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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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The One About The Woman Who Sleeps With A Married Man & Doesn't Get Punished


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#1 hepclassic

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 04:06 PM

Note that I didn't mention the Production Code as it relates to studios making movies on the cheap.    I mentioned the decade of the 30s.   So yes,  the studios made movies on the cheap during the 30s, pre and post code.

Duly noted. 


"Sometimes you have to look at a person and see that he's doing the best he can." Katharine Hepburn as Ethel Thayer in 1981's "On Golden Pond."
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#2 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 01:33 PM

The same could be true for Production Code films as well. Also, I am sure with the Depression studios had to economize ticket sales with movie production. 

 

Note that I didn't mention the Production Code as it relates to studios making movies on the cheap.    I mentioned the decade of the 30s.   So yes,  the studios made movies on the cheap during the 30s, pre and post code.



#3 hepclassic

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Posted 16 September 2014 - 02:29 AM

My guess is that MGM ended the movie Red Headed Women the way they did was because they wanted Harlow to get away with attempted murder.    MGM didn't want a Harlow character to be punished.   Also,  they were just cheap.    One can see how rushed these 30s movies are and how little care was taken as it relates to making a film.    So why waste money to script and shoot a better ending when it was cheaper to just put up the 'The End' card!

The same could be true for Production Code films as well. Also, I am sure with the Depression studios had to economize ticket sales with movie production. 


"Sometimes you have to look at a person and see that he's doing the best he can." Katharine Hepburn as Ethel Thayer in 1981's "On Golden Pond."
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#4 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 15 September 2014 - 07:04 PM

I think Precodes gave room for audiences to decide what they think about the characters whose story they see in the film. 

 

With the Code, the judgment by him would have stood as punishment alone and she would have been shamed for living as she did to the point of  the audience not being able to pick up on who she was to begin with because the interest groups represented wouldn't be comfortable with such subjects to handle a mature look at them. 

 

The problem with films made under the Code, as well as the legacy of the Production Code, is that audiences are believed already to be mature enough to not explore and discuss taboo topics that the Pre-codes and films made post-Code were unafraid to explore. But, if the Pre-Codes are any marker, it seems that the audiences were mature enough to see a film like Red Headed Woman for it to have the legacy it has. Besides, the people who were protested in the name of "morality" didn't see the films they were protesting. 

 

My guess is that MGM ended the movie Red Headed Women the way they did was because they wanted Harlow to get away with attempted murder.    MGM didn't want a Harlow character to be punished.   Also,  they were just cheap.    One can see how rushed these 30s movies are and how little care was taken as it relates to making a film.    So why waste money to script and shoot a better ending when it was cheaper to just put up the 'The End' card!



#5 hepclassic

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 09:51 PM

I don't think her character comes away without judgement;  Notice the speech that got caused her to shoot her husband;  He was correct in how he judged her.  

 

But none of her actions came back to bite her in the film since at the end of the film it is clear she had found yet another old sucker that she would take advanage of.      To just shoot someone and almost kill them and than to just laugh it off was a little much even for a pre-code film.

I think Precodes gave room for audiences to decide what they think about the characters whose story they see in the film. 

 

With the Code, the judgment by him would have stood as punishment alone and she would have been shamed for living as she did to the point of  the audience not being able to pick up on who she was to begin with because the interest groups represented wouldn't be comfortable with such subjects to handle a mature look at them. 

 

The problem with films made under the Code, as well as the legacy of the Production Code, is that audiences are believed already to be mature enough to not explore and discuss taboo topics that the Pre-codes and films made post-Code were unafraid to explore. But, if the Pre-Codes are any marker, it seems that the audiences were mature enough to see a film like Red Headed Woman for it to have the legacy it has. Besides, the people who were protested in the name of "morality" didn't see the films they were protesting. 


"Sometimes you have to look at a person and see that he's doing the best he can." Katharine Hepburn as Ethel Thayer in 1981's "On Golden Pond."
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#6 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 09:04 PM

I've noticed that too, but that's the draw of the PreCodes- that a character can come away without judgment. 

 

I don't think her character comes away without judgement;  Notice the speech that got caused her to shoot her husband;  He was correct in how he judged her.  

 

But none of her actions came back to bite her in the film since at the end of the film it is clear she had found yet another old sucker that she would take advanage of.      To just shoot someone and almost kill them and than to just laugh it off was a little much even for a pre-code film.



#7 hepclassic

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 08:25 PM

The movies is enjoyable,  but one thing I noticed with many pre-codes is they have no endings or very weak ones.   i.e. they just END.

 

We all know that the Production Code forced endings and many of those were phoney.  But I felt Red Headed Women needed a better ending.     Not because the women was immoral based on the standards of the era but because she was just rotten to the core.     So I felt some type of comeuppance would have provided some degree of balance to the picture. 

I've noticed that too, but that's the draw of the PreCodes- that a character can come away without judgment. 


"Sometimes you have to look at a person and see that he's doing the best he can." Katharine Hepburn as Ethel Thayer in 1981's "On Golden Pond."
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#8 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 14 September 2014 - 05:03 PM

liked this too....

 

 

 

The movies is enjoyable,  but one thing I noticed with many pre-codes is they have no endings or very weak ones.   i.e. they just END.

 

We all know that the Production Code forced endings and many of those were phoney.  But I felt Red Headed Women needed a better ending.     Not because the women was immoral based on the standards of the era but because she was just rotten to the core.     So I felt some type of comeuppance would have provided some degree of balance to the picture. 



#9 TheGayDivorcee

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Posted 13 September 2014 - 10:14 PM

Being a little slow on the uptake, I didn't realize these wonderful Genre Forums were here!  

 

One of my favorites of that era is Baby Face, 1933, with Barbara Stanwyck and George Brent.  Most entertaining, with some great lines.


Bring the boy an eggnog.  Two eggs.


#10 hepclassic

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 07:17 PM

liked this too....

 

red-headed-woman-jean-harlow-1932-everet

I saw that a while ago-and she liked it kinky too. 


"Sometimes you have to look at a person and see that he's doing the best he can." Katharine Hepburn as Ethel Thayer in 1981's "On Golden Pond."
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#11 mr6666

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Posted 27 July 2014 - 06:20 PM

liked this too....

 

red-headed-woman-jean-harlow-1932-everet


"A small elephant is not a rabbit."


#12 hepclassic

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Posted 19 July 2014 - 10:24 AM

Personally- I like Midnight Mary. 


"Sometimes you have to look at a person and see that he's doing the best he can." Katharine Hepburn as Ethel Thayer in 1981's "On Golden Pond."
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#13 hepclassic

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Posted 17 July 2014 - 11:06 PM

Many pre-codes dealt with sexual liberation, and some even on the scandalous side. Do you have a favorite? 


"Sometimes you have to look at a person and see that he's doing the best he can." Katharine Hepburn as Ethel Thayer in 1981's "On Golden Pond."
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





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