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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Bemoaning the movies on demand market


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#21 DVDPhreak

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 03:11 PM

Sounds like you may need to change your screen name to StreamingPhreak. :)

 

Absolutely, I second that!  Or at least "BlurayPhreak".  The DVD format is almost 2 decades old and is no longer optimal for showing video on modern TV systems, which need progressive, high-resolution, and efficiently compressed video that DVDs inherently can't offer.

 

As some of you may have heard, Walmart is able to convert your DVDs into streaming HD video with a fee.  They just put out a "do it at home" version of the service, so you don't need to go to Walmart to do it.  You put your DVD in your computer's DVD drive, pay $5, and you automatically get an HD cloud streaming version of the movie, which you can either stream online or download to be watched offline.  If you convert 10 movies at once, you get 50% discount.  This is an important service, because a lot of their HD movies are not available on Blu-ray at all.  I've already converted "Paper Moon", "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?", "Duck Soup", and "A Night at the Opera", films that you currently have no way to watch in HD otherwise because no Blu-rays have been made for them yet.



#22 TopBilled

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 02:10 PM

 Join the revolution and go stream!

Sounds like you may need to change your screen name to StreamingPhreak. :)


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#23 DVDPhreak

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Posted 15 April 2015 - 01:23 PM

Yes, the MOD disc phenomenon is really crappy.  But has any of you considered using STREAMING VIDEO services?  You watch movies instantly, and don't have to deal with all the unpleasantness of the physical discs.  No, you don't just watch them on your computers.  You can watch them on your TV too, provided that you have a streaming device set up.  Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu are the most famous video streaming services.  Then there is Warner Archive Instant that shows old movies.  And if you don't want to pay monthly fees, there are "a la carte" services as well, such as Vudu and iTunes, where you buy and/or rent by title.  Forget those MOD discs.  Forget DVDs in general; their days are numbered.  Consumers and the industry have moved towards streaming.  There are more and more titles available for streaming but not on disc (such as the 4-hour version of the silent classic "Greed" on iTunes).  Studios are reluctant these days to make physical discs because fewer people are buying them.  Naturally, costs are cut and you see the results on these crappy MOD discs.  Join the revolution and go stream!



#24 TopBilled

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 02:24 PM

I just went back to my local Shopko electronics section. As you can see by the photo below, the price for 50 Verbatim DVDs has been lowered, plus I was still able to get 10% off. Not bad!

 

photo.jpg


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#25 TopBilled

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 04:33 PM

 

Really, the DVD to Blu-ray transition, which really isn't a transition (both formats are intended to coexist,) has been the fairest and easiest change in the history of physical media.

But not always the cheapest. 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#26 TomJH

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 04:12 PM

Blu-ray players play DVDs and can be had for $50. Unless you don't have an HDTV, I don't know why anyone wouldn't replace a broken DVD player with a Blu-ray player. It's affordable, you don't have to replace or upgrade a single disc that you don't want to because you can still use them, from my experience they upscale way better than upscaling DVD players, and you can take advantage of all of the nice visual upgrades it offers in the future.

 

Really, the DVD to Blu-ray transition, which really isn't a transition (both formats are intended to coexist,) has been the fairest and easiest change in the history of physical media.

Purchasing a blu ray player, since it can play both formats, is neither here nor there, as far as I'm concerned. I considered it but didn't find any there were nearly as cheap as DVD players a few months ago.

 

However, I would not buy a blu ray player with the express purpose of replacing a DVD of a movie with a blu ray version of that same film. My upgrading to new format days are definitely OVER!



#27 JonasEB

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Posted 03 April 2015 - 11:38 AM

I've a couple of DVD players now but the suggestion of purchasing yet another one is a pretty good one. I've thousands of discs and will never switch to a new format. I switched from Beta to VHS to DVD in my movie collecting. This final format is IT (!!!) for me.

 

Blu-ray players play DVDs and can be had for $50. Unless you don't have an HDTV, I don't know why anyone wouldn't replace a broken DVD player with a Blu-ray player. It's affordable, you don't have to replace or upgrade a single disc that you don't want to because you can still use them, from my experience they upscale way better than upscaling DVD players, and you can take advantage of all of the nice visual upgrades it offers in the future.

 

Really, the DVD to Blu-ray transition, which really isn't a transition (both formats are intended to coexist,) has been the fairest and easiest change in the history of physical media.



#28 TopBilled

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 06:59 PM

 

I've a couple of DVD players now but the suggestion of purchasing yet another one is a pretty good one. I've thousands of discs and will never switch to a new format. I switched from Beta to VHS to DVD in my movie collecting. This final format is IT (!!!) for me.

Right-- they have us coming and going (the way they like it)...having to upgrade or reformat all the time. 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#29 TomJH

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 04:35 PM

Anyone with a DVD collection would be wise to buy a spare player or two. Just a few days ago I bought a new Panasonic (my favorite brand) for just $39. Although still plentiful online, they're getting harder to find in stores. I'm afraid, it won't be long before DVDs will be a dead format as far as the equipment manufacturers are concerned. I just recently heard that even new laptops are starting to come without CD/DVD drives now.

 

Incidently, most players are now made by the same company. Japan's Funai Electronics either owns the trademarks or makes them under license for major brands like RCA, GE, Emerson, Sylvania, Magnavox, Toshiba and Philips. So other than minor cosmetic differences, all those brands are the same.

 

Of course, just because it's a Japanese company, doesn't mean that they're made there. Funai has them made in China or other Asian countries, probably at the factory with the lowest bid.

I just bought a Magnavox DVD recorder as a backup for when my Pioneer recorder kicks the bucket. Of course, once I start using the Magnavox (whenever that will be, tomorrow, next year, five years from now) I will have no backup for it. I'm hoping, of course, that the blank discs will still be available. Completely nullifies by recorder if they aren't.

 

I've a couple of DVD players now but the suggestion of purchasing yet another one is a pretty good one. I've thousands of discs and will never switch to a new format. I switched from Beta to VHS to DVD in my movie collecting. This final format is IT (!!!) for me.



#30 TopBilled

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 04:12 PM

Anyone with a DVD collection would be wise to buy a spare player or two. Just a few days ago I bought a new Panasonic (my favorite brand) for just $39. Although still plentiful online, they're getting harder to find in stores. I'm afraid, it won't be long before DVDs will be a dead format as far as the equipment manufacturers are concerned. I just recently heard that even new laptops are starting to come without CD/DVD drives now.

 

Incidently, most players are now made by the same company. Japan's Funai Electronics either owns the trademarks or makes them under license for major brands like RCA, GE, Emerson, Sylvania, Magnavox, Toshiba and Philips. So other than minor cosmetic differences, all those brands are the same.

 

Of course, just because it's a Japanese company, doesn't mean that they're made there. Funai has them made in China or other Asian countries, probably at the factory with the lowest bid.

Good post. I have a MacBook which I bought two and a half years ago, almost three years ago maybe. It has a disc drive. But the newer, lightweight MacBook Air computers have no disc drive. 

 

I suppose the trend is towards file sharing or renting online, which I am not too crazy about. I like having control of my own physical library. Call me old-fashioned.

 

I own a small Sony DVD player for watching recorded movies in the bedroom, and a larger more heavy-duty Magnavox one in the living room.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#31 markfp2

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 04:02 PM


As I write this, I think buying an extra DVD player or two is probably the smarter investment. Because even if I reach a point where I've stopped recording discs, I will want several years afterward where I can still play them on a television set as opposed to a computer.

 

Anyone with a DVD collection would be wise to buy a spare player or two. Just a few days ago I bought a new Panasonic (my favorite brand) for just $39. Although still plentiful online, they're getting harder to find in stores. I'm afraid, it won't be long before DVDs will be a dead format as far as the equipment manufacturers are concerned. I just recently heard that even new laptops are starting to come without CD/DVD drives now.

 

Incidently, most players are now made by the same company. Japan's Funai Electronics either owns the trademarks or makes them under license for major brands like RCA, GE, Emerson, Sylvania, Magnavox, Toshiba and Philips. So other than minor cosmetic differences, all those brands are the same.

 

Of course, just because it's a Japanese company, doesn't mean that they're made there. Funai has them made in China or other Asian countries, probably at the factory with the lowest bid.


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#32 TopBilled

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 01:05 PM

I sometimes stock up on blank discs, fearful of the day they will no longer be around or, at least, far harder to find. Am I paranoid? I certainly hope so.

I did that for awhile, but what it meant was it increased my recording. And I was recording all sorts of stuff I really didn't ever watch again. So I've cut down a bit. I do have the fear that I will have to transfer all this stuff over to files I can play on a computer or future TV. If I can get ten good years out of these discs before having to re-do my classic film library, I will be okay with it.

 

As I write this, I think buying an extra DVD player or two is probably the smarter investment. Because even if I reach a point where I've stopped recording discs, I will want several years afterward where I can still play them on a television set as opposed to a computer.

 

Am I making sense? I am sure you can tell I am far from a techie. LOL


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#33 TomJH

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 10:34 AM

 

 

maybe because people are not using discs much anymore and going to on-line files?

I sometimes stock up on blank discs, fearful of the day they will no longer be around or, at least, far harder to find. Am I paranoid? I certainly hope so.



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Posted 01 April 2015 - 09:22 AM

I agree about Verbatim, though I don't find them so easy to find. I had problems a few years ago with Sony discs (after years of no problems, at all). My DVD recorder suddenly started to have "disc failures" with Sony (and only Sony) and wouldn't copy a film successfully on about every third blank DVD-R that I tried. I stopped purchasing Sony as a result of that, and have done very well since with Maxell and, more recently, Polaroid DVD-R blanks.

 

About a year ago I cautiously purchased some Sonys and, so far, no problem with them. Maybe it was just a batch issue at the time. However, it happened with a few different rondels of Sonys that I bought from different locations so, at the time, I thought, "Enough!"

I could never find Verbatim where I lived in Arizona. So I always bought Sony. I tried Memorex once but those were absolutely worthless.

 

Up here in Wisconsin, we have a midwest-based chain of stores (like a high-end Walmart/Target) called Shopko. In their electronics section, they have only Verbatim. I started buying them, when they would have a pack of 50 discs for $20 which I thought very cheap. And lately they had an extra ten percent off on all computer supplies and they were considering these discs part of their computer supplies inventory, so for a few weeks, I was getting them for around $18. 

 

But then I started wondering, why are these going so cheap? Is it because Verbatim's quality is not as good it used to be? Or maybe because people are not using discs much anymore and going to on-line files? At any rate, while I am still using discs, I am glad mark gives Verbatim a thumbs up.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#35 TomJH

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Posted 01 April 2015 - 08:05 AM

Sure, just remember that this is  based solely on my own experiences and it's not a plug for any one brand. Without question, my favorite is Sony. I've never had a bad one. Other brands that have worked well for me  are (in no particular order)  Fuji, Maxell, Verbatim, Kodak, and Philips. I'm sure there are others, but I haven't used them.

I agree about Verbatim, though I don't find them so easy to find. I had problems a few years ago with Sony discs (after years of no problems, at all). My DVD recorder suddenly started to have "disc failures" with Sony (and only Sony) and wouldn't copy a film successfully on about every third blank DVD-R that I tried. I stopped purchasing Sony as a result of that, and have done very well since with Maxell and, more recently, Polaroid DVD-R blanks.

 

About a year ago I cautiously purchased some Sonys and, so far, no problem with them. Maybe it was just a batch issue at the time. However, it happened with a few different rondels of Sonys that I bought from different locations so, at the time, I thought, "Enough!"



#36 markfp2

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 11:58 PM

Thanks. That is reassuring, because I only buy Sony and Verbatim. 

 

You're welcome. I've never gone wrong with either of those brands. :)



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Posted 31 March 2015 - 10:07 PM

Sure, just remember that this is  based solely on my own experiences and it's not a plug for any one brand. Without question, my favorite is Sony. I've never had a bad one. Other brands that have worked well for me  are (in no particular order)  Fuji, Maxell, Verbatim, Kodak, and Philips. I'm sure there are others, but I haven't used them.

Thanks. That is reassuring, because I only buy Sony and Verbatim. 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#38 markfp2

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 09:07 PM

mark,

 

When you get a chance (without sounding too much like a commercial) can you tell us which brands in your opinion are the more reliable ones? 

Sure, just remember that this is  based solely on my own experiences and it's not a plug for any one brand. Without question, my favorite is Sony. I've never had a bad one. Other brands that have worked well for me  are (in no particular order)  Fuji, Maxell, Verbatim, Kodak, and Philips. I'm sure there are others, but I haven't used them.



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Posted 31 March 2015 - 07:05 PM

 

It's true, finding good quality blank media is getting harder, particularly in local stores, so that's why I stick with certain proven brands from reliable online sources and I stock up when there's a sale.

mark,

 

When you get a chance (without sounding too much like a commercial) can you tell us which brands in your opinion are the more reliable ones? 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#40 markfp2

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Posted 31 March 2015 - 06:49 PM

All disks can degrade over time - this is the nature of petrochemical products.

 

 

In the broadest sense that's true, but it doesn't mean that every disc will degrade. Like I said in my previous post,  I' ve recorded thousands of discs, since the introduction of recordable DVDs and not one of them has "gone bad".  No doubt that some of that is due to proper storage and handling, but also because, early on, I learned not to always go for the cheapest discs because in the long run that could turn out to be foolish savings.

 

It's true, finding good quality blank media is getting harder, particularly in local stores, so that's why I stick with certain proven brands from reliable online sources and I stock up when there's a sale.

 

Making backups a fine idea. I've done it myself with certain hard to find titles, but even that isn't foolproff. The fact is that it's more likely that somebody will lose their collection to fire, flood, theft, or natural disaster long before all their  DVDs would have "spoiled".






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