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Bemoaning the movies on demand market


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#41 OllieTSB

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Posted 19 March 2015 - 07:52 PM

Also, from what I have heard we are paying good money mostly for DVD-Rs that have a very short shelf life...

All disks can degrade over time - this is the nature of petrochemical products.  But yes, DVDR's (plus, minus, whatever) have wider 'standards' (ahem) of manufacturing so "high quality" blanks can be difficult to locate AND difficult to continue to re-locate because manufacturers might always go for a lower-bid blank manufacturer.  Some gov'ts have been struggling to force their vendors to supply 'the good stuff' but I find it hard to believe a "10 year marketing claim", much less 20 or more.  This is why Backups are really a great thing.



#42 MovieCollectorOH

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Posted 18 March 2015 - 11:32 AM

The fact of the matter is that  it wasn't for "manufactured on demand" most of those classic films would never have seen  a release on DVD. Demand for  those titles just isn't enough to support a full-blown retail store release. Warner Bros. found a way to make them available in smaller numbers while still being profitable and other studios have followed. Obviously it's become a big success for the studios and collectors alike.

 

True, in the early days, there were problems with some DVD-R releases, but over the years quality control has improved and frankly the format has received  an undeserved bad rap. Nowadays, most of the complaints seem to come from people  who  have only "heard" that they're troublesome and have never bought any themselves.

 

Speaking for myself, I have about three thousand DVR-R discs that were recorded over the years and have yet to have a single one turn into a "coaster".

 

In a way, it is too bad one can't wander the stores browsing at them, but if comes down to MOD being the only way to get  access to those otherwise unavailable titles, I'll gladly forgo browsing.

 

Outside of TCM actually playing them, this is really the way to go for many of the harder to find movies. 

 

I have about half as many DVDs as you, but also do HD recording as well.  I suspect that the DVDs that turn out to be coasters for other people were coasters to begin with, and weren't detected (as they might if they had used Verify with ImgBurn). That is not possible with a shelf-top unit though, unless it temporarily stores the video on a hard drive first.

 

I have read the results for a study or two that show the outside areas (normally unused areas) of a DVD not holding up, or otherwise failing after torture tests, but that is torture testing and not using the DVD as designed.  So I think we can safely ignore those too.

 

The following is for others, in case they might be having issues:

 

As far as earlier first-generation stamped (replicated) DVDs not holding up, that is very well documented, as the layers were separating at the glue.  This can be observed as spots or splotches on the media side of the disc.  Things have changed significantly though since DVD technology in the early 2000s, and I haven't had that happen since. 

 

Vast improvements have been made for burned (duplicated) DVDRs as well.  The brands I use are Taiyo Yuden, and to a greater extent, Verbatim AZO (AZO is a marking on the container, not all Verbatims have this).  The non-AZO Verbatim discs are made in a non-Verbatim facility in China. 

 

Manufacturer can be verified by putting the DVDR discs into a computer and running the freeware program DVD Identifier, which will read the manufacturer identification number on the DVDR disc itself, and give you the actual factory of origin.

So for instance the Verbatim AZO series (and also the DVD-R/W discs)  will say something like "MCC (Mitsubishi Chemical Corp)" or "MKM (Mitsubishi Kagaku Media)", whereas the non-AZO series will say something completely different.  FWIW, I tried a couple MOD discs just now, and presumably due to the copyright protection, I was unable to enumerate the manufacturer on the first try.


Moviecollector's Corner                   *Look for what should be there, but isn't.*              Principia-Scientific.org (independent science news)

 

 


#43 JakeHolman

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Posted 07 March 2015 - 10:56 AM

One of the best things that ever happened for the classic movie fan. Waited for years to buy Gary Cooper's The Hanging Tree. Got it from WB's Archive Collection for a little over 13 dollars plus tax with free shipping made to order. Chump change. Very happy with it.


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#44 markfp2

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 11:34 AM

 The only objection I have is the high cost relative to other DVD's,but that is probably related to the relatively low demand vs. costs to produce. 

You figure that a big new mainstream title might sell several million copies while MOD releases are probably counted in the tens of thousands so that makes a lot of sense.

 

If somebody buys one title from Warner Archives at list price it is high, but hardly week goes buy that I don't get email notices of sales with deep discounts. I know people who will just wait for a good sale and then buy several titles at once to get a big discount.



#45 TheCid

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 08:56 AM

I have purchased several "video on demand" DVD's and have no problems with any.  Even after many watchings for some, no problems.  The only objection I have is the high cost relative to other DVD's,but that is probably related to the relatively low demand vs. costs to produce. 

Also, it would seem that some could be made with two movies on each disc.  An example is the Andy Griffith movies such as Girl in the Empty Grave and Deadly Game.  IMO could also add Winter Kill and Adams of Eagle Lake as another set as they are very similar.  All were TV movies.

This is another advantage in that the "on demand" system has generated availability of a lot of good TV movies, as well as the ":B" movies of the past.

BTW, I have had problems with standard, produced by major company DVD's deteriorating.  DVD's are not industructible.

If the manufacturer, producer and distributor can't make a profit, they won't make them.

Have you noticed how few Blue Ray DVD's are being produced?  I have never purchased one although one of my players is a Blue Ray.  Friends have told me that even with new HD TV's and Blue Ray players, they are not really worth the extra money so they no longer purchase them.



#46 markfp2

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Posted 06 March 2015 - 02:37 AM

The fact of the matter is that  it wasn't for "manufactured on demand" most of those classic films would never have seen  a release on DVD. Demand for  those titles just isn't enough to support a full-blown retail store release. Warner Bros. found a way to make them available in smaller numbers while still being profitable and other studios have followed. Obviously it's become a big success for the studios and collectors alike.

 

True, in the early days, there were problems with some DVD-R releases, but over the years quality control has improved and frankly the format has received  an undeserved bad rap. Nowadays, most of the complaints seem to come from people  who  have only "heard" that they're troublesome and have never bought any themselves.

 

Speaking for myself, I have about three thousand DVR-R discs that were recorded over the years and have yet to have a single one turn into a "coaster".

 

In a way, it is too bad one can't wander the stores browsing at them, but if comes down to MOD being the only way to get  access to those otherwise unavailable titles, I'll gladly forgo browsing.



#47 infinite1

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 08:03 PM

Am I the only one who bemoans this direction toward the "movies on demand" bandwagon that all the studios have apparently decided to jump on? Since the advent of the home video hobby back in the early 80s, one of my pleasures has been the weekly trip to the local video retail store to check on the latest releases and browse through the shelves of VHS tapes, Laser Discs, DVDs, and Blu Rays. But, these mail order movie on demand discs are the pits. In the first place, what use to be an easy enjoyable experience, going to a store to browse and buy what you want, has been replaced by online or by phone ordering that is time consuming and prone to error due to ignorant and overworked phone reps or computer malfunctions. Also, from what I have heard we are paying good money mostly for DVD-Rs that have a very short shelf life, some times going south after one playing. If I wanted to buy coasters I would buy them for a lot less then what these DVD-Rs cost. And what is going on with companies like WARNERS pulling their pressed DVDS and re-releasing them in this inferior format without the extras but apparently no cut in cost? Something smells rotten and it's not just the discs self destructing. 






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