase stuffed into an anonymous locker, the key to which is kicked down the drain, which recall Bruno’s desperate, and edge-of-the-seat suspenseful attempts to recover the key in Strangers on a Train.

 

I did not initially catch the resemblance of the hair dye down the drain to the blood down the drain in Psycho, creating a play on the plot expectations for Marnie, and think that is a terrific insight and argument for the evolution of these techniques and increasingly complex and mature characters in the films, which can only be seen when they are watched in chronological sequence, not to mention the fantastic mind that can retain these bits and use them over and over in new and meaningful ways.

 

I love the lush tones of the Hermann score as Marnie tosses back her newly blonde hair and together with the close-up of her newborn self.



#4 Bgeorgeteacher

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 03:38 PM

1. that Marnie is a fraud. She has multiple identities as we can see from her social security cards; that she has stolen money; has bought a lot of clothes and accessories; she's a brunette (and not yet a blonde) as we first see her but then she washes the dye off and becomes a blonde; that she loves new clothes and accessories and finally that she changes ID and leaves all the contents of the life she is leaving in a locker at a station and throws away the key. Without any dialogue, we find out a lot of about her character, through Marnie's interaction with the objects and her actions.

 

2. The music is very Bernard Hermann. It starts of being very quiet and repetitive a bit like that of Vertigo in the intro. It then changes when she puts the cash in the suitcase (sound of French horns?) and finally turns into dramatic rousing music when we see her after she has washed off the dark dye and as a blonde to reflect the triumphant look on Marnie's face that she has got away with  her crime. The music stops when she puts her suitcase in the locker in the station and all we hear is the station announcer's voice. I think Hitch stops the music to make us sit up and pay attention to what she's doing as she does this.

 

3. Hitch's cameo is slightly different to all the others as he turns around and looks at the camera almost as if he's saying: Yes, it's me. You've seen my cameo. You can concentrate on the rest of the film now and forget about looking out for me! Perhaps a little more obvious than all his other cameos with no other people around except Marnie and the porter.

Hitch truly is all about "focus on the story", isn't he?



#5 Bgeorgeteacher

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 03:38 PM

I haven't seen Marnie yet, but I'm getting the impression from the opening scene that she is a flat-out crook.  She's clearly hiding her identity, she has multiple forms of ID, she's changed her hair color, she's even changing out her identifying suitcase and purse.  Herrmann's score of this opening scene also feels a bit mysterious, waves of tones moving in and out as we think we know what this character is, and then we find out it's all a disguise.  And then, there's the classic Hitchcock cameo.  I guess I had seen these cameos before in various Hitchcock films, thinking he was just in there for fun....but now I'm seeing that perhaps he's put himself in there as part of a bigger plan.  He looks at the camera, almost like he's been caught at something...not sure.



#6 Suj

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Posted 07 August 2017 - 04:11 AM

1. that Marnie is a fraud. She has multiple identities as we can see from her social security cards; that she has stolen money; has bought a lot of clothes and accessories; she's a brunette (and not yet a blonde) as we first see her but then she washes the dye off and becomes a blonde; that she loves new clothes and accessories and finally that she changes ID and leaves all the contents of the life she is leaving in a locker at a station and throws away the key. Without any dialogue, we find out a lot of about her character, through Marnie's interaction with the objects and her actions.

 

2. The music is very Bernard Hermann. It starts of being very quiet and repetitive a bit like that of Vertigo in the intro. It then changes when she puts the cash in the suitcase (sound of French horns?) and finally turns into dramatic rousing music when we see her after she has washed off the dark dye and as a blonde to reflect the triumphant look on Marnie's face that she has got away with  her crime. The music stops when she puts her suitcase in the locker in the station and all we hear is the station announcer's voice. I think Hitch stops the music to make us sit up and pay attention to what she's doing as she does this.

 

3. Hitch's cameo is slightly different to all the others as he turns around and looks at the camera almost as if he's saying: Yes, it's me. You've seen my cameo. You can concentrate on the rest of the film now and forget about looking out for me! Perhaps a little more obvious than all his other cameos with no other people around except Marnie and the porter.

 


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#7 MagdaK83

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 06:30 PM

We already know that she's someone else and she uses a number of identities in order to escape. We want to follow her and learn why she's doing that...



#8 SherriW

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 06:08 AM

  1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

She's able to slide easily between her identities. She carefully packs the clothes from the boxes in one suitcase while casually tossing the other items she had just worn in the other. It 

 

 

2.How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

 

The score makes the scene feel mysterious and drawn out.

 

3.Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation mean

 

The Hitchcock cameo was very prominent in this movie. He's more in the shot than the actress and he looks right at the camera. It seems like he's trying ti distract us.



#9 AmyV

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 02:44 PM

1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character?

Something bad going on with her.  Sheis clearly a law-breaker by having multiple Soc. Sec. cards and very liekly the packets of cash denote something dishonest going on there - plus she completely changes her appearace; she has 2 suit cases, 2 purses - so she is someone who is changing her identity, running away from something, toward something else perhaps?

In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects?

We note how carefully she treats her nice, new things, while tossing aside their boxes and dumping things into the one suitcase.  She had previously dyed her hair dark, so we see her washing out the color now.  Finally, she takes the 2 suitcases and places one in a locker, the key to which she deliberately tosses down thru a grate at the station where the locker is.  So, she doesn't want anyone to find the suitcase anytime soon. 

 

2. How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

Very dramatic-sounding score, adds to the whole drama of what the character is doing, adds to our wonder of what she is up to & why.  Still, it is rather muted, not the louder, frenetic, sweeping music we've heard toward the beginning of some of Hitch's other films.

 

3. Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means?

His cameo was more pointed/direct, with him looking right at us/the camera, or so it appears, rather than being a rather casual appearance, as is the case in many of his other films. Not sure what this variation means, except maybe a wink and a nod to the audience that "here ya' go; here's my cameo," making it very clear & obvious this time - even as we are not real clear on what is going on with the female character who we see at the start.

 

 



#10 Master Bates

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Posted 04 August 2017 - 04:36 PM

1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

Right out of the gate, we see there is something "hidden," something "underneath" about this character, this Marnie. Methodically, she unboxes and takes the tissue off new clothes apparently bought at an upscale store. She obviously has money to spend on expensive clothing, which she carefully packs in a light-colored suitcase on her hotel bed. Meanwhile, she casually tosses undergarments into a second (darker) suitcase, taking no pains to pack them with care.

Her highly groomed hands take feminine accoutrements--compact, comb, lipstick--from her purse and set them aside. All those items pertain to her appearance, her surface. In setting them aside, she's keeping them at hand for whenever she needs to "put on her best face." Also, in setting them aside she's revealing that whatever is  "underneath" is something other.

She doesn't reach into the purse to remove anything else. Instead, she turns the purse upside down and shakes out the remaining contents. Money--and lots of it, wrapped in packets--that was hidden at the bottom of the purse is now on top in her suitcase, revealed. At no point does she actually touch the cash. Why not? Why doesn't she? Is the money somehow tainted?
 
Could be, because next, after removing her Social Security card from her wallet, using a metal fingernail file she deftly pries open a compartment behind her compact's mirror. From this hidden compartment, she reveals three, hidden Social Security cards, each bearing a different name. She replaces the one she removed from the wallet with one of these hidden cards.

She travels under various identities. 

This is further underlined when, in the bathroom sink, she washes black dye from her hair.  We now see she's a natural--what else?--blonde

Packed, she's now putting the dark suitcase that contains her undergarments in a bus station locker which she locks.

She intentionally drops the key onto a floor grate, taking care to ease it through the grate with her shoe.

In this opening sequence, Hitchcock--without any dialog--has had the camera tell us that this Marnie is feminine, attractive, has lots of (probably ill-gotten) cash and is traveling under an assumed name. The camera has also revealed that hidden under her cool, calm and collected exterior, she's some sort of thief.

​In time, as the story unfolds, we will realize how telling her handling of these items is: she is a sexually frigid kleptomaniac.

 

2.   How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?


     Herrmann's score here is a romantic--but disturbing--5-note phrase immediately echoed by the same 5-note phrase and repeated, over and over. It sounds like a small creature, a fly perhaps, weakly struggling to extricate itself  from a spider web in which it has become ensnared.
     This 5-5 pattern repeats, as said, over and over. But when this Marnie has rinsed the dark dye from her hair, and as she throws back her now-blonde hair, we see her face revealed for the first time. Here, the music swells full orchestra with lots of strings to show us the woman underneath, revealed. Over her face, the music seems to say "glamorous." It think it significant that at this moment, Hedren is centerscreen, facing us but looking at her reflection in the bathroom mirror. "Glamorous," then, is how she sees herself. No matter what she has just done with dyed black hair, she sees herself now as cleansed, purged of this darker side, if only temporarily.
     When the scene cuts--with a hard-edit, not a dissolve--to a rear view of her carrying the two suitcases, the score moves from violins and harps briskly down the scale and abruptly stops. This abrupt end to the music is replaced by a voice on the bus station's public address system announcing bus routes. The music also stops just before the dark suitcase is put into the locker.

 

3. Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? 

In his cameo here, Hitchcock was not only closer to the camera than anyone else in the shot, as he's coming out of a hotel room, he turns, looks into the camera--directly at us--and immediately turns away as we see Marnie and a porter further down the hallway.

I know this is going to be sacrilege and I can't believe I'm actually criticizing any shot in a Hitchcock film, but while his cameos are always fun to spot, I found this one jarring and off-putting. It took me out of the movie. Actually, it looked like an outtake that wasn't even supposed to be in the finished film,  a so-called blooper. It simply was not deft and subtle as all his other cameos seem to be. It smacked a bit too much of "self-promotion"--as if he needed it. This one didn't work for me.

Now, I will say this: If the idea is to place us in the hallway, that works. We--members of the audience--have come out of ​our ​rooms, too, and he's acknowledging us as we join him as co-conspirators--or co-voyeurs--as all of us follow Marnie through the impending story.

While I now see how that might have been his intent, it was not my immediate reaction. Maybe Hitch wanted me to think--beyond ​surface​, deeper.

He's tricky. And that's one reason why his films are so endlessly fascinating and watchable.

So, Hitch wins. Even in death, he wins.

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#11 pumatamer

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 07:53 PM

  1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects. She doesn't care about her objects. Her objects are just trophies for her success as a thief. She doesn't particularly care for the objects as she packs them. She throws them into her case. 

 

  1. Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? He looks right at the camera and then it cuts off. I found this cameo strange and a little distracting, to be honest. Maybe this variation is his subconscious effort to change up how he works?


#12 karenod1

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 06:16 PM

Watching Daily Dose #19 I am surprised that I now want to watch Marnie. I have been hesitant to watch it....it didn't sound like the best of Hitchcock, and my husband who is a film historian and teacher said he was surprised by it being one of the top recommendations because it wasn't that popular among Hitchcock buffs. So now I'm going to watch it tonight and I can probably say it is in large part due to this opening sequence and to Bernard Herrmanns' music. 

 

1.  Based on the opening sequence I learn that the lead character is extremely well dressed, she has obviously gotten a hold of a lot of money and is not going to leave town. She packs one suitcase extremely tidily and this one contains new clothes and all the money in the yellow bag. She throws old clothes messily into the gray suitcase. She washes the dye out of hair obviously used to disguise her while in this place and emerges as a natural blonde. She then hides the suitcase with the older clothes (the ones she wore when stealing the money?) in a locker and throws away the key. There must be someone she thinks is going to be looking for her. The key of course reminds one of the famous key scene in Notorious. And the dye going down the drain is reminiscent of Psycho.

 

2.  The Bernard Herrmann score gives just that hint of suspense...what is she up to? Is someone after her? It makes us want to follow her and see how she got that money and is she going to get caught.

 

3.  Hitchcock comes out of a hotel room...I have never seen him so fully in the scene..usually I have to look for him...outside a show window, getting on a bus etc. This time he actually seems for a minute to advance the plot...as he looks toward the camera as if trying to see if someone is there. I'm not sure what it means unless he just wanted to be more prominent as he became more and more successful as a director and enjoyed the attention. He also had a bit of obsession with Tippi Hedren and maybe liked being right with her in the scene...he did a very similar thing in The Birds!

 



#13 dan_quiterio

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 12:52 PM

The opening sequence of Marnie is certainly a compelling one. I'm drawn to films that can convey information effectively with limited or no dialogue, and this sequence does that well. Marnie appears to be somewhat meticulous and calculated. She knows what objects she needs, and she calmly and precisely chooses and places them. She's all about preparation. Anything that doesn't factor into her plans, she tosses aside. Her actions are nicely complemented by Bernard Herrmann's sweeping and evocative score, giving me a sense of mystery, crescendoing to a big reveal when we first see Marnie's face.

 

Hitch's cameo is an interesting one. He breaks the fourth wall by taking a very quick look into the camera. I imagine that's to heighten the intrigue. If Hitch is willing to address us personally, we better pay attention to what's to come.


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#14 filmcat

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Posted 03 August 2017 - 09:26 AM

This scene opens with a woman in a tailored tweed suit and heels walking down a hotel corridor with a bellboy carrying a large stack of boxes and what looks like a new suitcase still wrapped up.  While the suit looks of good quality, the style and color are a little dowdy.  Then we see her in the hotel room in a robe with two suitcases on the bed.  She is unwrapping new clothes from the boxes and packing them in, what I assume, is the new suitcase.  She is also tossing her old clothes and shoes into another suitcase.  She takes a wallet, compact, and some other items out of her large yellow purse and then dumps the remaining contents (which is a large amount of bundled money) into the new suitcase.  The yellow purse then joins the "old" clothes.  She then removes the Social Security card, reading Marion Holland, out of her wallet.  She has three other Social Security cards hidden in her compact and she removes one reading Margaret Edgar and places it in her wallet.  She does all of this very quickly and systematically, but she does not appear to be rushing or in a panic.

 

We then see her rinsing the black hair dye out of her hair and see it swirling down the drain (reminiscent of the blood swirling down the drain in "Psycho").  We still have not seen her face, but as the music soars, we suddenly see her stand up and throw her now blonde hair back off of her face.  It is a very dramatic moment!

 

Now we see her legs walking through a train station (reminiscent of "Strangers on a Train").  She is carrying both suitcases and is wearing a very stylish, fitted suit with her hair elegantly styled.  She puts the "old" suitcase in a locker and holds the key in her hand (like Alicia did in "Notorious") as she walks away.  When she gets to a grate, she intentionally drops the key and pushes it through the grate with her foot (again reminiscent of Bruno's dropping the lighter through a grate in "Strangers on a Train," although he did it accidently).  She appears very self-confident and pleased.  It seems like her personality has changed with the change of clothes and hairstyle.  It is also obvious that she has performed this kind of change in identity before.  We learn all of this about her without any dialogue, just watching her pack and changing her name and appearance.

 

Bernard Herrmann's score starts out soft and slow, a little sad and mysterious.  As she is rinsing the black dye from her hair, the music builds and seems more romantic and exciting.  Then, it climaxes as she throws her blonde hair back and reveals her face!  As she is walking in the train station, the music is hauntingly romantic.  It is really a very beautiful score without any apparent terror approaching.

 

As Marnie is walking down the hotel corridor with the bellboy, Hitchcock steps out of another room, watches her walking away, and then turns toward the camera (or the audience) with a slight shrug and then quickly looks away again.  This is the first cameo that I remember Hitchcock looking directly into the camera and I'm not sure what meaning to connect with it.  The only thing that I thought was, perhaps, he was saying that we all have some voyeur in us, that it is just human nature.



#15 brooke.fenton

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 09:58 PM

1. Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects. She's obviously a mysterious character. She has multiple IDs and other items that seem to be saved for a specific identity. 

 

2. How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene? It crescendos when we finally see her and is mysterious while we aren't able to see her.

 

3. Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? It was quick and he looks right into the camera. Something I don't think he ever really did. 


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#16 melissasimock

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Posted 02 August 2017 - 03:34 PM

Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

 

We know she uses multiple identities, by the number of SS cards she has.  We know she changes her appearance, we can assume with her identity, as she goes for quick changes.  (Fyi, that black dye would never rinse out like that, leaving bright blonde.)  She has expensive taste.  We know she's leaving one life behind.  She tosses her old clothes into the suitcase she leaves at the station, and she throws away the key.  The clothes for her newest life are neatly placed into the other suitcase.  

 

 

How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

 

The music is very low key until she starts rinsing the dye out of her hair.  Then it picks up in volume and gets more dramatic as we witness her transformation.

 

 

Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? 

 

This time he looks at the camera, towards the viewer.  A little cheeky!  Almost a nod to the audience.

 

 


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#17 Jennifer Anne

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 10:56 PM

1. We learn that Marnie carries herself in a very self-assured manner, and knows exactly what she is doing when it comes to changing her identity. She has evidently done this before because she is very calm and deliberate in her actions, seems to be in no hurry or panic. It's as if she is packing for a business trip in a routine manner. Her interaction with the two suitcases represents this change: the "discarded" identity is signified by the grey suitcase into which used clothes are thrown in a messy jumble; the new identity of the pink suitcase is neatly packed with brand-new items and primed for a fresh start.

As a side note, I wish it were that easy to dye ones hair blonde from jet black, without the colour turning green, but that's part of the fantasy of forming a new identity ;)

2. There is a somber, mysterious feel to the score with a slow and steady rhythm as Hedren moves about her business, which builds to a crescendo when we finally see her face and the reveal of her died blonde hair. The flip of her hair to the flourish of the music gives the impression of a baptism--the promise and hope of a new beginning.

3. Hitchcock comes into the hallway of the hotel or apartment, watches Hedren walking from behind, gives a sheepish glance at the camera and quickly looks away, as if he had been caught looking at something forbidden. He is acknowledging his own identity as a voyeur.
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#18 FilmFan39

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 09:43 PM

1.  She is an illusion. Everything about her is fake from her clothes to her hair, to the multiple social security cards she hid's behind the compact mirror. She is definitely hiding something.

 

2. The score builds and builds in intensity until the final revel of the blond Marnie.

 

3. I think this cameo is a little more on the nose than his previous ones. Usual Hitchcock's cameos fit seamlessly into the background of the scene and sometimes they are even difficult to catch if you aren't looking. This cameo had more of a wink to the camera feel to it.



#19 startspreading

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 03:04 PM

1.    Based on the opening sequence alone, what do you feel you already know about Marnie as a character? In what ways does Hitchcock visually reveal her character through her interaction with objects.

Well, she’s fake. She has four social security numbers, with four different identities. She is changing her clothes from one messed up baggage to another, tidier, and selecting only the best clothes We can imagine that she has multiple personalities, and Margaret ‘Marnie’ Edgar is the fancier one. We can definitely tell something is wrong with her.

 

2.    How does Hitchcock use Bernard Herrmann's score in this scene?

The score is suspenseful, yet not as suspenseful as the score of Psycho. We can sense a crescendo as Marnie changes her things from one purse and one baggage to the other. The climax of the score happens as her face is revealed, the real blonde Marnie is seen: it’s like a revelation. And, as she walks the train station, I can identify a sequence of notes that Herrmann used again in “Taxi Driver”.

 

3.    Did you see any variation in what Hitchcock is doing with his cameo in this film, and what do you think that variation means? 

It is too simple for my taste. Surely, Hitchcock was getting older, but not less creative. But something is interesting: even though the cameo lasts one second, maybe two, it’s the first time I remember seeing Hitchcock looking straight to the cameras in one of his cameos. It may be him acknowledging the audience, or the approximation he got through his TV show being translated to the big screen.



#20 dmaxedon

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 03:22 AM

1. We're meeting a woman who is practiced and polished, she's switching identities as someone might change their shirt. She's comfortable not only with becoming someone else, but leaving the previous person behind, reinforced by the fact she doesn't put the old social security card back in the deck, it's quickly discarded, and we never go back. Although, keeping that life in a suitcase at the train station does give her an out, if she ever needed it, but not too easy of an out, as she has to recover the key from the grate, which wouldn't necessarily be an easy task. She also has certain items in the suitcase as if to say, she's adept at this switch, she's done it before, and can easily do it again. This is not normal human behavior, and even eludes to the sociopathic nature of a kleptomaniac on the run.

2. It's slightly foreboding, but also soothing, perhaps even serene, symbolizing her comfort with the process of becoming someone else, while leaving her old self behind, like a pair of old socks. Even as she dumps a large sum of money in the suitcase, the music gets slightly softer, as if to say, this is normal for her. There's no trepidation or tension surrounding the money, or where it came from, as compared to the focus on the money in Psycho, which immediately puts us on edge, as we worry about what's going to happen to Marion for taking it.

3. Once again it's out of the way quickly, and as someone mentioned, it seemingly breaks the fourth wall, a feature I always like. Otherwise it's brief, and somewhat unassuming.

 

Note: I got the thrill of a lifetime a few years ago, when Ben Mankiewicz and Tippi Hedren came to Albuquerque for a screening of Marnie at the historical KiMo Theater. There was a Q and A session, and she told some wonderful behind the scenes stories, so cool, oh and we got to see Marnie on the big screen, did I say, so cool!!


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