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Bonanza: The Lost Episodes


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#1 rayban

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Posted 11 January 2017 - 03:53 PM

Today, on MeTV, on a lost episode of "Bonanza", there was an interesting one that featured guest star, Dan Duryea.

 

He was working as a US Marshal, who had gone over to "the dark side".

 

He was moonlighting as a killer for an outlaw gang.

 

And, as a US Marshal, he wanted to bring in a witness who had been working for the outlaw gang, but managed to escape their domination, leave town, get married and go "straight".

 

But, of course, his secret mission was to shoot the man down on the way back.

 

The episode was inhabited - totally - by Dan Duryea's special brand of "swarmiess". He was well-dressed, had perfect manners and was "rotten" to the core.

 

He wasn't even above "hitting" on the witness's wife.

 

The lost episodes are embellished with actors/actresses who were known for a special quality.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#2 TopBilled

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 05:15 PM

Jarrod -

 

The episode that we were talking about is titled, "The Witness" from 1973.

 

I just looked it up. It's one of the very-very last episodes from January 1973.

 

Interestingly, there is another episode of Bonanza called 'The Witness'-- made in 1969, also featuring David Canary. I wonder if that had ever happened before, the same show having more than one episode with the same title. 


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#3 rayban

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 04:58 PM

Landon was heading into middle age by then-- after almost 14 years on Bonanza, he was no longer youthful. I liked Landon's hair streaked with grey. He dyed it again in 1974 when Little House premiered, but during the last season-- after he handed the show over to Melissa Gilbert and was just appearing on a recurring basis, he was back to grey. And he was very grey (almost white) in the three made-for-TV movies that aired in 1983 and 1984. But then when Highway to Heaven premiered in the fall of '84, he was coloring it again-- and it seemed to have a few blond streaks in it.

Jarrod -

 

The episode that we were talking about is titled, "The Witness" from 1973.

 

Also, in the cast, was another male beauty - Stephen Nathan, who played the very young attorney who was trying to prove Candy's innocence.

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

Canary, Mathison, Nathan - please don't tell me these acting choices were "accidential".


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#4 TopBilled

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 04:30 PM

His face alone should've gotten him that pay raise.

 

Michael Landon's hair had gotten much darker and was streaked with grey.

 

Landon was 36 years old in the last season of Bonanza-- after almost 14 years as Joe Cartwright, he was no longer youthful. I liked Landon's hair streaked with grey. He dyed it in 1974 when Little House premiered, but during the last season-- after he handed the show over to Melissa Gilbert and was just appearing on a recurring basis, he was back to grey. And he was very grey (almost white) in the three made-for-TV movies that aired in 1983 and 1984. But then when Highway to Heaven premiered in the fall of '84, he was coloring it again-- and it seemed to have a few blond streaks in it.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#5 rayban

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 04:25 PM

Sounds like an episode from the very last season. David Canary (Candy) had left Bonanza in 1970 after a salary dispute. When Dan Blocker (Hoss) died in 1972, Michael Landon asked Canary to return to the show. Since Canary said yes, he probably got the raise in pay he had been requesting.

His face alone should've gotten him that pay raise.

 

Michael Landon's hair had gotten much darker and was streaked with grey.

 

Such an odd choice!

 

He wears tight, tight pants - and there's nothing there.

 

Canary and Mathison seemed to be providing "the sex appeal".


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#6 TopBilled

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 04:09 PM

Today, on MeTV, a very interesting lost episode of "Bonanza" -

 

It featured two later additions to the cast - David Canary as Candy and Tim Mathison as Griff.

 

It concerned a murder charge against Candy and the efforts to clear him of that charge.

 

It was well-constructed and nicely complicated - centering on the search for a woman with a very checkered past.

 

Sounds like an episode from the very last season. David Canary (Candy) had left Bonanza in 1970 after a salary dispute. When Dan Blocker (Hoss) died in 1972, Michael Landon asked Canary to return to the show. Since Canary said yes, he probably got the raise in pay he had been requesting.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#7 rayban

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Posted 28 November 2016 - 03:40 PM

Today, on MeTV, a very interesting lost episode of "Bonanza" -

 

It featured two later additions to the cast - David Canary as Candy and Tim Mathison as Griff.

 

It concerned a murder charge against Candy and the efforts to clear him of that charge.

 

It was well-constructed and nicely complicated - centering on the search for a woman with a very checkered past.

 

David Canary had a great deal of screen presence - and a terrific face.

 

And a very young Tim Mathison was very, very appealing, too.

 

And naming David Canary's character "Candy" could not have been an unconscious choice.

 


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#8 TopBilled

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Posted 25 November 2016 - 08:40 PM

Today, on MeTV, a lost Christmas episode of "Bonanza" with Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, brother Hoss Cartwright and guest stars Jack Oakie, Mary Wickes and Wayne Newton and a lot of orphaned kids that was . . well . . pure MAGIC!!!!

 

Jack Oakie raised $20,000 for the orphans' fund and then planned to run off with it.

 

But his nephew (Wayne Newton) saw him as an enlightened spirit.

 

And, thank God, his uncle COULD NOT LET HIM DOWN.

 

I agree-- it's one of my favorite episodes of the series. It was Jack Oakie's very last screen appearance. He was brilliant.

 

And in a later episode Wayne Newton returns as the same character.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#9 rayban

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Posted 25 November 2016 - 03:30 PM

Today, on MeTV, a lost Christmas episode of "Bonanza" with Lorne Greene, Michael Landon, brother Hoss Cartwright and guest stars Jack Oakie, Mary Wickes and Wayne Newton and a lot of orphaned kids that was . . well . . pure MAGIC!!!!

 

Jack Oakie raised $20,000 for the orphans' fund and then planned to run off with it.

 

But his nephew (Wayne Newton) saw him as an enlightened spirit.

 

And, thank God, his uncle COULD NOT LET HIM DOWN.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#10 TopBilled

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 09:13 AM

Mariette Hartley won an Emmy for the Incredible Hulk episode where she tries to cure David of his problem and her own terminal illness as well; they fall in love and briefly marry before she dies.  While she was her usual great self I kept thinking about all the even better work I'd seen from her on so many other occasions and felt this was one really deserved award.  Even when she wasn't the lead, as in the Felicity's Spring episode of The Virginian, she stood out.

 

Yes, regardless of genre, she always turns in a sincere performance. One of the best. She'd make an excellent guest programmer on TCM.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#11 wouldbestar

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Posted 28 October 2016 - 06:24 AM

Mariette Hartley won an Emmy for the Incredible Hulk episode where she tries to cure David of his problem and her own terminal illness as well; they fall in love and briefly marry before she dies.  While she was her usual great self I kept thinking about all the even better work I'd seen from her on so many other occasions and felt this was one really deserved award.  Even when she wasn't the lead, as in the Felicity's Spring episode of The Virginian, she stood out.


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#12 TopBilled

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Posted 22 October 2016 - 05:56 PM

Jarrod, I saw her recently in a "Gunsmoke" episode in which she played a married woman who was secretly in love with an outlaw.

 

In that one, she gave an outstanding performance, too.

 

She did have a brush with movie stardom, that's for sure.

 

She might have done better if she had come up during the studio system. But when she broke on to the movie scene, the studios were changing. And she would have greater success on television.

 

A performance of hers I really like is one she did in a western with Lee Van Cleef called BARQUERO. It was produced in 1970 and seems like a spaghetti western, but it's an American film.


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#13 rayban

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Posted 22 October 2016 - 05:49 PM

There's another "lost episode" where Mariette Hartley plays a love interest, and potential wife, for Ben Cartwright. But they face disapproval from the community because of their age difference. She's a very underrated performer.

Jarrod, I saw her recently in a "Gunsmoke" episode in which she played a married woman who was secretly in love with an outlaw.

 

In that one, she gave an outstanding performance, too.

 

She did have a brush with movie stardom, that's for sure.


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#14 TopBilled

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Posted 22 October 2016 - 02:24 PM

On MeTV today, there was a first-rate episode of the Lost Episodes of "Bonanza".

 

It centered on Hoss' adoration of a traveling actress (Mariette Hartley) who almost proved to be the death of him, but not quite.

 

At the end, as she left him, she said, "I wish that I were good enough for you."

 

The episode had two engaging performances from Mariette Hartley and Dan Blocker.

 

(He adored her so much that he was willing to take a murder rap for her.)

 

(A different kind of fan worship, right?)  

 

There's another "lost episode" where Mariette Hartley plays a love interest, and potential wife, for Ben Cartwright. But they face disapproval from the community because of their age difference. She's a very underrated performer.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#15 rayban

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Posted 22 October 2016 - 02:17 PM

On MeTV today, there was a first-rate episode of the Lost Episodes of "Bonanza".

 

It centered on Hoss' adoration of a traveling actress (Mariette Hartley) who almost proved to be the death of him, but not quite.

 

At the end, as she left him, she said, "I wish that I were good enough for you."

 

The episode had two engaging performances from Mariette Hartley and Dan Blocker.

 

(He adored her so much that he was willing to take a murder rap for her.)

 

(A different kind of fan worship, right?)  


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#16 TopBilled

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Posted 18 October 2016 - 02:22 PM

I've been meaning to mention my friend Rick's site...it is called Scenery of the Ponderosa. He started it back in the early days of the internet and he has a lot of great information about the series, including the Lost Episodes.

 

http://ponderosascen...om/episode.html


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#17 rayban

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Posted 13 October 2016 - 02:29 PM

Today, on one of the Lost Episodes of "Bonanza" on MeTV, there was a heartbreaking episode about a slovenly drunk (Susan Tyrell) who lost her husband to a jail sentence and just "gave" her little boy to Hoss Cartwright.

 

Hoss Cartwright took the little boy in and loved him very deeply, too.

 

The mom, lost to her alcohol addiction, was perfectly willing to allow Hoss to adopt the boy.

 

Instead, Hoss did his best to clean the mom up and get her a job in a doctor's household.

 

In the end, he was able to re-unite the mom and the little boy, who really did love his mom.

 

Helping us get through all this heartache was little Johnny Lee as Little Petey.

 

A TV Western series of this calibre is very rare indeed.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#18 rayban

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 06:20 PM

What a great review, Ray. It's interesting to see you post about a Jack Elam performance because I just wrote a blurb on him for an upcoming Golden Age Roll Call post. I try to mix in some character actors with the bigger name stars-- and I thought Jack Elam needed to be mentioned.

I look forward to that Roll Call blurb about him, Jarrod.

 

This was such a "lived-in" performance.

 

You couldn't take your eyes off the man.

 

And the fact that a young boy saw "so much" in him - well, it was kind of ironic.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#19 TopBilled

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 04:24 PM

Jack Elam's performance seemed carved out of hell.

 

And Mitch Vogel was his angel.

 

What a great review, Ray. It's interesting to see you post about a Jack Elam performance because I just wrote a blurb on him for an upcoming Golden Age Roll Call post. I try to mix in some character actors with the bigger name stars-- and I thought Jack Elam needed to be mentioned.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#20 rayban

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Posted 23 September 2016 - 04:19 PM

Okay, thanks. I was wondering about that. Have you seen anymore notable episodes?

Terrific "lost episode" that was titled "Honest John".

 

It featured an amazingly effective performance from the great character actor, Jack Elam.

 

He was ably supported by the young Mitch Vogel, as Jaime, the boy the Cartwrights eventually adopted.

 

Jack Elam came begging at the Cartwrights' door - he looked pretty bad and had a broken left hand.

 

Ben felt sorry for him and let him stay in the barn.

 

The Cartwrights were having trouble with Jaime, who was actually suffering from the loss of his father.

 

Jaime seemed to see his father in the old man that Jack Elam's character was.

 

The two of them also bonded over a crow that Jaime had found, but Elam's character said had once been his alone.

 

As it turned out, the old man was a serious alcoholic and far from responsible in any way.

 

But Ben was reluctant to toss him out, because Jaime was opening up - emotionally.

 

In the end, the old man took off, with the crow, which he sold, and some stolen money.

 

Hoss found the old man in a jail, where they thought that he was drunk, but he was actually dying.

 

Hoss brought him back and got him into a bed and then the old man died.

 

He left behind a note in which he bequeathed his belongings to Jaime.

 

But the old man had nothing - except his gratitude for a boy who chose to love him at the very end of his life.

 

What I liked about this episode was its' unrelenting grittiness - it was a far cry from heartwarming or even heartbreaking.

 

The old man was a reprobate - damaged from a lifetime of hard times - but somebody showed him a little mercy.

 

Jack Elam's performance seemed carved out of hell.

 

And Mitch Vogel was his angel.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".





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