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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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I Just Watched...


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#1 hamradio

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Posted Today, 02:43 AM

HBO / Starz / Showtime free weekend movies on Directv.

 

"Freaks of Nature" (2015)

 

What in the h_ll did I just watched??  Script was written by a zombie.

 

Rated R for ridiculous!

 

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#2 TomJH

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Posted Yesterday, 09:59 PM

I believe it’s The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes where Zucco as Moriaty has just been acquitted. He finds his plants haven’t been watered and berates his servant saying something to the effect that he was nearly sent to prison for merely killing a man. It’s a nifty little scene and Zucco is his usual superb self.

 

It's fun to watch Basil Rathbone and George Zucco play off one another in the scene in which they ride in a carriage together.

 

tumblr_ndt0tlasBT1t1g01wo2_1280.jpg

 

At one point Rathbone as Holmes says, "You've a magnificent brain, Moriarty. So magnificent that I'd like to pickle it in a jar of alcohol."



#3 speedracer5

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Posted Yesterday, 08:51 PM

I just finished watching Apartment For Peggy.

 

This was an enjoyable film, despite some sad moments in the film.  This film stars William Holden and Jeanne Crain who are a young married couple with a baby on the way.  Holden is a war veteran who has returned home from WWII and under the GI Bill, he is attending college.  He is studying in hopes of becoming a chemistry teacher.  Crain plays his young wife who is also expecting their first child.  At the beginning of the film, they are living in a cramped camper and are forced to locate new housing.  Living on only Holden's stipend, things are tight and they're barely getting by.  Much of the tension between the couple is Crain's insistence on Holden finishing college and Holden's concern about the lack of income and his feeling of failure that his wife is having to forgo things like refills on her pre-natal prescription due to lack of money.  He wants to take a job in Chicago selling cars.  Holden's real dream is to be a teacher and Crain is determined to support his dream.  

 

Meanwhile, Professor Henry Barnes (portrayed by Edmund Gwenn), an ex-philosophy professor at the college is depressed about having retired.  He is healthy and vital and feels that he was forced into his retirement.  He confides to his friend, a fellow professor, that he is planning on committing suicide.  He makes this decision calmly and rationally, explaining that he no longer feels needed or useful and no longer wants to be a drain on society.  He ends up being examined by a doctor who deems him healthy.  Gwenn asks the doctor to prescribe him sleeping pills.  The doctor agrees, but will only dispense two pills at a time to prevent Gwenn from using them to commit suicide.  Unbeknownst to everyone, Gwenn is stockpiling his "two pills" in order to gather enough to overdose on.  

 

Gwenn ends up meeting Crain randomly on a park bench and he is immediately taken by her enthusiasm and youth.  She ends up telling him about her housing dilemmas.  Before Gwenn knows it, Holden and Crain are moving into his attic.  They clean it up, re-purpose some of Gwenn's existing furniture and other items not being used in his home and fix it up to make it a habitable abode, despite it being small and rustic.  Gwenn is impressed with the young couple's resourcefulness and determination.  He ends up feeling needed by them as he supports Crain throughout her pregnancy and Holden during his schooling.  

 

There are a couple of sad events in the film that help add some drama and realism to the situation.  The film has a happy ending, but it seems realistic and not contrived.

 

I was really impressed by Jeanne Crain in this film.  I'd liked her in previous films of hers that I'd seen (Leave Her to Heaven; A Letter to Three Wives; Cheaper By the Dozen; People Will Talk; The Joker is Wild), but nothing made me think "Wow! I need to see more Jeanne Crain."  However, in Apartment For Peggy, I really liked the energy that she brought to the role.  This film is really Crain's film.  She runs the gamut of emotions from joy to sadness and does a great job.  I am interested in seeing more of her work.  I am not too familiar with Edmund Gwenn (except that he's in Miracle on 34th Street) but I thought he was fine in this film.  William Holden's role isn't that notable, he's more just there to interact with Crain and Gwenn, but he is fine in his role.  He's only a couple years away from his star-making role in Sunset Blvd.  


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#4 sewhite2000

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Posted Yesterday, 07:00 PM

I Just Watched, 31 Days of Oscar Edition, Post #8, 2/18

 

I was a total couch potato yesterday. One very late night of viewing probably merits a post all by itself if I'm going to keep this thing current.

 

Mutiny on the Bounty (MGM, 1935) - So, this is is the film that split the Best Actor vote three ways (well, maybe just two. Did anybody actually vote for Franchot Tone?), enabling Victor McLaglen to sneak off with the Oscar, and the next year, supporting acting awards were introduced. Every time this airs, we're told James Cagney did one day's work as an extra, but I've never been able to spot him. It's also almost always said that of three film versions, this one is the least historically accurate, but I certainly find it the most fun to watch of the three. I don't mind watching the '62 version, where I think Brando decided he wasn't going to try to compete with Gable's legacy and instead give a much more eccentric performance, where Trevor Howard gives us maybe just a slightly more nuanced version of Bligh than Laughton, although I love Laughton. He scares the heck out of me in this movie. I have an unfortunate, admittedly probably sexist, habit of talking about the male performances and then about the female appearances, but having acknowledged this problem, let me nevertheless say, Movita ... wow!

 

Network (MGM, 1976) - This movie often gets credit for being prescient, so I watched it this time with an eye particularly focused on that aspect of it. It's sort of like comparing apples and oranges to modern times in one respect - that TV news has largely been shuffled off to entirely separate networks, so you don't have all this interoffice skullduggery between news and programming and corporate anymore. I guess ABC, CBS and NBC still have weeknight newscasts (do they?), but their importance to a network's identity as a whole is greatly reduced from what it was in the '70s. I guess there have indeed been some "mad prophets of our times" - Glenn Beck immediately comes to my mind. Also there is some similarity to the "mad as hell" sentiment in the movie and the modern efforts by Fox News to stir up rage in its viewers over everything any Democrat says or does. But Faye Dunnaway's embrace of the counterculture is light years away from Fox News. Something else that proved prescient was the emergence of reality television, which doesn't require cash expenditures for things like scripts, actors and sets. Two scenes I absolutely love: the litany of shows all featuring "crusty but benign" male authority figures - I always envision an Edward Asner or John Houseman. And when Robert Duvall tells Dunnaway "You're talking about putting an irresponsible lunatic on the air", and her silent but emphatic, smiling nod is so infectious, the great sourpuss can't help but manage a little smile himself. "I'll get back to you, Diana ..." On the other hand, I can't ever hear that one line of dialogue from Beatrice Straight (who's otherwise brilliant): "I hurt ... badly!" without holding my stomach. I think that's the worst, most unintentionally funny line of dialogue from any Chayefsky script ever.

 

The New Land (Warner Bros., 1972) - So, this TCM premiere was the orginal 204-minute version originally released in Sweden. Warner Bros., the American distributor, cut the movie to half that running time back in the day, so no one in the US probably ever saw the original cut until the DVD era. There is more dramatic action than in its prequel, The Emigrants (which I had a hard time staying awake while watching a year or two ago, also during 31 Days), but a lot of it is very plodding and methodical as we see the drudgery of the day-to-day lives of Swedish immigrants to Minnesota in the mid-to-late 1800s. There is a scene in which an ox is cut open so that a boy may crawl inside its innards to keep from freezing to death (George Lucas seems to have stolen the idea outright for The Empire Strikes Back), in which a real ox was apparently killed on camera, according to imdb. I struggle with the morality of that - does that mean I should never watch this 45-year-old movie when sensibilities about such things were different, possibly even more so in Europe? Makes me think of the blackface issue, although in this instance, we're talking about the actual murder of a living creature (and do we distinguish between types of animals? I'm sure many fish have been killed in movies with fishing scenes in movies before a certain year, but that doesn't seem to upset people as much as the death of a mammal). Anyway, guess what folks, that turns out to be only the SECOND most disturbing shot in the movie! The most disturbing shot, oh my God, I can't even say. You know what I'm talking about if you've seen it. Those Euros were/are absolutely fearless in not flinching away from or soft-selling ugliness and real-world horror, not Universal-monster type. Is that great art or just exploitative? Probably too heady a question for me to answer. Just be warned that parts of this movie are very, very hard to watch.

 

Ninotchka (MGM, 1939) - In which Billy Wilder got to co-write a script for his idol Ernst Lubitsch, and it seems to have been a match made in Heaven. Garbo is an actress I just never really have gotten. My two favorite performances of hers are this movie and Camille. The "corruption" of the three Soviet functionaries, including the always great Felix Bressart, exposed to all the glourious luxuries of a decadent Western hotel, is great fun. Look for Peggy Moran, quite a beauty, in the dialogue-free role of First Cigarette Girl.



#5 Janet0312

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Posted Yesterday, 01:13 PM

scsu1975--Don't know if you've seen these two, but George Zucco has a good supporting role in "The Pirate" (1948), which is on this Monday, and a smaller role in "Topper Returns" (1941), which is on the last day of February.  Thought you'd like to know.


I believe it’s The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes where Zucco as Moriaty has just been acquitted. He finds his plants haven’t been watered and berates his servant saying something to the effect that he was nearly sent to prison for merely killing a man. It’s a nifty little scene and Zucco is his usual superb self.
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#6 Dargo

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Posted Yesterday, 01:07 AM

The Story of Esther Costello......

 

Is it a prequel to "The Story of Elvis Costello"?   

 

Well of course, MissW. That's 'cause Esther was Costello's "mudder".

 

(...but unfortunately the plan to make that other prequel about Costello's "fodder" was put out to pasture before filming ever began)


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#7 film lover 293

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 04:06 PM

scsu1975--Don't know if you've seen these two, but George Zucco has a good supporting role in "The Pirate" (1948), which is on this Monday, and a smaller role in "Topper Returns" (1941), which is on the last day of February.  Thought you'd like to know.


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#8 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 03:26 PM

Is it a prequel to "The Story of Elvis Costello"?   

 i've joked before that "CRAWFORD is ludicrously miscast as Elvis Costello"- but really, it's a surprisingly good film and very much like THE MIRACLE WORKER in many ways- Heather Sears plays a young Irish girl who is deaf and blind from an unexploded shell she comes across that detonates. Joan is the wealthy socialites who teaches and adopts her.

 

it does take a dark turn at the end, but i'd say it is more HIGH MELODRAMA than "noirish," but when you add post-MILDRED Joan to anything, the lights go down and the shadows cast long.

 

the guy who directed SUDDEN FEAR did it; Rossano Brazoi (who is waaaay hot) costars.


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#9 misswonderly3

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 03:08 PM

The Story of Esther Costello......

 

Is it a prequel to "The Story of Elvis Costello"?   


"You are so self-righteous....I mean, we're just people. We're just human beings, you know? You think you're God."

"Hey, I gotta model myself after someone."


#10 scsu1975

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 02:51 PM

"The Mad Ghoul" (1943)--Starring George Zucco, Evelyn Ankers, Turhan Bey, and David Bruce.

 

This is one I still haven't seen. Zucco has a way of taking anything remotely crappy and making it entertaining. I love watching the guy.

 

He was a treat as a policeman in Lured, which showed his flair for comedy. I wish he had done more of that.


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I'm a big boy.


#11 film lover 293

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 02:45 PM

"The Mad Ghoul" (1943)--Starring George Zucco, Evelyn Ankers, Turhan Bey, and David Bruce.

 

Good little Universal chiller about college professor Dr. Morris (Zucco) stumbling upon. then recreating secrets of the ancient Mayan sacrifices that took, then supposedly gave life:  Bruce is his unlucky student Zucco chooses to help him as his assistant, Ankers is Bruce's singing star girlfriend, and Bey stays on the sidelines as Ankers' accompanist.

 

The whole cast is restrained and relatively convincing; Bruce in particular is good, and Zucco is restrained and effective.  Ankers and Bey are ok, and Ankers demonstrates why she was named "Universals' Scream Queen".  Interesting film I had only heard of is worth at least one watch.  2.7/4.

 

Source--archive.org; search "661", select movies only, and it should be the 2nd result, archived Feb. 12th, 2017.


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#12 kingrat

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 02:02 PM

The Story of Esther Costello, based on a novel by Nicholas Monserrat, which was released several years before The Miracle Worker, was supposedly suggested by events in the later life of Helen Keller. This is a dark, twisted, noirish story, and Joan Crawford doesn't even play the villain.



#13 Sepiatone

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 01:28 PM

 

The Miracle Worker (United Artists, 1962) - I was sort of letting out a little sigh as this one was starting, like do I really want to commit to this? But it sucked me in. While I had started it many times in the past, I think this was the first time I had ever watched it all the way through. I had seen the climactic scene with the water pump before and was very familiar with the first 30 minutes, but there were large chunks in the middle I'm pretty sure I'd never seen before. Anne Bancroft's monologue about her childhood in the asylum was powerful stuff. She relates it not to evoke pity but to let us know it made her strong. The superimposition of flashbacks from Bancroft's childhood I found hokey, but the rest of the movie is powerful. Patty Duke was about 15 or 16 when she made this movie, though they manage to bundle her up and make her look like she's about 11. I guess we're supposed to believe she still remembers saying "wa-wa" when she was six months old when she tries to verbalize the word near the end of the movie. That seemed a bit of a stretch. Did Keller go on to being able to talk? I would like a movie to be made about her adult life. Arthur Penn seemed poised at one time to be as well-known a director of his era as anyone, but looking at his imdb resume, boy his career really petered out after about Little Big Man. What happened? The long, dialogue-free kitchen table fight scene, wow! Hope the actresses didn't hurt each other too much. And I spent the whole film knowing I knew Victor Jory from somewhere, but it wasn't until it was over and I went to my laptop that I remembered he was Wilkerson, the plantation overseer turned tax collector in Gone with the Wind. And he really didn't look very much different 23 years later!

 

I went with my family to see this when it came out and was knocked out by it.  Also developed a kind of "crush" on Patty Duke too.

 

It remains high on my list of favorites and for some of the reasons you state.  I never think of any part of it as being "hokey" though.  And as I already knew some neighbors who had a daughter who was like Helen( blind deaf and mute) The portrayals of Helen's parents and family overindulging her due to her condition I found spot on as I've seen it actually happen.

 

And yes, Keller did eventually learn to speak and went on many lecture tours through the years.  She was also a writer and political activist and lived to age 87, finding eternal rest in 1968.

 

 

Sepiatone


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I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#14 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 12:18 PM

I Just Watched, 31 Days of Oscar Edition, Post #7, 2/15-2/17

 

The Lost Weekend (Paramount, 1945) - Not really my favorite Billy Wilder film but certainly light years beyond your average dopey film of 1945. I'm okay with downbeat Wilder, but the intense focus on a man and his drinking problem makes me only want to watch this movie once in a while.

 

 

every one of those write-ups in your post below is excellent, but you nailed this film in particular (although I have to admit "dopey" would not be my personal choice as a bon mot for the average 1945 film...)

 

I bow at the altar of Wilder. I think, with the possible exception of Hitchcock, no Golden Age filmmaker had a hand in more UTTERLY PERFECT films than Billy. There are numerous titles of his (as writer, director, or both) that I would label four-star, flawless works- not one single thing done wrong in them...most people who make movies are lucky as hell to have just one perfect film, he's got a handful.

 

THE LOST WEEKEND, however, is not one of those films.

 

I think Milland is brilliant in it, glad he won the Oscar, but outside of that? It's a very faulty film with some weak support (I'm looking at you Phill Terry and Jane Wyman.)


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#15 sewhite2000

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 09:31 AM

I Just Watched, 31 Days of Oscar Edition, Post #7, 2/15-2/17

 

The Lost Weekend (Paramount, 1945) - Not really my favorite Billy Wilder film but certainly light years beyond your average dopey film of 1945. I'm okay with downbeat Wilder, but the intense focus on a man and his drinking problem makes me only want to watch this movie once in a while. Ditto The Days of Wine and Roses, which I could have watched earlier this month but passed on. It covers a lot of the same ground. Though he lives in a great metropolitan area, it seems to me like Ray Milland's world is really small - he only interacts with about four people in the whole movie. I guess that's part of his being "kept" by his brother, his only social life occasionally being allowed to go to an opera or symphony. I got a little tired of Howard DeSilva's moralizing bartender who should probably be in some other business if he's going to tell his best customer to "lay off the stuff". And that bar never seemed to have more than five customers in it, anyway. I paid particular attention to the female characters this time. Doris Dowling is an actress I really don't know. Looking at her imdb resume, I see she's been in some other pretty big films, but somehow I've never seen any of them except this one. Gloria is supposed to be prostitute, I guess (natch!). Movies had to be subtle about those things in those days, but the leer on the face of the guy planning to go to Grant's Tomb with her makes it pretty clear. But her genuine love for Milland and her hurt at him standing her up, which then immediately melts when he kisses her, breaks your heart. Gloria would have loved the social media era with all its LOLs and BRBs and HowRUs. And Jane Wyman's character seems really pathetic to stick with this guy for so long, though of course the film presents her as heroic. I liked her look at the end with her hair down. I wish she hadn't worn it short or up in so many of her movies, which I didn't think flattered her.

 

The Maltese Falcon (Warner Bros, 1941) - Somebody just mentioned on another thread that this was their first viewing, which proves a point I've often made on here. Every airing on TCM is a first viewing for somebody, which is probably why TCM isn't terribly interested when a long-time viewer like me says, "Oh my God, North by Northwest AGAIN?" I couldn't say how many times I've seen The Maltese Falcon. It's one of my first-ever classic film viewings. I rented it in college, I think, before there even was a TCM. I'd seen Casablanca and was intrigued enough to want to check out another Bogie film. Since then, if I'm at home, and it's on TCM, I'm going to watch at least part of it. I'll bet I've seen it all the way through at least 15 times and parts of it at least another 15. I love how Bogie/Spade is usually about 12 steps ahead of everybody else and has to say a lot of dialogue in short order to catch everyone else up to speed. He's all right with any situation as long as he knows the score. As he says, he gets up on his hind legs when Ward Bond and the other cop start grilling him without saying why, but once he knows he's a murder suspect, okay, everything's cool, boys, now that I know where I stand, and he totally relaxes again, even though most of us wouldn't relax if we knew we were murder suspects. Okay, it's a little ridiculous that holding a gun on Spade at point blank range does no good at all. One little side step, a quick move of the hands, and your gun is gone! Lorre and Cook both find this out multiple times. I would think one little squeeze of a trigger finger could happen faster than Spade could move, but we wouldn't have much of a movie if he had gotten shot in the chest 10 minutes into it. I guess the ending had to adhere to the Production Code, but I would have loved for Spade to join Cairo and the Fat Man and head off to Istanbul, and we could have gotten a sequel!

 

The Man Who Knew too Much (Paramount, 1956) - This film is not part of the package of 700 films released between 1929-1949 that Paramount sold, I think to MCA, for television in the '50s that are now owned by Universal, but somehow this film has also ended up under Universal's control, right down to Universal slapping an era-appropriate logo onto the end of the film. There are probably some interesting backstories to a lot film's ownership histories that I don't know (for example, High Noon was originally a UA release but is now under control of Paramount instead of MGM, like most UA films, which is why we don't see it on TCM any more often than we do). There's not a Hitchcock film I dislike, but there is Greater Hitchcock and Lesser Hitchcock, and despite its star power and great sets (looks like location shooting for sure), I would say this is probably Lesser Hitchcock. The working of the Oscar-winning song into the plot seems pretty strained. That kid is completely devoid of personality, and I just didn't care about his plight that much, honestly. The very long, dialogue-free scene at the concert hall seemed mainly to be a showcase of Bernard Herrman, who was probably deserving of one, but that could have been cut by five minutes easily. Did Edith Head recycle from movie to movie? That gray suit worn by Doris Day looks very familiar to the one Kim Novak would wear two years later in Vertigo. I did like the bit with all of Day's society friends still waiting in the hotel room at the end. In a modern film, that scene would have been a "stinger" after the eight minutes of closing credits.

 

Min and Bill (MGM, 1931) - I had never seen this one before. The brevity of The Lost Patrol has been discussed recently on another thread. Well, this film is only about 67 minutes! And we run the gamut from screwball comedy - the runaway speedboat scene and Marie Dressler letting Wallace Beery have it - to Stella Dallas-like heroic but heartbreaking motherly self-sacrifice. No wonder Dressler won the Oscar. She's a force of nature in this movie. I've seen too many similar movies to have been surprised by the plot twists at the end. When the girl's no-good biological mother just goes on and on and on near the end about how she's going to make everyone's life miserable, and we cut to a close-up of Dressler's stoneface at least six times, well that is telegraphing your scene, though the viewing audience of the day probably hadn't seen as many millions of movies as I have and were probably genuinely shocked by what happened next. But it was like watching a Bond villain explain his master plan before activating the death trap.

 

The Miracle of Our Lady of Fatima (Warner Bros., 1952) - I don't know if there are enough Catholic religious vision movies to qualify as a genre, but personally I can begin and end with The Song of Bernadette, which I really only enjoy for Vincent Price's performance as the cynic. At one time, the studios thought these stories meant good box office. In this modern world when someone is seeing Jesus in a tortilla or Mary in a splatter of paint on a wall every other week, the visions don't seem so special any more. I was raised Presbyterian and have become an agnostic in my adulthood, so all the Catholic fervor about Mary has always been hard for me to understand, and so, I don't really get into these movies, but I gave this one a shot. I'd never seen it before. Certainly more than a little inspired by Bernadette, I thought, though comparisons between the two are probably unavoidable - Angela Clarke even resembled Jennifer Jones a little, I thought. Gilbert Roland helped keep me entertained in this movie like Price in the other one. I'm reading on imdb his character was wholly invented for the movie, and I can't help but think the other films was probably an inspiration for that.

 

The Miracle Worker (United Artists, 1962) - I was sort of letting out a little sigh as this one was starting, like do I really want to commit to this? But it sucked me in. While I had started it many times in the past, I think this was the first time I had ever watched it all the way through. I had seen the climactic scene with the water pump before and was very familiar with the first 30 minutes, but there were large chunks in the middle I'm pretty sure I'd never seen before. Anne Bancroft's monologue about her childhood in the asylum was powerful stuff. She relates it not to evoke pity but to let us know it made her strong. The superimposition of flashbacks from Bancroft's childhood I found hokey, but the rest of the movie is powerful. Patty Duke was about 15 or 16 when she made this movie, though they manage to bundle her up and make her look like she's about 11. I guess we're supposed to believe she still remembers saying "wa-wa" when she was six months old when she tries to verbalize the word near the end of the movie. That seemed a bit of a stretch. Did Keller go on to being able to talk? I would like a movie to be made about her adult life. Arthur Penn seemed poised at one time to be as well-known a director of his era as anyone, but looking at his imdb resume, boy his career really petered out after about Little Big Man. What happened? The long, dialogue-free kitchen table fight scene, wow! Hope the actresses didn't hurt each other too much. And I spent the whole film knowing I knew Victor Jory from somewhere, but it wasn't until it was over and I went to my laptop that I remembered he was Wilkerson, the plantation overseer turned tax collector in Gone with the Wind. And he really didn't look very much different 23 years later!


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#16 cigarjoe

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Posted 18 February 2017 - 05:18 AM

Le Corbeau (1943) directed by Henri-Georges Clouzot, small town French village doctor becomes target of poison-pen letters sent to village leaders, accusing him of having various affairs and practicing abortion. 7/10


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#17 scsu1975

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 12:09 PM

Jigsaw (1949).

 

 

The most curious aspect of this low budget production are the various three to five second cameos made by a number of "A" list stars. There's Burgess Meredith as a bartender, Henry Fonda as a waiter, John Garfield as a newspaper reading street guy and Marlene Dietrich as a patron leaving a nightclub, that nightclub appropriately called "The Blue Angel." I also spotted Marsha Hunt and Everett Sloane.

 

Exactly why these stars briefly appear I'm not quite certain, though in the case of Garfield it was as a favour for pal Franchot Tone. It was probably much the same kind of thing with the others.

 

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#18 JR33928

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 11:33 AM

"TOO LATE FOR TEARS(1949) Bin looking for it for a long time.Finally found and downloaded the restored/remastered version of the movie.

It is still a bit dark looking but otherwise looks pretty darn good...can actually see what's going on now.


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#19 EricJ

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 11:29 AM

2. Like ERIC with THE HEIRESS, I never saw A STOLEN LIFE until AFTER Burnett's parody.   But none of them will EVER top "Went With The Wind" ("I saw it in the window and just couldn't resist...")  :D

 

Back in the 70's, it was hard to see just about any 30's-40's MGM or Warner movie (nobody owned a VCR, and some weren't allowed to stay up late), so Carol Burnett sketches were my only cultural familiarity with "Rancid Harvest", "The Enchanted Hovel", "Babes in Barns", "Double Calamity", and Nora Desmond.

(And hey, how about that, "Mildred Fierce" was on YouTube after all: )

 

Ah, the days when 70's Mad Magazine writers worked for the TCBS staff.


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#20 cigarjoe

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Posted 17 February 2017 - 10:08 AM

Jigsaw 1949 agree a dissapointment






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