We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

I Just Watched...


  • Please log in to reply
8369 replies to this topic

#1 film lover 293

film lover 293

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,188 posts

Posted Yesterday, 09:32 PM

"Madam Satan" (1930)--Starring Kay Johnson, Reginald Denny, Lillian Roth, and Roland Young.  Directed by Cecil B. DeMille.

 

Strange film that is a mix of bedroom farce, musical, and disaster movie.

 

Movie starts out as a comedy, when two friends enter the house drunk.  Wife Angela (Johnson)has seen from the newspaper that her husband Bob (Denny) and friend Jimmy (Young) spent the night in jail with a woman they named as Bob's wife.  Angela finds a card telling Bob to meet Trixie (Roth) that night at 9:00.  Bob ultimately walks out on Angela, and she vows to take Bob back.

 

The film's middle is set on a Zeppelin, where Jimmy is giving a masked party.  There are two eye-popping numbers, "Do The Cat Walk", which has lyrics like "Meow", and the waitresses(?) wear cat outfits, complete with waving tails.  That is immediately followed by "Ballet Mechanique", which looks like an Aztec religious ceremony crossed with the creation scene from "Frankenstein", mixed with late 20's fashions.  It's indescribably nutty.

 

Movie then switches to a disaster picture, which is well done (DeMille was strongest at handling spectacle).  The method of abandoning ship is something to see.

 

The spotlight tonight was on women editors.  Anne Bauchens edited this one.  Considering the plot, she did well to make a coherent film out of the footage from the editing room.

 

Douglas said this was a movie all film students should see.

 

Film is one of DeMille's strangest.  Stick with the film through the first 50 minutes; there are occasional laughs, but film is Slow paced.  Film starts moving once things get to the Zeppelin.  2.7/4.


  • LawrenceA likes this

#2 NickAndNora34

NickAndNora34

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 756 posts
  • LocationRedondo Beach, CA

Posted Yesterday, 05:17 PM

No Reservations (2007): starring Catherine Zeta-Jones, Aaron Eckhart, Abigail Breslin, and Patricia Clarkson. Cute little dramatic romantic comedy. 

 

Source: Netflix 


"Playing with matches, a girl can get burned." -Fiddler on the Roof 


#3 EricJ

EricJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,090 posts

Posted Yesterday, 04:41 PM

There's nothing really, in any biograpy info on TED KEY( creator of Mr. Peabody) that claims Webb as the inspiration for the "wayback" inventor.

 

But, it works for me.  ;)

 

Jay Ward, and later Total TV (of Underdog and Tennessee Tuxedo) were all about patterning characters after favorite old movie stars.

You can't watch Akim Tamiroff in a Preston Sturges comedy without seeing Boris Badenov, and after finding out that Underdog's enemy Simon Bar-sinister is "really" Lionel Barrymore, you can't not see that either.   :)


Let's start a revolution: http://movieactivist.blogspot.com

#4 hamradio

hamradio

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,707 posts

Posted Yesterday, 10:38 AM

"The Phantom Carriage" (1921) again.

 

 

He-e-e-re's Johnny!

phantom-carriage2.jpg :lol: 



#5 Sepiatone

Sepiatone

    Enhanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,204 posts
  • LocationLincoln Park, MI

Posted Yesterday, 07:33 AM

Y'know, they're right:  With that bowtie, Webb really WAS the inspiration for Mr. Peabody.  

Always thought they were kidding.

 

There's nothing really, in any biograpy info on TED KEY( creator of Mr. Peabody) that claims Webb as the inspiration for the "wayback" inventor.

 

But, it works for me.  ;)

 

 

Sepiatone


I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#6 cigarjoe

cigarjoe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,197 posts
  • LocationNY

Posted Yesterday, 06:16 AM

Shock Corridor (1963) Nutter Noir
 
Shock_corridor_poster.jpg
 
Sam Fuller's shot in 10 days in studio Neo Neo Noir.
 
Fuller (Pickup on South Street (1953), House of Bamboo (1955), The Crimson Kimono (1959), Underworld U.S.A. (1961), The Naked Kiss (1964)) also wrote the script back in the forties under the title Straitjacket for Fritz Lang. But Lang wanted to cast Joan Bennett in the lead. Cinematography was by Stanley Cortez (The Underworld Story (1950), The Night of the Hunter (1955), The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Three Faces of Eve (1957), Vice Raid (1959), and uncredited for Chinatown (1974)). Additional color footage sequences by Sam Fuller from The House Of Bamboo and the unfinished film Tigrero,  the Music was by Paul Dunlap.
 
Shock Corridor is good in some sequences with some powerful acting but in others not so much and not because of anything controllable, it was a victim of the restraints of the times. 7/10 
 
Review with more screencaps here: http://noirsville.bl...utter-noir.html

  • LawrenceA likes this

#7 hamradio

hamradio

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 14,707 posts

Posted 15 October 2017 - 11:00 PM

The month of Halloween and TCM had to show a stupid short about golf. :wacko:



#8 EricJ

EricJ

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,090 posts

Posted 15 October 2017 - 05:50 PM

Love the Clifton Webb pix.

 

Y'know, they're right:  With that bowtie, Webb really WAS the inspiration for Mr. Peabody.  

Always thought they were kidding.


  • Sepiatone likes this
Let's start a revolution: http://movieactivist.blogspot.com

#9 ChristineHoard

ChristineHoard

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,524 posts
  • LocationGA

Posted 15 October 2017 - 05:06 PM

Love the Clifton Webb pix.



#10 TomJH

TomJH

    I know what gold does to men's souls.

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,127 posts

Posted 15 October 2017 - 01:22 PM

TomJH--Joan Shawlee??

 

She was Sweet Sue in "Some Like It Hot" (1959).

 

Bingo! Give that man a free train berth ride to be shared with Jack Lemmon in drag!

 

slih-sweet-sue-facial-expressions.jpg
Okay, okay, make it Marilyn Monroe or Laurette Luez (take your pick).

 

Speaking of which, those two ladies had been friends in Monroe's pre stardom years. Here they are, with Waldo Lydecker playing sugar daddy.

 

01_116153797.jpg?quality=85&w=559


  • film lover 293 likes this

#11 film lover 293

film lover 293

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,188 posts

Posted 15 October 2017 - 10:29 AM

TomJH--Joan Shawlee??

 

She was Sweet Sue in "Some Like It Hot" (1959).



#12 TomJH

TomJH

    I know what gold does to men's souls.

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,127 posts

Posted 15 October 2017 - 08:10 AM

"Prehistoric Women" (1967)--Starring Martine Beswick, Edina Ronay, and Michael Latimer.  Produced and directed by Michael Carreras.


 

Source--YouTube.  I'd clicked on links to the film before, to find it removed.  I was in time, for once.  If you want to see it, don't delay.

 

In any You Tube searches for this film you will encounter countless prints of another PREHISTORIC WOMEN from 1950, starring Laurette Luez. I've yet to see a print of this film that is even slightly sub par in quality. They are all dark and soft focus.

 

prehistoricwomen1950_10_500x380.jpg

 

That's Luez, third from the left. Anyone recognize the second cave girl from the left? She had supporting roles in a couple of Billy Wilder's most famous comedies, one of them a role of significance.

 

I'll give you a clue: "BEANSTALK!!!"
 



#13 Sepiatone

Sepiatone

    Enhanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,204 posts
  • LocationLincoln Park, MI

Posted 15 October 2017 - 07:28 AM

I was gonna chime in yesterday after seeing PAY OR DIE(1960) that morning.  But life interferred.

 

Being familiar with ERNEST BORGNINE only from McHALE'S NAVY, I didn't recognize him at first when I first saw this movie on TV when I was 15 (1966).

 

Seen it sparsely over the years since, I always enjoyed it's attention to period detail.  I didn't do any research on it, so I don't know the cinematographer, but a hearty "well done!" to him.  All in all, I think it's really not too bad of a film. 

 

I'm not Italian, but have had several Italian neighbors and friends over the years, and that the movie seems devoid of any Italian OR mobster caricatures is a plus.

 

 

Sepiatone


  • LawrenceA likes this

I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#14 cigarjoe

cigarjoe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,197 posts
  • LocationNY

Posted 15 October 2017 - 06:46 AM

Mmmmmm...Martine Beswick. [sigh]

 

martine-beswick-prehistoric-women-pic-1.

She's great as Adelita in the film A Bullet for the General



#15 kingrat

kingrat

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,034 posts

Posted 14 October 2017 - 11:55 PM

Carny was a good little film. I'll second cigarjoe's recommendation.


  • Sepiatone likes this

#16 LawrenceA

LawrenceA

    Watchman

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,100 posts
  • LocationThe Wild Frontier

Posted 14 October 2017 - 10:09 PM

Mmmmmm...Martine Beswick. [sigh]

 

martine-beswick-prehistoric-women-pic-1.

 

 


  • film lover 293 likes this

#17 film lover 293

film lover 293

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,188 posts

Posted 14 October 2017 - 10:01 PM

"Prehistoric Women" (1967)--Starring Martine Beswick, Edina Ronay, and Michael Latimer.  Produced and directed by Michael Carreras.

 

Incredibly silly entry from Hammer Studios.

 

David (Latimer) is a guide to an African expedition.  The fool he's working for shoots, but only injures a leopard.  David goes to put the leopard out of its' misery, and unknowingly enters the land of The Sacred Great White Rhinoceros, which is guarded by fierce natives.  They capture David, and their leader speaks English.  He sentences David to death, while the others babble and wail nonsense (literally "ooga booga--listen for the phrase).  David escapes, and wanders further into the Rhino's land.  He is captured, this time by unfriendly women.  You can guess the rest of the plot.

 

The only acting required is to keep a straight face throughout the silliness.  Beswick succeeds admirably at this, and went on to better, more dignified roles with Hammer and AIP ( 1971's "Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde", 1974's "Seizure", etc.).  Ronay succeeds.  Latimer has a hard time keeping from smiling and in one instance, laughing.

 

The script is laughable.  It goes from business-like British, to nonsense, to pseudo-Biblical talk among the second group that captures Michael.  For those who've seen "Carry On: Up the Jungle" (1970), there are two scenes from PW satirized in that film.

 

The movie shows as much T and A as Hammer dared in the mid 60's.  It doesn't take a Freudian to figure out what these women are worshiping.

 

Don't expect a "good" movie.  On a "so bad it"s good" scale, 3.2/4.

 

Source--YouTube.  I'd clicked on links to the film before, to find it removed.  I was in time, for once.  If you want to see it, don't delay.


  • mr6666 and LawrenceA like this

#18 cigarjoe

cigarjoe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,197 posts
  • LocationNY

Posted 14 October 2017 - 09:29 PM

Carny (1980) Directed by Robert Kaylor with Gary Busey, Jodie Foster, Robbie Robertson, Meg Foster, Kenneth McMillan, Elisha Cook Jr., A nice surprize, a film about carny life that stayed interesting. Currently on Youtube 7/10

 

carny-movie-poster-1980-1010240908.jpg


  • mr6666, kingrat, Sepiatone and 2 others like this

#19 film lover 293

film lover 293

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,188 posts

Posted 14 October 2017 - 05:24 PM

"Et Mourir de Plaisir" aka "Blood and Roses" (1961)--Starring Mel Ferrer, Elsa Martinelli, and Annette Vadim.  Directed by Roger Vadim.

 

Slow paced, but beautifully photographed vampire film.

 

Time is 1960.  On a jet, a man tells his friends a story about an inexplicable medical mystery that happened in Italy.  Count Leopoldo Karnstein (Ferrer) is making preparations for a masked ball to celebrate his wedding to Georgia Monteverdi (Martinelli). His cousin, Carmilla Karnstein (Vadim) is in love with Leopoldo, and jealous of Georgia.  The night of the ball, Carmilla wants to be alone and wanders the estate.  Odd events follow.

 

Director Vadim seems more interested in following the erotic possibilities afforded by vampirism than by following vampire folklore.  Ferrer is good as Leopoldo, who treats the whole story of his family's vampirism as a joke, until it's too late.  Martinelli is fine as Georgia, who's the imperiled Gothic heroine in a modern setting.  Annette Vadim is very good as Carmilla, who at first doesn't know what's happening to her, and then thinks she's possessed by an ancestor.

 

The photography is by Claude Renoir, and his playing with colors, light, and shadows alone make the film worth checking out.

 

Film is in French, with English subtitles that you have to turn on.

 

Movie is worth seeing because of the dream-like tone it sets, early on, and for Renoir's stunning photography.  2.7/4

 

Source--Youtube.  YT has it listed under the French title.  The copy has an annoying hiss and occasional crackle, otherwise I'd have rated it higher.


  • cigarjoe and LawrenceA like this

#20 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 18,489 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 14 October 2017 - 04:21 PM

 But what Irena believed was true, and Kent Smith believed it all by the end of "Cat People". Plus I just love how he teaches his daughter that lying is rewarding by telling her that if she tells him that she sees Irena in the garden he'll punish her. She tells the truth - she sees Irena - and he spanks her. Wow this guy is just as bad as a father to his daughter as he was a husband to Irena.

 

It was my understanding that the father didn't wish for the child to 'see' his first wife due to guilt  (guilt due to the deception and actions both the father and mother practiced related to Irena).               






1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users