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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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From around the galaxy


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#1 hamradio

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Posted Yesterday, 10:53 PM

Artist perception of "The Great City" in Revelation.

 

3badce94fa1fbedd8c1e8a3bc34a7145.jpg

 

:o

 

0fe46365101cdda1466efcc5efbc1f34.jpg



#2 MovieCollectorOH

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Posted Yesterday, 11:34 AM

Yeah, Microsofts Embrace their newest operating system, Extend service / updates for a while and Extinguish all support later on. :angry:

 

2en6vwy.jpg

 

Except that XP was a MS product.  "Embrace-Extend-Extinguish" would apply to anything MS has joined in on late to the game and snuffed out in various stages.  The latest in their longtime strategy is to "Embrace" Linux as a viable operating system, after years (decades) of demonizing it.   Their CEO has already "Embraced" it, now they have a few "Extend" operations in play:  a variation of the Linux command shell on Windows (for Linux admins who may want to issue Linux-parlance commands to Windows machines).  MS SQL on Linux (though Linux has long had MySQL and other SQL variants).  Also there is a build of Linux that can run on top of Windows, although anyone even remotely familiar with Linux and its security model wouldn't need it or want it.  All three are considered to be outliers in the Linux community and are neither here nor there.  Linux is not for sale.  So there will be no "Extinguish" stage, just some awkward contributions by MS that will soon be forgotten by most.

 

Anywho...a thought for your thought and an image for your image:

 

bg-small.jpg



#3 hamradio

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Posted Yesterday, 07:28 AM

Vertical turntable with Bluetooth.  Reminds me of the old jukeboxes.

 

25ioxhk.jpg

 

89357bf720690d92ef2c41d7f4ef4c4e.jpg


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#4 hamradio

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 11:18 AM

Wheel of Fortune - Movie FAIL

 

http://www.eonline.c...fail-goes-viral

 

Could't figure out the LAST remaining letter - nobody can be this STUPID! :wacko:

 

rs_1024x559-170322062106-Wheel-of-Fortun



#5 hamradio

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:06 AM

1:50 into the Vimeo video shows water still flowing (more like seeping out) on the rim of the crater.  It will quickly turn to vapor because of the low atmospheric pressure.

 

Seen enough images from the rovers and orbiting spacecraft to be bored of the place - might as well live in Arizona. -_-



#6 JR33928

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 08:56 AM

A FICTIVE FLIGHT ABOVE A REAL MARS....

 

 

What it like to fly above Mars: Finnish filmmaker painstakingly puts together thousands of NASA images to create stunning video

  • Mars was once covered with oceans, ice sheets and erupting volcanoes that towered over the planet
  • The surface of the planet is filled with fascinating bumps and scratches revealing its geological history
  • The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has been orbiting and capturing pictures of the surface since 2006
  • Finnish filmmaker Jan Fröjdman transformed images imagery into a dynamic, three-dimensional, overhead view of the Red Planet 

 

 

THIS VIDEO IS FROM VIMEO...TO GO FULL SCREEN CLICK ON THE "V" ON THE LOWER RIGHT CORNER OF THE SCREEN.



#7 hamradio

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 12:05 PM

Meet Julia, a Muppet with autism....

 

2hi4cye.jpg

 

 

That's what happens when you give even them vaccines. :angry:

 

maxresdefault.jpg



#8 hamradio

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 01:16 PM

If you know about all that, then surely you must know about Microsoft's "Embrace-Extend-Extinguish" legacy:

 

Embrace: Development of software substantially compatible with a competing product, or implementing a public standard.

Extend: Addition and promotion of features not supported by the competing product or part of the standard, creating interoperability problems for customers who try to use the 'simple' standard.

Extinguish: When extensions become a de facto standard because of their dominant market share, they marginalize competitors that do not or cannot support the new extensions.

 

https://en.wikipedia..._and_extinguish

 

PS I had a TI 99/4a back in the day, and think I have read more recently that it supported CP/M either natively or using an add-on.

 

Yeah, Microsofts Embrace their newest operating system, Extend service / updates for a while and Extinguish all support later on. :angry:

 

2en6vwy.jpg



#9 MovieCollectorOH

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 12:39 PM

The early CP/M operating system was designed for the Z80 and 8080 (not to be confused with the 8088). Unfounded rumors flourished that Bill Gates stole the code for his MS-DOS OS.

 

220px-CP%E2%81%84M_Ad%2C_Dec_11%2C_1978.

 

 

Digital Research next came out with the CP/M 86 for the early 8086 / 8088 CPU (IBM).

 

CPM-86.png

 

 

A third party company sold a CP/M Program Pack for the Color Computer, I think it turned the 6809E CPU based CoCo into a Z80 machine.  Never purchased it because of limited capabilities, any software wouldn't work with the unique disk drive format.  Can't find a photo but looked a lot like this.

 

 

If you know about all that, then surely you must know about Microsoft's "Embrace-Extend-Extinguish" legacy:

 

Embrace: Development of software substantially compatible with a competing product, or implementing a public standard.

Extend: Addition and promotion of features not supported by the competing product or part of the standard, creating interoperability problems for customers who try to use the 'simple' standard.

Extinguish: When extensions become a de facto standard because of their dominant market share, they marginalize competitors that do not or cannot support the new extensions.

 

https://en.wikipedia..._and_extinguish

 

PS I had a TI 99/4a back in the day, and think I have read more recently that it supported CP/M either natively or using an add-on.



#10 hamradio

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 07:43 PM

The early CP/M operating system was designed for the Z80 and 8080 (not to be confused with the 8088). Unfounded rumors flourished that Bill Gates stole the code for his MS-DOS OS.

 

220px-CP%E2%81%84M_Ad%2C_Dec_11%2C_1978.

 

 

Digital Research next came out with the CP/M 86 for the early 8086 / 8088 CPU (IBM).

 

CPM-86.png

 

 

A third party company sold a CP/M Program Pack for the Color Computer, I think it turned the 6809E CPU based CoCo into a Z80 machine.  Never purchased it because of limited capabilities, any software wouldn't work with the unique disk drive format.  Can't find a photo but looked a lot like this.

 

300px-J%26M_disk_controller.jpg

 

Plugged into the large program port (rectangular door) on the left.

 

coco3_3.jpg



#11 MovieCollectorOH

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 12:56 PM

My Heathkit ID-5001 Weather Computer, HK-232 Terminal Node Controller, and SK-203 Printer Buffer uses the Z-80.  Built the boards, goodness how tiny some of the componets!

 

HK-232 board, the Z-80 CPU is next to the small orange jumper wire.

 

 

 

The Z80 lives on today, in an embedded form factor.  Of course it is not a real Z80 with original parts.  It is a more sophisticated microprocessor that uses Z80 code.  That is of course due to the rules of supply and demand.  There are EEs who still want to reuse old code, want a cheap processor, and/or they want it in a smaller package.  That newer one would never have been a viable replacement for the space shuttle though.  Being that the original run was what went through the validation procedures, the original die would be the only certified processor they could use.

 

 

So rather than having these

 

220px-Zilog_Z80.jpg

 

There are now these

 

220px-Z84C0010FEC_LQFP.png



#12 LawrenceA

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 11:13 AM

After Space Ghost: Coast to Coast, a serious live action version isn't very likely.

 

 

15-space-ghost-coast-to-coast.w529.h352.



#13 hamradio

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 10:57 AM

Hollywood haven't brought to life "Space Ghost".

 

Fan conception.

 

5147535-tom-velez-space-ghost-3.jpg



#14 hamradio

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 11:24 AM

Most don't realizes ALL rainbows are full circle.  The ground intercepts the bottom half when viewed at that level.

 

0756cf644d424a43614eeb4a249cb550.jpg

 

double_rainbow_alaska.jpg



#15 hamradio

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 01:02 AM

Maybe you've heard about studying the ways of the ants.  Well, these were some ants who really accomplished something.  The value of reconstructing that information would not end in the knowledge of the mission control system (if in fact that is what that is), but rather it would reveal to new people what their systematic thinking was, at the point when they devised it.  The methodology of the thought process used by the engineers at that time is the golden egg here, and in my opinion worth preservation for future study.

 

I see that is for the Apollo, but another point of interest might be that the space shuttle program used the original Zilog Z-80 processor-based system, originally made for the very first generation of shuttle flights.  The reason why they didn't use newer computers on later shuttles was an issue of software validation, which takes incredible amounts of time and at a huge expense.  So even at that scale, they would rather go with the tried and true, rather than have unforseen computer glitches on some newer platform.  Unfortunately, unrelated mechanical problems happened and led to the demise of the program.  At the end, there were heads-up displays in the cabin which used then-current Pentium processor-based units.  That was in no way connected to the mission control system though, which ultimately controlled the body and engines, and brought the shuttle in for so many successful re-entries and landings.

 

My Heathkit ID-5001 Weather Computer, HK-232 Terminal Node Controller, and SK-203 Printer Buffer uses the Z-80.  Built the boards, goodness how tiny some of the componets!

 

HK-232 board, the Z-80 CPU is next to the small orange jumper wire.

 

dscf0127.JPG



#16 MovieCollectorOH

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 11:41 PM

Is a computer with the power of a cheap calculator such a great loss? :unsure:

 

2reu0jd.jpg

 

Maybe you've heard about studying the ways of the ants.  Well, these were some ants who really accomplished something.  The value of reconstructing that information would not end in the knowledge of the mission control system (if in fact that is what that is), but rather it would reveal to new people what their systematic thinking was, at the point when they devised it.  The methodology of the thought process used by the engineers at that time is the golden egg here, and in my opinion worth preservation for future study.

 

I see that is for the Apollo, but another point of interest might be that the space shuttle program used the original Zilog Z-80 processor-based system, originally made for the very first generation of shuttle flights.  The reason why they didn't use newer computers on later shuttles was an issue of software validation, which takes incredible amounts of time and at a huge expense.  So even at that scale, they would rather go with the tried and true, rather than have unforseen computer glitches on some newer platform.  Unfortunately, unrelated mechanical problems happened and led to the demise of the program.  At the end, there were heads-up displays in the cabin which used then-current Pentium processor-based units.  That was in no way connected to the mission control system though, which ultimately controlled the body and engines, and brought the shuttle in for so many successful re-entries and landings.


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#17 hamradio

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 10:17 PM

Lesson #1 when conducting a television interview - keep the door LOCKED! :lol:

 



#18 hamradio

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 09:56 PM

 

20 Incredible Inventions That We Have Completely Lost

Here are 20 amazing inventions, conceived by the greatest minds in history, that we have completely lost.

 

#17. Apollo and Gemini Space Program Technology

 

1db710e6-aad0-4a2c-b6eb-f5e04662c281.jpg
 
Incredibly, much of the technology developed by NASA that led to the first moon landing (and a stunning victory over the Soviet Union in the space race) has been lost! The reason for this is that since the projects undertaken in the name of extraterrestrial supremacy were so intense, they also happened to be rather disorganized.

NASA technicians are trying to recover the information that led to the breakthroughs by working backwards to see how their predecessors achieved success. This is impossible thanks to independent contractors that NASA employs to work on various parts of the reverse engineering project separately from the main team.
 
[I don't know if it's just me, but that last sentence didn't seem to make much sense.]
 
 
 

 

Is a computer with the power of a cheap calculator such a great loss? :unsure:

 

2reu0jd.jpg



#19 hamradio

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 09:42 PM

I see they list the Library at Alexandria. That's the historical loss that has always bothered me the most. It's hard to imagine what knowledge was lost when that was destroyed.

 

The major problem with ancient inventions, the knowledge were not taught to future generations.  Some were used to conned temple goers i.e. the doors that opened by magic (to them).

 

herontempledoors.png

 

 

Of all their inventions, this is my favorite, Antikythera Mechanism. 

 

1-antikythera-mechanism-artwork-jose-ant

 

Antikythera-Mechanism-1.jpg


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#20 LawrenceA

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 06:16 PM

 

20 Incredible Inventions That We Have Completely Lost

Here are 20 amazing inventions, conceived by the greatest minds in history, that we have completely lost.

 

Incredibly, much of the technology developed by NASA that led to the first moon landing (and a stunning victory over the Soviet Union in the space race) has been lost! The reason for this is that since the projects undertaken in the name of extraterrestrial supremacy were so intense, they also happened to be rather disorganized.


NASA technicians are trying to recover the information that led to the breakthroughs by working backwards to see how their predecessors achieved success. This is impossible thanks to independent contractors that NASA employs to work on various parts of the reverse engineering project separately from the main team.
 
[I don't know if it's just me, but that last sentence didn't seem to make much sense.]
 
 

 

I see they list the Library at Alexandria. That's the historical loss that has always bothered me the most. It's hard to imagine what knowledge was lost when that was destroyed.


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