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TCM Imports - Nov. 2014


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#1 macocael

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Posted 23 December 2014 - 11:38 AM

Thanks to you all for your comments.  Glad to know that we all share a love of these films -- and classic jazz!  Hope you are all enjoying the holidays.



#2 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 11 December 2014 - 07:00 PM

Yes, you are probably right. TCM is primarily synonymous with the studio era American films, and as a kind of televised archive or museum of films, that is certainly an appropriate identity or brand.  I wouldn't quibble with that, though I think the mix could be more like 70/30, with the 30 going to foreign, silent and more contemporary films. Moving the Foreign Imports to its own night at a better hour would not alter TCM's brand and I suspect it might bring in more fans for foreign films.  I just browsed the Genre section of the board and I noticed an interesting thing: Silents had by far the most posts and replies, followed by noir, horror, and Westerns.  Foreign Language Films lagged far behind, but if it were given a boost, it might increase the fan base.  There were only 206 topics listed but over a thousand replies.  Somebody out there in TCM land likes foreign films!  

As for attracting a younger base, in order to keep this thing going, I think (or hope) that the generations to come, as they get older, will gravitate to TCM because they will want to know more about the history of film.  It is something that comes with age.  I admit, it is hard for them to see the appeal of Andy Hardy (but then, I cannot see it either, though I do tune in from time to time), or a genre like the musical, but I suspect that curiosity may lure them in eventually.  My daughter, for example, who is twelve, will not sit through a musical, but she loves Chaplin.  Chacun son truc, as the French say. To each his own thing.  I guess the question is whether a station like this captures its audience only because of a nostalgia for the films that defined their generation, or because it appeals to a general love of film, even while the taste for a particular generational style predominates.  I am hoping the latter.  Because for me TCM presents us with a valuable cultural legacy, which goes beyond mere entertainment.  A film student couldn't ask for a better cable station.

 

and btw, I noticed the same thing about jazz on the radio.  And I share your taste for the golden age.

 

Well we both hope that the younger generation,  as well as future ones,   continue to seek out the 'arts' created by prior generations.    Of course some always do,  but most people are mostly only into what is current or pop.   Interesting your daughter loves Chaplin.   One part of me says 'well of course!, since Chaplin is timeless!',  but how many other children her age even know who Chaplin is?   A lot depends on what is passed down.   

 

This is why I promote jazz music and especially jazz guitar playing to anyone that is interested.   I'll give free leasons IF I feel their inrestest in the music is sincere.    This is one way to keep these art forms current and relevant. 

 

There will always be people interested in the art of filmmaking.  This will lead them back in time to those that came before them.


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#3 Kay

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 09:49 PM

I agree that Monday at midnight would be a much better time for Imports. Their current time slot is really the pits. They are frequently the most interesting thing that comes on all day, as the Import is also a premiere almost every week, oftentimes two of them. The foreign film offerings are one thing that TCM can afford to keep premiering, it seems, but always at the worst hour.

 

A couple of good looking movies by Sacha Guitry are coming on the 28th, but they are backed-up another 45 minutes waiting for The King of Kings (again) to end. Not to mention one Sunday this month is only going to deliver Disney stuff. What a sorry replacement. They did it again in March, the schmucks.

 

The Imports are my major draw to TCM (and I'm part of the younger demographic, hint-hint), and even though they come on at 11:00pm for me I still struggle to catch both features most of the time (I'm also in the no-DVR demographic, to whom TCM clearly doesn't cater.)

 

P.S. What I really want TCM to do more than anything is continue Silent Sunday/Imports/Underground right through Oscar month and Summer Under the Stars. Moving Imports to Monday would make it more possible for SUTS, anyway.

 

(But then, my golden age of jazz is the 20s and 30s; somehow every time anyone caters to the younger demographic I end up losing out.)


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#4 macocael

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 03:45 PM

Ah,  the question of how TCM attracts younger viewers.    That raises the roof around here.   E.g. some say TCM should show more post studio-era (1969) movies.   Others say TCM should show colorized movies.   

 

So what does the TCM brand represent?   My personal perference is that 80% of TCM's programming is devoted to studio-era American films.   This leaves 20% for foreign films,  post studio-era movies,  specials,   etc...   To me the TCM brand has always been a devotion to studio-era American films.

 

BUT will sticking with that attract younger viewers?     I don't know but I suspect NOT.

 

I noticed the same thing with jazz music stations (the few remaining ones);   20 years ago the majority of the music was jazz from the 50s and 60s.   What I define as the golden age of American jazz music.     Today the stations focus on latin jazz,  a lot more singing (sometimes barely in the jazz style),  modern 'wave' jazz and even the blues.     So I just listen to my IPOD!

 

BUT I do understand why these stations changed.  The ones that stayed to 'old school' music couldn't make it!

Yes, you are probably right. TCM is primarily synonymous with the studio era American films, and as a kind of televised archive or museum of films, that is certainly an appropriate identity or brand.  I wouldn't quibble with that, though I think the mix could be more like 70/30, with the 30 going to foreign, silent and more contemporary films. Moving the Foreign Imports to its own night at a better hour would not alter TCM's brand and I suspect it might bring in more fans for foreign films.  I just browsed the Genre section of the board and I noticed an interesting thing: Silents had by far the most posts and replies, followed by noir, horror, and Westerns.  Foreign Language Films lagged far behind, but if it were given a boost, it might increase the fan base.  There were only 206 topics listed but over a thousand replies.  Somebody out there in TCM land likes foreign films!  

As for attracting a younger base, in order to keep this thing going, I think (or hope) that the generations to come, as they get older, will gravitate to TCM because they will want to know more about the history of film.  It is something that comes with age.  I admit, it is hard for them to see the appeal of Andy Hardy (but then, I cannot see it either, though I do tune in from time to time), or a genre like the musical, but I suspect that curiosity may lure them in eventually.  My daughter, for example, who is twelve, will not sit through a musical, but she loves Chaplin.  Chacun son truc, as the French say. To each his own thing.  I guess the question is whether a station like this captures its audience only because of a nostalgia for the films that defined their generation, or because it appeals to a general love of film, even while the taste for a particular generational style predominates.  I am hoping the latter.  Because for me TCM presents us with a valuable cultural legacy, which goes beyond mere entertainment.  A film student couldn't ask for a better cable station.

 

and btw, I noticed the same thing about jazz on the radio.  And I share your taste for the golden age.



#5 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 03:16 PM

It's a gamble.  No doubt the people who monitor the numbers at TCM feel that there isn't enough popular support for this sort of programming, and that is why it is relegated to the wee hours.  Yet one of the tricks of marketing is convincing people they want something when they don't yet know they want it, and more people might get on board if a promotional effort were made.   I came to films as a result of watching Janus collection foreign films on PBS on Saturday matinees (channel 13, when I was a kid.  TCM's audience has enough film enthusiasts in the mix who are probably just like me and want to see all types of film, rather than just classic American far, so it might be worth the gamble.  Plus, TCM's audience must eventually change too, and TCM is going to have to make an effort to attract younger viewers.  

 

Ah,  the question of how TCM attracts younger viewers.    That raises the roof around here.   E.g. some say TCM should show more post studio-era (1969) movies.   Others say TCM should show colorized movies.   

 

So what does the TCM brand represent?   My personal perference is that 80% of TCM's programming is devoted to studio-era American films.   This leaves 20% for foreign films,  post studio-era movies,  specials,   etc...   To me the TCM brand has always been a devotion to studio-era American films.

 

BUT will sticking with that attract younger viewers?     I don't know but I suspect NOT.

 

I noticed the same thing with jazz music stations (the few remaining ones);   20 years ago the majority of the music was jazz from the 50s and 60s.   What I define as the golden age of American jazz music.     Today the stations focus on latin jazz,  a lot more singing (sometimes barely in the jazz style),  modern 'wave' jazz and even the blues.     So I just listen to my IPOD!

 

BUT I do understand why these stations changed.  The ones that stayed to 'old school' music couldn't make it!


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#6 macocael

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Posted 10 December 2014 - 02:55 PM

While I agree with your take here,  I"m not sure about 'more TCM fans'.    Note that I say the same thing to those that say TCM shouldn't show any non American films (folks like that are at this forum),  or slient films or movies made after 1969 or etc.....

 

So it is difficult to guess what a majority of TCM fans (viewers),  really would like to see.   e.g. many at this forum wish TCM would get rid of The Essentials.   Just so many different POVs and movie genre preferences.

It's a gamble.  No doubt the people who monitor the numbers at TCM feel that there isn't enough popular support for this sort of programming, and that is why it is relegated to the wee hours.  Yet one of the tricks of marketing is convincing people they want something when they don't yet know they want it, and more people might get on board if a promotional effort were made.   I came to films as a result of watching Janus collection foreign films on PBS on Saturday matinees (channel 13, when I was a kid.  TCM's audience has enough film enthusiasts in the mix who are probably just like me and want to see all types of film, rather than just classic American far, so it might be worth the gamble.  Plus, TCM's audience must eventually change too, and TCM is going to have to make an effort to attract younger viewers.  



#7 mr6666

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 07:44 PM

airs late Sun., 11-30

 

2:30 am ET
87 min
drama
Army, The (1944)    aka 'Rikudun'         PREMIERE

A sickly young man from a military family fights to earn a place in the Japanese Army.

DirKeisuke Kinoshita CastKen Mitsuda , Kazumasa Hoshino , Chishu Ryu .
 
"...one of Keisuke Kinoshita’s earliest efforts, is strikingly anti-war. Kinoshita’s pacifism would resurface, but it feels particularly strong here, especially because he’s projecting it in a film that was intended to be (according to censors) pro-war."
 
69967.jpg

 

 

later....

4:15 am ET
C- 94 min
comedy
Good Morning (1962)    aka 'Ohayo'

Two boys stop speaking until their parents will buy them a new TV.

DirYasujiro Ozu CastKoji Shidara , Masahiko Shimazu , Chishu Ryu .

 

Article: http://www.tcm.com/t...g/articles.html

 

"..."another Ozu gem, a covertly sophisticated ensemble piece scripted with the intricacy and precision of a well-constructed Restoration comedy of manners."


"A small elephant is not a rabbit."


#8 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 03:36 PM

A great lineup this month.  But am I the only TCM fan who thinks that the company ought to give the Foreign Imports segment more of a boost, move it to a better time slot, and beef up its promotion?  Look what the ads have done for The Essentials.  Why not have Ben Mankiewicz do a similar thing, have a guest, either semi permanent or rotating, and discuss the films in the context of film history, so as to help out those TCM fans whose knowledge of other cinemas is a bit thin?  Why not move it from Sunday to, say, Monday night, at midnight?  That way Sunday night could be entirely reserved for silent films, and Monday night's programming could be spiced up a bit.  I think more TCM fans would try out the foreign imports if the company got behind them in a big way.

 

While I agree with your take here,  I"m not sure about 'more TCM fans'.    Note that I say the same thing to those that say TCM shouldn't show any non American films (folks like that are at this forum),  or slient films or movies made after 1969 or etc.....

 

So it is difficult to guess what a majority of TCM fans (viewers),  really would like to see.   e.g. many at this forum wish TCM would get rid of The Essentials.   Just so many different POVs and movie genre preferences.



#9 macocael

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 01:53 PM

A great lineup this month.  But am I the only TCM fan who thinks that the company ought to give the Foreign Imports segment more of a boost, move it to a better time slot, and beef up its promotion?  Look what the ads have done for The Essentials.  Why not have Ben Mankiewicz do a similar thing, have a guest, either semi permanent or rotating, and discuss the films in the context of film history, so as to help out those TCM fans whose knowledge of other cinemas is a bit thin?  Why not move it from Sunday to, say, Monday night, at midnight?  That way Sunday night could be entirely reserved for silent films, and Monday night's programming could be spiced up a bit.  I think more TCM fans would try out the foreign imports if the company got behind them in a big way.


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#10 mr6666

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Posted 22 November 2014 - 11:51 PM

airs late Sun., 11-23

 

2:15 am ET          PREMIERE
C- 103 min
comedy

A rundown country home is the site for drinking and teen sexual explorations.

DirLucrecia Martel CastMartin Adjemian , Diego Baenas , Leonora Balcarce .

ARTICLE: http://www.tcm.com/t...a/articles.html

"an attempt on the part of its maker to transcend her family history and heal the damage done by the traumas of provincial rearing."

 

220px-Lacienagaposter.jpg

 

4:00 am ET
80 min
drama

Two storylines concern the simultaneous efforts of a husband and wife to mend their broken marriage interwoven with the life of a fishing village.

DirAgnes Varda CastPhilippe Noiret , Sylvia Montfort ,

ARTICLE: http://www.tcm.com/t...e/articles.html

"loosely strung experiences of local citizens as they ply their demanding trade, run their modest households, and grapple with bureaucrats....The other story centers on a young Parisian couple, known only as Him and Her, coping with a crisis in their marriage."


"A small elephant is not a rabbit."


#11 mr6666

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Posted 13 November 2014 - 08:19 PM

airs late Sun., 11-16

 

2:00 am ET
108 min
drama

Five friends struggle to escape the boredom of their provincial hometown in Italy.

DirFederico Fellini CastAlberto Sordi , Franco Interlenghi , Franco Fabrizi .

 LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:

D: Federico Fellini. Alberto Sordi, Franco Interlenghi, Franco Fabrizi, Leopoldo Trieste.

"Magnificent comedy-drama--arguably Fellini's masterpiece--about five shiftless male adolescents in a small Adriatic town who have to cope with emerging adulthood. Film's episodic structure brings to mind AMERICAN GRAFFITI; its love of humanity anticipates the director's own AMARCORD two decades later. In any event, a lovely film."

 

MV5BMTgzODM1NTYxN15BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMTU1


"A small elephant is not a rabbit."


#12 mr6666

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Posted 07 November 2014 - 04:35 PM

airs late Sun., 11-9

 

2:15 am ET
79 min
romance

An older man shocks his family by falling for a young hairdresser.

DirDusan Makavejev CastMilena Dravic , Janez Urhovec , Eva Ras .

 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059063/

 
 
3:45 am ET
68 min
drama

After finally finding love, a switchboard operator betrays it.

DirDusan Makavejev CastEva Ras , Slobodan Aligrudic , Ruzica Sokic .

 

ARTICLE: http://www.tcm.com/t...r/articles.html

 

"What Makavejev (the director) needs to reach," Ebert wrote, "is that specific American subculture consisting of old Bob and Ray fans, Marvel Comics readers, Realist subscribers, people who can recite scenes from 'Catch-22,' and people who write obscene letters to large corporations. They will share Makavejev's vision of the real world, where the grotesque and the hilarious are identical."


"A small elephant is not a rabbit."


#13 mr6666

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 05:29 PM

airs late Sun., 11-2

 

2:00 am ET
87 min
romance
Silence of the Sea (1949)    PREMIERE

A cultured German officer billeted in a French house has a change of heart when he sees occupied Paris.

DirJean-Pierre Melville

LEONARD MALTIN REVIEW:

D: Jean-Pierre Melville.Cast: Howard Vernon, Nicole Stephane, Jean-Marie Robain, Ami Aroe, Denis Sadier.

"During the Occupation, a patrician German officer is assigned lodging with a provincial family who is unwilling even to speak to him. Nevertheless, each evening he reminisces about life and war in the face of their stubborn silence. Melville's intimately contained first feature clearly reflects postwar attitudes, particularly concerning what defines an enemy. From a 1942 novella by Vercors (Jean Bruller), a classic of Resistance literature."

 

3:30 am ET
107 min
drama
Strange Ones, The (1952)    PREMIERE

A brother and sister close themselves off from the world by playing an increasingly intense series of mind games with the people who dare enter their lair.

DirJean-Pierre Melville CastEdouard Dermit , Nicole Stephane , Renee Cosima .

LONARD MALTIN REVIEW:

D: Jean-Pierre Melville.Cast: Nicole Stephane, Edouard Dermithe, Renee Cosima, Jacques Bernard, Melvyn Martin, Maria Cyliakus, Jean-Marie Robain.

"Jean Cocteau (who also narrates) chose Melville to direct this adaptation of his daring play detailing the perverse, fantasy-filled relationship between a brother and sister and the tragedy that ensues when their private world is shattered by outsiders. Handsomely crafted, well acted, and beautifully shot by Henri Decae. U.S. title: THE STRANGE ONES."


"A small elephant is not a rabbit."





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