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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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LEAST & MOST FAVORITE of the week...


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#881 misswonderly3

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:44 PM

Interesting, LoveFilmNoir, what you said about Walter Huston being even better in this role than Walter Brennan would have been. Because I always get those two mixed up, and not because they're both named "Walter". They're both crusty crabby smart amusing old men. But yeah, I take W. Huston a little more seriously than I do W. Brennan.

"....What is it?"

"The stuff that dreams are made of."


#882 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:41 PM

Bennet's widow had already written him a 'Dear John' letter since he had been gone so long, but she just didn't know where to sent it! To me the actions Holt said he do are just not believeable. They didn't kill him.

I don't really feel that sorry for him since I felt he was being too greedy. Ok, I would of given him 5 - 10% but not a full 25% unless a new gold find site was found by the team.

#883 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:40 PM

TCM showed noirs all day yesterday until 8PM. THE STRIP starring Mickey Rooney was not very good. Has anyone heard William Demarest sing? THE UNSUSPECTED had a convoluted, difficult-to-follow plot. DARK PASSAGE, BORN TO KILL, and THE NARROW MARGIN were the best of the lot.

#884 misswonderly3

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:32 PM

When Bogart, Huston, and Holt (can't remember the names of the other two characters, so I'll just use the actors' names) are planning what they're going to do with their "goods" when they cash it all in, Dobbs lists a few things and then sort of trails off. I love the pause; we all know what they're thinking before Huston says something like "Better not to get thinking about women out here, fellas." Dobbsy's going to use his "goods" to get DAMES !

I really like to think that Tim Holt settles down with Bruce Bennet's widow in that fruit orchard. Poor old Cody, were they really going to kill him?

Edited by: misswonderly on Jul 9, 2010 2:37 PM

"....What is it?"

"The stuff that dreams are made of."


#885 FredCDobbs

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:18 PM

> {quote:title=jamesjazzguitar wrote:}{quote}
> but I can see others feeling that Holt Huston should of at least got something for all their trouble!).


They both got great dames. The widow of Cody and the Indian girl in the village.

Dames are the only things more important in life than gold. But you have to have a lot of gold to get the best dames, and that is why gold is so important. :)

Say buddy, will you stake a fellow American to a meal?


#886 FredCDobbs

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 01:13 PM

> {quote:title=jamesjazzguitar wrote:}{quote}
> The part where Huston helps the indian boy drags on too long for me

This scene is nearly an exact duplicate of the same scene in "White Shadows in the South Seas" (1928), including the trick with the mirror.

Say buddy, will you stake a fellow American to a meal?


#887 LoveFilmNoir

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 12:37 PM

Great observations. I too think that people were expecting Bogie to solve a murder and get the girl - however in this film, there are no murders or dames....nor were there any stinkin' badges.

If it makes Jack Warner's ghost feel good, the film definitely has a following today and there is NO ONE ELSE who was under contract to him at the time that could have played Bogie's character. I can't think of any character actor in the business that could have played Walter Huston's role either (not even Walter Brennan)

#888 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 12:29 PM

The part where Huston helps the indian boy drags on too long for me but other than that I enjoy this movie a lot. I agree that acting is first class and Huston did a great job of directing.

I believe that people who say they don't enjoy this movie say so for the same reasons it didn't do well at the box office and the fears Jack Warner had about it;

Bogie going insane and being a complete cad; Bogie was now one of America's movie heros and this wasn't a role that Bogie fans wanted to see him in. Bogie didn't crack wise (something we was very good at in prior roles) or show much heart (except at the start), instead he was angry a lot.

The movie is about greed and thus the subject matter just doesn't have much appeal to fans especially with the ending (which was perfect in my view, but I can see others feeling that Holt Huston should of at least got something for all their trouble!).

#889 FredCDobbs

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 11:44 AM

> {quote:title=ValentineXavier wrote:}{quote}
> *The Treasure of the Sierra Madre* is on my short list of best US films. The film is about what really has value in life, and it isn't gold.

Come on, man! Everybody knows that the only thing that matters in life is gold.

I think I'll go to sleep and dream about piles of gold getting bigger and bigger and bigger.

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Say buddy, will you stake a fellow American to a meal?


#890 misswonderly3

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 11:14 AM

Whoa ...(how do you spell that sound you make when you want to slow something down?) One at a time here, I can't keep up. You've mentioned so many movies on this thread that I have a strong opinion on, I don't know where to begin.

I'll settle for a defense of *The Treasure of Sierra Madre*. (FrecCDobbs, where are you?)
This is one of my very favourite movies.( I know I'm always saying that, but that's because we're always talking about great movies on these boards.) Let's see - great directing from John Huston, a funny little running gag at the beginning in which Huston himself appears as the rich American giving a hand out with a frown to Humphrey Bogart.
Performances: Walter Huston, dancing a jig as he explains to the two greenhorns that they've struck gold and they don't even know it. Tim Holt's quiet patience with nutty Bogart; his touching speech when he daydreams about starting a peach orchard. Humphrey Bogart's descent into greed, obsession and madness has to be one of the most compelling performances along these lines I've ever seen. I love his line, *"I need dough, and plenty of it."*, and the way he says it. (Precurser of his nuttiness in *The Caine Mutiny* .)

I don't mind that there's no female character in this - how would she fit in, it would be merely obvious Hollywood practice of sticking a romantic or sex interest into a film where none belongs. And I often dislike movies without female characters, generally finding them not as interesting. But it's not always about love and/or sex.

Finally, one of the best endings to a movie, ever. Absolutely haunting, so perfect, so existentialist, Walter Huston and Tim Holt laughing their heads off as the gold dust, all their hard work and pain and effort, blows away in the desert wind. (There's a similar scene at the end of *The Killing*, with Sterling Hayden, but that's another story.)

Anybody else care to add to this, or explain why they think *The Treasure of the Sierra Madre* is a great movie?

"....What is it?"

"The stuff that dreams are made of."


#891 ClassicViewer

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Posted 09 July 2010 - 10:18 AM

We're nearing the end of another week...these are some of the selections I focused on:

- CAPE FEAR...the original version with Mitchum and Peck. When you watch this one, you wonder why there was even a need to remake it. It's truly on par with PSYCHO, which was made the same year (1960). Mitchum has a juicy role and plays it for all it's worth, carefully not going overboard. Peck photographs so well, he appears prettier than Polly Bergen, who plays the wife. I didn't think the juvenile actress playing the daughter was very good...that's a tough role to do, to present innocence but also a type of palpable sexuality that would attract Mitchum's character. I think black-and-white cinematography really works for this picture, and again, I think the color remake with DeNiro and Nolte falls short. Despite the implausibilities of the script, the story really does make you think about the rights of an ex-con trying to assimilate back into society and what happens when an attorney is forced to confront his worst nightmare.

- LET'S MAKE LOVE...aside from Marilyn's 'Daddy' number, the first part of this film really drags. It finally picks up speed about half-way into the picture when Yves Montand is coached by Milton Berle, Bing Crosby and Gene Kelly on how to be an actor (very clever cameos!). I do think Marilyn and Yves have a fairly good chemistry (supposedly they were involved off-camera)...but Marilyn looks tired and reminds me of Judy Garland's last days at MGM. But George Cukor does pull the production together, and there are actually many good musical sequences and it's worth the time.

- FACE OF A FUGITIVE...this one has been airing on the Encore westerns channel...it had been a few years so I decided to watch it again...funny how time gives you a deeper appreciation for a movie...in a way, it's not a B-western, it's almost a notch above that (not quite an A..maybe an A/B western if such a thing exists)...Fred MacMurray is very effective in the lead...and what I enjoy about it is that it's jam packed with irony...here we have this violent criminal and yet he does all these good deeds in a town where the people do not yet know his real identity. It's also a rare bad-guy role for MacMurray and he plays it very carefully...the best sequence is the one with him and the unsuspecting girl on the train...

- WRITTEN ON THE WIND...this was my *most favorite* film of the week. Dorothy Malone just blows the competition away. If you have not seen this film, even if you've seen it and it's been awhile, do yourself a favor and watch it again. Sirk's Technicolor melodrama was a big hit in its day (on par with ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS and IMITATION OF LIFE). It has an interesting cast...Malone is joined by Rock Hudson, Lauren Bacall and Robert Stack. In fact, Sirk reteams with Hudson, Stack and Malone for THE TARNISHED ANGELS, which will air on TCM next month. But WIND is a truly great film, a searing tale about the life of spoiled youth in an old oil town and the interconnected destinies and smoldering passions of its inhabitants. Only Sirk (or Minnelli) could've made something as potent as this.

- Probably my *least favorite* film this week was ODD MAN OUT. I've already commented on it in the thread for it. Again, I just found it to be a rehash of Cagney gangster pictures (without Cagney) and a film that would've been tighter in the hands of Alfred Hitchcock. James Mason is fine in the lead, but I prefer his Hollywood films like EAST SIDE, WEST SIDE that were made a short time after this one.

Coming up...I haven't seen THE RAINS OF RANCHIPUR yet and I recorded it from Fox Movie Channel this morning...also, I plan to get to BELOVED INFIDEL and a Clint Walker western called MORE DEAD THAN ALIVE...

#892 ClassicViewer

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 08:15 PM

Maybe someday I will give it another shot. LOL

Edited by: ClassicViewer on Jul 6, 2010 9:19 PM

#893 ValentineXavier

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Posted 06 July 2010 - 08:13 PM

*The Treasure of the Sierra Madre* is on my short list of best US films. The film is about what really has value in life, and it isn't gold.

"Those who would give up essential liberty
to purchase a little temporary safety
deserve neither liberty, nor safety."
Benjamin Franklin 1775

"I know that the hypnotized never lie... Do ya?"
Pete Townshend 1971 


#894 mr6666

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 07:14 PM

_286_ posts in a month! Holy Smoke!

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#895 SansFin

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 07:04 PM

I am sorry. I did not know there are such rules for posting.

I can not objectively state why I love some movies and other movies do not appeal to me. It would be like using calculator to show why my knees go weak when I see Steve McQueen smile.

The best I can do is like what I said for *The Great Race* It always seems like mindless gushing.

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#896 ClassicViewer

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 05:32 PM

You should pick one or two from the least favorite and the most favorite categories and provide a little more detail...why did they meet your criteria, or why didn't they...? etc.

For instance, I'd be curious to read a paragraph from you about why TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD did not register favorably with you...

#897 SansFin

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 04:34 PM

List deleted because I did not understand rules of this thread.

Edited by: SansFin on Jul 5, 2010 8:03 PM

My Avatar: Little girl ghost from "義足のMoses"

 

Russian nesting dolls are full of themselves.


#898 ClassicViewer

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 03:47 PM

Okay...I watched a few more on my list:

- I'LL BE SEEING YOU...Ginger is gorgeous and Joseph Cotten is just starting to break away from the Mercury players and build his own career as a leading man. David Selznick produces and teenaged Shirley Temple costars. An added bonus is the addition of the ever-effervescent and utterly charming Spring Byington in the cast, PLUS a young John Derek (going by his earlier stage name, Dare Harris). I have to say I really did enjoy this film...it's very subtle and understated and is not afraid to handle a dark subject about a soldier experiencing a type of traumatic stress disorder...keep in mind, the film was released in '44, when patriotism was at its highest and the war was still on against the Nazis. There are some beautiful holiday scenes in this movie and the two lead characters are given a very romantic storyline. It's an uplifting picture, based on a radio play. I recommend seeing it.

- THE SNOWS OF KILIMANJARO...Gregory Peck, Susan Hayward and Ava Gardner star. Ava has more screen time than Susan but Susan gets higher billing. Gregory Peck plays the Hemingway protagonist (a stand-in for Hemingway himself). There are some good outdoor hunting scenes, and Peck is perfectly groomed and dressed...in fact, he looks MORE suave than Cary Grant ever did. The scene where Ava's character is killed off is not to be missed. I think the script for this one is a little better than THE SUN ALSO RISES, if that's possible. I'd watch both of these again as part of a double feature, probably on Hemingway's birthday.

#899 ClassicViewer

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 09:42 AM

Hey Tiki,

I noticed FLYING HIGH on TCM's schedule, but since I am without TCM (and cable) for a week, I did not have the opportunity to see it. I'm glad you enjoyed it. Bert Lahr is also in a few musical comedies from the early 40s if I remember correctly...one with Dick Powell and Lucille Ball and there's another good one he did with June Haver. Look for them if you haven't yet seen them. (I can't remember the titles but search his filmography...)

DESK SET is a blast. I couldn't get over how far ahead of its time the storyline was...it was about how a computer takes over an office...and today we're seeing all these layoffs because technology really is taking over and causing companies to eliminate jobs that involve people. But DESK SET is more than a warning about technology, it's a spritely comedy involving some of the best actors of its era.

I have not watched 1776 and have no intention. I saw the play when I was younger and didn't really enjoy it.

#900 TikiSoo

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Posted 05 July 2010 - 09:24 AM

Interesting thread...
Oh I'm sorry I missed Desk Set. I'm making a Tracy/Hepburn box set and wanted to record this for it-I loved it!

Best film this week for me was aptly titled Flying High (1931). I wondered if the last Bert Lahr film I enjoyed was a fluke, but it wasn't-I love Lahr's comedy! His over the top style is so vaudvillian, it actually captures the feeling of it for us later generations. And a few drug & sex references made it even better. And early Busby numbers! Wow!

The worst for me was 1776. I loved the story and the art direction. I spend a lot of time in Boston & Philly and it made those areas come alive for me-not to mention our early American heroes. But as soon as anyone started singing the entire film fell apart for me. Especially disappointing because I'm a big musicals fan. But the portrayals of the charactors were strong enough that it wasn't a complete loss.




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