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Questions for Alexandre Philippe for August 1st Shindig


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72 replies to this topic

#1 Marianne

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Posted 05 August 2017 - 11:35 AM

The link for the video featuring Alexandre Philippe seems to have disappeared from Canvas. Is there another place to find the link?

 

Thanks!

 

I just found it: It's a tab at the top of the page for Week 6, Hitchcock's Legacy, Pt. 3: The Last Word on Collaborators: Spotlight on Alma Reville.



#2 melkirsch

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 07:15 PM

Thank you, Professor Edwards and Mr. Phillipe.



#3 katwent

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 11:19 AM

A big shout out to Prof Edwards and Mr. Philippe, thank you for letting us join your conversation on Hitch.

 

A big concept that looms in my mind is the influence that a director like, Nolan gathered from Hitch. In his latest, DUNKIRK, the score is haunting, question: Do you think that the ticking watch, boat engine sounds and especially the musical score of Hans Zimmer mirrors Hitch's recurring motifs?

 

Here is an article that touches on that subject: https://www.nytimes....pher-nolan.html

 

Zimmer used the Shepard Tone to hone suspense, sort of a barber pole effect on our senses.

 

Thank you again, I have learned so much!



#4 Kylan

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 09:00 AM

Mr Philippe enjoyed your conversations with Ben immensely. I was sad you didn't get a chance to reflect on the Birds. Can you share with us what the actual bird attacks mean in the context of the film. I think they are the mcguffin and the film is actually about relationships And how we treat one another.

#5 efederman

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 02:56 AM

Both Orson Welles and Alfred Hitchcock were known to have filmed numerous projects within a circle of chosen actors over time. I find it interesting that they differed so greatly with Orson preferring method actors and Hitchcock favoring non-method actors. At the core, what does this say most about the approach of these two iconic directors?


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#6 Earthshine

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 07:12 PM

One more question from me, if you don't mind.  This one is for Alexandre Philippe. I love the idea behind your film 78/52 and how it focuses on the number of camera shots and edits for the shower scene in Psycho.   In a few of my earlier posts for this course, I have been critical of certain contemporary film techniques.  More specifically, I am bothered by any film maker who chooses to stay on any one camera shot for no more than 1-3 seconds before moving on to the next shot.  I see that as a response to a shorter attention span.  Usually the film I use as an example to illustrate this is the remake of The Great Gatsby, with all due respect to the actors and the director, Baz Luhrmann.  However, finally, my point/question is this:  I think the quick cuts are very effective in Psycho, unlike similar camera cuts in today's films.  I was just wondering if you could share your thoughts on how the shower scene compares to other quick editing and why and how you feel about some of today's contemporary techniques.

 

As always, thank you very much,

 

Loren Santiago 


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#7 rtoast

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 06:55 PM

My question is this:  Why do you think Alfred Hitchcock decided to add his own cameo to his movies and describe how they evolved over the decades.  Thanks!    Rose Anne Ost


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#8 joant

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 06:49 PM

Hello again Mr. Philippe and Professor Edwards,

 

I've been reading about Hitchcock on my time off. I have found many journalists and biographers and people on the street believe Hitchcock was a very disturbed man, because of his recurring subjects: i.e. murders, fear, taboo activities, portrayals of women (blondes), voyeurism, etc.

 

Sometimes, I think his mind may have been a dangerous neighborhood to wander through. Do you believe he was neurotic and was able to turn his neurosis into art?  

 

I know this may be a touchy subject...

 

Thank you both for your time and sharing your knowledge with us.

 

Joan Tarshis


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#9 akparty14

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 06:05 PM

Hi Alexandre: I really enjoyed your discussions with Ben before all the Hitchcock movies last week. I have see most of his movies at least 10 times including his silent films and your pre and post move discussions were quite enlightening. I actually have a personal question? Are you one of my fellow Canadians? I grew up just north of Montreal and am curious as to whether you are from Quebec, Eastern Ontario or New Brunswick? 

Tony Cowan

Vancouver, B.C. 

 

He's from Switzerland.



#10 LRH

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 06:00 PM

Like many other folks, I too would like to know why Hitchcock pulled the rights to Rope, Rear Window, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), and Vertigo.

 

Thanks for a great class!

--Lydia


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#11 Walt3rd

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 05:31 PM

Two related questions.  

 

Why Psycho?  What's the fascination that remains with this particular film?

 

Also, can you distinguish after watching the shower sequence so many times which shots are of Janet Leigh and which are of Marli Renfro, her body double?

 

Thanks - 

Walt3rd



#12 Walt3rd

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 05:29 PM

     Casting Sean Connery right after he had done the first James Bond film, Dr. No, as the lead in Marnie was a courageous move on Hitchcock's part. Since we know from analyzing how Hitchcock used stars in his films, do you think Hitchcock was trying play with audience expectations of Sean Connery's on-screen persona in Marnie ?  By casting Connery in the role of a man who struggles to help a woman who is suffering emotionally and mentally, he seemed almost to be saying to the audience you thought this was going to be an adventure/romance film like Dr. No where Connery(007) wins the girl's love right away in the first few minutes of the film.

 

Actually, By the time Marnie came out, Connery had done both Dr. No and From Russia with Love, and Goldfinger was released the same year as Marnie.  Connery probably was glad to get away from Bond for at least one film.


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#13 brunafp

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 04:53 PM

I would like to ask about film noir in Hitchcock's works, in this course we've learned that he made three film noirs: Shadow of a Doubt, Notorious and Strangers on a Train, but other films like The Wrong Man and Stage Fright (sometimes I see Rebecca being considered as well) would also be considered film noirs, or not? And why?
Also I would like to know Prof. Edwards and Alexandre Philippe's favourite Hitchcock movie and why? 

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#14 Scripty

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 03:13 PM

Hi Everyone!
Is there a possibility that we will ever see Hitch's very first films, or destroyed in some way/partially found(?) that were spoken of early in the course...AND...are we absolutely positive that Hitch never discussed why he cut the rights to ROPE, REAR WINDOW, THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY, THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (1956) and VERTIGO for so long? Did not mention anything to any still living person, not even his daughter as to what caused him to make this decision? Was he made at the studio?
Thabk you so much for a fantastic journey into the mind of one of my all time favorite directors, person and fellow Leo, Alfrd Hitchcock.
Demethress -( the "h" is silent-Deme, for short)

#15 CathSK

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 02:23 PM

Hi, everyone... :-)

 

My question(s)...

 

We've learned that: If Alma didn't like it, Hitch didn't do it.

 

So, I'm wondering: Were any of the movies Hitch decided not to make (based on or in accordance with Alma's advice) later made by other directors?... which ones?... and were they successful? And did Hitch (and/or Alma) have any regrets about not pursuing some of those stories/opportunities after all?

 

Also: Were there any movies made by other directors (stories that had not come Hitch's or Alma's way) that Hitch would have wanted to take a crack at directing himself, if he'd had the chance?

 

Thank you... and thanks for the class!

 

Cath


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#16 PaulaG

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 02:13 PM

I've really learned a lot from your intros, but I haven't been to catch them all, so apologies if these questions were covered already. Looking forward as well to seeing 78/52.

 

  1. Do you think that Hitchcock remained essentially a silent film director throughout his career? Not that his dialogue and sound design weren't brilliant, of course they were, but after watching so many of his films in a row, I feel the ones that work best are the ones that could have worked as silents, and the ones that 
  2. Also, why do you think Hitchcock pulled the rights to ROPE, REAR WINDOW, THE TROUBLE WITH HARRY, THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (1956) and VERTIGO for so long? 


#17 ckusama

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 01:47 PM

After watching all the Hitchcock films on TCM and listening to your input on the movies, I'm very anxious to see "78/52". Where will we have a chance to see your film and could you give us a time frame on when we can? Really looking forward to it.  Have enjoyed all your input and I feel I know Hitchcock as a filmmaker so well now!  Thank you so much for all the sharing of your knowledge!


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#18 gtunison

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 01:14 PM

What three Hitchcock films would you recommend as a way to understand Hitchcock to someone just discovering Hitchcock?



#19 UFgator89

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 12:54 PM

The more we've gotten into discussing the different parts that make the whole (music, art, costume, etc.), I continue to think back on the silent films. It was discussed early in the class, especially in the transition from silent to sound, that Hitchcock believed in using sound or music as he would any parts of the scene and shot to create the mise-en-scene. This has made me think more of the music used to accompany the silent films. Did he have any say into what music was played with the silent films? Is the music accompanying the silent films as we see them now, the same music used then. In general, I sometimes find myself not interested in viewing a silent picture now, because the music that is accompanying it just doesn't seem to me to fit. The music with these films fit very nicely and somewhat fit well with the films. Can you speak more about the music accompanying his silent films that we saw during this course?

Betty G

Huntsville, AL


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#20 Dubbed

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Posted 31 July 2017 - 12:49 PM

With his critical and commercial successes, and having a lastingly, profound cultural impact, do you believe Hitchcock is the most influential filmmaker of the 20th Century? Of all time?
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