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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Seeking copy of Hollywood Revuew of 1929


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1707 replies to this topic

#1 TomJH

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 09:28 AM

I know the guy who started this thread, and he got a copy after the Warner Archive made one available. When this thread started in 2008 there was no such thing as the Warner Archive.

Glad to hear there was a happy ending, calvinnme.



#2 calvinnme

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Posted 11 January 2015 - 09:26 AM

Still seeking a copy?

I know the guy who started this thread, and he got a copy after the Warner Archive made one available. When this thread started in 2008 there was no such thing as the Warner Archive.



#3 slaytonf

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 09:06 PM

Still seeking a copy?



#4 calvinnme

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Posted 10 January 2015 - 08:42 AM

A trip down TCM message board memory lane...



#5 ugaarte

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Posted 31 October 2010 - 09:50 AM

Oh, that is so Clara Bow . . . getting into the spirit of things.
these are great shots of her, gagman . . . and I love her
''spats' high-heel shoes, too.
and as always, Great coloring, gagman . . .

Everyone, please have a Safe holloween !

Regards,
ugaarte

#6 gagman66

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 09:43 PM

ugaarte,

*HAPPY HALLOWEEN!!!*



Posted Image

*Clara-"Treats and Tricks"*

















































































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*"Claraween!"*









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*"As Shadows Fall!"*

#7 ugaarte

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Posted 29 October 2010 - 09:42 AM

Hey Gagman . . .


Just wanted to say these are great pics of 'Cutie' Clara Bow,
especially the one where she's holding that 'Jack-O-Lantern',
Just in time for Holloween . . .
And I just can't say enough about our 'Sweet Colleen Moore' -
just that I would Love to make my way back to the
Chicago Museum of Science & Industry to view her Fairy Castle
again . . . It was quite a 'Wonderland' experience.

Regards,
Ugaarte

#8 gagman66

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Posted 27 October 2010 - 02:16 AM

Posted Image

*Clara Bow-Some Gamtacular Show!*









Posted Image

*Clara with Leggy Lighting Muses-1929*

#9 gagman66

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Posted 26 October 2010 - 08:37 PM

Posted Image

*Colleen Moore-"Love Of Nature"*









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*Colleen-Spinning A Tall Yarn"*















Posted Image

*Clara Bow-"Bewitching Hour!"*









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*Clara-"It's The Gams!"*

#10 gagman66

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 09:35 AM

Posted Image

*Clara Bow and Buddy Rogers*

#11 gagman66

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 09:08 AM

ugaarte,

Hi, I am happy to e back as well. Good to see a new response to this old thread. Can't believe that it is almost *Halloween* again! Where did the year go to? The annual perish Bizarre this Sunday. Oh, boy.

By the way, THE VIKING is on TCM in November!












Posted Image

*Esther Ralston-Slightly Spooked!*

#12 ugaarte

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Posted 20 October 2010 - 08:32 AM

Gagman . . .
It's Great to see you and your 'always stunning' portraits back again . . .
I know about 'complications with computers' . . .been there !
Pauline Stark looks radiant, especially in ther Viking Get-up.
Appears more like she's going for a 'Flash Gordon' look . . . with a woman's touch.
Once again, good to have you back, Gagman.

Regards,
Ugaarte

#13 gagman66

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 02:26 AM

Posted Image

*Pauline Starke-"Spring Ensemble"*











Posted Image

*Pauline-"Sharply Dressed"*





































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*Pauline-Arrayed In Gold*





































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*"Dreamy Viking"*

#14 gagman66

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 12:11 AM

ugaarte,

Finally, everything is working properly again! Just kicked in all of a sudden! I don't know how, but it did. Won't complain! decided to revive the old thread never realized that it had been since July that I had posted here!



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#15 ugaarte

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Posted 14 September 2010 - 08:29 PM

Dearest Gagman and All . . .

Well, I have an Brand New Computer now and hoping to do some catching up on this thread.

Most of all, I want to Express my appreciation on all those Awesome and Rich portraits
posted mostly by Gagman. I haven't been able to enjoy these prints since April 3rd . . .
(too much has happened here to get into right now. . )
But anyways, Gagman, Awesome, Awesome Pics of those fabulous gals, Colleen Moore,
Norma Talmadge, Vilma Banky Renee Adoree, Esther Ralston and Clara Bow, Just to name
few . . . I have to say, one of the Lovliest pics has to be of Mary Picford, Posted on April 8th
(which happened to be my Birthday) and also Surprised to find out it was also Mary's Birthday
as well. (Do we really both share the same Birthdate ?) But those Rich Portraits of her in her famous golden locks of hair always seems to give her that luminous glow that's just too, too Lovely !
And I can't forget to mention those Dashing Gents too: Ramon Navarro, John Gilbert and Gilbert Roland.
Much Much thanks again for Rich and Classic Pics.
Sincerely,
Ugaarte

#16 JackFavell

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 03:57 PM

That was a lovely article Jeff. I really enjoyed it.

#17 gagman66

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 01:21 AM

*FIG LEAVES, WHAT PRICE GLORY?, BEAU GESTE, THE NIGHT OF LOVE*, Marion Davies *BEVERLY OF GRAUSTARK*, or course *THE BIG PARADE* and *WINGS.* Any of those at the festival would be great. *CHILDREN OF DIVORCE* and *LILAC TIME* or *HER WILD OAT* as well. Anyway one film for Clara Bow and one for Colleen Moore. I doubt that they will schedule more than 3 or 4 Silents. I know that the BFI has a 35 Millimeter Safety-print of *ORCHIDS AND ERMINE.* It must have been struck from the Nitrate that Kevin Brownlow talked about in the article?







































Posted Image

*Colleen Moore-Precious Jeannine From LILAC TIME*



Wow-wee! Now tell me again that Colleen Moore wasn't among the Cutest Actresses of the 20's Mr. Herbert Howe! I think Colleen is mostly overlooked because she rarely played the Glamor girl. There is a comical quote by a fan in Picture Play. He say's that:

*"Colleen Moore is Fresh Faced and natural. She isn't wearing a half of pound of make-up like some of these other girls are."*

Wanted to mention, you might think that Colleen's hair was Jet Black? But according to a 1925 issue of Photoplay they say it was Reddish-Brown. And yes they mention the One Brown Eye and one Green without hesitation. Unfortunately, they don't say which one was which. So I still don't know.

I have her autobiography. There is No mention of Eye Color that I can recall. But obviously it was public knowledge in the 20's. Her fans knew about the two different colors. She never tried to hide this in any way as future sources would apparently have us believe.

#18 countessdelave

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Posted 21 July 2010 - 12:20 AM

Gagman,

One of my film recommendations for next year's Film Festival is *Fig Leaves*. It would be a great crowd pleaser and it's quite clever and fun. I'm keeping my fingers crossed. I'd love to see more Clara Bow and Colleen Moore show up on Silent Sunday Nights-here's hoping someday soon...

#19 gagman66

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 09:51 PM

Wendy, Anna,

Your will love reading this article where Kevin Brownlow extols the virtues and the beauty of Nitrate prints. Sadly in the case of many films transferred to Safety decades ago, and carelessly in allot of cases that beauty is often lost.

Now where is that 35 MM of *ORCHIDS AND ERMINE* that is mentioned (The BFI does have a print), or *LILAC TIME* or any Colleen Moore feature? And speaking of Howard Hawks, how about getting the restored *FIG LEAVES* shown at next years TCM Film Festival? Or maybe *BEAU GESTE?* Might go a long ways to getting these films released on DVD.



http://www.bfi.org.u...ive/nitrate.php

Once upon a time the silver screen really glistened. Kevin Brownlow remembers when a good film could clear the air

What was I supposed to do with that? Knowing I was keen on films, someone had given me a 200ft roll of nitrate. It showed a scene from Rupert of Hentzau, made in 1913. I had heard that old films were printed on cellulose nitrate stock, which was highly inflammable. What?s more, the industry was still using it. It was 1950; I was 12 years old, and enjoyed staging battles with my friends on the acres of bombed sites that surrounded my home in North London. I placed this roll in a paper bag, climbed to the roof of a bombed building and when my pals passed beneath, I lit the fuse and dropped it. It exploded most satisfactorilly. But I could have kicked myself when I needed the sequence for a documentary in 1996. That roll was all that was left of an important film ? and the images on the reel had looked most impressive.

Far more exciting than burning nitrate was watching it on the screen. I remember at the National Film Theatre showing a dim 16mm dupe of a Colleen Moore comedy called Orchids and Ermine (1927). It was the usual thing that laboratories subjected us to in the 1960s. Then the projectionist switched over to the same scene in original nitrate. The audience gasped. The difference was indeed breathtaking. The 16mm barely registered. The 35mm looked stereoscopic ? you felt you could walk into it.

I first became aware of the beauty of nitrate when the Museum of Modern Art sent a print of The Strong Man (1926) to the National Film Theatre in the 1950s. Expecting the standard dupe of the time, we were treated to a gorgeous tinted print, identical to what people saw in 1927 ? it was bright, steady and sharp as a tack. I had become a connoisseur of print quality because my first sight of a moving picture had been a dreadful home movie made by Dr Barnardo?s and shown to us kids at boarding school. I knew nothing about films ? had never even seen one ? but I felt instinctively that this was Bad. When I finally went to a cinema, around 1943, Snow White was accompanied by a newsreel. Four naval officers were walking towards camera. The superb black and white photography remains in my mind to this day. Snow White?s Technicolor animation impressed me less than that one rich image.

My enthusiasm for early films was sparked at another school, where once a term we saw a talkie; the rest of the time we saw silents, hired from Wallace Heaton film library. Enthralled by these, I beseeched my parents for a projector and soon became an avid collector myself. The British Film Institute used to show silents at the French Institute in those pre-National Film Theatre days. But what miserable prints! Oily, soupy, dupey, there was absolutely nothing to commend them.

Without Bert Langdon, a collector in Camden Town who used to show original nitrate prints every Saturday night, I might have abandoned my interest. He cranked his projector with one hand and played gramophone records with the other. Thus we had stunning picture quality and orchestral accompaniment. How he managed to hold on to those films I cannot imagine. He lived in a council flat, and he had been there all through the war. His collection included 86,000ft of extracts. Had all that celluloid been hit by incendiaries, the entire terrace would have gone up.

Bert Langdon wouldn?t admit it, but he was slightly afraid of nitrate. He knew he should have proper ventilation yet he didn?t even open a window and kept incense burning throughout the show. To minimise the fire risk, he limited his lamp output to 100 watt. This was a shame because it reduced the impact of the films. Nonetheless, the quality was superb and we could see all the tints and tones.

I hadn?t realised the old films were so elaborately tinted and not only that, the early French had a stencil system called Path?color which could be incredibly beautiful. Those evenings watching unique nitrate prints set a new standard and made me paranoid about print quality. I couldn?t so much as watch 8mm. But sell me a 16mm print from the Kodascope library ? you could tell these by the smell of camphor ? and I knew I had the nearest to nitrate, for the prints were uncannily sharp. Original 35mm prints were hard to see outside the NFT and Bert Langdon?s, although some fleapit would make up a Sunday programme somewhere from old nitrate prints.

But rapidly they fell into obsolescence. People became paranoid about them. Fire officers took sadistic delight in relating horror stories in which nitrate burned under water, producing its own oxygen. ?Nonsense,? we veterans retorted. ?So long as you treat it properly, it is no more dangerous than the petrol in your car.? But even archives, once they?d made their copies, burned the nitrate. Many of them still do. How desperately grateful we would be, in this age of DVD and HD, to have access again to those exquisite prints?

My wife was deeply impressed by the nitrate we used to see at the Fox studios, in Los Angeles, when the great Murnau and Borzage and Hawks films were dug out of the vaults. That was 40 years ago, but even today, when you get that incredibly intense light right after a rainstorm, she will break into a seraphic smile and say ?Nitrate weather again.?

And yet I remember when a West End cinema was showing a nitrate print of a Garbo film ? out of focus. A slight twist of the lens and it would have looked superb. I called an usher and asked him to contact the projectionist. The film was being ruined. ?Oh, that,? he said, gesturing with contempt. ?That?s an old film. Nothing you can do with it.?

#20 JackFavell

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Posted 20 July 2010 - 09:23 PM

Oh you know I love Betty Bronson! And that Milton Sills is growing on me...maybe he is one of the best looking men of the 1920's... :D

Personally, I find Tom Moore attractive and charming. But perhaps I should have mentioned that in the silent movie crushes thread.

I am glad to see you back Ugaarte!




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