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Ultimate GEORGE SANDERS thread


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Posted 26 October 2016 - 09:30 AM

Good news George Sanders fans!

 

TCM has scheduled an evening of THE SAINT films on January 20, 2017. The four George did will be included:

 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-10-26%2Bat%2B7.27.0


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"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 23 October 2016 - 03:28 PM

In a few days, I will start covering George Sanders' films from the 1950s. I've discussed 60 so far, and by my count, he made 115 feature films, which means I've gone over roughly half of them at this point.

 

I am not sure if I will mention any of his television projects-- some of them were rather prestigious, but maybe it's a separate topic. I will probably just continue focusing on the theatrical movies he made.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 21 October 2016 - 05:28 PM

#60: SAMSON AND DELILAH (1949)

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The other film George did in 1949 was probably the biggest one of his entire career. It was Cecil DeMille's biblical epic about a strongman (Victor Mature) and a scorned woman (Hedy Lamarr). The Technicolor extravaganza was produced by Paramount and was the top grossing picture of the year. It was also one of the greatest moneymakers of the decade. George and Hedy had worked together a few years earlier on THE STRANGE WOMAN; and supporting actress Angela Lansbury had done two other films with him. George plays the Saran of Gaza, a Philistine leader who has enslaved the Israelites. He is threatened by Samson's power and works with Delilah to betray him. It's a villainous role that only George Sanders could play.


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"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 16 October 2016 - 02:45 PM

#59: THE FAN (1949)

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For the first time since 1936, George Sanders had a year where he did not appear in any new motion pictures. The year was 1948. But in 1949, he returned in a 20th Century Fox remake that was based on Oscar Wilde's hit play 'Lady Windermere's Fan.' He played Lord Darlington, the role that had been done by Ronald Colman in Ernst Lubitsch's earlier silent version of the mid-20s. In the story George courts a married woman (Jeanne Crain) who wants to get even with a husband that humiliated her. Richard Greene is the husband and Madeleine Carroll, in her last film, plays the other woman in this quadrangle. Otto Preminger produced and directed THE FAN. George had previously worked with him on FOREVER AMBER.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 11 October 2016 - 09:17 PM

#58: FOREVER AMBER (1947)

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The next film for George Sanders in 1947 was a controversial affair back at his home studio. Problems had arisen with the production code office, which considered the original source material unacceptable for movie screens. But 20th Century Fox was finally able to get FOREVER AMBER made and into theaters. Of course, it would still get a "C" rating from the Catholic Legion of Decency, which meant it was Condemned, until certain changes were made for exhibition. Linda Darnell appeared as the scandalous title character, a woman who goes through men like water, as she rises from humble beginnings to nobility. One of those men-- George as King Charles II.  FOREVER AMBER went on to become one of the year's highest grossing films, and it was one of many hits for George Sanders in the 1940s.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 07 October 2016 - 05:28 PM

#57: LURED (1947)

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The third George Sanders picture of 1947 was a United Artists release directed by Douglas Sirk called LURED. George had collaborated with Sirk before, but this was the first (and only) time he worked with costars Lucille Ball and Charles Coburn. The film is a remake of a French film called PIEGES which was directed by Robert Siodmak and starred Maurice Chevalier. George is a dashing man about town who falls for a dancer (Ball) that is assisting the police. It is her job to nab a killer, and though she begins to fall in love with George, she is not sure of his innocence. There are other characters who also seem suspicious, namely ones played by Alan Mowbray, Cedric Hardwicke and Boris Karloff. The end result is a stylish whodunit that's a lot of fun for viewers.


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"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 03 October 2016 - 01:49 PM

I assume you're joking here,  since Miles had Lucy in the bag.    The only reason he lost her was because he was married.

 

Yes-- don't you just hate it when marriage gets in the way of a perfectly good romance...? :)


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"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#48 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 02 October 2016 - 06:48 PM

 

#56: THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR (1947)

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The next motion picture assignment for George Sanders occurred back at his home studio, 20th Century Fox. He was given a supporting role in the screen adaptation of a fantasy drama about a widow who has a relationship with a ghost. George plays Miles Fairley, an author of children's books who meets Lucy Muir (Gene Tierney) one day outside their publisher's office. They become friends, and George wastes no time pursuing the woman romantically. He has no idea she's attached to the spirit of a crusty sea captain (Rex Harrison); and she has no idea he's married. Although they spend much time together in town and out at the seaside cottage where she lives, their relationship is doomed. As Harrison's flesh-and-blood rival, poor George just doesn't stand a ghost of a chance winning Tierney's heart.

 

 

I assume you're joking here,  since Miles had Lucy in the bag.    The only reason he lost her was because he was married.



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Posted 02 October 2016 - 07:43 AM

#56: THE GHOST AND MRS. MUIR (1947)

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-10-02%2Bat%2B5.32.2

The next motion picture assignment for George Sanders occurred back at his home studio, 20th Century Fox. He was given a supporting role in the screen adaptation of a fantasy drama about a widow who has a relationship with a ghost. George plays Miles Fairley, an author of children's books who meets Lucy Muir (Gene Tierney) one day outside their publisher's office. They become friends, and George wastes no time pursuing the woman romantically. He has no idea she's attached to the spirit of a crusty sea captain (Rex Harrison); and she has no idea he's married. Although they spend much time together in town and out at the seaside cottage where she lives, their relationship is doomed. As Harrison's flesh-and-blood rival, poor George just doesn't stand a ghost of a chance winning Tierney's heart.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 28 September 2016 - 09:25 PM

#55: THE PRIVATE AFFAIRS OF BEL AMI (1947)

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There were four George Sanders movies in 1947-- a mixture of productions at major studios and smaller independent production companies. In THE PRIVATE AFFAIRS OF BEL AMI, the actor is back to villainy as a shallow writer desperately wanting to move up in society. He seems to accomplish his goals, but it comes at a terrible cost to his own happiness. During the story he destroys most of the women in his orbit. One of them is played by Angela Lansbury with whom George had worked two years earlier on THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY. The other victims are portrayed by Ann Dvorak and Marie Wilson. In supporting roles people like John Carradine and Frances Dee shine. So does Warren William in what was his last screen appearance. It's an absorbing remake based on an earlier German drama, and George Sanders gives one of his finest performances. A performance that bolsters his reputation as Hollywood's premiere cad.


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"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 23 September 2016 - 08:27 AM

#54: THE STRANGE WOMAN (1946)

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The next film George Sanders made was a United Artists release directed by Edgar Ulmer. It starred Hedy Lamarr, now freelancing after her MGM contract had ended. THE STRANGE WOMAN was something she produced personally. It had all the artistic flourishes we might expect in an Ulmer film, and as a period piece, it was handsomely filmed. The cast included Louis Hayward, Gene Lockhart and Hillary Brooke; with everyone doing their usual good job. But George seemed slightly miscast as the lumberjack who caught Hedy's eye. Off-screen, it was rumored the two stars had an affair. A few years later, George and Hedy shared scenes again in Cecil B. DeMille's biblical epic SAMSON AND DELILAH.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 19 September 2016 - 03:35 PM

#53: A SCANDAL IN PARIS (1946)

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It's another year, and another chance for George Sanders to display his suave charms on screen. This time he plays a clever Frenchman, and he is directed again by Douglas Sirk. His luscious costars include Signe Hasso and Carole Landis. Hasso is cast as an ingenue, and Landis is a dance hall girl. George's character is a career criminal who has somehow managed to work his way up to a position as a chief of police. Of course, this just means he has new opportunities for larceny, and the two women figure into all of it. Perhaps realism is secondary in a film of this type, but audiences who watch these kinds of stories want Hollywood escapism and the leads do a nice job.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 15 September 2016 - 03:40 PM

#52: THE STRANGE AFFAIR OF UNCLE HARRY (1945)

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All three of George's films in 1945 had a gothic Victorian theme. After HANGOVER SQUARE and THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY, he appeared in THE STRANGE AFFAIR OF UNCLE HARRY on loan out to Universal. This time, he's an eligible bachelor who meets and falls in love with charming Ella Raines. They plan to marry, but George's controlling sister (Geraldine Fitzgerald) tries to prevent the union. In an attempt to poison Raines, she accidentally poisons and kills an older sister (Moyna Macgill). Suspicion falls on George, and he must clear his name and get help for Fitzgerald. There's a great deal of suspense; the acting is uniformly superb and the attention to detail means the sets and costumes are exquisite.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 10 September 2016 - 11:09 AM

#51: THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY (1945)

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George's next assignment occurred at MGM, and it would lead to one of his most memorable screen roles. He was cast in a handsomely mounted production based on Oscar Wilde's well-known story. The title role was played by Hollywood newcomer Hurd Hatfield, but George practically stole the picture away from him as the corrupt Lord Henry Wotton. The story begins simply enough, but gains traction when George's character meets Dorian and becomes an evil influence on him. Things spiral out of control from here, leading to the suicide of a singer played by Angela Lansbury. This was the first motion picture George made with Lansbury; they would go on to make two more together in the 1940s, plus another one in the mid-60s. 


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 07 September 2016 - 12:47 PM

#50: HANGOVER SQUARE (1945)

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-09-07%2Bat%2B10.45.

George Sanders appeared in three films in 1945, but the first one to be released didn't hit screens until October. And that was a perfect time of year for Fox to unleash the gothic horror in HANGOVER SQUARE, which reunited George with Laird Cregar and Linda Darnell. After Darnell is stalked and killed by Cregar, Sanders sets out to find the culprit. In some ways, the story has similar elements to the previous year's version of THE LODGER. Since Cregar is playing the villain, George gets to be the good guy, a more gentlemanly type looking for answers-- reminiscent of his earlier Saint and Falcon assignments. Cregar died a short time after the film was completed, which makes his character's fiery demise at the end all the more realistic and tragic.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 01 September 2016 - 02:48 PM

Falcon movies on TCM tomorrow.

 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-09-01%2Bat%2B12.33.

 

Put that in your pipe and smoke it.

 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-09-01%2Bat%2B12.32.

 

Sorry, not you Bob-- you didn't play the Falcon.

 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2016-09-01%2Bat%2B12.35.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 31 August 2016 - 06:36 PM

A reminder that George's four Falcon movies are leading off Friday morning's lineup on TCM...


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 27 August 2016 - 04:29 PM

#49: SUMMER STORM (1944)

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SUMMER STORM was an independent production released thru United Artists which had a script based on one of Anton Chekhov's stories. It cast George for the first time with Linda Darnell and also for the first time with Anna Lee. They played his lovers in the film, and he would make other pictures with them back at Fox. Darnell is a seductive woman who causes George's character to go mad and murder her. He nearly gets away with it, until considerably burdened by his conscience, he confesses. Anna Lee's character persuades him to turn himself into the police. The movie was director Douglas Sirk's second Hollywood production. He personally selected George over other actors for the role of Fedor, a cynical aristocrat (something at which George excelled). This was the beginning of a good working relationship, and Sirk would direct him three more times.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 23 August 2016 - 02:47 PM

#48: ACTION IN ARABIA (1944)

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George was back on screen in July 1944 in an adventure yarn made at RKO. His leading lady was lovely Virginia Bruce. They played a couple caught up in a power struggle between the Allies and the Nazis in war torn Damascus. The production reunited George with Leonide Moguy, his director from PARIS AFTER DARK a year earlier. The story features George as a reporter trying to solve the murder of a man killed by the Germans, and Bruce is a glamorous secret agent who helps him unmask the culprit and prevent the Suez Canal from being used by the Nazis. Originally, the story had been set in Algiers, but the setting was changed and so was the title. RKO spent a lot of money on this picture, and it did well with critics and audiences.


"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


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Posted 18 August 2016 - 09:20 AM

#47: THE LODGER (1944)

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The story about Jack the Ripper's killing spree had been produced several times, once as a silent film by Alfred Hitchcock in England. But 20th Century Fox wanted to make its own American version which it cast with Merle Oberon in the lead role and with Laird Cregar as the madman on the loose. George has second billing, portraying the inspector who is called in to investigate when Oberon's life is in danger. It's all very suspenseful and the performers give razor sharp performances. Audiences and critics liked what they saw, and it became a big hit at the box office. In 1953, Fox would remake the story again-- that time starring Jack Palance and Constance Smith and with Byron Palmer taking over George's role.


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"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.





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