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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Recently watched Noir


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#481 markbeckuaf

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Posted 07 May 2011 - 06:56 AM

Miss Wonderly, please share your thoughts on IMPACT when you've had a chance to view it? It's one of my faves, even though I guess you could say it's "soft noir" but a very good film!

#482 cigarjoe

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Posted 06 May 2011 - 08:48 PM

Agreed "soft" noir.

Ok now back to "hard core" noir.

Watched *99 River Street* (1953) last night, I saw this recently on TCM but only from the about the the halfway point to the end, and from what I saw I though it was pretty good. Boy did I miss a lot of outstanding sequences.

Directed by Phil Karlson, with John Payne as ex prizefighter/cabby Ernie Driscoll, Evelyn Keyes as pixie-ish wanna be actress Linda James, Brad Dexter as dapper jewel thief Victor Rawlins, Frank Faylen as cab company shift boss Stan Hogan, Peggie Castle as ex-showgirl Pauline Driscoll
and Jack Lambert as mob muscle Mickey.

Basically Ernie and Pauline are having marital difficulties. Pauline thought she was marring the next champ but Ernie gets an eye injury and is banned from boxing. She resents the fact that she gave up a promising career and now she's married to a cabby. Unbeknownst to Ernie Pauline has fallen in with Rawlins who commits a jewel heist.

Keyes has a nice meaty role playing it slightly over-wound. Faylen is a sort of mentor to Ernie. The film has some great sequences a nice twist, and an interesting denouement on a great set piece. 10/10

#483 redriver

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Posted 06 May 2011 - 06:21 PM

It's a little different. Kind of a soft, thoughtful noir, if that makes any sense. I think you'll like it.

#484 misswonderly3

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Posted 06 May 2011 - 01:16 PM

You know what, guys? I have *IMPACT* on a video I picked up for a song, years ago, and for some unaccountable reason have never watched it. Well, I still have a functioning VCR, so I'm finally going to haul it out and give it a whirl. Now that it's been endorsed by all these charming and erudite film noir fans.

"....What is it?"

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#485 redriver

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 06:06 PM

I discovered IMPACT on the PBS station in Chicago. Late night, of course. Been a fan ever since.

#486 markbeckuaf

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Posted 05 May 2011 - 05:58 PM

I absolutely groove to IMPACT!!! Saw it for the first time late night when A&E used to show classic films. I was transfixed! I have it on a PD compilation and watch it fairly frequently. As it's a PD flick, I'm surprised I don't see it more often on TCM if ever.

#487 cigarjoe

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Posted 04 May 2011 - 06:44 AM

*Impact* (1949) directed by Arthur Lubin with Brian Donlevy, Ella Raines, Charles Coburn, Helen Walker, Tony Barrett. and Anna May Wong.

This one had decent and dark story line that made up for its lack of being very Noir-ish stylistically.



Basically Walker and Barrett plan on killing her husband Donlevy an auto company executive working in San Francisco. I'd have killed him myself for the unbearably overly attentive husband shtick routine he was playing, lol. Anyway once the attempted murder goes haywire (a bumbling Barrett accidentally drives into a gasoline tanker and is burned beyond recognition), the police assume the body is Donlevy's.

Donlevy, who was conked on the head and left for dead regains conscious climbs into a parked moving van, passes out, and wakes up someplace in Nevada.

Humiliated and devastated by his wife's complicity in the attempted murder, Donlevy gets a job as a mechanic working for Raines in a fly speck town in Idaho. He does not reveal his identity and, lets his wife get indicted as an accomplice in his murder.

There is an unexpected twist. 6.5-7/10

#488 markbeckuaf

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 06:41 PM

I really love MURDER, MY SWEET, very good flick.

I am fortunate to have RAILROADED on a collection called "Film Noir: The Dark Side of Hollywood". I really like it, it's a B, but a very enjoyable one.

I wish TCM/Warner's would do more of the Noir collections, even if they do them as MOD's.

#489 redriver

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 04:13 PM

I like Bogart's Marlowe, but MURDER, MY SWEET is my favorite Chandler film. I have wanted to see RAILROADED since reading about it on this website. It sounds like one I'd like. Thinking of Marlowe reminds me of Robert Montgomery. His take on Chandler doesn't come off well. But RIDE THE PINK HORSE is outstanding. A dark, mature story, it's somewhat unique. Very much worth watching.

#490 cigarjoe

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Posted 03 May 2011 - 06:16 AM

*Murder My Sweet* (1944) Watched this recently even though I haven't read the book its based on in years, I was wondering why they deviated so much from the plot of the novel. I'll agree with a few noir-phile friends that in seeing it again that O"Halloran is the superior Malloy in 1975?s *Farewell My Lovely*, thought I do like the Pepper's Ghost entrance of Mazurki (Malloy) that is employed in this interpretation, the Richards entire film is superior and I believe more faithful to the book. ?

This version ties up the loose ends in a beach house rather than on the gambling ship and the Burnette character is absent. ?It short shifts the Jessie Florian character, though it has a nicely done Dali-esque sanatorium-hallucinogenic sequence. But it also sports a lame epilogue with Marlowe temporarily blind catering to the love story expecting, female audience.

Powell is great as Marlowe pretty much as I pictured him in my minds eye as I remember the book (Mitchum was just a tad too old and a tad too iconic, unfortunately), but I'll go with Rampling as Velma in *Farewell My Lovely* she had a more devious look in her eyes, Trevor wasn't as believable to me she played it a bit to convincingly upper crust, with a Boston Brahmin accent pronouncing the word cant as k-on-t, all in all though, I prefer all the rest of the actors in the Richards version 1975 version, you cant beat John Ireland. But still I'll rate it 8/10

*Railroaded!* (1947) Directed by Anthony Mann with John Ireland, Hugh Beaumont, Sheila Ryan, and Jane Randolph, another low budget Noir, with a lame script.

Sexy beautician Clara Calhoun (Randolph), who has a bookie operation in her back room, connives with her boyfriend, mob collector Duke Martin (Ireland), to stage a robbery of the day's take. But the caper turns violent; a cop and Duke's partner are shot; and Duke arranges for innocent Steve Ryan, owner of the car they stole, to be framed. Sheila Ryan plays love interest to cop Hugh Beaumont.

This had a few too many contrived plot points for me but Ireland puts in a very good turn as mobster, watch it for Ireland. Randolph is a looker. 6.5/10

#491 ValentineXavier

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 06:59 PM

I like it, too. A minor noir, to be sure, but certainly entertaining.

I wish TCM would show *This Gun For Hire*. I haven't seen it in a long time.

"Those who would give up essential liberty
to purchase a little temporary safety
deserve neither liberty, nor safety."
Benjamin Franklin 1775

"I know that the hypnotized never lie... Do ya?"
Pete Townshend 1971 


#492 markbeckuaf

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Posted 02 May 2011 - 05:43 AM

I actually dig PUSHOVER quite a bit, and may have to watch it again sometime soon, as I am fortunate to have it on one of the Sony Noir sets! I agree it's not one of the best, but it's fun enough a watch, for me at least.

#493 redriver

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Posted 01 May 2011 - 03:12 PM

sorry, redriver and all the other Pushover fans out there.)

We're not so far apart, Brigid. I agree with your assessment. I merely enjoyed it in spite of that.

#494 cigarjoe

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 11:47 AM

Thanks that's what happens when you copy and paste sometimes, fixed

#495 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 11:18 AM

You never gave the title-----THE PHENIX CITY STORY

#496 cigarjoe

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Posted 30 April 2011 - 06:52 AM

*Phenix City Story* (1955) Semi doc Noir Directed by Phil Karlson, with John McIntire, as Albert L. Patterson, Richard Kiley as John Patterson, Kathryn Grant as Ellie Rhodes, Edward Andrews as Rhett Tanner crime boss.

A sort of semi documentary with a ten minute intro of a series of interviews with the actual participants. Basically an Alabama border town town is run by a crime syndicate that's grown fat on prostitution and crooked gambling, directed at soldiers from Fort Benning across the river in Georgia, all the vice is concentrated on 14th Street. Crusaders against the Good ol' Boys story.

A hometown boy, lawyer John Patterson, a army war crime prosecutor back from Germany, eventually is persuaded to fight the corruption when he visits the "Poppy Club" run by Rhett Tanner and observers the mob in action. He joins up with reformers. With the help of Poppy Club dealer Ellie Rhodes and his father Albert Patterson who is persuaded to run for State Attorney General the process of cleaning up the town commences.

I'd seen the end of this once before but never the whole way through, in the beginning it concentrates mostly on the illegal gambling end of the corruption, has a very tame night club/ torch singer/"B" girl sequence (its probably supposed to suggest a strip tease, but its very lame), barely touches on prostitution (which is alluded to with scenes viewed of soldiers & women co-mingling on the street either in background shots, or viewed through traveling car windows). The way its depicted in the film is that the rigged gambling was the main attraction when you know that with Fort Benning just across the river the soldiers were probably more after ****-tang than anything else.

From the point where the mob decides to teach Patterson a lesson to the end (which is the part I saw before) its entertaining, the documentary interview at the beginning is almost sleep inducing. What is interesting is that a poster from Phenix City on IMDb says that it's still a crap hole, the corruption is still there just not "in your face" out in the open as before and its on both sides of the river now, lol, go figure.

"Touch of Evil" which covers the practically same territory, I like much better, you get a better feel of the sleazy side of corruption in the Wells film through Janet Leigh's character.

John McIntire is always good and Richard Kiley also. If this would have developed a bit more of the corruption angle to juxtapose the crusaders it would have strengthened the story still I'll give this a 7/10

Edited by: cigarjoe on Apr 30, 2011 12:45 PM

#497 cigarjoe

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 05:30 PM

*The Scarf* (1951) Directed by Ewald Andr? Dupont, with John Ireland, Mercedes McCambridge, James Barton, Ezra Thompson, Emlyn Williams and Lloyd Gough.

Ireland escapes from a metal hospital where he's been confined for killing a girl friend, but he doesn't remember doing it. Desert Rat turkey farmer Thompson takes him in, skeptical at first but eventually believing his story. A hitchhiking McCambridge (who actually doesn't look too bad in this film) gets picked up by Ireland on his way to town. A scarf she's wearing triggers a memory in Ireland and sends him of a search for his best friend Williams, who had witnessed the murder and who's testimony sent Ireland to the mental hospital. Prison psychiatrist Gough, Thompson, and McCambridge eventually trick Williams into revealing his complicity.

Cheap and not a very stylish Noir, and McCambridge's singing waitress outfit is atrocious. Kept me watching though, 6/10

#498 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 05:19 PM

My lame response is, "But this is the film in which the world first became aware of Kim Novak".

#499 misswonderly3

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Posted 28 April 2011 - 03:57 PM

Well, I don't even like it. I am no pushover for *Pushover*. It just doesn't "work"; it feels as though the director gathered ideas and scenes from other noirs and sort of glued them together.

(sorry, redriver and all the other *Pushover* fans out there.)

"....What is it?"

"The stuff that dreams are made of."


#500 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 26 April 2011 - 05:07 PM

I should love PUSHOVER. DOUBLE INDEMNITY and REAR WINDOW are 2 of my 3 favorite all-time films. (I DO like it, but don't love it.)




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