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RAMBLES Part II


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#1 FrankGrimes

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Posted 12 March 2017 - 01:32 PM

Good afternoon, Piecemaker -- Well, there is no accounting for tastes sometimes.. ha. My brothers all liked it too. (they were still in highschool and junior high for the most part... that was likely more the standard audience for that show, overall) But you never know why someone will like something. I once dated a boy (way... way back when I was in highschool. You know.. practically dinosaur days. ha) and his little sister (she was 7) ABSOLUTELY l-o-v-e LOVED The Dukes of Hazard. If you knew that little girl, you'd NEVER have suspected she would.. very prissy.. very much a "princess" but oh me.. every time that show was on, she was right there, asking to watch it. If I was visiting them and it was time for the Dukes.. oh yeah, the whole world had to stop and we all got to watch Rosco P. Coltrane and Boss Hogg try and get one step ahead of those Duke boys. ha. Again.. no accounting for tastes. We all just like what we like.. and usually have our own reasons. (but ha.. some of us have NO rhyme or reason.. I confess I likely have at least a FEW unexplainable favorites on my "hit list" too.)

 

A Dukes of Hazzard lady?!  My kind of girl!

 

After that, the best batman performance I can think of would be... the Batman character in The LEGO Movie, maybe. ha. (Now THERE was a super hero!! ha)

 

I definitely love the Will Arnett "Batman" from the LEGO series.  My favorite is Adam West, followed by Kevin Conroy, who voiced "Batman" on the Animated Series.

 

But it may be a stand alone fan moment for me. Even if I like that movie, I am not sure if we'll dive in to the whole "Justice League" stuff, though, now that that is all starting to come together. I still have not gotten past the really awful things I heard (and thought) about the Batman V Superman film when they were advertising it.. ha. It just looked too doofy. (not sure why.. I love the whole Marvel Avengers stuff.. and that has to be the height of doofiness. But it works for me, somehow. Doofy can be a very subjective thing sometimes, I guess. ha)

 

Yeah, I heard bad things about that film, too.  It's trouble when the boys in my family think it's not that good.  They love everything.  I'm a DC fan more than Marvel but the Marvel films are currently done better.



#2 rohanaka

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Posted 05 March 2017 - 05:54 PM

Howdy, Ma Stone

 

Howdy Jabez...  

 

I can't believe it's your dad who watched The A Team!  That's pretty remarkable, actually.  I can't say many from his generation would watch such a show

 

Well, there is no accounting for tastes sometimes.. ha. My brothers all liked it too. (they were still in highschool and junior high for the most part... that was likely more the standard audience for that show, overall) But you never know why someone will like something. I once dated a boy (way... way back when I was in highschool. You know.. practically dinosaur days. ha) and his little sister (she was 7) ABSOLUTELY l-o-v-e LOVED The Dukes of Hazard. If you knew that little girl, you'd NEVER have suspected she would.. very prissy.. very much a "princess" but oh me.. every time that show was on, she was right there, asking to watch it. If I was visiting them and it was time for the Dukes.. oh yeah, the whole world had to stop and we all got to watch Rosco P. Coltrane and Boss Hogg try and get one step ahead of those Duke boys. ha. Again.. no accounting for tastes. We all just like what we like.. and usually have our own reasons. (but ha.. some of us have NO rhyme or reason.. I confess I likely have at least a FEW unexplainable favorites on my "hit list" too.) :D  

 

Ha!  I'm guessing I'll just like it enough because I like Superman and Christopher Reeve as he

 

 

I liked him in the first one.. he was ok in the second. But oh me,  I am not kidding.. HOLD YOUR NOSE from there on out. ha!! 

 

I have seen Burton's first Batman, but that's it from that series.

 

Well, again, I wish I could say ANYthing nice about the series after that first one. But I just can't think of any good way to recommend them. I really did enjoy the first one a lot. After that, the best batman performance I can think of would be... the Batman character in The LEGO Movie, maybe. ha. (Now THERE was a super hero!! ha) :D

 

 

(I haven't seen the Batman Lego Movie yet.. though. So I don't know how he holds up in any sequels) :D 

 

I've seen Batman Begins and The Dark Knight but not The Dark Knight Rises....  Christopher Nolan directed the Batman pics and co-wrote the story of Man of Steel.  I can't see you liking the Batman reboot.  Probably too dark for you.

 

Oh, you never know. "Dark" isn't as bothersome to me as "Dark with no good reason" ha. So it might or might not be. It really does depend on the story and the character. But I just never got that excited about those when they came out, so can't say if I will ever get around to them or not.

 

I haven't seen Man of Steel.

 

We really do like it a lot here at Casa de Ro. Even the QT is a fan.  There are things that are overdone about it though. (I was NOT kidding about the fight scenes and how LOOONGGG they last) But I remember reading that the guy who directed this movie was the same guy who made that 300 movie.. about all the Spartans.. fighting and fighting and fighting. ha. So maybe he likes that sort of action. ha. But if you can get past that.. I think Man of Steel really was a good telling of the Superman story. (at least for my money) Not sure if you will like it as much or not.  (But given our history, since I like it.. you'd probably hate it. HA!)

 

But it may be a stand alone fan moment for me. Even if I like that movie, I am not sure if we'll dive in to the whole "Justice League" stuff, though, now that that is all starting to come together. I still have not gotten past the really awful things I heard (and thought) about the Batman V Superman film when they were advertising it.. ha. It just looked too doofy. (not sure why.. I love the whole Marvel Avengers stuff.. and that has to be the height of doofiness. But it works for me, somehow. Doofy can be a very subjective thing sometimes, I guess. ha) :D  



#3 FrankGrimes

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Posted 02 March 2017 - 08:18 PM

Hiya, Bronxie -- I think you'll be pleasantly surprised with THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES, even though I can't believe you've never seen it before! 

 

I was actually a little disappointed.  I just didn't find the humor as good since Bud and Lou were separated so much.

 

Gale Sondergaard plays a mediumistic housekeeper (I won't spoil what Binnie Barnes says to her by way of introduction) who conducts a seance to contact "the ghosts of the well" and find out why their spirits are bound to Danbury Manor until "crack of doom". The seance scene has some genuinely spooky moments which are satisfyingly interwoven with the comedy elements, two years before the boys meet Frankenstein.

 

Ha!  I did love the "Mrs. Danvers" reference.  That was classic.  Lou did make me laugh during the seance.

 

THE HARD WAY requires some suspension of disbelief as we are supposed to believe that Joan Leslie's character suddenly blossoms into a great Broadway musical star.  Jack Carson is excellent in a sympathetic dramatic role, and Dennis Morgan is very believable as an ostensibly love 'em and leave 'em type who has Ida's number, and she doesn't like it, lol. 

 

"She doesn't like it" made me want to see it even more. :D

 

Actually now that I think about it there is another Claire Trevor film where she's over the top but I can't remember the name of it.  It's a noir of sorts, with Lawrence Tierney as a stone-cold killer she falls for and tangles with.  Heavy handed all around as I remember.

 

That's Born to Kill, which I really like.  It's directed by Robert Wise, surprisingly.

 

Just saw this on YouTube!  But it's the colorized version.  I must tell you that Helen Gahagan looks a bit like Fanny Brice, and old enough to be Randolph Scott's mother.

 

So she's literally 200 years old? :D

 

She doesn't conjure up timeless sexual allure the way Ursula does.

 

Not many do!  But I'm someone who is turned on by ice.  Yeah, I know I'm weird.

 

Howdy, Ma Stone -- Look at YOU sporting a new avatar!! Sweet little Lamby.. it's about time you climbed down out of that tree. :)

 

I needed a feminine touch. :D

 

HA!! You ARE an 80's guy!! This was one of those shows my dad watched. Fortunately by then, I was out of school and working so at least I wasn't home ALL the time when it used to be on. But I DID watch now and then. (she said to her own embarrassment) Oh the hours I only WISH I could get back. Oh, who am I kidding.. I do confess I enjoyed SOME of it. I loved Howling Mad Murdock.  He was a laugh riot.  :D 

 

I can't believe it's your dad who watched The A Team!  That's pretty remarkable, actually.  I can't say many from his generation would watch such a show.

 

And in the story of Samson (the original story) you get both! :D

 

Femmes fatale.  They are everywhere!

 

Yeah.. I can't comment on #4 because after #3 I just wrote it all off. ha. So good LUCK with all that. :D

 

Ha!  I'm guessing I'll just like it enough because I like Superman and Christopher Reeve as he.

 

Since you are on a "super hero" kick.. have you ever seen that Batman movie that I mentioned (when we were talking about Tim Burton?) It is pretty dark (compared to the Superman movies you are watching) but I really did like it a lot (WAY more than the Christopher Reeve Superman films) I absolutely would NOT recommend any of them AFTER the first one (the one with Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson) I saw the second one (with the penguin and the catwoman) and I even saw #3 and #4 (because yeah.. by that point I had stepsons.. and I went because they really wanted to see them.. but agh.. those movies REALLY were not anywhere NEAR as good as the first one) But all that aside.. I really did like the FIRST one a lot (which means you'd probably hate it.. ha) 

 

I have seen Burton's first Batman, but that's it from that series.  I have them on blu-ray, so I will be watching them, in time.  I liked Jack as "The Joker" and, of course, "Batdance".

 

I have not seen any of the Batman reboots (with the Christian Bale, etc)  so I can't comment on how they compare. I DID like the new Superman film that came out a few years ago. (Man of Steel) it has a much different take on General Zod (and his cohorts too) than the 80's movie. There is a bigger "back story" with Jor-El and Krypton (and its demise) than the 80's films. I don't know whether you'd like it or not. The 80's Zod is nothing like this newer one. But overall.. I liked the new film.  Though I do confess it got a bit tedious at times (with the ridiculously LONGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG fight scenes. Especially the one between Kal-el and Gen. Zod.)  OH my golly I just wanted them to END it already. ha.  But other than that.. I really did enjoy Man of Steel pretty well. 

 

I've seen Batman Begins and The Dark Knight but not The Dark Knight Rises.  I haven't seen Man of Steel.  Christopher Nolan directed the Batman pics and co-wrote the story of Man of Steel.  I can't see you liking the Batman reboot.  Probably too dark for you.



#4 Bronxgirl48

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Posted 22 February 2017 - 10:22 PM

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 


 

 

 


 


 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 


 

 

 

That sounds excellent.  I will be watching it in the very near future.  I have ten A&C pics to watch.

 

 

I think you'll be pleasantly surprised with THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES, even though I can't believe you've never seen it before!  Gale Sondergaard plays a mediumistic housekeeper (I won't spoil what Binnie Barnes says to her by way of introduction) who conducts a seance to contact "the ghosts of the well" and find out why their spirits are bound to Danbury Manor until "crack of doom". The seance scene has some genuinely spooky moments which are satisfyingly interwoven with the comedy elements, two years before the boys meet Frankenstein.

 

 

Ha!  You remember correctly, she does raise the eyebrow more than once!  Poor Claire.  The rest of the cast was so darn bland and cardboard.  I'm gonna check out The Hard Way.

 

THE HARD WAY requires some suspension of disbelief as we are supposed to believe that Joan Leslie's character suddenly blossoms into a great Broadway musical star.  Jack Carson is excellent in a sympathetic dramatic role, and Dennis Morgan is very believable as an ostensibly love 'em and leave 'em type who has Ida's number, and she doesn't like it, lol.  

 

Actually now that I think about it there is another Claire Trevor film where she's over the top but I can't remember the name of it.  It's a noir of sorts, with Lawrence Tierney as a stone-cold killer she falls for and tangles with.  Heavy handed all around as I remember.

 


 

You haven't seen the 1935 She?  Now that shocks me, actually.  You must watch that one.  Helen Gahagan plays the icy "She" and it's her only film appearance.  She's quite an attraction.  She brings just the right amount of ice and eccentricity to the role that makes the film.  Also, the film has a better journey to reach the hidden kingdom.  Randolph Scott and Nigel Bruce are the key travelers.

 

 

Just saw this on YouTube!  But it's the colorized version.  I must tell you that Helen Gahagan looks a bit like Fanny Brice, and old enough to be Randolph Scott's mother.  She doesn't conjure up timeless sexual allure the way Ursula does.  However Gahagan does have some acting chops, and world-weary soulful eyes that do convey a sense of that long, long wait.  But a goddess she ain't.  Helen Mack was my favorite character.  She's the very heart and soul of the story.


 


 


 

 

 


 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

 

 

 


 


 


 


 

 

 


 


 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 



#5 rohanaka

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Posted 21 February 2017 - 02:14 PM

HELLO there Mr. Grey, 

 

Look at YOU sporting a new avatar!! Sweet little Lamby.. it's about time you climbed down out of that tree. :)

 

I love it when a plan comes together.

 

HA!! You ARE an 80's guy!! This was one of those shows my dad watched. Fortunately by then, I was out of school and working so at least I wasn't home ALL the time when it used to be on. But I DID watch now and then. (she said to her own embarrassment) Oh the hours I only WISH I could get back. Oh, who am I kidding.. I do confess I enjoyed SOME of it. I loved Howling Mad Murdock.  He was a laugh riot.  :D 

 

You speak of Hedy Lamarr?

 

HA!! Not hardly. I speak of the Old Testament!! Not to mention all that destruction and mayhem. woo! Next to repentance (my favorite movie theme), I also DO enjoy a good movie about divine retribution!! (though somehow I suspect you already KNOW this about me) :D

 

And in the story of Samson (the original story) you get both! :D

 

Talk about a weird film to quote from!  I agree, the characters are really hard to root for.  And I've never found a film where I didn't love Thelma Ritter!  She doesn't play a likable mother in this one.  She's Burt's mom.  Burt is coarse.  But that at least leads to the great scene between him and the prison guard who is doing him favors.  The guard tells him he won't do things for him anymore because he never thanks him.

 

Ha.. leave it to the QT to quote one of the more obscure movie references. Isn't it funny how little moments like that will stick with you though? As for the characters.. yeah.. there are not too many that I remember really feeling much attachment to.  I don't remember Thelma (as being the actress) but I DO remember the mom. Ugh.. the whole movie is filled with one mess of human nature after another. (as I recall) 

 

I do love Gene Hackman, but I wasn't as keen on his "Lex Luthor" compared to "Zod".  But I can't fault anyone choosing Gene's "Lex".  He's a likable weasel.  And I do prefer the second film to the first, but it's not by a lot.  I'll be watching the third and fourth films, too.  I'll brace for disaster!

 

Yeah.. I can't comment on #4 because after #3 I just wrote it all off. ha. So good LUCK with all that. :D

 

Since you are on a "super hero" kick.. have you ever seen that Batman movie that I mentioned (when we were talking about Tim Burton?) It is pretty dark (compared to the Superman movies you are watching) but I really did like it a lot (WAY more than the Christopher Reeve Superman films) I absolutely would NOT recommend any of them AFTER the first one (the one with Michael Keaton and Jack Nicholson) I saw the second one (with the penguin and the catwoman) and I even saw #3 and #4 (because yeah.. by that point I had stepsons.. and I went because they really wanted to see them.. but agh.. those movies REALLY were not anywhere NEAR as good as the first one) But all that aside.. I really did like the FIRST one a lot (which means you'd probably hate it.. ha) 

 

I have not seen any of the Batman reboots (with the Christian Bale, etc)  so I can't comment on how they compare. I DID like the new Superman film that came out a few years ago. (Man of Steel) it has a much different take on General Zod (and his cohorts too) than the 80's movie. There is a bigger "back story" with Jor-El and Krypton (and its demise) than the 80's films. I don't know whether you'd like it or not. The 80's Zod is nothing like this newer one. But overall.. I liked the new film.  Though I do confess it got a bit tedious at times (with the ridiculously LONGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG fight scenes. Especially the one between Kal-el and Gen. Zod.)  OH my golly I just wanted them to END it already. ha.  But other than that.. I really did enjoy Man of Steel pretty well. 

 

I did not go see Batman V Superman (the one that came out last summer). So I can't comment on that one. I don't know why but it looked.. um.. stupid. (at least to me) :D

 

(but maybe I am being too harsh) :D

 

 

Kurt is doing a parody of the "Duke", I feel.  Kind of a cocksure John Wayne in a mystical Asian underground.  Definitely a "fish out of water" scenario

 

I could see your point of him doing a "parody". I don't remember TOO much about this movie (just because I haven't seen it in about a gazillion years, ha) But as I recall he was very OVER the top in being over confident and he made a lot of blunders while he was trying to fight the bad guys (but it all still turned out ok for him, due mostly to dumb luck) as I recall. Definitely (as you said) a fish out of water. :D

 

PS: Fred B. 

 

Not thinking, I replied "I though the same about "The Story of Mankind". Mr. Allen just looked at me, turned and walked away.

 

HA!!  Maybe that was what inspired him to make all those disaster films he was so famous for! :D



#6 FrankGrimes

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 07:40 PM

Hi, TikiSoo --  I have wanted to see this movie ever since it came out. I just can't seem to get the courage to watch it, thinking there will be scenes of bunnies tortured or killed. I cannot stomache the thought - even just depicted in drawings in a movie.

 

Please tell me if my fears are unfounded.

 

As SansFin points out, the film really doesn't focus on the harming of the animals.  There is a scene with a lab but it doesn't reveal much.  The story is about a mother looking to cure her sick child and then her need to move her family away from the impending disturbance in the field where they live.  Hers is a journey for help.

 

Your post did lead me to a possible thought with the film's "message", if there is one.  The laboratory rats end up gaining more human qualities through the experiments and this brings about both positive and negative results.

 

Hey, Fred -- I was working at a local TV station in L.A. in the mid 70's and directing a interview show called "The Movie makers". Well, Our guest on one show was Irwin Allen. After the interview I went into the studio and the host introduced me to Irwin Allen. He told Allen that I had worked as film consultant on the just released Warner Bros. 50th anniversary albums. Mr. Allen looked at me and said "I though they could have been better".  Not thinking, I replied "I though the same about "The Story of Mankind". Mr. Allen just looked at me, turned and walked away....

 

Hilarious!  You're a bad boy!

 

Howdy, SansFin -- I like this as a good example of 1960s romantic comedy. I find it a nice break from: Doris Day and Rock Hudson movies.

 

You're definitely right about that.  Similar formula, different ingredients.  Not as tasty but still with taste.

 

I like this movie very much. I feel it is excellent animation and a good story. I feel there is not an allegory or moral which it is "all about". The story has several plotlines weaving in and out. I find it sad that it is often mistaken for a children's movie. I doubt that most young children could follow the events well. It is on my list of movies for which I wish to find a good DVD at reasonable cost.

 

I believe you hit on it: it's not really a story aimed at children.  This is a mother's story.  You may also be correct about it simply being a mother's tale without any other grandiose message.

 

Hola, Lafitte -- I purposely and cowardly avoided the word "erotic" in my mention of The Barbarian, maybe because it might inspire others to think that it was a baser nature of mine that drew me to the film or that it may have been somehow intrusive to emphasize it. I'm glad you mentioned it because when I first saw it I had thoughts of Wertmuller's Swept Away, although TB pales in comparison. In the latter we get a small taste of that kind of thing whereas SA quite wallowed in it. I count SA as one of the most erotic films ever.

 

Pervert! :D No, I'm not going to look in the mirror!

 

I liked your list and for a change there a few I've seen. Seen but not remembered I saw them way back when they first came out (50s and 60s). But I'm glad you mentioned The Act of Love, a movie I remember thoroughly  enjoying. A revisit is in order. I had forgotten it even existed. The most vivid memory that arises is the spectacle of Dick Van Dyke running in slow motion. I think he was drunk, yes? Hilarious. The movie was consistently funny as I do recall.

 

Yes, the final sequence has Dick Van Dyke running the streets in an effort to prevent an event involving James Garner.  Classic Dick Van Dyke.  It's his brand of physical comedy at the very best.  It was a joy to see.

 

Bonjour, Bronxilla -- Thanks so much, Scottie.  Mom and I are hanging in there.

 

That warms my heart. :)

 

THIS IS THE NIGHT -- Thelma Todd cheating on Cary Grant with Roland Young and Charlie Ruggles??  Sounds like a science fiction film, lol.

 

Hahahaha!  That was hilarious!  And true!

 

I don't remember LITTLE GIANT too well and should revisit it, but for me the most unique A&C teaming is THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES.  Bud and Lou both play double roles in different centuries.  Marjorie Reynolds is charming as "Mistress Melody" and there are a lot of picturesque moments but then, I'm a sucker for Early American history and ghost stories.

 

That sounds excellent.  I will be watching it in the very near future.  I have ten A&C pics to watch.

 

HARD, FAST AND BEAUTIFUL reminds me of another Ida Lupino movie, but not as a director -- THE HARD WAY, where Ida plays a frustrated housewife who tries to realize her ambitions through a younger sister.  Same "stage mother" plot in both, but I find HARD, FAST AND BEAUTIFUL pretty trite  I've never seen Claire Trevor give a bad performance but here she's none too subtle and, if I remember correctly, actually arches her eyebrows before every new ruthless machination.

 

Ha!  You remember correctly, she does raise the eyebrow more than once!  Poor Claire.  The rest of the cast was so darn bland and cardboard.  I'm gonna check out The Hard Way.

 

I haven't seen the 1935 SHE, but its Hammer remake is very dull.  Christopher Lee is relegated to a rather muted supporting role.  Peter Cushing just seems to be going through the motions.  Ursula Andress is appropriately icy and seductive, but can't act.

 

You haven't seen the 1935 She?  Now that shocks me, actually.  You must watch that one.  Helen Gahagan plays the icy "She" and it's her only film appearance.  She's quite an attraction.  She brings just the right amount of ice and eccentricity to the role that makes the film.  Also, the film has a better journey to reach the hidden kingdom.  Randolph Scott and Nigel Bruce are the key travelers.

 

Good evening, Quiet Gal -- hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha... To quote Mr. T.. "I pity the fool" who would try. :D 

 

I qualify as a pitiful fool!  I love it when a plan comes together.

 

Now that you put it that way, I totally get it. I think you are drawing a good comparison. He was definitely a monster, to be sure. 

 

It's certainly not my own theoretical creation.  Others brought it to my attention and I saw what they were speaking of.

 

The Story of Mankind (1957    Saw it several years ago. Not a big fan. (to borrow from you.. tedious is a good word, if I am remembering it correctly)

 

Ronald Colman and Vincent Price are wonderful, but all the stories of mankind just didn't add much excitement or story.

 

Of Mice and Men (1939)  I have not seen this version, but I saw a more modern one several years ago. Not sure I could handle sitting through the telling of that particular tale all over again.  Once more, I will agree with you (don't get used to it.. ha) "Sad and Dark" are perfect words for it. It is a hard story to watch play out. 

 

It's a tough one, all right.

 

Samson and Delilah (1949) Meh. I often like Demille (at least more than some folks) but this particular one is not too high on the list for me. (I do like the big crashing moment at the end.. but hey! That is not because of Demille. He just had good material work from) :D 

 

You speak of Hedy Lamarr? :P 

 

The Mating Game (1959) Not my MOST favorite Debbie movie.. but I do like it. It's fun. (and funny!) And I like seeing Tony Randall get a chance to be "the hero" usually he plays the "born loser" or the "weasel" :D 

 

Tony is wonderful.  And it's hard to top Paul Douglas.

 

The Last Starfighter (1984) It's a good "popcorn" movie. Just sit down and have fun with it.. and then walk away. ha. Can't say it's a "great" movie, but I do enjoy watching it just for fun. Not often, but will pull it out, maybe once every 10 or 15 years. We watched it with the kidteen several months ago. She thought it was a fun story.. but she was NOT impressed with the 80's technology special effects. (ha. she kept comparing it to poor Benny in the Lego Movie.. "Spaceship, spaceship") :D 

 

Ha!  Well, she's correct, it's definitely 80s cheese.  But kudos to her for finding the story at least interesting.  And you're right, it's certainly a "popcorn" pic.

 

Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) I have only seen this movie one time. (and this is another one that for me would be too hard to watch again. At least that is how I remember it) I really struggled with some of it, anyway.  I agree that Telly Savalas was very sympathetic. But boy.. he was about the only one I remember feeling that way toward. But to be fair.. I really have no strong memory for much of the story (or the characters) I had even forgotten that Thelma was in it. I just remember the impressions that certain parts of the story line gave me (at least with regard to the main character) and that is likely why I was not as much of a fan of this film as others might be. (that and the fact that I am just not too huge on Burt in general, so that might have had some effect on things too.) But the QT is a fan. He's seen it several times. And we DO quote a line from this movie around here once in a while. Every so often, the QT will say "Don't mash him" sometimes when he is handing me something fragile to carry.. ha. In fact that is WHY I saw this movie in the first place, because he used to say that line to me every now and then, and he would say it was from Birdman of Alcatraz.. so then I had to watch it just to hear that line in context.   :D 

 

Talk about a weird film to quote from!  I agree, the characters are really hard to root for.  And I've never found a film where I didn't love Thelma Ritter!  She doesn't play a likable mother in this one.  She's Burt's mom.  Burt is coarse.  But that at least leads to the great scene between him and the prison guard who is doing him favors.  The guard tells him he won't do things for him anymore because he never thanks him.

 

The Paleface (1948)  Saw this when I was a kid.. I remember thinking it was funny THEN.. but I don't really remember it NOW,  so I honestly can't say why. :D 

 

For some reason, I didn't laugh a lot in this one.  I found Bob funnier in other films.  But Jane Russell was so good.  She was both funny and attractive as "Calamity Jane".  It just may be by favorite performance of hers.

 

This film came out my Senior year of highschool and I can remember going to the theater to watch it. (woo.. I am OLD) ha. I can't say Superman II was AS good as the FIRST Superman movie (of this series) but I DID like it well enough. You are right, Zod was menacing (and so were his cohorts) They were probably the best part (for me) The romance  I would have to say was not so big a deal (to me) I liked it better when she did NOT know who he was for sure. (but maybe that is just me) But I think the reason I liked #1 better is I just loved Gene Hackman as Lex Luthor. He MADE that movie for me.. ha. So it was hard for me to get as much enjoyment out of the second movie because I really wanted him to be the main bad guy again. He just wasn't as much fun (to me) in this one.  But I guess as sequels go.. this one lives up ok to the first movie, overall.  I would say if you watch number one and two together.. they match up pretty well. But alas, I made the sad.. so very sad mistake of watching number three. Shoulda stopped at number two. ha. (it went downhill...wwaaaaaaaay, waaaaaaay down hill after that) 

 

I do love Gene Hackman, but I wasn't as keen on his "Lex Luthor" compared to "Zod".  But I can't fault anyone choosing Gene's "Lex".  He's a likable weasel.  And I do prefer the second film to the first, but it's not by a lot.  I'll be watching the third and fourth films, too.  I'll brace for disaster!

 

RE: your revisit of Big Trouble in Little China (1986) - Kurt Russell playing the "Duke".   Hahahahaha... maybe in some sort of whacked out alternate universe. But hey, if I remember this movie correctly.. THAT is not so far fetched after all. All things considered.

 

Kurt is doing a parody of the "Duke", I feel.  Kind of a cocksure John Wayne in a mystical Asian underground.  Definitely a "fish out of water" scenario.

 

Ciao, Snippy -- Hello strangers! Count me as a fan of The Barbarian. I think it's Myrna's most erotic film. It seems inspired from the thrilling silents made by Rudolph Valentino. Capra's Bitter Tea of General Yen and Garbo's Wild Orchids fall into this interesting romantic film type. A good film to watch --- It's even better in the dark. Don't let the "real" world intrude to really enjoy it.

 

I did watch the film.  Quite a strange film.  At one point it's female fantasy.  Then it turns to a twisted male fantasy.  Maybe that's how relationships work! Heck if I know!  The film seemed to find Myrna caught in the middle of her vamp and perfect wife worlds.  She's lovely, of course.

 

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#7 SansFin

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 12:15 PM

 

I have wanted to see this movie ever since it came out. I just can't seem to get the courage to watch it, thinking there will be scenes of bunnies tortured or killed. I cannot stomache the thought - even just depicted in drawings in a movie.

 

Please tell me if my fears are unfounded.

 

 

I am sad to say that it has been a long time since I have watched it and so might not remember some short specific scenes but I do not believe there are scenes such as you describe. The story is not set within NIMH. There is a flashback scene concerning the rats escaping and it might show other animals in cages but I believe the focus is on the rats.


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#8 TikiSoo

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Posted 20 February 2017 - 06:53 AM

The Secret of NIMH (1982) - Quite a strange animated film that proved to be darker than I expected.  I'm still not sure what it was really all about.  But the feel of the film worked for me.  Loved hearing John Carradine as "The Great Owl".  Always love Dom DeLuise.
 

 

I like this movie very much. I feel it is excellent animation and a good story. I feel there is not an allegory or moral which it is "all about". The story has several plotlines weaving in and out. I find it sad that it is often mistaken for a children's movie.

 

 

I have wanted to see this movie ever since it came out. I just can't seem to get the courage to watch it, thinking there will be scenes of bunnies tortured or killed. I cannot stomache the thought - even just depicted in drawings in a movie.

 

Please tell me if my fears are unfounded.



#9 fredbaetz

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 08:10 PM

HELLO Mr. Grey... 

 

Sounds like a challenge!

 

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha... To quote Mr. T.. "I pity the fool" who would try. :D 

 

No, it's true.  Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotten) in Shadow of a Doubt is basically a vampire.  The opening tips us off with that.  Not in the strictest of sense, mind you.  He does cavort in the daytime.  But he's certainly a bloodsucker (widows).  Jack Graham (Macdonald Carey) basically plays "Van Helsing".  Here's the "plague" coming to town.  Notice the shot differences:

 

Now that you put it that way, I totally get it. I think you are drawing a good comparison. He was definitely a monster, to be sure. 

 

How are you related

 

Ha. HOW indeed!! I used to ask myself that question ALL the time (when I was a teenager) :D 

 

More films I have watched

 

I have seen at least a few from your newest batch: 

 

The Story of Mankind (1957    Saw it several years ago. Not a big fan. (to borrow from you.. tedious is a good word, if I am remembering it correctly) 

 

Of Mice and Men (1939)  I have not seen this version, but I saw a more modern one several years ago. Not sure I could handle sitting through the telling of that particular tale all over again.  Once more, I will agree with you (don't get used to it.. ha) "Sad and Dark" are perfect words for it. It is a hard story to watch play out. 

 

Samson and Delilah (1949) Meh. I often like Demille (at least more than some folks) but this particular one is not too high on the list for me. (I do like the big crashing moment at the end.. but hey! That is not because of Demille. He just had good material work from) :D 

 

The Mating Game (1959) Not my MOST favorite Debbie movie.. but I do like it. It's fun. (and funny!) And I like seeing Tony Randall get a chance to be "the hero" usually he plays the "born loser" or the "weasel" :D 

 

The Last Starfighter (1984) It's a good "popcorn" movie. Just sit down and have fun with it.. and then walk away. ha. Can't say it's a "great" movie, but I do enjoy watching it just for fun. Not often, but will pull it out, maybe once every 10 or 15 years. We watched it with the kidteen several months ago. She thought it was a fun story.. but she was NOT impressed with the 80's technology special effects. (ha. she kept comparing it to poor Benny in the Lego Movie.. "Spaceship, spaceship") :D 

 

Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) I have only seen this movie one time. (and this is another one that for me would be too hard to watch again. At least that is how I remember it) I really struggled with some of it, anyway.  I agree that Telly Savalas was very sympathetic. But boy.. he was about the only one I remember feeling that way toward. But to be fair.. I really have no strong memory for much of the story (or the characters) I had even forgotten that Thelma was in it. I just remember the impressions that certain parts of the story line gave me (at least with regard to the main character) and that is likely why I was not as much of a fan of this film as others might be. (that and the fact that I am just not too huge on Burt in general, so that might have had some effect on things too.) But the QT is a fan. He's seen it several times. And we DO quote a line from this movie around here once in a while. Every so often, the QT will say "Don't mash him" sometimes when he is handing me something fragile to carry.. ha. In fact that is WHY I saw this movie in the first place, because he used to say that line to me every now and then, and he would say it was from Birdman of Alcatraz.. so then I had to watch it just to hear that line in context.   :D 

 

The Paleface (1948)  Saw this when I was a kid.. I remember thinking it was funny THEN.. but I don't really remember it NOW,  so I honestly can't say why. :D 

 

Superman II (1980) - I've seen most of this film before but never from start to finish.  Terence Stamp is clearly the attraction here.  He's a strong super villain, showing the perfect narcissism that is needed.  Also loved Sarah Douglas and Jack O'Halloran as Zod's (Stamp) comrades.  The film is much more romantic than your typical superhero pic.

 

This film came out my Senior year of highschool and I can remember going to the theater to watch it. (woo.. I am OLD) ha. I can't say Superman II was AS good as the FIRST Superman movie (of this series) but I DID like it well enough. You are right, Zod was menacing (and so were his cohorts) They were probably the best part (for me) The romance  I would have to say was not so big a deal (to me) I liked it better when she did NOT know who he was for sure. (but maybe that is just me) But I think the reason I liked #1 better is I just loved Gene Hackman as Lex Luthor. He MADE that movie for me.. ha. So it was hard for me to get as much enjoyment out of the second movie because I really wanted him to be the main bad guy again. He just wasn't as much fun (to me) in this one.  But I guess as sequels go.. this one lives up ok to the first movie, overall.  I would say if you watch number one and two together.. they match up pretty well. But alas, I made the sad.. so very sad mistake of watching number three. Shoulda stopped at number two. ha. (it went downhill...wwaaaaaaaay, waaaaaaay down hill after that) 

 

RE: your revisit of Big Trouble in Little China (1986) - Kurt Russell playing the "Duke".   Hahahahaha... maybe in some sort of whacked out alternate universe. But hey, if I remember this movie correctly.. THAT is not so far fetched after all. All things considered.   :D 

I was working at a local TV station in L.A. in the mid 70's and directing a interview show called "The Movie makers". Well, Our guest on one show was Irwin Allen. After the interview I went into the studio and the host introduced me to Irwin Allen. He told Allen that I had worked as film consultant on the just released Warner Bros. 50th anniversary albums. Mr. Allen looked at me and said "I though they could have been better".  Not thinking, I replied "I though the same about "The Story of Mankind". Mr. Allen just looked at me, turned and walked away....


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#10 rohanaka

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 12:55 AM

HELLO Mr. Grey... 

 

Sounds like a challenge!

 

hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha... To quote Mr. T.. "I pity the fool" who would try. :D 

 

No, it's true.  Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotten) in Shadow of a Doubt is basically a vampire.  The opening tips us off with that.  Not in the strictest of sense, mind you.  He does cavort in the daytime.  But he's certainly a bloodsucker (widows).  Jack Graham (Macdonald Carey) basically plays "Van Helsing".  Here's the "plague" coming to town.  Notice the shot differences:

 

Now that you put it that way, I totally get it. I think you are drawing a good comparison. He was definitely a monster, to be sure. 

 

How are you related

 

Ha. HOW indeed!! I used to ask myself that question ALL the time (when I was a teenager) :D 

 

More films I have watched

 

I have seen at least a few from your newest batch: 

 

The Story of Mankind (1957    Saw it several years ago. Not a big fan. (to borrow from you.. tedious is a good word, if I am remembering it correctly) 

 

Of Mice and Men (1939)  I have not seen this version, but I saw a more modern one several years ago. Not sure I could handle sitting through the telling of that particular tale all over again.  Once more, I will agree with you (don't get used to it.. ha) "Sad and Dark" are perfect words for it. It is a hard story to watch play out. 

 

Samson and Delilah (1949) Meh. I often like Demille (at least more than some folks) but this particular one is not too high on the list for me. (I do like the big crashing moment at the end.. but hey! That is not because of Demille. He just had good material work from) :D 

 

The Mating Game (1959) Not my MOST favorite Debbie movie.. but I do like it. It's fun. (and funny!) And I like seeing Tony Randall get a chance to be "the hero" usually he plays the "born loser" or the "weasel" :D 

 

The Last Starfighter (1984) It's a good "popcorn" movie. Just sit down and have fun with it.. and then walk away. ha. Can't say it's a "great" movie, but I do enjoy watching it just for fun. Not often, but will pull it out, maybe once every 10 or 15 years. We watched it with the kidteen several months ago. She thought it was a fun story.. but she was NOT impressed with the 80's technology special effects. (ha. she kept comparing it to poor Benny in the Lego Movie.. "Spaceship, spaceship") :D 

 

Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) I have only seen this movie one time. (and this is another one that for me would be too hard to watch again. At least that is how I remember it) I really struggled with some of it, anyway.  I agree that Telly Savalas was very sympathetic. But boy.. he was about the only one I remember feeling that way toward. But to be fair.. I really have no strong memory for much of the story (or the characters) I had even forgotten that Thelma was in it. I just remember the impressions that certain parts of the story line gave me (at least with regard to the main character) and that is likely why I was not as much of a fan of this film as others might be. (that and the fact that I am just not too huge on Burt in general, so that might have had some effect on things too.) But the QT is a fan. He's seen it several times. And we DO quote a line from this movie around here once in a while. Every so often, the QT will say "Don't mash him" sometimes when he is handing me something fragile to carry.. ha. In fact that is WHY I saw this movie in the first place, because he used to say that line to me every now and then, and he would say it was from Birdman of Alcatraz.. so then I had to watch it just to hear that line in context.   :D 

 

The Paleface (1948)  Saw this when I was a kid.. I remember thinking it was funny THEN.. but I don't really remember it NOW,  so I honestly can't say why. :D 

 

Superman II (1980) - I've seen most of this film before but never from start to finish.  Terence Stamp is clearly the attraction here.  He's a strong super villain, showing the perfect narcissism that is needed.  Also loved Sarah Douglas and Jack O'Halloran as Zod's (Stamp) comrades.  The film is much more romantic than your typical superhero pic.

 

This film came out my Senior year of highschool and I can remember going to the theater to watch it. (woo.. I am OLD) ha. I can't say Superman II was AS good as the FIRST Superman movie (of this series) but I DID like it well enough. You are right, Zod was menacing (and so were his cohorts) They were probably the best part (for me) The romance  I would have to say was not so big a deal (to me) I liked it better when she did NOT know who he was for sure. (but maybe that is just me) But I think the reason I liked #1 better is I just loved Gene Hackman as Lex Luthor. He MADE that movie for me.. ha. So it was hard for me to get as much enjoyment out of the second movie because I really wanted him to be the main bad guy again. He just wasn't as much fun (to me) in this one.  But I guess as sequels go.. this one lives up ok to the first movie, overall.  I would say if you watch number one and two together.. they match up pretty well. But alas, I made the sad.. so very sad mistake of watching number three. Shoulda stopped at number two. ha. (it went downhill...wwaaaaaaaay, waaaaaaay down hill after that) 

 

RE: your revisit of Big Trouble in Little China (1986) - Kurt Russell playing the "Duke".   Hahahahaha... maybe in some sort of whacked out alternate universe. But hey, if I remember this movie correctly.. THAT is not so far fetched after all. All things considered.   :D 


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#11 rohanaka

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Posted 16 February 2017 - 11:44 PM

Woo! Bronxgirl AND Miss Goddess.. this IS a nice (and welcome) surprise!! :) 

 

 


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#12 Bronxgirl48

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Posted 15 February 2017 - 02:28 PM

Thanks so much, Scottie.  Mom and I are hanging in there.

 

THIS IS THE NIGHT -- Thelma Todd cheating on Cary Grant with Roland Young and Charlie Ruggles??  Sounds like a science fiction film, lol.

 

I don't remember LITTLE GIANT too well and should revisit it, but for me the most unique A&C teaming is THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES.  Bud and Lou both play double roles in different centuries.  Marjorie Reynolds is charming as "Mistress Melody" and there are a lot of picturesque moments but then, I'm a sucker for Early American history and ghost stories.

 

HARD, FAST AND BEAUTIFUL reminds me of another Ida Lupino movie, but not as a director -- THE HARD WAY, where Ida plays a frustrated housewife who tries to realize her ambitions through a younger sister.  Same "stage mother" plot in both, but I find HARD, FAST AND BEAUTIFUL pretty trite  I've never seen Claire Trevor give a bad performance but here she's none too subtle and, if I remember correctly, actually arches her eyebrows before every new ruthless machination.

 

I haven't seen the 1935 SHE, but its Hammer remake is very dull.  Christopher Lee is relegated to a rather muted supporting role.  Peter Cushing just seems to be going through the motions.  Ursula Andress is appropriately icy and seductive, but can't act.


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#13 SansFin

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 05:49 PM

The Wheeler Dealers (1963) - Reminiscent of Breakfast for Two.  Not as good, though.  Still, it's hard to dislike James Garner and Lee Remick.

 

 

I like this as a good example of 1960s romantic comedy. I find it a nice break from: Doris Day and Rock Hudson movies. 

 

 

 

The Secret of NIMH (1982) - Quite a strange animated film that proved to be darker than I expected.  I'm still not sure what it was really all about.  But the feel of the film worked for me.  Loved hearing John Carradine as "The Great Owl".  Always love Dom DeLuise.
 

 

I like this movie very much. I feel it is excellent animation and a good story. I feel there is not an allegory or moral which it is "all about". The story has several plotlines weaving in and out. I find it sad that it is often mistaken for a children's movie. I doubt that most young children could follow the events well. It is on my list of movies for which I wish to find a good DVD at reasonable cost.  


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#14 laffite

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 02:51 AM

Hello strangers!
Count me as a fan of The Barbarian. I think it's Myrna's most erotic film. It seems inspired from the thrilling silents made by Rudolph Valentino. Capra's Bitter Tea of General Yen and Garbo's Wild Orchids fall into this interesting romantic film type.
A good film to watch --- It's even better in the dark. Don't let the "real" world intrude to really enjoy it.

 

Hello MissGoddess

 

I purposely and cowardly avoided the word "erotic" in my mention of The Barbarian, maybe because it might inspire others to think that it was a baser nature of mine that drew me to the film or that it may have been somehow intrusive to emphasize it. I'm glad you mentioned it because when I first saw it I had thoughts of Wertmuller's Swept Away, although TB pales in comparison. In the latter we get a small taste of that kind of thing whereas SA quite wallowed in it. I count SA as one of the most erotic films ever.

 

Scott, I liked your list and for a change there a few I've seen. Seen but not remembered I saw them way back when they first came out (50s and 60s). But I'm glad you mentioned The Act of Love, a movie I remember thoroughly  enjoying. A revisit is in order. I had forgotten it even existed. The most vivid memory that arises is the spectacle of Dick Van Dyke running in slow motion. I think he was drunk, yes? Hilarious. The movie was consistently funny as I do recall.



#15 FrankGrimes

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Posted 10 February 2017 - 02:09 AM

That should read "The Glass Wall" not "The High Wall" with Gloria Grahame. I like both films, actually.

#16 FrankGrimes

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 11:53 PM

More films I have watched:

 

The Wheeler Dealers (1963) - Reminiscent of Breakfast for Two.  Not as good, though.  Still, it's hard to dislike James Garner and Lee Remick.

 

The Widow from Chicago (1930) -- Eddie G's jumping off point for Little Caesar. Not much to it, though. Alice White is the focus.

 

Swamp Water (1941) - Jean Ford.  That's Renoir mixing his sensibilities with John Ford's.  It's mostly good.  The cast is stellar.  It's the Ford players (John Carradine, Ward Bond, Russell Simpson, Mae Marsh) meeting Walter Brennan, Walter Huston, Dana Andrews, and Anne Baxter.  Brennan is top-notch.

 

She (1965) - A pale comparison to the 1935 film version, which is wonderful.  Even the presence of Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing couldn't elevate this Hammer production.

 

Fathom (1967) - Ludicrous fun with Raquel Welch in a Bond knock-off flick.  It's very "60s" fun.  Check out the clothes for Raquel.  And the bathing suits!

 

In Society (1944) - I'm looking to watch all of Abbott & Costello's films, so their presence is fairly heavy in what I'm watching.  This one is more "Three Stooges" than A&C.  I love the Stooges but it doesn't work as well with Bud and Lou.  Still, it's a decent pic.

 

Romance in Manhattan (1935) - A later film that reminded me of this was The High Wall with Gloria Grahame.  It's about an illegal immigrant who jumps ship in NYC to avoid deportation.  In the Gloria role is a lovely Ginger Rogers.  The later film has more of a kick. This one is softer.

 

The Defiant Ones (1958) - A very "Stanley Kramer" pic.  I like Kramer but he sometimes shoves story aside for social commentary.  This can cause his films to lag some.  After a cold start with Tony Curtis, I'm warming up to him.  I'll be looking to watch more Sidney this year.  I like him.  He's terrific, here.

 

Trapeze (1956) - I avoided this film for a while because the subject matter didn't really attract me.  Good thing Burt Lancaster is the star, because he's sensational.  Yep, this is Burt and Tony Curtis before the acidic NYC journey to come.  Loved Gina Lollobrigida.

 

The Story of Mankind (1957) - Tedious film despite the wonderful set-up of Ronald Colman battling Vincent Price (Mr. Scratch) in a celestial court about Mankind.  All-Star film with small historical bits for each.  Groucho is funny, as usual.

 

Of Mice and Men (1939) - Very impressed by this sad, dark film.  Lon Chaney, Jr. puts on a show.  I haven't see Betty Field this way before.  Quite a turn.  Roman Bohnen ("Candy") was the best, to me.

 

The Pick-Up Artist (1987) - Very much a 30s picture dressed in 80s clothing.  I really enjoyed it.  Quite a surprise.

 

Shootout at Medicine Bend (1957) - An underrated western that's quite entertaining.  It features comedy and good suspense.  Randolph Scott, James Garner, and Gordon Jones go undercover as Quakers to figure out who raided their town  Their search ends up in Medicine Bend.

 

Samson and Delilah (1949) - Not as bad as I expected it to be.  DeMille surprises me by making the film out to be a doomed romance.  And that worked for me.  The relationship between Samson (Victor Mature) and Delilah (Hedy Lamarr) is rather similar to "Rhett and Scarlett".

 

How Sweet It Is! (1968) - A fun romp that features an oversexed James Garner and Debbie Reynolds behaving naughtily.  They are parents of a teen boy and make some assumptions about him and other teens based on their own paranoia, making this a generational comedy... somewhat.  But, oh, Debbie Reynolds!  Never saw her more sexy.

 

The Mating Game (1959) - More Debbie.  Here she's the feisty but cute farm girl.  Basically an extension of "Tammy". Love Paul Douglas in this pic.  My kind of guy.  And it's impossible not to like stuffy Tony Randall.

 

Here Come the Co-Eds (1945) - More Bud and Lou.  This one is also middle-of-the-road, which still makes it good.  The surreal?  Seeing Lou play basketball... as a girl.  Crazy!

 

Hello, Frisco, Hello (1943) - Painful.  Turn-of-the-20th-Century musicals sure ain't my thing.  It's basically "A Star Is Born" with a happy ending.

 

Judge Hardy's Children (1938) - I've started watching "Andy Hardy".  It's off to a poor start.  This definitely feels like the first television sitcom, at least.

 

The Last Starfighter (1984) - Sci-fi 80s cheese at its finest.  It's more sweet than involving.

 

Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) - I kept putting this film off because I do not go for prison flicks.  It's such a limiting world.  Well, this one is different.  Once the birdies showed up, I was interested.  Loved seeing and hearing the birds.  Can't say many people were likable in this, including darling Thelma Ritter!  Telly Savalas was one of the few that was sympathetic. Great looking film.  John Frankenheimer is an excellent director.

 

The Act of Love (1965) - A pleasant surprise!  Dick Van Dyke and James Garner in a goofball comedy directed by Norman Jewison.  Van Dyke is given free reign and he puts on a comedic show.  Angie Dickinson has a recurring bit that kills me.  Plus there's "guillotine!".

 

Thanks for the Memory (1938) - A rather mundane comedy from Bob Hope. Shockingly.  It's basically a "Mr. Mom" for Bob... minus his being a father.

 

The Paleface (1948)  - I never thought I'd see someone upstage Bob Hope, but Jane Russell does in this.  She's amazing!  She has a "Gilda" quality to her.

 

Silver Streak (1976) - A Hitchcock film with Hope & Crosby.  Yeah, it's really good.  And it's more action/suspense than comedy.  That really surprised me.  Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor are such an underrated comedic team.

 

Hard, Fast and Beautiful (1951) - Oh, Ida.  I was very disappointed in this tennis picture.  It's basically Claire Trevor's "The Little Foxes".  It just never comes off.

 

This Is the Night (1932) - A racy pre-code with a messy, comedic situation.  Cary Grant is married to Thelma Todd whose lover is Roland Young and whose liason is Charlie Ruggles.  Enter Lili Damita, who quickly catches the eye of Cary.

 

Rampage (1963) - A rather ridiculous film that attempts to be The Macomber Affair.  Robert Mitchum is the "trapper", Jack Hawkins is the "hunter", and the prey is Elsa Martinelli.  Yeah, Elsa is back with the "animals".

 

Bengazi (1955) - Richard Conte and Victor McLaglen seek gold in a Sahara mosque.  The only problem is, so do others.  The film has a bit of a "Lost Patrol" feel... minus the great psychological study.

 

Torchy Blane... Playing with Dynamite (1939) - The last in the "Torchy" series finds Jane Wyman playing "Torchy" and Allen Jenkins playing "Steve".  And they are good.  The story has a nice "Torchy" feel.  You get wonderful comedy from Gahagan (Tom Kennedy) and a good crime story.  It's a good swan song.

 

Little Giant (1946) - Without a doubt, the most unique Abbott & Costello that I've seen.  Bud and Lou are not paired together.  Instead, Lou is a greenhorn salesman and Bud plays his boss... twice over.  Yep, it's a dual role for Bud.  The film starts slow but the comedy picks up and the emotion is rather excellent.  Very surprising.

 

The Secret of NIMH (1982) - Quite a strange animated film that proved to be darker than I expected.  I'm still not sure what it was really all about.  But the feel of the film worked for me.  Loved hearing John Carradine as "The Great Owl".  Always love Dom DeLuise.

 

Pepe (1960) - A three-hour "All-Star" pic about the journey of a guy to get his horse back?  I kept putting this one off.  Well, I was wrong to do so.  It's such a fun, loving film.  It's basically Around the World in Eighty Days with heart.  Shirley Jones is lovely in this. Debbie Reynolds has a funny bit.  Judy Garland sings a song.  Although she's not in the film.  The Rat Pack cracks jokes.  Eddie G. stirs the pot.  And Maurice Chevalier sings AND dances.  Lots of good vibes.

 

Polly of the Circus (1932) - A sassy Marion Davies challenges the reverend... Clark Gable?  Uh-huh.  Funny and sweet to start, with a dramatic turn in the second half.

 

13 Rue Madeleine (1946) - Henry Hathaway is back with another espionage docu-drama.  James Cagney is our lead and he certainly brings some needed energy to the dry proceedings.  The first half is predictably slow and boring.  The second half kicks into gear.  The ending was a surprise.

 

Superman II (1980) - I've seen most of this film before but never from start to finish.  Terence Stamp is clearly the attraction here.  He's a strong super villain, showing the perfect narcissism that is needed.  Also loved Sarah Douglas and Jack O'Halloran as Zod's (Stamp) comrades.  The film is much more romantic than your typical superhero pic.

 

7th Cavalry (1956) - A disappointing Randolph Scott western.  Scott leads a hodge-podge group of volunteers into Sioux territory to retrieve the bodies from Little Big Horn, namely General Custer.

 

Revisits

 

Big Trouble in Little China (1986) - Kurt Russell playing the "Duke".

Slap Shot (1977) - The Wild Bunch of hockey.  I didn't realize that until this viewing.


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#17 MissGoddess

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 09:55 PM

Hello strangers!
Count me as a fan of The Barbarian. I think it's Myrna's most erotic film. It seems inspired from the thrilling silents made by Rudolph Valentino. Capra's Bitter Tea of General Yen and Garbo's Wild Orchids fall into this interesting romantic film type.
A good film to watch --- It's even better in the dark. Don't let the "real" world intrude to really enjoy it.
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#18 FrankGrimes

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Posted 09 February 2017 - 09:22 PM

Nice to see you, Bronxie!  I hope all is well.

 

Bonjour, SansFin -- My insignificant other discovered a review describing the main character as: 'orphaned mute vampire.' He wished to find and watch it so as to ascertain how many adjectives/tropes/stereotypes were truly heaped into that one character. I liked it more than he did. "Trashy fun" is a wonderful description. I admit that I have a fondness for camp French surrealism and examples are relatively rare.

 

We all have our "weaknesses". :D

 

Hola, Lafitte -- Not at all. The move doesn't phase me. I am indifferent about it. I did, however, vote against financing the proposed new stadium. When the Chargers were not in contention, I lost all interest. When they were good and in the playoffs I was intensely interested and very serious about it and when they lost the crucial games I actually suffered (in that way we do in sports). I will never get over the 2006 loss to the Patriots (both teams had first-round byes) and the subsequent firing of Schottenheimer. Sad thinking over the history of the franchise. One Superbowl ('94) and they lost it. I do feel a sadness. The Chargers are now back where they started. The first year of their existence, they were the Los Angeles Chargers.

 

Ohhhh, many of my favorite teams resemble the Chargers.  I "waste" lots of energy on them, too.  I often ask myself why.  Sports diehards (me) are idiotic.

 

I should have said miniseries. DVDs that were originally shown on television. They have proliferated mightily in the last 10 years or so. I'm zoned into BBC productions but I get out into the real world sometimes and take in the kitschy stuff as well.

 

That seems to be a favorite zone for many on the TCM board.  Can't say that I've ever got into them.

 

Do you publish your reviews on the site? I haven't thoroughly navigated LETTERBOXD yet so I don't know. I can see your imprint as your fave film has been SS as long as I can remember here ... and so there it is, in the top spot. I would fain know my ultimate preference but it seems destined to remain undetermined.

 

I got burned out on writing reviews.  I prefer discussion versus reviews.  I enjoy talking to people versus talking at them.  But it's difficult to make that work, at times.

 

Incidentally, The Accused reminds me of another film I would see soon if I could, The Barbarian (1933), similar in the way that we have another of our beloved good girls finding herself in an unusual-for-her-persona predicament. Myrna Loy is an English woman who is abducted by the eponymous rascal (Ramon Navarro) and is treated none to well as they travel together over desert sands. Nothing heinous, but English ladies have dignity. She shouldn't be made to roll in the dirt on the whim of a captor :-O. Myrna wasn't established at this time but we know of course the persona to be. Myrna has an arresting bathing scene in that film that I believe is on youtube. I looked on youtube for the whole movie and see that there is going to be a live streaming of The Barbarian on June 17. I didn't know they did that sort of thing.

 

I noticed the "live streaming" at YouTube just last week.  I've never done such a thing.  I have The Barbarian recorded, so I shall watch it.  I love Myrna.

 

How do, Ma Stone -- Ha.. maybe it is one of those things like "greatness" You know.. some are born slobs, some achieve slobhood.. and others have slobbery thrust upon them?? No wait.. that doesn't work.. well, not exactly. ha. Or maybe it DOES.
 
I'd say I have achieved it.  Woohoo!
 
HA!! Just let them try. If they even get NEAR me with that scrub brush, I could make Veta look like a walk in the PARK! :D

 

Sounds like a challenge!

 

Well, it is a vampire pic, so after hours works!

 

???????????????????? (Shadow of a Doubt???????) Well... that Uncle Charlie guy IS pretty creepy.. ha. Or did  you accidentally mix your reply to me with  your reply to SF?) 

 

No, it's true.  Uncle Charlie (Joseph Cotten) in Shadow of a Doubt is basically a vampire.  The opening tips us off with that.  Not in the strictest of sense, mind you.  He does cavort in the daytime.  But he's certainly a bloodsucker (widows).  Jack Graham (Macdonald Carey) basically plays "Van Helsing".  Here's the "plague" coming to town.  Notice the shot differences:

 

shadowofadoubt1_zpszrykp1fc.jpg

 

shadowofadoubt2_zpsnjrrnm87.jpg

 

I am not surprised (too much) that you liked this one. But I WAS surprised you liked this (and BeetleJuice) so much. (that they were you favorites among all those classics you recently watched as well)

 

I'm big on the 80s.  The classics represent who I am today, more so.  The 80s represents my youth.

 

Ha.. NOT. I was being kind. I really hated that movie if you want to know. (but my younger brothers loved it)   :D

 

How are you related? :P

 

Yeah, I know. Still can't say I liked it much. The creepy villain was just too.. creepy. And those alligators.. or were they crocodiles. Whatever. I stand by the "meh" ha.  

 

Creepy is good, though!



#19 rohanaka

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Posted 05 February 2017 - 04:56 PM

Hello Mr. Grey.
 
That's why I choose to be a slob.
 
Ha.. maybe it is one of those things like "greatness" You know.. some are born slobs, some achieve slobhood.. and others have slobbery thrust upon them?? No wait.. that doesn't work.. well, not exactly. ha. Or maybe it DOES. 
 

 

You need a good scrubbing!

 

HA!! Just let them try. If they even get NEAR me with that scrub brush, I could make Veta look like a walk in the PARK! :D

 

Well, it is a vampire pic, so after hours works!

 

???????????????????? (Shadow of a Doubt???????) Well... that Uncle Charlie guy IS pretty creepy.. ha. Or did  you accidentally mix your reply to me with  your reply to SF?) 

 

Attempting to average two new classics a day through March.  Then my time goes away.

 

Woo.. yeah. That is a WHOLE lotta movie watching. But if anyone could do it, it'd be you, sir. Wowsa. 

 

 

It is a fun pic.  Winona made me laugh.  Burton mixes sweet with vulgar.

 

That's a great way to say it. It seems to be his method (at least for a lot of his films) Though to be honest, I have only seen just a few. Most of his stuff is too.. um.. uh.. bizarre for my movie watching tastes, ha. I did also like Batman (the first one, with Micheal Keaton. (Jack Nicholson was really good as the Joker) 

 

An American Werewolf in London (1981)   

 

That was funny!  Certainly memorable.  Loved the feel of the film.  The opening is excellent.

 

I am not surprised (too much) that  you liked this one. But I WAS surprised you liked this (and BeetleJuice) so much. (that they were you favorites among all those classics you recently watched as well)

 

I'd say it's Rod Steiger's best performance.  Love the intermixing of the Nazi concentration camps with NYC.  Brilliant.

 

Well to be fair.. I would really have to watch it all over again to comment TOO much more. I do remember what you are referring to (about the intermixing of the concentration camps with NYC) but mostly I just remember that ending.. Agh! But I was in college when I watched this.. ha.. and we saw it in class over a couple of days, so mostly I remember just not liking it as much as some of  the others we viewed in that class, and just being glad when it was OVER!! ha. 

 

The Accused (1949) 

 

It's hard to track down.  I don't believe TCM has played it.  Or if they did, it was a while ago.  I had to get the DVD to view it.  

 

Ok then.. it must have been some other film that I looked into, because whatever it was.. I THINK TCM showed it recently.. at least in the last month, and I was not able to catch it. Wish I could remember what it was. (but alas.. I am old and very forgetful these days) 

 

The Bad News Bears (1976)  (meh)

 

Blasphemous!

 

Ha.. NOT. I was being kind. I really hated that movie if you want to know. (but my younger brothers loved it)   :D

 

The Rescuers (1977)  (meh) 

 

Hey!  Sweet Bob and Eva!

 

Yeah, I know. Still can't say I liked it much. The creepy villain was just too.. creepy. And those alligators.. or were they crocodiles. Whatever. I stand by the "meh" ha.  

 

So of your lists.. do you have any new favorites? And for the ones I have not seen, what do you recommend?

 

The hidden gem is Four Hours to Kill!, which is on YouTube.  It's more of a JackFavell flick because it's similar to Union Depot.  It has one of the better endings I have seen from that era.

 

I have not seen either movie but I looked up the one you watched (FHTK) and am glad to hear it is on youtube.  I may have to see if I can get to it soon (I hope) but probably will not be able until at least later next week . (alas this coming week is already filling up faster than I like to think) 


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#20 laffite

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Posted 04 February 2017 - 03:58 AM

Bonjour, Lafitte - Are you still a Chargers fan after the move?  I'm not a fan of it, of course.

 

Not at all. The move doesn't phase me. I am indifferent about it. I did, however, vote against financing the proposed new stadium. When the Chargers were not in contention, I lost all interest. When they were good and in the playoffs I was intensely interested and very serious about it and when they lost the crucial games I actually suffered (in that way we do in sports). I will never get over the 2006 loss to the Patriots (both teams had first-round byes) and the subsequent firing of Schottenheimer. Sad thinking over the history of the franchise. One Superbowl ('94) and they lost it. I do feel a sadness. The Chargers are now back where they started. The first year of their existence, they were the Los Angeles Chargers.

 

What shows?  It seems like many are watching television shows.  I'm the opposite.  I'm sports and movies.  That's it.

 

I should have said miniseries. DVDs that were originally shown on television. They have proliferated mightily in the last 10 years or so. I'm zoned into BBC productions but I get out into the real world sometimes and take in the kitschy stuff as well.

 

Do you publish your reviews on the site? I haven't thoroughly navigated LETTERBOXD yet so I don't know. I can see your imprint as your fave film has been SS as long as I can remember here ... and so there it is, in the top spot. I would fain know my ultimate preference but it seems destined to remain undetermined.

 

Incidentally, The Accused reminds me of another film I would see soon if I could, The Barbarian (1933), similar in the way that we have another of our beloved good girls finding herself in an unusual-for-her-persona predicament. Myrna Loy is an English woman who is abducted by the eponymous rascal (Ramon Navarro) and is treated none to well as they travel together over desert sands. Nothing heinous, but English ladies have dignity. She shouldn't be made to roll in the dirt on the whim of a captor :-O. Myrna wasn't established at this time but we know of course the persona to be. Myrna has an arresting bathing scene in that film that I believe is on youtube. I looked on youtube for the whole movie and see that there is going to be a live streaming of The Barbarian on June 17. I didn't know they did that sort of thing.






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