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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Favorite Silent Actresses


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255 replies to this topic

#41 Guest_Lord, Scott_*

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Posted 17 October 2002 - 12:25 PM

Please than TCM for showing The Divine Woman with Garbo last night. I do intend to use the film on my website(please visit). www.geocities.com/lord02141/index.html

#42 Guest_Alix_*

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Posted 26 September 2002 - 04:15 PM

Dressler in a western? Oh, how horrible! It would also have been awful to have seen her in chiffon as somebody's heavy-set mother! What a break for us, that she got the chance to have starring roles!

#43 Guest_son, jery_*

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Posted 26 September 2002 - 02:21 PM

that's why I think it's fantastic that Marie Dressler was somehow given the chance to show what a real trouper could do if just given the chance. She had everything against her. Especially her off-beat looks. If it wasn't for her buddy, screen writer Frances Marion, I have a terrible image of Dressler trudging away as some "Mother" in flea-bitten westerns.

#44 Guest_Alix_*

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Posted 25 September 2002 - 08:45 PM

Don't you kind of think Hollywood back then didn't know what to do with actresses who were over 40? You were either a hot young thing, or you were wearing those big swishy chiffon dresses as someone's mother. Things have maybe improved a LITTLE bit today, but not much.

#45 Guest_son, jery_*

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Posted 25 September 2002 - 12:35 PM

I'm always horrified to see the once great Clara Kimball Young, who was the hottest female star on the planet during the l900s, suddenly pop up in tiny little bit parts in the early 1930s. TCM shows one of these weirdo's repeatedly. The camera pans over a row of women's faces who're all at a type of long dressing table. They all say something like, "Yeah, I'm tired of working hard all day, etc." Kimble is the heavy, middle-aged woman with horrible looking make-up, greasy looking hair, bags under her eyes. She was also reduced to playing Grade-Z poverty row "mothers" and there was not a shred of anything about her that would make you think this gal was the Elizabeth Taylor of her day!

#46 Guest_Alix_*

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Posted 22 September 2002 - 09:15 PM

Yes, you're right...so many big stars did sort of drift into oblivion as the transition was made, and you have to have a quick eye and good mind for faces to remember them. By the way, Ed, anything new about your book? I still think it'd be an AWESOME and interesting read!

#47 Guest_Lorusso, Ed_*

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Posted 22 September 2002 - 09:00 AM

My computer was down for several weeks..... but what about the others???? Caught Strange Cargo (1940) the other day. Clark Gable and Joan Crawford were terrific but early in the film Joan goes to the docks with a friend who looked vaguely familiar. Imagine my surprise when I discovered it was Betty Compson! No billing at all--the former great star of the 20 and early talkies and an Oscar nominee for The Barker and no billing at all....... Just amazing how she could have drifted into bit parts, but then so did Alice White, Marie Prevost, etc.

#48 Guest_Alix_*

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Posted 21 September 2002 - 08:51 PM

Yes, it has, and perhaps the reason is the silent films that have been shown. I've been terribly unimpressed by what's been programmed for Silent Sunday Night lately. All it would take to get things hoppin' here would be for TCM to show something new, exciting, different...like SLIDE KELLY, SLIDE or a silent Shearer film. That would perk up the place, don't you think? How about a film fest about Flappers? How about more William Haines? How about some early Crawfords? I'm ready for some silent excitement.

#49 Guest_Lorusso, Ed_*

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Posted 21 September 2002 - 08:15 AM

Has this been dead for a month?

#50 Guest_o, rita_*

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Posted 22 August 2002 - 04:27 PM

I think she died from substance abuse related issues and/or a drug overdose. Jeanne was a morphine addict. They made a movie about her life starring Kim Novak as Jeanne Eagles. I haven't seen that movie in years. In fact, I had forgotten about it until this post about her. I would love to see that movie again!

#51 Guest_Alix_*

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Posted 21 August 2002 - 09:49 PM

I've never seen one of her films. I'd love to see her 1929 version of THE LETTER. It's suppose to be awesome. Maybe someone who knows more than I do about her can tell her story. I don't quite know what happened to her, except that she died young.

#52 Guest_lettuce, hedda_*

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Posted 20 August 2002 - 05:37 PM

Does anybody remember Jeanne Eagels? I caught her in a l918 drama, "Woman and the City" and thought she was fantastic! I would love to have seen her and another great actress, the Russian Nazimova, in a movie together. Eagels reminded me a lot of that tragic gal, Frances Farmer.

#53 Guest_MissPriss_*

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Posted 08 August 2002 - 09:37 PM

Amen! I think "GWTW" the book was the Great American novel,and "GWTW"the movie may well be the Great American film! I LOVE that movie, I could watch it once a month, and see something I missed before. Not to mention a great love story,combined with epic history, is timeless and eternal.Hokey? What's hokey about a love that was destined to be? What's hokey about brothers fighting on opposite sides,the growth pangs of a great nation in the making,the destruction of an outmoded civilisation that just couldn't drag itself into the future(even though I'm Southern and still get goosebumps at the romanticism,chivalry and mysticism of Southern history)? And it was all done with such talent and scope,and originality,and feeling? I'll always CARE whether Rhett returns to Scarlett or not(and no, I'd NEVER read or watch that TERRIBLE sequel,that could never catch the spirit of Margaret itchell's book,or David O Selznick's film-NEVER!) I just don't understand people who will praise a movie filled with blatant violence or pornography,while not seeming to understand the much greater talent and creativity required when subtlety and symbolism must be employed. Ok, now I'm off the soapbox, but "GWTW" is a pet book/movie of mine,LOL.

#54 Guest_MissPriss_*

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Posted 08 August 2002 - 09:21 PM

I agree with you there! I LOVE Lillian Gish-she was my introduction to silent movies. I bought "Way Down East" "Broken Blossoms", and "Birth Of A Nation", and want more films with her in them-I've seen "Orphans Of The Storm" and another one shown on TCM with beautiful Lillian in it. It's amazing to see her in a movie or a still picture looking so fragile and delicate, and then read the things she voluntarily did for her art,like almost freezing to death in "Way Down East", by trailing her hair and hand in the freezing river, simply for thr sake of realism in the film! it's unbelievable! They don't make actors and actresses like that anymore-she was truly dedicated to helping pioneer in the new medium of "motion pictures" I also love Norma Shearer, and her silents-one of my all-time favorite movies is "The Student Prince In Old Heidelburg"-I LOVE that movie, and Norma Shearer is just a beauty:)

#55 Guest_son, jery_*

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Posted 07 August 2002 - 07:55 AM

Right on, Alix! Think Kay Francis at Warners, Joan Crawford and Luise Rainer at MGM, Betty Grable at 20th Century. All forced out, dumped because their movies didn't make the money to feed and clothe those high-priced studio execs.

#56 Guest_Alix_*

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Posted 06 August 2002 - 07:06 PM

Way back when, the studios used to protect their stars, if they knew of something unsavory, like a drug addiction, love affair, drunk driving charges, etc. I also wondered if the studios kind of abandonned her too. It's long been suggested that the studios let Mary Miles Minter become a dumping ground for rumors and innuendo (Did the police really have a pink nightie embroidered with MMM or was it just a rumor?) because she had a high priced contract, but little box office pull. And then, consider John Gilbert's sad story. I think the studio execs loved you while you were on top, and as soon as you were no longer lucrative...hasta la vista, baby.

#57 Guest_Richmond, Lela_*

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Posted 06 August 2002 - 08:23 AM

I get so upset when someone is dragged down by events that happened with their associates...although it was not just the possibility that Mabel Normand might have murdered Taylor that ruined her. After the murder, Mabel's one-time addiction to opium or such became public, although I sometimes feel that the studios only let this get out so that they could dump her...if they had really valued her, they would have found a way to maintain the problem as a secret. Gee, I just LOVE old Hollywood so much.

#58 Guest_Alix_*

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Posted 05 August 2002 - 07:56 PM

Jery, you just HAVE to see that dollhouse. It is the hobby of a lifetime, and there are no words to really describe it. I finally got to see WEST POINT, and Haines was wonderful. So handsome, so cocky, so sweet in his love scenes with Crawford. No wonder all the women (and men) were in love with this man. He had charisma, and how!

#59 Guest_son, jery_*

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Posted 05 August 2002 - 08:10 AM

Alix, I've always wanted to see the Colleen Moore Dollhouse!She writes about this in detail in her memoirs, SILENT STAR. You described it beautifully and now I've got to see it. Yes, it really is sad that she's put into the same forgotten folder as Mae Murray. These two gals were the Julia Roberts of their heyday. The two movies I've seen of Moore are bad prints. This gal had to have had something going for her to be so famous. I'd love to hear what Anita Page has to say about Moore! Anita knew them all--especially our fave, charming Billy Haines!

#60 Guest_Alix_*

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Posted 26 July 2002 - 04:04 PM

In June I was in Chicago and got to see Colleen Moore's "Fairy Castle" at the Museum of Science & Industry. Has anyone else seen this **awesome** dollhouse? Apparently, decorating it was Moore's greatest hobby during the 30's, and I have to tell you, I was just blown away! I guess it went on tour during the depression, and ended up on loan to this museum in 1949, and is not part of the permanant collection there. The room it's located in is darkened, promoting it's mystery. All of the miniatures are priceless--some dating back over 1000 years old! Moore used many of her own jewels, and relatives also donated jewels to be incorporated into the dollhouse. There are headphones all around the glass case it's housed in, and if you listen in, you hear Colleen describing the fairy castle, room by room. On a sadder note, I heard two people talking about the display as I exited, and one said to the other, "Who's this Colleen Moore?" and the other one said, "I think some silent film actress or something." How sad she's all but forgotten today.




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