We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

Sappho and Her Friends: The Poetry Thread


  • Please log in to reply
162 replies to this topic

#21 Princess of Tap

Princess of Tap

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11,276 posts

Posted 04 September 2016 - 10:20 PM

Les Litanies de Satan By Charles Baudelaire

==
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

"Les Litanies de Satan" ("The Litanies of Satan") is a poem by Charles Baudelaire, published as part of Les Fleurs du mal. The date of composition is unknown, but there is no evidence that it was composed at a different time to the other poems of the volume.[1]

The poem is a renunciation of religion, and Catholicism in particular.[2] It includes a blasphemous inversion of the Kyrie Eleison and the Glory Be, parts of the Catholic Mass,[3] or it substitutes Satan for Mary and liturgy directed towards her.[4] Swinburne called it the key to Les Fleurs du mal.[4] The poet empathizes with Satan, who has also experienced injustice[5] and can have pity for those who are outcasts. But for political reasons, Baudelaire had to preface the poem with a note explaining he had no personal allegiance with Satan.[6] Even so, Les Fleurs du mal led to him and his publishers being fined for "insult to public decency".

The poem is an inspiration to Satanists to this day.[7]

==

I saw the name "Satan" in the title quite by chance in a book of poems and looked it up. The line in Bold (my emphasis for purposes here of course) might be a little misleading, it's possible that B really did not have allegiance with Satan (despite being irreligious). Milton in Paradise Lost represents Satan as expelled because he was contrary to God but he was also represented as a Rebel, which is thematically important to Romantic Poets in general who hearkened back to Milton for this. Baudelaire, as you know, did not like the Establishment (if you will) and thought that there was more to life than the prettified notion of accepted normalcy (and here against religion). I don't think that he was a Satanist, per se., and shame on the Satanist today who try to co-opt B for their miserable purposes.

I'm deciding against printing out the poem because the poem might be scandalous to the devout even today. Am I being too scrupulous? I hope not and it would be nice to think that discretion is not a thing of the past. And as we all know, the poem is available on the Net.

PS I remember a novel in the first person who periodically refers to his "Baudelaire period." Perhaps a rebellious period, though could mean many things. That's all I remember about the book.

..



For the sake of French literature, I don't see any problem with you printing some verses en français-- Baudelaire was an artist and much of what he did was just that art.

After all Laffite, what are you going to do when Vautrin and I start to talk about Rimbaud?

Which reminds me, in one of my graduate French literature classes we watched the movie where DiCaprio played Rimbaud- - a profoundly explicit film.

I went to the apartment in Bruxelles where Rimbaud et Verlaine had their little incident. It's near La Grande Place in Brussels. They have a little plaque on the door commemorating it, believe it or not.

#22 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 04 September 2016 - 09:19 PM

I just can't see Baudelaire chalking a pentagram on his floor,

lighting candles and chanting something in pig Latin. What

we might call a practicing Satanist. But it does appear that

Satan had some meaning for him, exactly what I don't know.

No doubt there are a number of interpretations of Satan's place

in his poetry. I do remember one critic remarking that CB was

just turning his childhood Catholicism on its head and in a

simplistic way, making Satan just another stick figure. I'm sure

some of the modern biographies discuss the subject in more

detail.

 

Les Litanies de Satan By Charles Baudelaire

 

==

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

"Les Litanies de Satan" ("The Litanies of Satan") is a poem by Charles Baudelaire, published as part of Les Fleurs du mal. The date of composition is unknown, but there is no evidence that it was composed at a different time to the other poems of the volume.[1]

 

The poem is a renunciation of religion, and Catholicism in particular.[2] It includes a blasphemous inversion of the Kyrie Eleison and the Glory Be, parts of the Catholic Mass,[3] or it substitutes Satan for Mary and liturgy directed towards her.[4] Swinburne called it the key to Les Fleurs du mal.[4] The poet empathizes with Satan, who has also experienced injustice[5] and can have pity for those who are outcasts. But for political reasons, Baudelaire had to preface the poem with a note explaining he had no personal allegiance with Satan.[6] Even so, Les Fleurs du mal led to him and his publishers being fined for "insult to public decency".

 

The poem is an inspiration to Satanists to this day.[7]

 

==

 

I saw the name "Satan" in the title quite by chance in a book of poems and looked it up. The line in Bold (my emphasis for purposes here of course) might be a little misleading, it's possible that B really did not have allegiance with Satan (despite being irreligious). Milton in Paradise Lost represents Satan as expelled because he was contrary to God but he was also represented as a Rebel, which is thematically important to Romantic Poets in general who hearkened back to Milton for this. Baudelaire, as you know, did not like the Establishment (if you will) and thought that there was more to life than the prettified notion of accepted normalcy (and here against religion). I don't think that he was a Satanist, per se., and shame on the Satanist today who try to co-opt B for their miserable purposes.

 

I'm deciding against printing out the poem because the poem might be scandalous to the devout even today. Am I being too scrupulous? I hope not and it would be nice to think that discretion is not a thing of the past. And as we all know, the poem is available on the Net.

 

PS I remember a novel in the first person who periodically refers to his "Baudelaire period." Perhaps a rebellious period, though could mean many things. That's all I remember about the book.

 

..



#23 Vautrin

Vautrin

    Quel siecle a mains!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,401 posts
  • LocationNorth Carolina

Posted 04 September 2016 - 04:48 PM

He did however mention Satan in his verses ... for instance in the poem below that we looked at ...

 

Si tu n'as fait ta rhétorique

Chez Satan, le rusé doyen,

...

 

...So what exactly did he mean? A symbol of the darker aspects of this vision? The wicki page for B mentions the word "Satan" just once and in a sentence where they say "...alleged Satanism." It might be fun to research 'Satanism according to Baudelaire'. (so maybe I will).

 

Did the biographies say anything?

I just can't see Baudelaire chalking a pentagram on his floor,

lighting candles and chanting something in pig Latin. What

we might call a practicing Satanist. But it does appear that

Satan had some meaning for him, exactly what I don't know.

No doubt there are a number of interpretations of Satan's place

in his poetry. I do remember one critic remarking that CB was

just turning his childhood Catholicism on its head and in a

simplistic way, making Satan just another stick figure. I'm sure

some of the modern biographies discuss the subject in more

detail.


  • laffite likes this

Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#24 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 04 September 2016 - 04:48 PM

***

 

Poetry is a sort of homecoming.

 

-Paul Celan, poet and translator (1920-1970)

 

***

 

Thoughts?



#25 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 04 September 2016 - 02:38 AM

CB wrote a few "happy" poems, both in verse and in his poems

in prose, but they are definitely in the minority. For a long time

Baudelaire had the reputation of being mad, a Satanist, etc.,

which were superficial views that many people lapped up, perhaps

not knowing any better. This simplistic view had been replaced,

for the most part, by a more nuanced and realistic portrait.

This isn't to say that he wasn't acquainted with the more

perilous mores and lifestyles of Paris, just that there is so much

more to his work and life than that.

 

He did however mention Satan in his verses ... for instance in the poem below that we looked at ...

 

Si tu n'as fait ta rhétorique

Chez Satan, le rusé doyen,

...

 

...So what exactly did he mean? A symbol of the darker aspects of this vision? The wicki page for B mentions the word "Satan" just once and in a sentence where they say "...alleged Satanism." It might be fun to research 'Satanism according to Baudelaire'. (so maybe I will).

 

Did the biographies say anything?



#26 Vautrin

Vautrin

    Quel siecle a mains!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,401 posts
  • LocationNorth Carolina

Posted 03 September 2016 - 05:10 PM

CB wrote a few "happy" poems, both in verse and in his poems

in prose, but they are definitely in the minority. For a long time

Baudelaire had the reputation of being mad, a Satanist, etc.,

which were superficial views that many people lapped up, perhaps

not knowing any better. This simplistic view had been replaced,

for the most part, by a more nuanced and realistic portrait.

This isn't to say that he wasn't acquainted with the more

perilous mores and lifestyles of Paris, just that there is so much

more to his work and life than that.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#27 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 03 September 2016 - 03:49 AM

Laffite-- Anywhere out of this world was the poem that we usually read in class-- and I believe the English title is the title of the French poem.

Les fleurs du mal-- is primarily maligned because of the lesbian content.

If I recall correctly, they actually seized the copies and closed down the printer.

Baudelaire had to flee to Belgium where he tried to make a living giving lectures.

But the worsening condition of his syphilis caused him to collapse and he was sent home to die.

I found his life very interesting to study, but I also found his poetry very difficult to understand.

As a consequence I think I spent more time with Verlaine. I can relate to it a little better.

 

Tap, I, too, don't understand Baulelaire's poems in any real valid sense. I haven't studied him and actually know very little about him. You are all saying things that I don't know. Baudelaire came to me through the voice of Louis Jourdain. In College studying French I ran across an LP where he and a lady recited a number of his poems. I can't remember her name but she delivered the poems in that sort of lilting, traditional, sing-songy way that did not appeal to me (B would have hated it imo, ha). Jourdan's renditions reminded me of Lawrence Olivier doing Shakespeare. Unlike the beautiful deliveries of Gilguid (sp?) Olivier wanted to get away of the lofty poetry recitation aspect and emphasized the lines with a modern delivery. There was an edge to it and that's what Jourdain does. Wonderful, thrilling even, and many of them are available on you tube.. I used to mimic his manner and committed about 10 to 15 of my faves to memory and I know them still. The ones I like seem fairly straightforward (on a surface level anyway) and I feel I have at least a working and intuitive understand of what's going on. I may be corrected on this but I have never taken his references to Satanism as any kind of ritual cult proceeding that we might see today. I always took it as a symbol of some the darker aspects of his poetic vision. You biography readers do correct me, au fond, Je n'en sais rien.

 

Tap, L'invitation au Voyage is the only happy poem he ever penned, so I read some time ago. Several composers have put it to song, notably Henri DuParc and Emmanual Chabrier.

 

I would like to do another dual-language Baudelarie poem here, if it's not too far off the beaten path for this thread.

 

Note: During an Introduction to Shakespeare class way back there the professeur, after telling us to forget about even trying to find something wrong about Sheakespare ("You'll never find it.") he then began talking a tort et travers about other poets in general and during which he called Baudelaire "a madman." Even though my knowledge was scarce I had the sensibility to be appalled and I spoke with him after class, saying that as impressionable students (most of were young)  he oughtn't say anything so blatantly negative and in such terms. I would like to tell you he ironed it out in the next session but I don't remember.

 

In German class, an Austrian born professor was rambling about and called the music of Mahler, "Shrecklich!" I did the same with him, seriously, a teacher shouldn't say that. It's hard enough to get people to listen without having entire classrooms having their minds poisoned for life.

 

Parbleu, la vie est dur.



#28 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 03 September 2016 - 02:21 AM

Lafitte -- you might like this. One of my favorite pieces of music is Constant Lambert's setting of "Summer's Last Will and Testament." I have a great (Hyperion) recording, which I play at least once a year, generally just after Labour Day.  Lambert's "Rio Grande" is also on the recording. Great CD of a little-known British composer.

 

I'll look into this, thank you. I do well with recommendations.



#29 Swithin

Swithin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,656 posts
  • LocationNew York City

Posted 02 September 2016 - 06:05 PM

The highlighted verses are Pathetic Fallacy, yes? Not that it's the end of the world. I believe they are considered bad form though. Just looked up that Ruskin coined the term claiming that "objects ... derive their influence not from properties inherent in them ... but from such as are bestowed upon them by the minds of those who are conversant with or affected by these objects." (Wiki) The idea was to curb a sort of low level sentimentality, which Rusking claimed was "rampant" (in the 18c) even among the greats, like Blake and Shelley, e.g. I am no expert though. it's a possibility that these verses might wiggle out of it, not sure.

 

edit: just looking again, if it was "Streams, turn YOUR tears to tributary course," that's Pathetic Fallacy. Maybe Nashe is innocent.

 

Lafitte -- you might like this. One of my favorite pieces of music is Constant Lambert's setting of "Summer's Last Will and Testament." I have a great (Hyperion) recording, which I play at least once a year, generally just after Labour Day.  Lambert's "Rio Grande" is also on the recording. Great CD of a little-known British composer.


  • laffite likes this

#30 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 02 September 2016 - 03:57 PM

As summer draws to an end, a bit of poetry by Thomas Nashe (1567-1601), from Summer's Last Will and Testament:

 

 

FAIR summer droops, droop men and beasts therefore, 

So fair a summer look for nevermore : 

      All good things vanish less than in a day, 

      Peace, plenty, pleasure, suddenly decay. 

            Go not yet away, bright soul of the sad year, 

            The earth is hell when thou leav'st to appear.

 

What, shall those flowers that decked thy garland erst, 

Upon thy grave be wastefully dispersed ? 

      O trees, consume your sap in sorrow's source, 

      Streams, turn to tears your tributary course. 

            Go not yet hence, bright soul of the sad year, 

 

            The earth is hell when thou leav'st to appear.

 

The highlighted verses are Pathetic Fallacy, yes? Not that it's the end of the world. I believe they are considered bad form though. Just looked up that Ruskin coined the term claiming that "objects ... derive their influence not from properties inherent in them ... but from such as are bestowed upon them by the minds of those who are conversant with or affected by these objects." (Wiki) The idea was to curb a sort of low level sentimentality, which Rusking claimed was "rampant" (in the 18c) even among the greats, like Blake and Shelley, e.g. I am no expert though. it's a possibility that these verses might wiggle out of it, not sure.

 

edit: just looking again, if it was "Streams, turn YOUR tears to tributary course," that's Pathetic Fallacy. Maybe Nashe is innocent.


  • Swithin likes this

#31 Swithin

Swithin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,656 posts
  • LocationNew York City

Posted 02 September 2016 - 06:49 AM

As summer draws to an end, a bit of poetry by Thomas Nashe (1567-1601), from Summer's Last Will and Testament:

 

 

FAIR summer droops, droop men and beasts therefore, 

So fair a summer look for nevermore : 

      All good things vanish less than in a day, 

      Peace, plenty, pleasure, suddenly decay. 

            Go not yet away, bright soul of the sad year, 

            The earth is hell when thou leav'st to appear.

 

What, shall those flowers that decked thy garland erst, 

Upon thy grave be wastefully dispersed ? 

      O trees, consume your sap in sorrow's source, 

      Streams, turn to tears your tributary course. 

            Go not yet hence, bright soul of the sad year, 

 

            The earth is hell when thou leav'st to appear.


  • laffite likes this

#32 Vautrin

Vautrin

    Quel siecle a mains!

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 9,401 posts
  • LocationNorth Carolina

Posted 02 September 2016 - 12:04 AM

Just to correct the chronology a bit. CB went to Belgium a number

of years after the controversy surrounding The Flowers of Evil,

likely to get some folding money. My favorite Baudelaire poem is

The Voyage, but it is a fairly lengthy piece.

 

From what I recall CB was involved in some fairly ruinous personal

habits--hashish, drink, hos, so to a certain extent he did lead the

life that jibes, to some degree, with his public image. Not sure how

serious the Satanic element was. Not too much I believe.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#33 Princess of Tap

Princess of Tap

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11,276 posts

Posted 01 September 2016 - 11:50 PM

Baudelaire was always strapped for money, even though his deceased father left him well off. His mother was a great deal younger than his father. He was very young when his father died so his money was left in trust under her control.

She had doubts about baudelaire's lifestyle, so she always kept him on a tight leash. It didn't help that she was remarried to a Napoleonic officer who was the antithesis of Baudelaire's character.

Something that I always thought was fantastic - - he made a living by translating Edgar Allan Poe into French. After that I always thought of them as being of maybe similar type personalities.

But Edgar Allan Poe was truly ruined by alcoholism - - whereas so much of what Baudelaire wrote about--he really wasn't taking part in. It was part of his image.

L'INVITATION au Voyage was published in Les Fleur du Mal but it's a non controversial poem that is often found in High School French textbooks.
For many French students, it's the first Baudelaire they will read.


I remember the refrain--

Là, tout n'est qu'ordre et béauté
Luxe, calme et volupté

" there, all is order and beauty
Luxury, peace, and pleasure."


The Richardson biography is the most thorough of those recently written and it was published in 1994.
  • LawrenceA likes this

#34 Swithin

Swithin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,656 posts
  • LocationNew York City

Posted 01 September 2016 - 10:35 PM

As a lad, I cherished Enid Starkie's brilliant biography of Baudelaire, a book which was famous for introducing English readers to the poet. I still have the yellowing Pelican paperback, 1971 edition of her 1933 book. Starkie precedes her introduction with this quote from "Epigraph for a Condemned Book" (with appropriate accents, of course):

 

Mais si, sans se laisser charmer

Ton oeil plonger dans les gouffres,

Lis moi pour apprendre a m'aimer.

 

I thought then, as a callow youth, that Starkie was a lesbian, and Joanna Richardson's 1973 biography of Starkie touches gingerly on the subject. 

 

I recommend both biographies -- Starkie's of Baudelaire; and Richardson's of Starkie.

 

Starkie was active in Oxford politics. She campaigned vigorously for the election of Cecil Day-Lewis to the Chair of Poetry, the oldest Chair in Oxford. Day-Lewis won (the Poetry Chair was by election). He was father to Daniel Day-Lewis.



#35 Princess of Tap

Princess of Tap

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11,276 posts

Posted 01 September 2016 - 03:37 AM

Laffite-- Anywhere out of this world was the poem that we usually read in class-- and I believe the English title is the title of the French poem.

Les fleurs du mal-- is primarily maligned because of the lesbian content.

If I recall correctly, they actually seized the copies and closed down the printer.

Baudelaire had to flee to Belgium where he tried to make a living giving lectures.

But the worsening condition of his syphilis caused him to collapse and he was sent home to die.

I found his life very interesting to study, but I also found his poetry very difficult to understand.

As a consequence I think I spent more time with Verlaine. I can relate to it a little better.

#36 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 01 September 2016 - 02:35 AM

For those who don't know the bulk of Baudelaire's poetry, it is primarily contained within a single great work, The Flowers of Evil. Baudelaire detested the Bourgeoisie and realized that many of his poems would not be accepted by them. But not only them, the authorities banned many of them as well. Baudelaire was more that his current society could take. This poem is about a book but in truth about his oeuvre. He addresses three types of readers.

 

==

 

Epigraph for a Condemned Book

 

Quiet and bucolic man resting

So at your ease, sober and pristine,

In quiet complacency languishing.

Throw away my book, so saturnine,

So wild and so melancholy waxing.

 

If your rhetoric does not meld with writhing

Satan, personified by the depths of Truth

Throw it away I say, you'd grasp nothing,

And if so think me quite mad or uncouth.

 

But if, succumbing not to sentimentality,

Rather casting your eye to the depths of my creed,

Read me then, to love me and understand my screed.

 

O Inquisitive One! You there! The Soul that does Suffer

And relentlessly pursues You're own Paradise real and versed,

So then I ask you, do Pity me well! ... If not, let you be cursed!

 

— translated by William Aggeler (with an unauthorized assist from laffite)

 

I love Baudelaire and my erstwhile French studies has enabled me

to understand some poems just as a native speaker would. Most English

translations are good or very good (including William Aggeler's) but

these translations never satisfy me. The meaning is always right there

but they fail to capture the rhythm and the beauty. I've tried to remedy

that by my upstart changes to reflect how I would like it read in English.

I didn't intend to include rhymes but they help at least a little with what I'm

trying to do. Some of then are forced. And there is more verbiage.You can

see that the stanzas get longer and longer (oops!) but this is all in fun.

Apologies to Mr Charles Baudelaire and Mr William Aggeler.

Below is the original Baudelaire---laffite

 

-

 

Épigraphe pour un livre condamné

 

Lecteur paisible et bucolique,

Sobre et naïf homme de bien,

Jette ce livre saturnien,

Orgiaque et mélancolique.

 

Si tu n'as fait ta rhétorique

Chez Satan, le rusé doyen,

Jette! tu n'y comprendrais rien,

Ou tu me croirais hysthérique.

 

Mais si, sans se laisser charmer,

Ton oeil sait plonger dans les gouffres,

Lis-moi, pour apprendre à m'aimer;

 

Âme curieuse qui souffres

Et vas cherchant ton paradis,

Plains-moi!... Sinon, je te maudis!

 

— Charles Baudelaire

 

Oh Charles, you do it with such great economy.


  • Princess of Tap likes this

#37 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 30 August 2016 - 11:26 PM

***

 

When I can look Life in the eyes

Grown calm and very coldly wise.

Life will have given me the Truth

And taken in exchange---my youth.

 

-Sara Teasdale, poet (1884-1933)

 

***


  • LawrenceA likes this

#38 NipkowDisc

NipkowDisc

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 11,812 posts
  • Locationzaygon hegemony

Posted 15 August 2016 - 10:16 AM

"the sun kisses the morning sky,

 

the birds kiss the butterflies"....

 

( zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz )

 

the...class?...class?...

 

 

WAKE UP!!!

 

               -SISTER MARY ELEPHANT

 

:lol:


"okay, so we're moving right along, folks" -al pacino, dog day afternoon


#39 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 15 August 2016 - 12:19 AM

   ----

 

Anne Bronte (1820-1849)

 

Farewell

 

Farewell to thee! but not farewell

To all my fondest thoughts of thee:

Within my heart they still shall dwell;

And they shall cheer and comfort me.

O, beautiful, and full of grace!

If thou hadst never met mine eye,

I had not dreamed a living face

Could fancied charms so far outvie.

 

If I may ne'er behold again

That form and face so dear to me,

Nor hear thy voice, still would I fain

Preserve, for aye, their memory.

 

That voice, the magic of whose tone

Can wake an echo in my breast,

Creating feelings that, alone,

Can make my tranced spirit blest.

 

That laughing eye, whose sunny beam

My memory would not cherish less; --

And oh, that smile! whose joyous gleam

Nor mortal language can express.

 

Adieu, but let me cherish, still,

The hope with which I cannot part.

Contempt may wound, and coldness chill,

But still it lingers in my heart.

 

And who can tell but Heaven, at last,

May answer all my thousand prayers,

And bid the future pay the past

With joy for anguish, smiles for tears?

 

Farewell

 

 

----


  • Swithin and LawrenceA like this

#40 laffite

laffite

    Oh Johnneeeeee

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,725 posts
  • LocationSoCal

Posted 07 August 2016 - 02:37 AM

***

 

Western wind, when wilt thou blow,

The small rain down can rain?

Christ, if my love were in my arms

And I in my bed again!

 

***

 

Anon (16c)






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users