We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...


  • Please log in to reply
923 replies to this topic

#881 DownGoesFrazier

DownGoesFrazier

    Advanced Spinner

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 57,510 posts
  • LocationPhiladelphia, PA

Posted 10 July 2010 - 08:44 AM

He didn't have much of a chance to look like ANYTHING again, leaving us not long after MADRE.

#882 ClassicViewer

ClassicViewer

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,051 posts

Posted 09 July 2010 - 07:39 PM

What on earth is semiology? I've been trying to figure that out for years!

#883 ClassicViewer

ClassicViewer

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,051 posts

Posted 09 July 2010 - 07:38 PM

Now that's a film I'd pay to see...!

But I think you need to find a role for Mary Astor. LOL

#884 ClassicViewer

ClassicViewer

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,051 posts

Posted 09 July 2010 - 07:34 PM

I think you're probably right about old Jack Warner. In many ways, Huston sabotaged the commercial value of his projects because he had his own notions about artistic merit. And he held on to those beliefs all the way up to THE DEAD.

#885 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,059 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 09 July 2010 - 06:57 PM

I'm not going to try to speak for Miswonderly (she does great on her own!), but the point about a female is how it might of enhanced the box office appeal to more people. Often a studio will add a sexy female to a movie even when the source material doesn't call for one.

So say there was a sexy women that was Bogie's gal went along with the 3 and it caused even more tension between Bogie and Holt because she flirts with Holt. i.e. his friend isn't just trying to steal all his gold but his women as well!!!

Don't get me wrong; I'm NOT saying this would of improved the movie but it might of improved the box office take. Remember the movie was a major disapointment at the box office and since it was shot on location it wasn't that cheap to make.

As I said before Huston had to fight Jack Warner hard to ensure Bogie died at the end. So my guess is that Jack wanted a women in the picture as well as a way to attract a larger fan base..

#886 FredCDobbs

FredCDobbs

    Show me your badges!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25,506 posts
  • LocationTampico. What a town.

Posted 09 July 2010 - 06:47 PM

Ahh, I can see it now:

*?Treasure of the Sierra Madr? Club?*

Joan Crawford, as Frederica C. Dobbs

Marjorie Main, as Hortense

Janet Leigh, as Curtrina

Joan Bennett, as Codina

Katy Jurado, as La Bandita

Say buddy, will you stake a fellow American to a meal?


#887 misswonderly3

misswonderly3

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,188 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 09 July 2010 - 06:36 PM

It has never once occurred to me that *The Treasure of the Sierra Madre* is somehow lacking because there is no feminine viewpoint in it. This reminds me of what I used to think sometimes in one of my film classes ("Film Criticism and Semiology" or some such title). Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.

"....What is it?"

"The stuff that dreams are made of."


#888 FredCDobbs

FredCDobbs

    Show me your badges!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25,506 posts
  • LocationTampico. What a town.

Posted 09 July 2010 - 06:35 PM

> {quote:title=ClassicViewer wrote:}{quote}
> If it were about a group of women looking for gold, it would probably not be deemed a classic,

Where on earth are we going to see a group of women digging for gold, other than at a nightclub?

Say buddy, will you stake a fellow American to a meal?


#889 DougieB

DougieB

    I Love Melvin

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,678 posts

Posted 09 July 2010 - 06:14 PM

I got into the film of "Treasure of The Sierra Madre" after reading the book. There was a major revival of B. Traven's work in the 1970's, including the six volumes of "Jungle stories" about the conditions leading to the Mexican Revolution. Very spare and powerful writing, which I think was adapted well for the movie in terms of screenwriting, directing and acting. Having just seen so much Kurosawa this past spring on TCM, I'm wondering now if he wasn't perhaps influenced by this film. I understand your frustration, CV, but sometimes I think men give up their secrets more fully if left to themselves, if you know what I'm saying.

Edited by: DougieB on Jul 9, 2010 7:14 PM

"When Fortuna spins you downward, go out to a movie and get more out of life."...Ignatious J. Reilly, A Confederacy of Dunces


#890 ClassicViewer

ClassicViewer

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,051 posts

Posted 09 July 2010 - 05:10 PM

One of the issues I have with MADRE (ironically, a feminine title) is that I think it gets a lot of attention precisely because it neglects to tell the female point of view in the story. If it were about a group of women looking for gold, it would probably not be deemed a classic, or else if it was a classic, it would be read by film theorists as being subversive with lesbian subtext...but really, the female version of this is the frilly gold digger musical. LOL

Also, I think that if CAPE FEAR were about a woman attorney hunted by a female killer, again it would be seen as pseudo-lesbian and it would not be given as much attention as a male-male thriller gets in our double-standard society.

#891 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,059 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 09 July 2010 - 04:37 PM

Funny you mention the fat man because I did notice that line and I don't remember noticing it before and I had seen the movie a few times. Windsor with those big eyes and dressed in black was something.

#892 FredCDobbs

FredCDobbs

    Show me your badges!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25,506 posts
  • LocationTampico. What a town.

Posted 09 July 2010 - 03:43 PM

> {quote:title=LoveFilmNoir wrote:}{quote}
> And THIS is why I like him in this role. No typecasting here.

His rapid-fire dialogue at the Oso Negro is some of the best acting I?ve ever seen.



And his ?Nuts? speech:


Say buddy, will you stake a fellow American to a meal?


#893 Fedya

Fedya

    Crotchety blankety-blank

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,297 posts

Posted 09 July 2010 - 02:59 PM

> The Narrow Margin is the best of what was shown yesterday. 71 minutes of fast action and noir grit.

Nobody likes a fat man except his grocer and his tailor.

#894 LoveFilmNoir

LoveFilmNoir

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,731 posts

Posted 09 July 2010 - 02:23 PM

> {quote:title=FredCDobbs wrote:}{quote}
> > {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}
> > If someone other than John Huston had directed the film, Brennan probably would have been the first one considered to play "Howard". Walter Huston's roles were typically MUCH different from the "Howard" role.
>
>
> I think one reason Walter Huston is so good in the film is because he plays a unique character. Someone who doesn't turn up in any other film. He never looked that way before, and he never looked that way again.

And THIS is why I like him in this role. No typecasting here. W. Huston is not every director's first idea for the "drunk old man" or the "funny old man" or the "crusty old man"....that is why I thought he was so great in this film. I loved his character in *And Then There Were None* - he's so sketchy and that character trait is what adds to the suspense in the plot.

#895 FredCDobbs

FredCDobbs

    Show me your badges!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25,506 posts
  • LocationTampico. What a town.

Posted 09 July 2010 - 02:16 PM

> {quote:title=finance wrote:}{quote}
> If someone other than John Huston had directed the film, Brennan probably would have been the first one considered to play "Howard". Walter Huston's roles were typically MUCH different from the "Howard" role.


I think one reason Walter Huston is so good in the film is because he plays a unique character. Someone who doesn?t turn up in any other film. He never looked that way before, and he never looked that way again.

Say buddy, will you stake a fellow American to a meal?


#896 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,059 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 09 July 2010 - 02:13 PM

The Narrow Margin is the best of what was shown yesterday. 71 minutes of fast action and noir grit.

I like The Strip because the story revolves around jazz music but they could of cut some of the 'fluff' scenes (Demarest character is named Fluff) and added more grit and tention to it. Of well this is what one gets from an MGM noir.

#897 DownGoesFrazier

DownGoesFrazier

    Advanced Spinner

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 57,510 posts
  • LocationPhiladelphia, PA

Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:53 PM

If someone other than John Huston had directed the film, Brennan probably would have been the first one considered to play "Howard". Walter Huston's roles were typically MUCH different from the "Howard" role.

#898 FredCDobbs

FredCDobbs

    Show me your badges!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 25,506 posts
  • LocationTampico. What a town.

Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:50 PM

> {quote:title=misswonderly wrote:}{quote}
> I really like to think that Tim Holt settles down with Bruce Bennet's widow in that fruit orchard. Poor old Cody, were they really going to kill him?

Well, that?s part of a hypothetical fiction plot, that didn?t happen, because something else came up. I?d like to think that if the bandits had not shown up, they would have backed down at the last minute and not killed Cody.

I liked the way that Howard said, ?Come on down, friend,? to Cody, after Cody had spotted the outlaws, and after Howard and the others had planned to kill him. Howard seemed pleased that they didn?t have to kill him and that he finally served some useful purpose to the original three men.

Say buddy, will you stake a fellow American to a meal?


#899 misswonderly3

misswonderly3

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 8,188 posts
  • LocationCanada

Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:44 PM

Interesting, LoveFilmNoir, what you said about Walter Huston being even better in this role than Walter Brennan would have been. Because I always get those two mixed up, and not because they're both named "Walter". They're both crusty crabby smart amusing old men. But yeah, I take W. Huston a little more seriously than I do W. Brennan.

"....What is it?"

"The stuff that dreams are made of."


#900 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,059 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:41 PM

Bennet's widow had already written him a 'Dear John' letter since he had been gone so long, but she just didn't know where to sent it! To me the actions Holt said he do are just not believeable. They didn't kill him.

I don't really feel that sorry for him since I felt he was being too greedy. Ok, I would of given him 5 - 10% but not a full 25% unless a new gold find site was found by the team.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users