We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

The funniest Drama you have ever seen.


  • Please log in to reply
36 replies to this topic

#1 NickAndNora34

NickAndNora34

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 721 posts
  • LocationWalt Disney World

Posted 09 November 2015 - 12:25 PM

Stage Door (1937) is one that has both comedy and drama. The beginning is filled with wise cracks by Lucille Ball, Ginger Rogers, and Eve Arden (and the other girls). It stays like this for around the first 15 minutes, and then levels out a bit, and changes to drama when the Footlights Club (theatrical boarding house for girls) suffers a tragedy. When I first watched it, it was a little confusing for me to figure out what genre it was, but I guess it works. I don't know if this really answers the thread, but this was one dramatic film that has elements of comedy (at least in the beginning of it, I thought it was going to be hilarious). It's a great film, though. I would recommend it to anyone.


"The prettier the flower, the farther from the path." -Into the Woods 


#2 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37,310 posts

Posted 08 November 2015 - 04:18 PM

I'm a sucker for the overwrought melodramas produced during the 1950s--mostly because of this very thing.  These films are so overdramatic and so over the top that they crack me up.  Add in the intense film scores and the big gestures and you've got a ridiculously cheesy and entertaining film.

 

A Summer Place is a film that fits this very description and one that I enjoy watching just because it's so over the top.  This film has everything: teenage love, adultery, a rich score, a bigoted parent who will do everything to keep her daughter "chaste," an alcoholic father, a doormat father, teen pregnancy, underage marriage--everything I love in a melodrama.  

Sorry, I don't think I agree with that...to me, a film about a girl struggling with pregnancy is not funny, even if the performances are slightly overwrought. 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#3 speedracer5

speedracer5

    Errol Flynn's girlfriend in a parallel universe,back in time

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,529 posts
  • LocationForest Grove, Oregon

Posted 08 November 2015 - 03:39 PM

I'm a sucker for the overwrought melodramas produced during the 1950s--mostly because of this very thing.  These films are so overdramatic and so over the top that they crack me up.  Add in the intense film scores and the big gestures and you've got a ridiculously cheesy and entertaining film.

 

A Summer Place is a film that fits this very description and one that I enjoy watching just because it's so over the top.  This film has everything: teenage love, adultery, a rich score, a bigoted parent who will do everything to keep her daughter "chaste," an alcoholic father, a doormat father, teen pregnancy, underage marriage--everything I love in a melodrama.  


"It's not an old movie if you haven't seen it." -Lauren Bacall

 

"A little song, a little dance, a little seltzer down your pants." -Ted Baxter on "The Mary Tyler Moore Show"

 

Proud member of:

 

dxmdyx.png

 

 

My classic movie and television blog:

 

Whimsically Classic

 

https://whimsicallyc....wordpress.com/


#4 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37,310 posts

Posted 20 October 2015 - 01:23 PM

The Woman in The Window, when Edward G. kept making suspicious remarks about the murder left and right. He couldn't have stuck his foot in it any worse even if it were a parody!

 

I kind of feel this way about Robinson's turn as a desperate man with backwoods secrets in THE RED HOUSE. Sometimes I think he is lapsing into an overwrought performance but pulling himself back just in time so that it's not a full parody. Is he brilliant? Or is he unintentionally straddling the line between serious drama and silliness? Either way, he's an entertaining actor.

 

And he sort of does this as Johnny Rocco in KEY LARGO, too.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#5 film lover 293

film lover 293

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,730 posts

Posted 01 August 2015 - 08:40 PM

"Duel in the Sun" (1946)--or, as the film was known during production, "Lust in the Dust".


  • mr6666 and jamesjazzguitar like this

#6 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,446 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 05 July 2015 - 11:33 AM

The Woman in The Window, when Edward G. kept making suspicious remarks about the murder left and right. He couldn't have stuck his foot in it any worse even if it were a parody!

 

(Not sure if others will see this one, but I have to say...) Last time I watched the opening diner scene from The Killers I imagined the thugs as Abbott & Costello. Made me wish they'd parodied it, but once again, wouldn't hardly have to change a thing.

 

You got guts mentioning the iconic opening scene from The Killers.   But yea,  I can see Abbott & Costello doing that scene with only a few minor changes and it would be a riot.    But hey,  Woody Allen took the iconic ending scene of Casablanca and made it funny.  Much of the dialog of Casablanca is over the top lines no one would ever really say e.g. hill of beans???    This is what makes the film so great since it all ends up working anyhow.


  • Kay likes this

#7 Kay

Kay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 806 posts

Posted 04 July 2015 - 10:20 PM

The Woman in The Window, when Edward G. kept making suspicious remarks about the murder left and right. He couldn't have stuck his foot in it any worse even if it were a parody!

 

(Not sure if others will see this one, but I have to say...) Last time I watched the opening diner scene from The Killers I imagined the thugs as Abbott & Costello. Made me wish they'd parodied it, but once again, wouldn't hardly have to change a thing.


  • TopBilled likes this

#8 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37,310 posts

Posted 04 July 2015 - 05:55 PM

     That 1946 movie with Lucille Ball and John Hodiak 'TWO SMART PEOPLE' is supposed to be a comedy.  Huh?  I know TCM has aired it; I think it's a lot more 'Drama' than 'Comedy'. 

I don't think it was ever intended as a comedy. It's because Lucy became famous for comedy after she made this film that when it was broadcast on television, it was promoted as a comedy. It's actually a noir-influenced mystery drama. And it's quite good. She made a bunch of noir at this time, including THE DARK CORNER and LURED.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#9 Mr. Gorman

Mr. Gorman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,750 posts
  • Locationstate of GA

Posted 22 June 2015 - 08:39 AM

The trailer for KISS THEM FOR ME (1957) would lead one to believe it was a comedy -- more or less.  I'd have to classify it as a 'Comedy-Drama'.  There's plenty of material in the movie not played for laughs, to be sure.  Leif Erickson is not a comedy character.

 

     That 1946 movie with Lucille Ball and John Hodiak 'TWO SMART PEOPLE' is supposed to be a comedy.  Huh?  I know TCM has aired it; I think it's a lot more 'Drama' than 'Comedy'. 

 

    



#10 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 37,310 posts

Posted 16 June 2015 - 11:38 PM

Great topic. And we could also ask what is the most serious comedy someone has seen.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#11 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,446 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 10 December 2014 - 12:17 PM

220px-Fountainheadmp.jpg

 

I think The Fountainhead is a great choice if the topic is a drama that is funny but wasn't intented to be funny.   (but it appears most post at this forum are sticking with a drama that just has funny scenes and moments).



#12 traceyk65

traceyk65

    Is this where the club meets?

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,162 posts
  • LocationOhio

Posted 09 December 2014 - 11:16 PM

The Apartment--Wilder injected a lot of comedy into it.

 

Same thing with Terms of Endearment and Steel Magnolias (what is about Shirley Maclaine?)

 

IT's a little different, but movies with a serious setting that are funny are interesting. Like A Foreign Affair (the Allied occupation of Germany) M*A*S*H* (field hospital during the Korean War) Good Morning Vietnam (Vietnam War) 

 

 

 


"If you always do what interests you, at least one person is pleased." Katharine Hepburn 


#13 mr6666

mr6666

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 18,645 posts

Posted 09 December 2014 - 07:15 PM

220px-Fountainheadmp.jpg


"A small elephant is not a rabbit."


#14 CoraSmith

CoraSmith

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 246 posts
  • LocationBelgium

Posted 02 December 2014 - 07:33 AM

Cary Grant after drinking bourbon in North by Northwest.

 

Charles Laughton as the lawyer in Witness for the Prosecution.

 

Peter Ustinov as the slave buyer in Spartacus.



#15 joefilmone

joefilmone

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,314 posts
  • LocationNew Jersey

Posted 14 October 2014 - 09:13 PM

"Beyond the Forest" is full on unintentional laughs..."Psycho" has a lot of funny lines- Hitchcock loved dark humor.



#16 DougieB

DougieB

    I Love Melvin

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,697 posts

Posted 13 October 2014 - 04:42 PM

I know I heard Alfred Hitchcock refer to his movie "Psycho" as being a comedy. I guess some people didn't see it that way.

But Hitchcock is a great example of what the OP is looking for. There are some very funny "bits" in many of his films and he seems to have positioned certain actors specifically to be comic relief. I'm thinking especially of Jessie Royce Landis in "North by Northwest" and "To Catch a Thief" and Thelma Ritter in "Rear Window". And there was often some good comic byplay between the male and female leads, such as in "The 39 Steps" and "Satoteur". Rebecca's employer in the early part of that film is an appalling character, but definitely played for laughs, or at least chuckles of recognition. Tippi Hedren's character in "The Birds" goes out of her way to play a very elaborate joke, which isn't necessarily "funny" but it sets a very light initial tone, so that what comes later can have its full effect. Hitchcock was a master of many things, one of them being the use of intentional comedy to heighten the effect of drama. To answer the question of what was the funniest drama I've ever seen, it would probably be "North by Northwest", due to both Landis and Cary Grant, who does some great comic double-takes and a near constant stream of comic patter and wry commentary as he gets more and more involved in danger. How funny is the scene in the train station men's room, with Grant trying to "inconspicuously" shave with the tiny razor? Priceless.


"When Fortuna spins you downward, go out to a movie and get more out of life."...Ignatious J. Reilly, A Confederacy of Dunces


#17 TikiSoo

TikiSoo

    sprockethole

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,855 posts
  • LocationSyracuse, NY

Posted 10 October 2014 - 06:31 AM

The Barbara Stanwyk/Ralph Meeker drama JEAPORDY. 

 

Mr Teek & I watched it one afternoon and laughed our a s-s-e-s off. The premise was a family vacationing at a beach. The young son wanders off to a crumbling pier and gets his foot stuck. The father, instead of helping him, climbs up onto the pier himself, urges the kid to walk back and the pier collapses on the father and traps him. The entire debacle is laughably ridiculous.

 

As the tide rises, it's Stanwyk's job to "get help" before he drwns. Even though she meets a group of Mexicans along the way, she gives up trying to communicate with them and drives off (!) She meets up with Meeker, an escaped convict who takes her hostage. 

 

There are MANY hilarious moments, one when Meeker looks into the glove box and finds a GUN! Sorry, no one in their right mind stores a handgun in the glove box...only a Hollywood writer would think that one up.

 

The scene that made us roll around in laughter was when the cops stopped Stanwyk's car "looking for the criminal". Meeker pretended to be asleep and the cops just let them go!

Really?

You don't think in "real life" the cops would wake him & take a look at his face?

 

It remains our favorite "comedy" and I made a magnet of this picture for the 'fridge that always makes me laugh:

 

jeopardy.jpg



#18 Kay

Kay

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 806 posts

Posted 02 October 2014 - 04:37 PM

I think this movie is more intentionally funny than unintentionally, but it has a bit of both. The Ghost and Mrs. Muir (1947). When I first saw this movie I thought it was a comedy, it was hilarious, but I've never actually seen anyone refer to it as a comedy.

 

Beware minor spoilers

 

It wasn't just surly Rex Harrison that was funny, but how George Sanders was such a creep and she didn't seem to notice. She got quite a surprise when she visited his home, but I knew how it would turn out and got a good laugh out of that dramatic scene. Later, another hilarious line about seeing him again years later ("He was bald and fat, and had too much to drink and started crying" she said so passively.) Another funny bit was her maid, an older woman who seemed unaffected by the passing decades. Our heroes got older, but she was always the same. Yes, the romantic bits went by without my notice, but I think of this very fondly as a really funny movie.

 

(By the way, I like this idea for a thread. I hope people keep mentioning unintentionally funny films as well, with all due respect to the OP and his wishes.)



#19 Mr. Gorman

Mr. Gorman

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,750 posts
  • Locationstate of GA

Posted 02 October 2014 - 06:17 AM

I would like to see the 1978 movie "MOMENT BY MOMENT" which I've read about as being unintentionally funny.  Lily Tomlin and John Travolta star.  Never on video as far as I can discern (or I would have bought it).  Apparently Lily Tomlin is a bored Beverly Hills housewife or socialite (or some such) and John Travolta is some dude named "Strip Harrison" and they meet.  Righto then.  If that doesn't sound like 'guaranteed entertainment' I don't know what does.  Hee Hee.   

 

The 1980 drama WINDOWS, which I've seen 3 times, has some interesting moments and some very scenic shots of New York City circa 1979 (courtesy director Gordon Willis) -and- also some parts that are hilarious and cannot possibly have been intended that way.  The climactic confrontation scene between Talia Shire and Elizabeth Ashley cracks me up.  I couldn't help it; I had to laugh.  I do like the movie all right despite itself and remember "It's Lawrence -- don't call me 'Larry'!!"  Those who have not seen this should check it out when you're in the mood for something indescribably screwy.  ► It may not hit you until after the movie is over just how barmy the whole thing really is.  But trust me:  It's one-of-a-kind but not a good kind. 

 

     Anyone who can watch the scene with Shire and Ashley at the end and not bust out laughing deserves some form of credit for keeping a straight face.  I could not on any of my 3 viewings. 



#20 mistervegan

mistervegan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 246 posts
  • Locationmilwaukee, wisconsin

Posted 02 October 2014 - 05:41 AM

i concur with the majority of posters in this thread: i discern many more laffs in non-comedy flicks than those movies that 'propose' comedy.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users