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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...


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#1 kingrat

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 04:50 PM

That would be Russell's first, "Billion Dollar Brain" (1967)--

Which seems like a nice, tight coherent Harry Palmer spy thriller for Michael Caine, until the villain reveals his plot, the stylistic point is to satirize "American patriotism", and then....clear the dance floor for Ken Russell's Subtlety.   :rolleyes:

Indeed, Eric. First half good, second half not. One of the few English-language films of the time that sees the Soviets as preferable to the Americans.



#2 skimpole

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Posted 23 July 2017 - 02:11 AM

I saw four movies last week.  The Ninth Configuration advertises itself as a black comedy where one wonders whether the psychiatrist at a secret military hospital is really sane or not.  Well, it wouldn't be much of a movie if there wasn't anything wrong with hm.and while we go on there is a facile Christ complex and facile talk of redemption.  But that doesn't mean the movie should be simply ignored.  Marriage of the Blessed deals with a common theme, the war-damaged veteran who returns from the front and has trouble adapting.  And so we have him thinking he's a burden to his family, while his woman stands by him regardless.  The interesting thing is that this is from Iran, and its brief (about 70 minutes) is shot in an innovative style.  Ode to Billy Joe benefits from a good performance by Glynnis O'Connor as the young Mississippi girl who is half of the romantic couple in the movie.  And there is a genuine attempt to deal with rural Mississippi without condescension and mockery.  (Though this is done by one particularly egregious omission, which I'll discuss in the Ode to Billy Joe thread).  Unfortunately Robby Benson is borderline hysterical even before the homosexual tryst which causes him to commit suicide.  And the movie is too obvious and literal considering that the power of the original song was its tact and understatement. (It wasn't really enigmatic:  obviously the singer wouldn't be singing it if Billy Joe was simply a vague acquaintance.)  What can one say of Inside Daisy Clover?  It's more subtle than earlier Hollywood movies about how difficult it is for an ingenue to make her way through Hollywood. But it isn't necessarily more intelligent or thoughtful.  It's sort of in a transitional state, like Hollywood at the time.


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#3 film lover 293

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Posted 19 July 2017 - 10:22 AM

I saw five movies for the first time last week:

 

"From Beyond The Grave" (1973)--Four part British anthology horror film from Amicus.  The tone of the four stories varies from serious to dizzy farce (most of the tale about getting rid of an elemental).  The tales all revolve around an odd antique store and four unhappy customers.  Peter Cushing stars.  Recommended.

 

"The War Wagon" (1967)--John Wayne and Kirk Douglas transplant the caper genre to the Old West. Wayne, Douglas, and three others try to rob a stagecoach carrying $500,000 dollars in gold.  Naturally, things don't go as planned.  Movie tries to be a serious caper film, a serious Western, yet a spoof of both, all at the same time.  Film is diverting enough, but not essential viewing.

 

"Games" (1967)--Curtis Harrington directed this little gem, a near perfect thriller that's a tribute to Hitchcock and French thrillers.  A couple that's into mind games is introduced to darker games that ultimately turn fatal.  But will the dead stay dead?  Starring Simone Signoret, Katharine Ross, and James Caan.  Recommended.

 

"Throne of Blood" (1957)--Akira Kurosawa's version of Shakespeare's Scottish Play is set in feudal Japan.  It's an excellent mixture of the Samurai, Horror, and Western genres, with some Noh drama and a bit of Shakespeare mixed in. Arguably Kurosawa's best film. 

 

"Sanjuro" (1962)--Kurosawa's sequel to "Yojimbo" (1961) focuses on the comedic potential of the Samurai film.  Star Toshiro Mifune is a comedic revelation, and the cast are nearly his equals.  A most enjoyable watch.  Recommended. 

 

Most Favorite--"Sanjuro" (1962).

 

Least Favorite--"The War Wagon" (1967).


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#4 skimpole

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Posted 16 July 2017 - 03:42 AM

I saw five movies last week.  David and Lisa is a pioneering movie about mental illness, in this case the obsessive compulsive disorder and schizophrenia of the characters.  It was nominated for best director, one of three non Best Picture nominees that year, probably because there were three big budget movies nominated for best Picture that apparently the voters had little faith in.  As for the movie, there are other movies that treat the issue with more subtlety and distinction.  Charlie Wilson's War was made by Mike Nichols, whose adaptation of Catch-22 made one wonder whether he had a sense of humor.  This movie is slightly better, but it's insubstantial, offensively so.  It's bad enough the movie has Hanks as a white man heroically saving Afghanistan.  What's even worse is that he didn't actually, and the movie looks even worse a decade later, since Afghanistan's civil war between a brutal fanatical insurgency and its corrupt selfish government is still going on, with no idea of how to solve it.  Certain Women consists of a triptych about three women and their lives, which suffers from their underwhelming stories, as if the towns in the western states couldn't afford a proper epiphany.  It's not that Laura Dern, Michelle Williams and Kristen Stewart don't try, but ultimately what is the point?  The Paradine Case is not one of most admired Hitchcock movies:  it certainly wasn't Hitchcock's.  Interestingly, like in Senso and The Third Man, Alida Valli is in love with a man who doesn't love her back.  This story actually works better than having Gregory Peck fall madly in love with her, ignoring her manifest flaws.  Infatuation isn't something Peck does very well.  Cosmos is a very strange movie.  A law student and his friend takes room in a boarding house, and then he, but not his friend, but some of the the characters, start acting very strangely, with outbursts of hysteria.  Worth watching a second time to understand what's going on.


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#5 EricJ

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 01:55 PM

while Russell seems on the verge of losing narrative coherency.  This style works well for him in "The Devils" (1971), "Tommy" (1975), and "Altered States" (1980).

 

Russell seems in near total control of his vision in "Women In Love" (1969) and "The Lair of the White Worm" (1988), two of my favorite Russell films.

 

In "The Music Lovers" (1971) and "Savage Messiah" (1972), the leading performers hold the films together while Russell pours on the imagery and words.  Richard Chamberlain and Glenda Jackson are fine in TML, while Dorothy Tutin's performance keeps SM from being a boring talkathon.

 

I saw "Gothic" (1986) when released, but remember nothing about it.  "Salome's Last Dance" (1988) tries too hard to shock the viewer.  Glenda Jackson is the best performer in the film.

 

"Lisztomania" (1975) and "Valentino" (1977) are successions of images with lousy scripts and next to no coherency.

 

If I haven't mentioned a film, assume I haven't seen it. 

 

That would be Russell's first, "Billion Dollar Brain" (1967)--

Which seems like a nice, tight coherent Harry Palmer spy thriller for Michael Caine, until the villain reveals his plot, the stylistic point is to satirize "American patriotism", and then....clear the dance floor for Ken Russell's Subtlety.   :rolleyes:


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#6 film lover 293

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Posted 11 July 2017 - 09:33 AM

I saw four movies for the first time last week:

 

"Ivan The Terrible, Part I" (1944)--Sergei Eisenstein film is beautifully produced, but execrably acted.  Subtlety does not exist in the world of this movie.  The actors declaim loudly, in order that the second balcony may hear them, the villains skulk around like The Wolf Man, the main baddie sounds like Maria Ouspenskaya predicting Doom, the villagers attack Ivan's castle with torches and pitchforks.  The movie's a mad mix of horror film, historical biopic, and grand opera where nobody gets to sing.

 

"Ivan The Terrible, Part II: The Boyars Plot" (1946)--More stylized than Part I, this film's more successful because the cast Does finally get to sing.  Ivan declares he will act according to his nickname; multiple deaths later, slow witted Ivan discovers who poisoned his wife in Part I, and takes his revenge.  Part of the film is in color.

 

"The Kissing Bandit" (1948)--Sinatra/Grayson film is memorable mainly for "Dance of Fury", which was performed by Ricardo Montalban, Ann Miller, and Cyd Charisse.  Number was a last minute addition to the film; in the print Comcast showed, Montalban, Miller, and Charisse weren't even listed in the credits!  Also memorable were Grayson's song "Love Is Where You Find It", and Sono Osato's "Whip Dance".  Gorgeous Technicolor and elaborate costumes aside, this is maybe the worst of Sinatra's MGM musicals.

 

"Yojimbo" (1961)--Akira Kurosawa film about an unemployed samurai (Toshiro Mifune) who goes to a village where two factions fight for control of the town.  Mifune's character decides both factions are worthless, and leaves the town much more peaceful than when he arrived.  Black comedy shows the influence of "High Noon" (1952), "Shane" (1953), and "West Side Story" (1961), among other films.  Recommended.

 

Most Favorite--"Yojimbo" (1961).

 

Least Favorite--"Ivan the Terrible, Part I" (1944).


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#7 skimpole

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Posted 09 July 2017 - 03:01 AM

I saw five movies last week.  Muppets Most Wanted is another unnecessary sequel to another unnecessary revival.  The songs aren't bad, and Ricky Gervais and Tina Fey have fun.  But most of the Muppets have nothing special to do, and the romance between Kermit and Miss Piggy, never the most interesting part of the show, takes up a large part of that.  The Last Samurai is a movie that is as epic as it empty-headed.  Considerably more needs to be done to explain why we should care about the quarrel between militaristic Samurai and their modernizing empire, and the movie punts it aside.  There is no real appreciation of Japanese culture.  The battle scenes are competent and some of the cinematography is pretty though.  The Music Man is an OK musical, with three good songs and a nice performance by Robert Preston.  It has some nice touches, like the way Preston's character prevents the delegation from the mayor from investigating his credentials by turning them into a glee club.  One problem, compared with better musicals of the decade, is that Preston is the only real charismatic presence.  The other characters aren't bad, but also not particularly memorable.  Chameleon Street is one of the more interesting movies of 1989, based on a true story about a black con man who tries with some success to blur into more socially prominent professions, such as a doctor, a TIME reporter, a Yale student and a lawyer. It's actually fairly funny, with director Wendell Harris doing a good job playing the con man.  It won the grand prize at Sundance, and is certainly better than the winners that preceded and followed it, True Love and Poison.  The Lost City of Z is everything that The Last Samurai only tries to be.  It's an actual attempt of a man trying to appreciate another culture (one that may not exist, since the story is of a British explorer who finds fragmentary evidence of a developed civilization in the Amazon).  It actually shows what true effort and difficulty are like, in contrast to Zwick's film.  It is a fascinating adventure story, though not one with a conventionally happy or exciting ending, which probably explains why its release a few months ago didn't monopolize public attention.  Charlie Hunnan gives a good, understated performance as the protagonist, while Robert Pattinson acquits himself well in an unrecognizable role as Hunnan's assistant.  There are a couple of clumsy scenes between Hunnan and his wife, so that has to be taken into account.


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#8 film lover 293

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 09:11 AM

TikiSoo--Yes, this was my first viewing of "Tommy" (1975).

 

As to a comparison between Russell's and Lynch's directorial styles--in addition to the similarities that you've already mentioned, there is one big difference.  Lynch ("Eraserhead" (1977), "The Elephant Man" (1980) & "Blue Velvet" (1986)) always seems in control of what his directorial vision is (even if I can't figure it out, LOL), while Russell seems on the verge of losing narrative coherency.  This style works well for him in "The Devils" (1971), "Tommy" (1975), and "Altered States" (1980).

 

Russell seems in near total control of his vision in "Women In Love" (1969) and "The Lair of the White Worm" (1988), two of my favorite Russell films.

 

In "The Music Lovers" (1971) and "Savage Messiah" (1972), the leading performers hold the films together while Russell pours on the imagery and words.  Richard Chamberlain and Glenda Jackson are fine in TML, while Dorothy Tutin's performance keeps SM from being a boring talkathon.

 

I saw "Gothic" (1986) when released, but remember nothing about it.  "Salome's Last Dance" (1988) tries too hard to shock the viewer.  Glenda Jackson is the best performer in the film.

 

"Lisztomania" (1975) and "Valentino" (1977) are successions of images with lousy scripts and next to no coherency.

 

Lynch holds the edge as fas as narrative coherency, but both directors have made memorable films.

 

If I haven't mentioned a film, assume I haven't seen it. 


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#9 TikiSoo

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 04:57 AM

filmlover293: was this your first viewing of Tommy?

 

Do you see any similarities between Ken Russell's films and David Lynch's films? They both use nightmarish imagery and odd fantasy sequences to tell the story.....is one more successful than the other? 

 

(just curious about your opinion/impressions as a movie buff)



#10 film lover 293

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 08:07 AM

I saw five movies for the first time last week:

 

"Zabriskie Point" (1970)--Michaelangelo Antonioni film that tried to exploit the divisions of American society of the late 1960's and 1970.  Film opens with a campus discussion of why whites can't be revolutionaries, then moves to a setup purposefully reminiscent of Kent State.  One of many demonstrators is picked up by the police and this exchange occurs.  Policeman filling out a form, to demonstrator: "What are you?"--Demonstrator: "I'm a professor of social history"--Policeman--"That's too long; I'll put clerk".  Whole film is on this level of subtlety, and it gets old Fast.  There is one commercial for a housing development that's amusingly overdone, but it's only three minutes long.  The desert scene of couples making love is interesting, as is the fiery climax and the plane/car boy meets girl sequence.  Overall, barely worth the watch.

 

"The Phantom of the Opera" (1962)--Hammer film dramatizing the Gaston Leroux novel.  The setting is moved to London.  Films' opening 20 minutes are fine, Herbert Lom is an excellent Phantom, and Heather Sears is very convincing as a victim. But Sears is Not remotely convincing as an opera diva-in-waiting, director Terence Fisher botches the staging of the Phantom's unmasking, and the ending is hurried and doesn't make sense.  Despite scattered scares, Lesser Hammer effort at best.

 

"War and Peace" (1956)--King Vidor's attempt at the Leo Tolstoy novel suffers from too many adaptors (seven, including the screenwriter), too much material is left out, and Henry Fonda's Midwestern accent.  Still, the performances of Audrey Hepburn as Natasha, and to a lesser degree, the overly philosophical Pierre of Henry Fonda hold the film together and make the film worth watching.

 

"Tommy" (1975)--Ken Russell version of The Who's rock opera about a boy who is deaf, dumb, and blind as a result of a trauma is full of vivid imagery (Three--Tina Turner in a red dress, standing, vibrating from the ankles up; The Church of Marilyn Monroe, with a statue of her pose in "The Seven Year Itch" (1955), where she stands over a subway grating and her dress billows up; Ann-Margret, all in white, in an all white room) the music is memorable (Elton John's "Pinball Wizard", etc), fine performances (Ann-Margret, Tina Turner's unforgettable role as "The Acid Queen).  Recommended.

 

"The Music Lovers" (1971)--Ken Russell's biopic of Tchaikovsky has memorable imagery (Tchaikovsky dragging his dying mother out of a hot bath; cannons firing and blowing the heads off Tchaikovsky's friends and acquaintances, to the tune of "The 1812 Overture", etc.).  Film's worth a watch.

 

Favorite--"Tommy" (1975).

 

Least Favorite--"Zabriskie Point" (1970).


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#11 skimpole

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 02:56 AM

I saw three movies this week.  Yoyo was very charming indeed, especially with the first third that was a homage to silent movies with jokes worthy of Tati.  (Hardly surprising, since Etaix was Tati's assistant.)  I especially liked the elaborate limo ride so the protagonist can walk his dog. Dreamgirls asks us to believe that it is a great injustice for Jennifer Hudson to be passed over in favor of Beyonce Knowles, much like Diana Ross received undeserved fame in real life.  I think for this to work, the songs supposedly before Beyonce Dreams have to be a lot better when in the movie they're all fairly forgettable.  Another problem is the emotional tone:  the pleading in the love songs is undercut by the shallowness of the movie's three main romantic relationships.  There are good movies when one of the couple, usually the man, is unworthy of the other.  But then their lesson isn't that you shouldn't sleep with selfish jerks.  There's no emotional core to the relationships.  11 Minutes is a skillful Polish film by the director of Deep End (which I've seen) and Moonlighting (which I haven't), about various characters who find themselves inhabiting the same eleven minutes near a hotel in Warsaw, as it reaches towards the climax.  Yet I can't say I appreciated the Rube Goldberg mechanism to disaster that concludes the movie.



#12 skimpole

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 02:20 AM

I saw four movies last week.  Ender's Game was quite underwhelming.  This big budget sci-fi movie about children who are militarily trained to ward off an invasion of insectoid creatures is both uninvolving and full of bogus moral dilemmas.  Wait Until Dark I suspect is more valued for its nostalgic quotient.  It was not Audrey Hepburn's last movie, but it was the movie that marked the end of her career as a major movie star.  Her next movie was not made until nine years later and further movies were sporadic at best.  The movie shows its origins as a stage play.  And it's hard to ignore the fact that Alan Arkin's plan is overly complicated.  There are some good thrills throughout, but not Academy Award worthy in my view.  Two Arabian Knights is best known for having won the first and only Academy Award for comedy direction.  This was also the year Charles Chaplin was kept from any of the contested awards with a special Oscar.  I don't know why Steamboat Bill Jr, wasn't nominated.  It's possible it wasn't released nation wide in time.  With those provisos, the result is occasionally amusing.  Mary Astor isn't given much more to do than be pretty, but the villain gets a good last line, or last subtitle.  Interesting point, at one point the protagonists think of going to the American consulate in Constantinople.  I first thought this was odd, because the protagonists are two WWI American soldiers who were caught by the Germans and by complicated circumstances ended up in the Ottoman Empire.  But as it turned, the United States never declared war on the Ottoman Empire.  Jackie is quite a bit better than I thought it would be.  It's more striking than the same director's Neruda.  Natalie Portman is extremely good indeed as the distraught widow, while the same time seeking to manipulate both the funeral and a post-assassination interview.  It's not a good idea to close with the title song of Camelot, but the movie is otherwise good enough to get away with it.



#13 film lover 293

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 10:59 PM

I saw six movies for the first time in the last ten days:

 

"From Hell It Came" (1957)--Fun science fiction nonsense involving A death curse, soft hearted/headed scientists researching atomic dust and black plague,and a shrub that grows into Tabanga, The Killer Tree in two days time.  Let's see--there is also the lady scientist who uses the 1957 version of Miracle-Gro on the shrub to keep it from dying.  The viewer is also treated to the sight of the shrub/tree's heart (not shaped like a valentine--that would be too perfect)/bark beating.  Recommended for bad movie lovers.

 

"Portrait in Black" (1960)--Lana Turner and Anthony Quinn are illicit lovers who can't wait for Lana's dying husband to kick the bucket, so they decide to speed the process up.  After the funeral, Lana gets a blackmailing letter and everything goes to heck.  Unconvincing would-be noir has a list of suspects a mile long, but most viewers will have figured out the mystery before the film's half over. The script is funnier than some comedies.  Watch for Rajah, the All-Knowing house cat.

 

"The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor" (2008)--Brendan Fraser and Jet Li star in the third installment of the series.  Film is CGIed to death, but there are knowing nods to Japanese horror movies, the least impressive special effects look intentionally tacky, and otherwise, the special effects are impressive.  Best line: describing a "lady of the evening"; "Archeologically speaking, she is a tomb many pharaohs have lain in."

 

"The Land Unknown" (1957)--Cheapo Universal sci-fi flick has a Naval expedition getting ready to go to the South Pole, with a lady reporter to tag along with them.  When they arrive, their helicopter crashes into a sunken tropical valley that is filled with dinosaurs and a sea monster that is obviously mechanical.  Films' errors include two monster costumes very noticeably getting ripped during a fight; another monster has a visible zipper running up its' back. Tolerable time passer.

 

"Eating Raoul" (1982)--Cult comedy has  prudish Paul and Mary Bland (Paul Bartel and Mary Woronov) raising money for their own restaurant by unexpected means.  Along the way, they lose their prudishness.  Edie McClurg has a memorable scene.  The hot tub scene is very funny.  Funny comedy of sex and murder is highly recommended.

 

"Knickerbocker Holiday" (1944)--Based on a Maxwell Anderson play that had music by Kurt Weill, film is horribly disappointing.  Songs are ok, but not memorable (with the exception of "September Song").  Nelson Eddy and Constance Dowling sing well enough, but film never takes off.

 

Favorite Film--"Eating Raoul" (1982).

 

Least Favorite--"The Land Unknown" (1957).


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#14 skimpole

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 02:23 AM

I saw six movies last week.  A Quiet Passion was the best, with an excellent performance by Cynthia Nixon, a script that was both witty, moving and intelligent, with plenty of poetry by Emily Dickinson, and the excellent cinematic vision of Terence Davies.  One can only hope it will be remembered at year's end.  Cruel Story of Youth is known as the Japanese Rebel without a Cause.  Although I didn't give it my full attention it struck me as considerably more tough-minded than the Ray movie.  Days of Eclipse is a very strange science fiction movie, about a scientist concerned about his research in Soviet Turkmenistan.  The plot is not easy to follow but the filmmaking is striking, with the sinuous elegant camera moves that we would see in later Sokurov movies, as the film shifts from black and white (or sepia and white) to colour.  It's a difficult film, but worthy of the effort.  The Wanderers is also a film with considerable qualities, with a kind of larger picture and competence that would become much rarer in the next decade.  The main flaw with this movie about Italian American gang youth members in the early sixties, is that the characters are just a little too stupid, a little too lazy, do not have the right amount of depth.  Desire is a sort of Borzage/Lubitsch collaboration where Gary Cooper meets Marlene Dietrich, this time as a charming jewel thief.  The result is charming, if not the best achievement of either director, or either star.  Sweet Sweetback Baad Asssss Song, has plenty of nudity, a nice sound track and tends to meander as the title stud wanders towards a larger political consciousness after a run in with racist police   The result is somewhat mixed as one notices something a bit more interesting than the crude simplicities of the plot.


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#15 film lover 293

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 03:02 PM

kingrat--I saw Angel Angel Down We Go (1969) on YouTube.  The print was titled "Cult of the Damned".



#16 kingrat

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 01:08 PM

Filmlover, I'm with you completely on The Pleasure Seekers and The Song of Songs. Where did you find Angel, Angel, Down We Go? I've always wanted to see it for Jennifer Jones.

 

The Pleasure Seekers makes you appreciate how good Jean Peters and Maggie McNamara were in Three Coins in the Fountain. The Spanish scenery is nice, and the actor who plays the Spanish doctor is quite handsome. When you think about how good Negulesco's early black and white films are, it's disappointing that his later work is like this.


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#17 film lover 293

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 10:20 AM

I saw three movies for the first time this past week:

 

"The Pleasure Seekers" (1964)--Remake of "Three Coins in the Fountain" (1954) is set in Spain instead of Italy, has nice photography, good performances from Brian Keith and Gene Tierney, and Ann-Margret belting out tunes in skintight clothes or bathing suits.  It also has a cliched, boring script, a dim performance from Pamela Tiffin (to be fair to her, the character is a nitwit), music that is forgettable, to say the most.  Nice travelogue, bland movie.

 

"Angel Angel Down We Go" aka "Cult of the Damned" (1969)--Robert Thom's script for "Wild in the Streets" (1968) did so well that American International Pictures let him write and direct this follow-up movie.  Film is essentially a revenge tale of a rich girl getting even for her less-than-idyllic upbringing.  Never mind that Mommy Astrid (played by Jennifer Jones in one of her last roles) and Daddy are mega-rich.  Film starts out in a mansion as music from a Tarzan film plays.  An occasional Tarzan yell is heard between drumbeats. Weird beginning to a weird film.

 

"The Song of Songs" (1933)--Marlene Dietrich film is a bit of a letdown because of its' creaky script, but the performances, especially of Dietrich, Brian Aherne, and Alison Skipworth, the camera work,and the playful music score, not to mention Rouben Mamoulian's direction make this film worth watching.

 

Favorite--"The Song of Songs" (1933).

 

Most Forgettable--"The Pleasure Seekers" (1964).



#18 skimpole

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 02:11 AM

Last week I saw seven movies.  It didn't start off well.  A Good Day to Die Hard was not only completely unnecessary, it managed to be thoughtlessly mediocre in a wide variety of ways.  One particular problem is that the CIA seems to have been deeply stupid in the first place, and there's no good reason why Bruce Willis should catch on to the plot twist when he's running around in a foreign country that is not really enthusiastic having foreigners running around with firearms.  Tie me Up! Time me Down! is certainly superior to it on a technical level, though one might wonder what about a movie which suggests that its all right for a nitwit to kidnap a porn star until she falls in love with him if said nitwit looks like Antonio Banderas.  Paradise is There:  the New Tigerlily Recordings is a documentary about Natalie Merchant who decided to rerecord her 1995 album 'Tigherlily." I actually like the album, although Merchant appears a little vain about it and her fans don't appear particularly perceptive.  More music in the music documentary would have helped.  There is one interesting scene, involving the song 'Wonder,' where Merchant back in the mid nineties met two twin girls who suffered from a serious disease who were inspired by the song.  We see them meeting after the girls' graduation, we Merchant talking to their mother, we see the girls grown up later, and later we learn that the two have in fact died.  Colossal is a more impressive movie, with Anne Hathaway looking very pretty and fetching as a bit of a screw-up who finds that when she walks through a park in the morning, a giant monster shows up in Seoul.  Hathaway is very good, and the show plays out its conceit very well.  (Although one important point is told rather than shown.)  Night and Day may join They died with Their Boots On for egregiously historically inaccurate Hollywood movies that are still enjoyable.  Grant is charming, and one might think he would be perfect to play Cole Porter if you had no idea of what Porter actually looked like.  There are also some nice musical numbers.  Personal Shopper is an odd, but interesting film, with a very good performance from Kristen Stewart, who plays a shopper for a supermodel who would find it too awkward to do her shopping herself.  The movie appears to be a number of things, a picture of a woman essentially be a servant of the super rich, an erotic thriller and also a supernatural thriller.  The result is genuinely disconcerting in places.  The Warriors is a movie that one would think would have a bigger reputation than it does.  It's well shot, well directed, with a fine sense of atmosphere and a good music score.  One should note Lynne Thigpen as an especially sinister DJ.  One should also note the relatively nuanced gender politics involved.  It says something about how New York exists in the popular imagination that critics noticed at the time how unrealistic it was.  Such is the image of the almost bankrupt city that isn't immediately apparent when you see it for the first time.  The violence that attended the original release also hampered the movie's reception.


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#19 film lover 293

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Posted 07 June 2017 - 08:08 PM

I saw five movies for the first time over the past two weeks or so:

 

"Ruby" (1977)--Enjoyable horror movie starring Piper Laurie, directed by Curtis Harrington.  Film is old style horror film, with music cues that alert the viewer a shock is coming up.  Laurie's performance makes the movie work; she makes a fleshed out character out of cardboard.  Film has a prelude in 1935 Florida, where Ruby (Laurie) is a gangster's moll, then the bulk of the movie takes place in 1951.  Ruby has rebuilt her life and owns a drive-in movie theater.  Things are going alright until employees start dying on the job.  Best line; Mother to son, after Sonny tries to tell her something Odd is in the Coke machine: "No more horror movies for you!".

 

"High, Wide, And Handsome" (1937)--Operetta set in 1859 Pennsylvania is about the finding of oil.  Irene Dunne and Randolph Scott star, and Rouben Mamoulian directed.  Dunne is in fine voice, and gets to sing most of the Jerome Kern/Oscar Hammerstein II score.  Dorothy Lamour makes a good impression in her smallish role.  Film is part operetta, part action film.  Everyone involved looks to have done their utmost, but film doesn't quite work.  Still, a recommended watch.

 

"Deadwood '76" (1965)--Starring Arch Hall Jr.  Crazy western tries to fit in as many cliches as possible and has one of the most idiotic scripts of any film I've sat through.  Hall Jr. rides to the rescue of a man in a covered wagon who is being attacked by 5 Indians.  Traveler tries to shoot the Indians, but finds he forgot to load his rifle. After tells the Indians to shoo, Traveler plans to get rich by selling his cargo of house cats (yes, cats). Nutso film is cautiously recommended for lovers of bad movies.

 

"The Man From Planet X" (1951)--Edgar Ulmer film had a minute budget, yet this tale of outer space aliens in Scotland is an enjoyable film, due to imaginative camerawork, an intelligent script, and better-than expected acting.

 

"The Amazing Transparent Man" (1960)--Ulmer film is good only for horselaughs--a near total disaster.  For bad movie lovers only.

 

Favorite film--"High, Wide, and Handsome" (1937).

 

Least Favorite--The Amazing Transparent Man" (1960).


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#20 skimpole

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 01:57 AM

I saw four movies last week.  Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo suffers from sentimental brave soldiers and the women who love them, or at least one soldier and one pregnant wife.  On the other hand Spencer Tracy is good in an unfortunately small role and the actual Dolittle raid and its aftermath are pretty good.  Summer Magic is not one of Disney's most admired live action movies.  But it's interesting because there is something in Disney that wishes he made Meet Me in St. Louis and this movie is an attempt to do that.  So basically we're seeing a movie that is clearly inferior to that in every conceivable respect.  The songs aren't memorable, the nostalgia more unequivocal and more fake, the direction, cinematography, art direction and costume design are less successful, the movie has less depth and the performances are less successful in every respect.  It's odd that Hayley Mills, arguably the bright spot of the movie, doesn't sound remotely like her two brothers.  And Burl Ives' character seems to act like a pathological liar.  Fences has good performances by Denzel Washington and Viola Davis.  It's based on a play by August Wilson who insisted on an African-American director.  Maybe he should have insisted on someone who had better experience adapting plays into movies, since as a movie the movie does resemble a filmed play too much.  So the movie of the week is Song to Song, whose plot was admittedly a little confused for me because I didn't realize that Natalie Portman was playing a blonde.  More complex in its narrative than To the Wonder, more optimistic than Knight of Cups, I certainly admired it and will argue that this "weighless" trilogy will improve in critical reputation over the years.


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