We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

Romance Films on TCM


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 01 February 2017 - 04:58 PM

Great comments, Ray! It's been awhile since I've seen SERENADE and I did not catch it on TCM yesterday.


  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#2 rayban

rayban

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,625 posts

Posted 01 February 2017 - 08:45 AM

"Serenade" - such a crazy film - 1956

 

the plot premise that the bloodless femme fatale of Joan Fontaine could destroy the vocal talents of Mario Lanza cannot be believed on the basis of this film -

 

he is just so crazy about her - and he can't have her - she walks out on him - and, so, he is unable to perform or sing - he walks off the stage on his opening night -

 

later, he is recouping in Mexico and tries a stage comeback, but, this time around, he can no longer sing -

 

he meets a lovely Mexican woman, who restores him to life -

 

he comes back to New York and gets a New York engagement -

 

via his New York agent, Vincent Price, a kind-hearted, but acerbic gay man -

 

Joan Fontaine, not caring one bit that she destroyed Mario Lanza, tries to win him back just for the hell of it -

 

but, as hard as she tries, Mario Lanza is safe once again in the arms of his young Mexican love -

 

my hat is off to the director, the great Anthony Mann, who works overtime to make this nonsense work -

 

disconcertingly, Mario Lanza is much heavier in the Mexican sequences than in the New York sequenes -

 

there must have been quite a gap - a time gap - in the actual filming -

 

but his voice, his voice is so magnificent, that you actually sit through this totally unconvincing "romance" -

 

can a woman be a destroyer - yes, of course, she can - but she must live and breathe - Joan Fontaine's fashion mannequin is barely alive -


  • TopBilled likes this

"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#3 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 21 January 2017 - 08:28 AM

"Three Guys Named Mike" - (1951)

 

Jane Wyman gives a delightful performance as a stewardess who becomes involved with three handsome, eligible men - Van Johnson, who is studying to be a scientist, Howard Keel, who is already a working pilot and Barry Sullivan, who works for a top-notch advertising agency -

 

all the men ARE extremely eligible - and Jane does have her hands full - it becomes a very hectic life -

 

finally, in the end, she chooses "her man" -

 

Charles Walters directs this fantasy escape-like love story with such an lighter-than-air touch and it consistently floats higher and higher during its' one hour and forty-five minutes - 

 

he also gets four delicious high-comedy performances from his four principals -

 

if you happen to know that Charles Walters was a gay man, too, the film will be full of "gay touches" for you -

 

but none more "gay" than the ending - two of Jane Wyman's suitors are left out in the cold - one of them says to the other, "Well, we have each other."    

 

Nice write-up. The film is in the public domain (MGM accidentally let the copyright lapse) so it can be found various places online when TCM is not airing it. As you indicated, it's a thoroughly entertaining and delightful romp. It's always nice to see Jane do something lighter. She and Van re-teamed for MIRACLE IN THE RAIN five years later.


  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#4 rayban

rayban

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,625 posts

Posted 20 January 2017 - 11:22 PM

"Three Guys Named Mike" - (1951)

 

Jane Wyman gives a delightful performance as a stewardess who becomes involved with three handsome, eligible men - Van Johnson, who is studying to be a scientist, Howard Keel, who is already a working pilot and Barry Sullivan, who works for a top-notch advertising agency -

 

all the men ARE extremely eligible - and Jane does have her hands full - it becomes a very hectic life -

 

finally, in the end, she chooses "her man" -

 

Charles Walters directs this fantasy escape-like love story with such an lighter-than-air touch and it consistently floats higher and higher during its' one hour and forty-five minutes - 

 

he also gets four delicious high-comedy performances from his four principals -

 

if you happen to know that Charles Walters was a gay man, too, the film will be full of "gay touches" for you -

 

but none more "gay" than the ending - two of Jane Wyman's suitors are left out in the cold - one of them says to the other, "Well, we have each other."    

 

 


  • TopBilled likes this

"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#5 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 05 December 2016 - 03:05 PM

I was surprised, too, to see it called the most successful of the year, although I recall that it was a hit. I did a little research, and the biggest hit of 1951 was listed as Quo Vadis, with ~$21 million on a $7.6 million budget, while David and Bathsheba  was #5 for the year, with ~$7 million on ~$2.2 million budget. Disney's Alice in Wonderland sits at #2, but that's including re-releases. Show Boat at #3 and A Streetcar Named Desire at #4 round out the top 5 for the year.

 

We can say that DAVID AND BATHSHEBA was Fox's most successful film of the year. Audience tastes were different then.


  • LawrenceA and rayban like this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#6 LawrenceA

LawrenceA

    Champion

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,247 posts
  • LocationThereabouts

Posted 05 December 2016 - 02:57 PM

"David and Bathsheba" - the most financially successful film of 1951 - extremely lavish production, horribly self-conscious, but highly literate dialogue, too - the bubbling passion of a forbidden love - and two attractive, iconic stars, Gregory Peck and Susan Hayworth - of its' kind, entertaining and engrossing.

 

I was surprised, too, to see it called the most successful of the year, although I recall that it was a hit. I did a little research, and the biggest hit of 1951 was listed as Quo Vadis, with ~$21 million on a $7.6 million budget, while David and Bathsheba  was #5 for the year, with ~$7 million on ~$2.2 million budget. Disney's Alice in Wonderland sits at #2, but that's including re-releases. Show Boat at #3 and A Streetcar Named Desire at #4 round out the top 5 for the year.


  • rayban likes this

#7 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 16,266 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 05 December 2016 - 01:25 PM

"David and Bathsheba" - the most financially successful film of 1951 - extremely lavish production, horribly self-conscious, but highly literate dialogue, too - the bubbling passion of a forbidden love - and two attractive, iconic stars, Gregory Peck and Susan Hayworth - of its' kind, entertaining and engrossing.

 

Wow,  the most financially successful film of 1951 - I never would have guessed that.     Not my type of film (far from it),  but the two stars were indeed very attractive.


  • rayban likes this

#8 rayban

rayban

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,625 posts

Posted 05 December 2016 - 01:16 PM

"David and Bathsheba" - the most financially successful film of 1951 - extremely lavish production, horribly self-conscious, but highly literate dialogue, too - the bubbling passion of a forbidden love - and two attractive, iconic stars, Gregory Peck and Susan Hayworth - of its' kind, entertaining and engrossing.


  • TopBilled likes this

"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#9 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 10 March 2016 - 10:17 AM

Hi Jarrod,

 

I happened to think of Random Harvest because it is in my top 10 favorites.  (The top is All This and Heaven Too).  I thought of Dark Angel, which I had once seen when I saw it listed here.  It was also a very touching film.  I can easily think of 25 great films from the 30's and 40's which I really love, including The Rains Came.

 

No, I don't blame Love Story, like you were saying.  Of course there are much worse.  Yes, the gangster films were pretty violent and crime films of the 70's.  The occasional swear word does not bother me, either.  Come to think of it, if our Bette could have let out a couple of epithets in some of her films; Beyond the Forest, etc. or even Joan in some of her tough roles that would have been been something!  Of course the romance can still come across in films. 

 

I don't think we've discussed THE RAINS CAME yet on this sub-forum. Or if we did, I missed it. Personally, I prefer the remake THE RAINS OF RANCHIPUR. I feel Lana and Richard Burton have a lot more chemistry than Power and Loy do, who seem very mismatched to me. I also like how the subplot with MacMurray and Caulfield is developed, and seeing the flood in Technicolor and CinemaScope is a real treat.

 

The original version has Maria Ouspenskaya, and she's always an asset to any film in which she appears. But overall, both these films are restricted by the production code mentality of the times in which they were made, so the interracial romance has to be downplayed. Primarily it is a disaster epic with romance in the background. Maybe that's why I like the MacMurray - Caulfield scenes in the remake, because it seems like their story is allowed to play out more fully. 


  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#10 MCannady1

MCannady1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 908 posts
  • LocationUnited States

Posted 08 March 2016 - 08:52 PM

I don't disagree with you that THE DARK ANGEL (seldom aired on TCM) and RANDOM HARVEST are wonderful romance dramas. Anyone stumbling on to this sub-forum looking for titles to check out, should pick those two for sure. It's been awhile since I have seen ROOM AT THE TOP, so I cannot comment much on it, except to say I believe it did air on TCM a few summers ago when Simone Signoret had a day for Summer Under the Stars. 

 

Getting back to LOVE STORY, I don't feel it should be blamed for the trend of profanity in movies. It was representing the freedoms of the era, in terms of dialogue, with the code having been abolished. It received a specific rating from the MPAA because of the language. The gangster and crime films that studios turned out in the early 70s were much more explicit, in my opinion. An occasional swear word does not bother me. In fact, I think it would have been better if Bette Davis had been allowed to say d*mn or sh*t in a few of her movies. She was a tough gal and you would have expected her to talk that way in certain situations. It's a form of realism, and it may seem less glamorous I suppose, but characters who cuss from time to time can still get the romantic feelings across in their scenes. 

Hi Jarrod,

 

I happened to think of Random Harvest because it is in my top 10 favorites.  (The top is All This and Heaven Too).  I thought of Dark Angel, which I had once seen when I saw it listed here.  It was also a very touching film.  I can easily think of 25 great films from the 30's and 40's which I really love, including The Rains Came.

 

No, I don't blame Love Story, like you were saying.  Of course there are much worse.  Yes, the gangster films were pretty violent and crime films of the 70's.  The occasional swear word does not bother me, either.  Come to think of it, if our Bette could have let out a couple of epithets in some of her films; Beyond the Forest, etc. or even Joan in some of her tough roles that would have been been something!  Of course the romance can still come across in films. 

 

I am only saying that the way romance was projected earlier had a certain magic...  

  If it sounds like I mean this film primarily, I guess I was in error.  But speaking from the perspective of films that have that aspect. it often leads to more.  Not necessarily that particular film.  (At the time I was eighteen when I saw Love Story and preferred the old movies).  Like I was saying though, I wouldn't mind trying again.

 

One of my boys (33) changed his mind when his fiancee liked some of the older films from Netflix.  Now he says,

"I can see why you like them, Mom".  I was pretty surprised.  Our daughter who is 24 will watch an older film with me and then I watch a newer one with her.  So I try to keep an open mind.

 

So I guess the key word is preference. 

 

BUt you do have a good point there.  Swearing in films is not the epitome of removal of romance.  Other elements can contribute to that.

 

But all of that taken aside, like you said, I nailed it.  There was something pretty special about the 30's and 40's - and 50's at times.  When I take my favorite films and compare with today's, it's usually no can do, but it's  not always that way. 


  • TopBilled likes this

#11 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 08 March 2016 - 05:10 PM

Hi Jarrod,

 

Yes, I think it was the presentation of the story that affected me that way.  Though it is basically good with all the elements of romance, there is an element of feeling (for me) that it could have been done differently.  We know that our main characters loved each other very much and the unforeseen tragedy which strikes is devastating for Ryan's character.   With that I agree.  Like Dark Victory, the dying female protagonist knows and feels she has been loved.

 

It is not Love Story's fault, but after that we had a wave of films that progressed from swearing to other extremes.  (Even a few years before that there are a few).  This is different from the frankness of Sophia Loren's films or Lawrence Harvey's Room at the Top.  I saw these as a young child and liked many.   I watched several British films on a TV station called Cinema 9  and became a fan of them. too.  They were franker about social issues, but often done in a more tactful manner.  These were primarily 50's and 60's.  (A Taste of Honey was another). 

 

So I am essentially saying that one (negative) factor can open the door to others.  What is merely swearing can open the door to other things that draw us away from romance.

I don't disagree with you that THE DARK ANGEL (seldom aired on TCM) and RANDOM HARVEST are wonderful romance dramas. Anyone stumbling on to this sub-forum looking for titles to check out, should pick those two for sure. It's been awhile since I have seen ROOM AT THE TOP, so I cannot comment much on it, except to say I believe it did air on TCM a few summers ago when Simone Signoret had a day for Summer Under the Stars. 

 

Getting back to LOVE STORY, I don't feel it should be blamed for the trend of profanity in movies. It was representing the freedoms of the era, in terms of dialogue, with the code having been abolished. It received a specific rating from the MPAA because of the language. The gangster and crime films that studios turned out in the early 70s were much more explicit, in my opinion. An occasional swear word does not bother me. In fact, I think it would have been better if Bette Davis had been allowed to say d*mn or sh*t in a few of her movies. She was a tough gal and you would have expected her to talk that way in certain situations. It's a form of realism, and it may seem less glamorous I suppose, but characters who cuss from time to time can still get the romantic feelings across in their scenes. 


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#12 MCannady1

MCannady1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 908 posts
  • LocationUnited States

Posted 08 March 2016 - 03:28 PM

Janet,

 

I was waiting to see if anyone else would reply. I think you've made some solid points. A romantic love story in 1970 would certainly have been handled differently than any similar tale made during the production code era. But I still think the main ingredient is there: two attractive young leads, characters who represent the hopes and dreams of a generation, a couple who believe for a fleeting moment that what they have can conquer everything else. Even in something like DARK VICTORY, the female protagonist is dying at the end, but we still feel she has been loved. And we get that feeling with Ali's character in LOVE STORY. 

Hi Jarrod,

 

Yes, I think it was the presentation of the story that affected me that way.  Though it is basically good with all the elements of romance, there is an element of feeling (for me) that it could have been done differently.  We know that our main characters loved each other very much and the unforeseen tragedy which strikes is devastating for Ryan's character.   With that I agree.  Like Dark Victory, the dying female protagonist knows and feels she has been loved.

 

It is not Love Story's fault, but after that we had a wave of films that progressed from swearing to other extremes.  (Even a few years before that there are a few).  This is different from the frankness of Sophia Loren's films or Lawrence Harvey's Room at the Top.  I saw these as a young child and liked many.   I watched several British films on a TV station called Cinema 9  and became a fan of them. too.  They were franker about social issues, but often done in a more tactful manner.  These were primarily 50's and 60's.  (A Taste of Honey was another). 

 

So I am essentially saying that one (negative) factor can open the door to others.  What is merely swearing can open the door to other things that draw us away from romance.

 

 In a small - (smile) footnote:   There is a better way to express flirtation and love.  Room at the Top (though frank) was enacted so brilliantly with Simone Signoret and Lawrence Harvey.  We can clearly feel with the main characters;  pain and regrets of the clandestine lovers.  (I will not say more or give anything away and spoil it for anyone else).  This film had it all; tragedy and regrets.   I just watched it again recently and was even more drawn to the story. I had first seen it on TV at 11 or 12.  Maybe TCM will air it one day.

 

So I would pick something like The Dark Angel or Random Harvest if anyone asked me about a romantic film.  I'm a difficult nut to crack because I have loved the classics for so long.  Two-thirds of my life I have derived a lot of happiness and pleasure from them.

 

But, I have to admit and respect other people's feelings and opinions.  If I were to see Love Story again I might have a different feeling about it.  In fact, if TCM or Fox Movies runs it  I will certainly be glad to see it.  

 

 

  Today I feel so glad we have TCM.  Now Playing is one of the best magazines on our coffee table!


  • TopBilled likes this

#13 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 08 March 2016 - 10:05 AM

I was 18 when this film came out.  I was in my first job and going to school nights at business college.  A co-worker and I went to see Love Story  in theater.  Later I read the book.  I do like Ali McGraw and Ryan O'Neal, so I looked forward tot his film.

 

  Sadly, it was not as romantic as films I had learned to treasure, although it had a tragedy and a great love between Ryan and Ali's characters,  Yes, the basic story had the elements of romance with  ultimate tragedy too, which made for a tearjerker.  (Don't want to give anything away, so I have described it like that).

 

Maybe it was partly the swearing (which I was not used to in films).  That may have taken some of the romance away.  I believe the code had lifted by this time in '70...  

Janet,

 

I was waiting to see if anyone else would reply. I think you've made some solid points. A romantic love story in 1970 would certainly have been handled differently than any similar tale made during the production code era. But I still think the main ingredient is there: two attractive young leads, characters who represent the hopes and dreams of a generation, a couple who believe for a fleeting moment that what they have can conquer everything else. Even in something like DARK VICTORY, the female protagonist is dying at the end, but we still feel she has been loved. And we get that feeling with Ali's character in LOVE STORY. 


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#14 MCannady1

MCannady1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 908 posts
  • LocationUnited States

Posted 06 March 2016 - 03:43 PM

How come TCM never plays LOVE STORY, with Ryan O'Neal & Ali MacGraw..? It's like the biggest romance film of that particular generation.

I was 18 when this film came out.  I was in my first job and going to school nights at business college.  A co-worker and I went to see Love Story  in theater.  Later I read the book.  I do like Ali McGraw and Ryan O'Neal, so I looked forward tot his film.

 

  Sadly, it was not as romantic as films I had learned to treasure, although it had a tragedy and a great love between Ryan and Ali's characters,  Yes, the basic story had the elements of romance with  ultimate tragedy too, which made for a tearjerker.  (Don't want to give anything away, so I have described it like that).

 

Maybe it was partly the swearing (which I was not used to in films).  That may have taken some of the romance away.  I believe the code had lifted by this time in '70  (LOL!)  which was oftimes a beneficial thing, but later it began to wreck the romance of a film as promiscuity and excessive violence came to the fore in many.  I am sorry to say that the trend is still out there, although I find a diamond in the rough now and then,  Oddly enough, my contemporaries are in some I don't care for; for this reason.

 

I do like Ryan O'Neal and Ali McGraw, but wish the film had been handled more adroitly.

 

It wasn't long before I went back to the older films which we now call classic films.  While classmates and co-workers went for the new, I went for the old; now and then watching some of the newer ones.    I did enjoy current programs like Medical Center and even All in the Family or Maude now and then.

 

I would not mind watching the film again on TCM (45 years later?) or Fox Movie Channel and to see what I think.  I hope I am not too judgmental.  Actually, I just wanted to express the reasons why I love the 30's through the 50's films so well.  Pre-codes handle awkward situations with many of the current problems in the world, and the other decades express real feelings of the characters .

 

Case in Point;  ALice Faye and Tyrone Power are luminous together in all of their performances.  They truly radiate love in interesting atmospheric stories.


  • TopBilled likes this

#15 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 06 March 2016 - 11:16 AM

How come TCM never plays LOVE STORY, with Ryan O'Neal & Ali MacGraw..? It's like the biggest romance film of that particular generation.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#16 MCannady1

MCannady1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 908 posts
  • LocationUnited States

Posted 26 November 2014 - 07:03 PM

Random Harvest is one of my favorite films -  Right near the top!  Greer Garson and Ronald Colman are splendid in their roles as the heartbreaking amnesia nearly destroys their lives together.


  • TopBilled likes this

#17 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 05 June 2014 - 10:24 AM

Airing in June 2014:

6.05

DIANE

 

6.06

FORSAKING ALL OTHERS

JUNE BRIDE

 

6.08

ORPHEUS

 

6.17

SAYONARA

FANNY

RANDOM HARVEST

DARK VICTORY

 

6.19
DEVOTION
 
6.22
MARY OF SCOTLAND
SARATOGA TRUNK
DESIGN FOR SCANDAL
SUSAN SLADE
 
6.24
BEWARE OF PITY
 
6.25
FORGET-ME-NOT
 
6.26
THE CONSTANT NYMPH
 
6.27
LOVE ON THE RUN
THREE COMRADES
 

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#18 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 28 April 2014 - 10:06 AM

Airing in May 2014:

5.01

DEAR HEART

IMITATION OF LIFE (1959)

 

5.04

QUEEN CHRISTINA

LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON

 

5.06

MY REPUTATION

THE AGE OF INNOCENCE (1993)

THE GORGEOUS HUS-SY

 

5.07

A FAREWELL TO ARMS (1932)

ONE SUNDAY AFTERNOON (1933)

TODAY WE LIVE

 

5.11

NOW, VOYAGER

MARTY

IMITATION OF LIFE (1959)

 

5.12

MARY OF SCOTLAND

 

5.14

HER HIGHNESS AND THE BELLBOY

 

5.16

CROSS COUNTRY ROMANCE

MARRIED AND IN LOVE

MY LOVE CAME BACK

'TIL WE MEET AGAIN

 

5.18

THE DIVINE LADY

 

5.20

HOLD YOUR MAN

RICH MAN, POOR GIRL

 

5.22

DANGER LIGHTS

HISTORY IS MADE AT NIGHT

 

5.23

DODSWORTH

KING OF THE LUMBERJACKS

 

5.24

THE SHOPWORN ANGEL

A GUY NAMED JOE

 

5.26

THE WHITE CLIFFS OF DOVER

 

5.27

LYDIA

 

5.30

CLASH BY NIGHT


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#19 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33,102 posts

Posted 09 April 2014 - 01:00 PM

images-26.jpg

April 2014

4.10

THE SINS OF RACHEL CADE

YOUNG AT HEART

 

4.16

THE REMAINS OF THE DAY

ENGLISH WITHOUT TEARS

 

4.20

LOLA MONTES

 

4.23

THE QUIET MAN

 

4.26

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST '46

THE GLASS SLIPPER

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN

 

4.27

ROMEO AND JULIET '36

THE WAY WE WERE

 

4.29

THREE


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users