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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Pre-Code Gallery


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1027 replies to this topic

#41 mdffyx

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 08:51 AM

Rookie soldiers probably did this on occasion without realizing that at night the light of a flame can be seen by the enemy if they are near. Today it is a superstition, then it might have been
a lesson in battle.

#42 goldensilents

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 11:19 PM

Wow, would fellow soldiers actually do that to one another so their brother in arms could get shot by the enemy? Or is it just an old superstition?

#43 ugaarte

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 01:47 PM

Well that Explains a lot, MDFFYX. . .

In the Film Noir, "Three Strangers" with Peter Lorre, Sydney Greenstreet & Geraldine Fitzgerald,
(on Youtube, under the Clip "Meeting of Strangers"), Peter lights Geraldine's cigarette,
and then his own, and then proceeds to hold up the match to Sydney, to light his cigarette,
but Sydney backs up and Peter blows the match out and 'snickers' at Sydney, "Whats the matter,
Three on a Match ? ". . . .and Sydney just states, " We all have our Silly Superstitions". . .

And also another Peter Lorre Movie, "Crack Up" 1936, (on Youtube, under the Clip,
"Three on a Match" . . . 3 guys light up their Final cigarettes with One match and one of them
asks if anyone is superstitious, to which Peter Lorre replys, "Only of a guy who's born Bad
and grows up Worse ". . . . (at least, thats what it sounds like he's saying).

And your Explaination seems to come from that time era and just seems to fall
right in place. Thanks a Lot.

Ugaarte

#44 mdffyx

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 09:03 PM

Thanks for the nice comments. A Google search of 3 on a match, offers a couple of explanations.
The most popular one comes from WWI, when it was said that if foxholed soldiers passed
a match to a third person, the enemy would have been given a clue as to where to aim his shot.
That would mean bad luck for the third person, as he would be the one to get hit.
The phrase, over time, has come to mean that the third person on a match would have severely bad luck.

#45 ugaarte

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Posted 14 March 2009 - 12:46 PM

These are just Wonderful Pics, MDFFYX . . .

One of your Pics, posted on 3/13/09, has Joan Blondell, Ann Dvorak & Bette Davis,
in, "3 on a Match". . .
I had inquired on a another thread about the term, "Three on a Match".
Would you happen to know what this 'Term' means ? . . . It seemed to have been used
quite a bit. I noticed it a lot in some of the Peter Lorre Movies I had seen.
I'm really curious to find out.

And that is such an interesting photo of a blonde Claudette Colbert, too.

Thanks again for sharing your Wonderful photos.

Ugaarte.

#46 mdffyx

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 10:33 AM

Mmaureen O'Sullivan 1933


Maureen O'Sullivan, Stage Mother, 1933
Fay Wray


Fay Wray
Women of All Nations 1931


Lowe, Nissan, McLagan 1931
William Cargan & Dorothy Wilson 1933


Lucky Devils, 1933, Wm Cargan & Dorothy Wilson
Upperworld 1933


Upperworld, 1934, Warren William and Ginger Rogers
Once A Lady 1931


Once A Lady 1931, Ruth Chatterton and Paul Lucas
Claudette Colbert


Claudette Colbert
1932


1932
Ann Sothern & Edmund Lowe


Ann Sothern & Edmund Lowe 1934
Ginger Rogers


Three Wise Girls 1931


Three Wise Girls, Columbia 1931

#47 goldensilents

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 10:22 AM

I watched Charles Farrell's *Lilliom* from the Murnau-Borzage DVD box set last night. I thought it was ok, the cinematography was nice, the print excellent, the acting was good (Charles made an effort to lower his rather high pitched voice) but the story seemed too stilted to me. I didn't care for the After Death sequences. I think it's a difficult story to film well because the male lead isn't sympathetic.

If you've seen it what were your thoughts on it?

#48 mdffyx

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 08:49 AM

Thanks for the correction re: Eddie Q, rather than Eddie G.

#49 musicalnovelty

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Posted 13 March 2009 - 02:11 AM

Thanks for posting so many great pictures!
By the way, that's Eddie Quillan, not Eddie Gribbon in "The Tip Off".

#50 mdffyx

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Posted 12 March 2009 - 04:33 PM

Gloria Stuart


Gloria Stuart
Colbert in Manslaughter


Claudette Colbert in Manslaughter, 1930
Dorothy Mackaill


Dorothy Mackaill
The TipOff 1931


The Tip Off 1931 Robt Armstrong, Eddie Gribbon, Ginger Rogers
1932


1932
Claire Trevor


Claire Trevor
Chevalier, Ruggles, Colbert


Chevalier, Ruggels, Colbert 1931
Ida Lupino @ Columbia


Ida Lupino at Columbia
Robt Armstrong & Lina Basquette


Robt. Armstrong and Lina Basquette.

#51 mdffyx

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 09:05 PM

Jackie Cooper was probably a likeable kid in real life, but he played those whiney, sniveling
parts that really irritate. Fay and G Raft were excellent in the Bowery but I couldn't
enjoy Cooper's and Beery's scenes. And that's my unprofessional opinion!

#52 metsfan

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Posted 11 March 2009 - 08:28 PM

The Bowery (1933)


Bolero (1934)


#53 mdffyx

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Posted 03 March 2009 - 01:14 PM

Photobucket


1933 Maureen O Sullivan and Franchot Tone
Photobucket


1931 Ben Lyon and Bebe Daniels, My Past
Photobucket


Robert Armstrong and Lina Basquette, Show Folks, 1928
Photobucket


Fast and Loose 1930, Miriam Hopkins and Chas. Starrett
Photobucket


Ruth Chatterton and Paul Lucas, 1930

#54 PrinceSaliano

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 08:44 PM

I don't know why RETURN OF THE TERROR (First National, 1934) has never played on TCM. But I'd love to see pics from it.

#55 metsfan

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Posted 24 February 2009 - 06:54 PM

It's been a while since I haven't come here but I want to thank you all for posting these wonderful pictures I'm enjoying at the moment.

#56 goldensilents

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 07:34 PM

Oh I LOVE that one of Mae in Waterloo Bridge! Dreamy. Thanks for posting it.

#57 JackFavell

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 09:32 PM

Thanks for all the Blondell pics- she's a favorite.

#58 mdffyx

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 10:28 AM

Pictured on the lobby card is Claire Dodd who's no slouch either. She was usually a
femme fatale, and not bad at it.

#59 VP19

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 10:06 AM

"Hard To Handle" is arguably one of Cagney's most unheralded films, a sprightly pre-Code comedy with plenty of in-jokes (e.g., a Florida land scheme named "Grapefruit Acres"). Mary Brian had the female lead, but supposedly Warners wanted Carole Lombard (who might have accepted had she not been working at her home studio of Paramount at the time with an A-lister himself on loanout, Clark Gable). It would've been interesting to see Carole and Cagney work together. For more on "Hard To Handle," go to http://community.liv...d_co/74359.html.

#60 PrinceSaliano

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Posted 10 February 2009 - 05:55 PM

Fox should release CALL HER SAVAGE and HOOPLA as a 2-for-1 DVD!




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