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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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"The Ghost and Mr. Chicken" (1966)


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10 replies to this topic

#1 LiamCasey

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Posted 20 April 2015 - 04:16 PM

Many words are only objectionable based upon the context that those words are used in. And, since context is not easily determined by software, it is not surprising that this message board errs on the side of caution. Especially since the moderators can't assume that we will all be trustworthy in that regards. So it is no surprise to me that Terrence's two examples got censored as the first example was potentially used in a racist manner and the second example was potentially used in a sexual manner. And maybe JJG is right about my example since it not only started with an 'F' but had four letters!
 
:)
 
All in all, I sure feel sorry for anyone daring to start a thread regarding that series of movies starring Chester Morris!
 
:lol:


#2 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 01:57 PM

Liam, I understand what you're saying about possibly objectionable words.  This has happened to me twice.  The first time I was referring to Clark Gable's role in "San Fransisco".  The system would not allow me to mention his first name.  The second was when I was referring to the character of Agnes in "Auntie Mame".  Again the system would not allow me to use her last name.  Any thoughts on this?

 

Terrence.

 

This website uses a software program that has a list of so called objectionable words that the program will turn into *****.

 

Yea,  often the words this program changes doesn't make any sense but one can let the moderator know and they will remove that word from the list.     I guess the program is sensitive to words that start with an F.    :lol:



#3 Terrence1

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 09:42 AM

Liam, I understand what you're saying about possibly objectionable words.  This has happened to me twice.  The first time I was referring to Clark Gable's role in "San Fransisco".  The system would not allow me to mention his first name.  The second was when I was referring to the character of Agnes in "Auntie Mame".  Again the system would not allow me to use her last name.  Any thoughts on this?

 

Terrence.



#4 LuckyDan

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Posted 19 April 2015 - 12:22 AM

Joan Staley was definitely appealing in The Ghost and Mr. Chicken. And not just because she was a former Playmate.
 
Way back in the day, The Incredible Mr. Limpet was my favorite of Don Knotts's movies. Considering its age, it is not surprising that its mix of live action and animation hasn't held up. I hope, however, that its story has.
 
And now, the big question. What is wrong with the word ****? Or maybe I should type f i g g just so any viewer of this thread know what word I am referring to. Hard to believe that a word that appears in the title of a 40+ year old Don Knotts movie would be considered objectionable. Does it have some modern day connotation that I am unfamiliar with?


It was only a few years ago that I saw Joan's playboy photos, in which she is blonde! But I adored her even before i saw those.

I noticed the censor after I posted, too, but decided I didn't give a **** about it.

#5 LiamCasey

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 11:46 PM

Joan Staley was definitely appealing in The Ghost and Mr. Chicken. And not just because she was a former Playmate.

 

Way back in the day, The Incredible Mr. Limpet was my favorite of Don Knotts's movies. Considering its age, it is not surprising that its mix of live action and animation hasn't held up. I hope, however, that its story has.

 

And now, the big question. What is wrong with the word ****? Or maybe I should type f i g g just so any viewer of this thread know what word I am referring to. Hard to believe that a word that appears in the title of a 40+ year old Don Knotts movie would be considered objectionable. Does it have some modern day connotation that I am unfamiliar with?


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#6 LuckyDan

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 02:31 PM

I still enjoy it, and had great fun watching the Svengoolie airing. I like the look of the movie - very colorful. Joan Staley is a very appealing leading lady. There are a wealth of memorable sight gags and lines. The malfunctioning elevator, the microphone that feedsback during Luther's hilarious picnic speech, with the "Atta boy, Luther!" refrain. I even got goosebumps during the scene when Luther slowly climbs the staircase to the organ loft, helped along by the ominous score.

And that's another part that makes it worthwhile, Vic Mizzy's signature orchestral style. The music is almost a character in its own right.

And curiously, it isn't until the final scene that we see any evidence of a an actual ghost, when the wedding organ begins playing by itself. Its good,nostalgic fun and my favorite Knotts movie, followed by The Shakiest Gun in the West.

I never got interested in The Love God, despite all the girls, and Limpet just hasn't held up with advances in animation. How to Frame a **** has it's moments, but Chicken still delivers for me.

#7 Mr. Gorman

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 07:17 PM

RETA SHAW was in "The Ghost and Mr. Chicken", too. 

 

I recall Don Knotts made a spate of those type of 'nebbish' movies from the mid-60s to the early '70s.   

 

     If you still liked 'THE GHOST AND MR. CHICKEN' after all these years you might also like HOW TO FRAME A F-I-G-G (1971), THE RELUCTANT ASTRONAUT (1967); THE SHAKIEST GUN IN THE WEST (1968) and/or THE INCREDIBLE MR. LIMPET (1964). 

 

     I don't know if I'd categorize 'THE LOVE GOD?' (1969) in the same vein as the others above, though.  I think it's a little more risqué! 

 

     Another movie from that time you might like if you've not seen it:

 

     McHale's Navy Joins the Air Force (1965)   



#8 Terrence1

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 05:07 PM

Another great character actress found in the movie is Jessalyn Fax, who appeared in countless TV shows of the past.



#9 LiamCasey

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Posted 05 April 2015 - 07:08 AM

Familiar faces? Now that was an understatement. This movie was chock-full of 1960's television actors and actresses. Obviously we begin with "Barney Fife" (Don Knotts), but then who are the next two characters we see? "Otis" (Hal Smith) playing a (what else) drunk and "Clara Edwards" (Hope Summers) playing a (what else) nosy neighbor. Followed closely by the second "Darren Stevens" (Dick Sargent). And so on and so on. Is it any wonder we eventually got "Mr. Whipple" (Dick Wilson). The only thing that kept it from feeling like 1960's television was the fact that it was in color and was obviously filmed in (but not shown last night in) a widescreen format.

 

Although it does not rank as high as other mixes of comedy and horror (Young Frankenstein, etc., do set that bar relatively high.), it was, all in all, an enjoyable movie.



#10 Terrence1

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 11:01 AM

Liam, I have seen ths movie several times over the years.  I find it very amusing. It's a wonderful depiction of small-town life in America, and uses many familiar faces in character parts.



#11 LiamCasey

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Posted 04 April 2015 - 07:01 AM

Tonight on METv's Svengoolie is 1966's The Ghost and Mr. Chicken:
 
 
Which, regardless of the venue that this movie is being shown on tonight, is definitely a comedy movie rather than a horror movie. Hence the genre forum under which this topic has been created.
 
Now, I have seen The Ghost and Mr. Chicken once before and, if memory serves, I did enjoy watching it. But, when I did see it, the fact that it took two digits to represent my age was still a novelty. And, considering that I don't color my hair this shade of gray, it is also a fact that that novelty has long worn off.
 
So, knowing that a person's likes and dislikes usually evolve (hopefully!) as one gets older, will I still enjoy watching The Ghost and Mr. Chicken as an adult?





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