We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

I Just Watched...


  • Please log in to reply
8183 replies to this topic

#1 cigarjoe

cigarjoe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,101 posts
  • LocationNY

Posted Today, 11:09 AM

I just watched The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) for  probably the 10th time and it reminded me of something that brought me great joy in my pre-teen years.

 

My older brother and I used to tease my mother daily with a quotation from this movie. We drove her NUTS.

 

She would ask: Have you done your homework?

 

We would answer: We don't have to show you any stinkin' badges.

 

She would ask: Do you have your scarf and mittens?

 

We answered: We don't have to show you any stinkin' badges.

 

You get the picture. We laughed hysterically and used this line to block all efforts at maternal control. 

 

It may sound cruel but we loved it; and we still do it to her sometimes to this day, but now she laughs too. 

There was a spoof of this in a Western with John Astin (from The Addams Family) he's Mexican bandit and he's got a sheriff's badge, and he's saying the line while pouring whiskey on it and hammering at it with his revolver.



#2 Hibi

Hibi

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,393 posts
  • LocationOhio

Posted Today, 10:29 AM

"Go Naked in the World" (1961)--Starring Gina Lollobrigida, Anthony Franciosa, and Ernest Borgnine. Written and directed by Ranald MacDougall.

 

This one is early 60's MGM melodrama, and full of howlers.

 

As the film begins, Julie (Lollobrigida) gets out of a limousine, accompanied by an older man.  A "sister" on the street, dressed all in red, winks at her.  Message sent to audience.  Julie and companion enter the fancy restaurant.  Her escort has to leave.  Julie sits in a booth.  Nick (Franciosa), who has just finished an enlistment in the Army, catches sight of her.  Despite her brushing him off like a fly, he persists in trying to make a date with her.  They proceed to her place and sleep together as an ending to their first date.  It never dawns on Nick that Julie  is anything other than a "nice" girl, despite numerous hints given him. Their romance proceeds from there.

 

A few of the films' memorable lines;

 

Julie to companion :"I haven't been alone since I was twelve years old".

 

Nicks father Pete (Borgnine) to Nick: "Spit on me for luck".

 

Nick's clueless mother Mary (Nancy R. ****) to Julie, at her 30th wedding anniversary party--"Everybody is staring" (with good reason, as it turns out).

 

Nick to Julie, after he's found out the terrible truth--"I'll never get clean again!"

 

Julie to Nick, after he's asked how many men she's been with--"Why count waves in the ocean?"

 

Lollobrigida is ok as Julie, and has a way with a sarcastic line.  Franciosa is just terrible as Nick; nobody is that stupid.  Borgnine yells his way through his part, but manages some good acting in his few quiet scenes. 

 

Check out the portrait above Lollobrigida's bed in the two scenes where it's shown.  It looks like a fuzzy picture of Elizabeth Taylor in her slip from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1958),  The artist didn't even bother to change the hair color.

 

If you like melodramas to laugh at, this film's for you.  2.7/4.

 

Edit--Otto censored the actress's name.

 

 

I recorded this. Cant wait to see it! LOL.



#3 Hibi

Hibi

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 21,393 posts
  • LocationOhio

Posted Today, 10:27 AM

 

 

Regarding Blithe Spirit, there are a few television productions of the play, include one with Noel Coward, Lauren Bacall, and Claudette Colbert.

 

 

Yes, the version where Noel (who I think directed) spouted the famous line to Colbert: I'd Ring Your Neck If You Had One!!!!! (LOL).


  • LornaHansonForbes likes this

#4 Sepiatone

Sepiatone

    Enhanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,084 posts
  • LocationLincoln Park, MI

Posted Today, 07:16 AM

I just watched The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) for  probably the 10th time and it reminded me of something that brought me great joy in my pre-teen years.

 

My older brother and I used to tease my mother daily with a quotation from this movie. We drove her NUTS.

 

She would ask: Have you done your homework?

 

We would answer: We don't have to show you any stinkin' badges.

 

She would ask: Do you have your scarf and mittens?

 

We answered: We don't have to show you any stinkin' badges.

 

You get the picture. We laughed hysterically and used this line to block all efforts at maternal control. 

 

It may sound cruel but we loved it; and we still do it to her sometimes to this day, but now she laughs too. 

 

At least, you said " any" stinkin' badges, instead of  "no" stinkin' badges and NOT throw in any bad grammar along with your bad behavior.  ;)

 

Reminded me of an old RICHARD BELZER  routine about lounge singers trying to be "hip" and wound up singing, "I can't get any....satisfaction."

 

 

Sepiatone


  • marcar likes this

I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#5 kingrat

kingrat

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,015 posts

Posted Yesterday, 11:49 PM

Regarding Blithe Spirit, there are a few television productions of the play, include one with Noel Coward, Lauren Bacall, and Claudette Colbert.

Swithin, I recall seeing a TV production (early 60s?) starring Dirk Bogarde, Tammy Grimes, Rachel Roberts, and Ruth Gordon. It would be fun to see that again.



#6 TomJH

TomJH

    I know what gold does to men's souls.

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,007 posts

Posted Yesterday, 10:45 PM

I just watched The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) for  probably the 10th time and it reminded me of something that brought me great joy in my pre-teen years.

 

My older brother and I used to tease my mother daily with a quotation from this movie. We drove her NUTS.

 

She would ask: Have you done your homework?

 

We would answer: We don't have to show you any stinkin' badges.

 

She would ask: Do you have your scarf and mittens?

 

We answered: We don't have to show you any stinkin' badges.

 

You get the picture. We laughed hysterically and used this line to block all efforts at maternal control. 

 

It may sound cruel but we loved it; and we still do it to her sometimes to this day, but now she laughs too. 

 

alfonso-bedoya-gold-hat-the-treasure-of-

 

"That's funny. I used to say that to my mother too!"


  • mr6666 and marcar like this

#7 marcar

marcar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts
  • LocationWestern Mass

Posted Yesterday, 10:29 PM

I just watched The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) for  probably the 10th time and it reminded me of something that brought me great joy in my pre-teen years.

 

My older brother and I used to tease my mother daily with a quotation from this movie. We drove her NUTS.

 

She would ask: Have you done your homework?

 

We would answer: We don't have to show you any stinkin' badges.

 

She would ask: Do you have your scarf and mittens?

 

We answered: We don't have to show you any stinkin' badges.

 

You get the picture. We laughed hysterically and used this line to block all efforts at maternal control. 

 

It may sound cruel but we loved it; and we still do it to her sometimes to this day, but now she laughs too. 


  • mr6666, Sepiatone and LornaHansonForbes like this

#8 calvinnme

calvinnme

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,577 posts

Posted Yesterday, 02:57 PM

"Millions in the Air" (1935) Paramount 6/10 

Title : "Millions of plot holes!"

 

I was very surprised to find out this was a Paramount film, because it played out like a B film from one of the smaller studios of the 30s in that it was entertaining, but important plot points seemed to be missing. Plus there were no big stars in it. In fact, this is Robert Cummings' third credited film role and John Howard's fourth! The film is about an heiress, Marion Keller (Wendy Barry), daughter of the owner of the KELLO soap company, who wants a singing career. Her dad is the bellowing bellicose type (George Barbier as Calvin Keller) who wants Marion to marry her obnoxious fiancé Gordon and forget this career nonsense. She lies to dad and says she is auditioning for a society recital. She is actually auditioning for the WOX radio station amateur hour, sponsored by her dad's company. While waiting to audition she meets Eddie Warren, ice cream truck driver (John Howard). Eddie wants the 500 dollar prize money to buy a spot for his ice cream truck in front of the natural history museum, where he will make more money.

The two have one of those "lightning strikes" moments when they meet, and then the initial chemistry turns to friendship and then to love. But meanwhile Marion has to hide her identity from Eddie too, claiming to be somebody who works in a dime store and whose father is unemployed.

So now Marion is balancing plates on multiple poles. She has to explain all of her absences to her dad and to fiancé Gordon while she is out with Eddie, and she has to pretend to be the plain working girl to Eddie, even having him walk her to a boarding house door that isn't even hers.

Of course all of this is going to collide into a situation that makes everybody mad at her, so watch and find out how that happens.

Now the story of the heiress who pretends to be a commoner is as old as the hills, but what makes this fun is how it is combined with old time radio. Vying for the radio prize is a guy who thinks he is Houdini but can't escape from anything, and another guy who thinks that just because he is Italian he is destined to sing opera and keeps popping up on stage with poorly done disguises with actual operatic singers. Joan Davis does a comic number decades before Jim Backus could say "I Married Joan" (No, they weren't really married). And who can't find a singing and dancing 7th billed 25 year old Bob Cummings endearing?

Those plot holes I was talking about? Somehow in the middle of the film Bob Cummings' character is trying to get the same ice cream truck spot that John Howard's character is trying for, but this is just slipped into conversation and there is no introduction to the topic or Cummings' character at any point. Wendy Barry and John Howard talk about rehearsing together, but their acts started out and remain separate. What are they talking about? And then Barry's character's father and fiancé suddenly just show up at the radio station the night of the contest. How did they find out? This is never mentioned.

No, it's not like those poverty row films where things get so involved and unexplained you have to keep rewinding to figure out what just happened, but it causes enough confusion I took a star off of my rating. I'd still recommend it for the nostalgia and fun of it all.


  • kingrat and LawrenceA like this

#9 LornaHansonForbes

LornaHansonForbes

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,697 posts
  • LocationDark City, USA

Posted Yesterday, 10:18 AM

Ps- I think it's one that requires multiple viewings as I was lukewarm on the first 20 mins...maybe skip ahead a bit too?

#10 LornaHansonForbes

LornaHansonForbes

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,697 posts
  • LocationDark City, USA

Posted Yesterday, 10:15 AM

You know come to think of it I remember liking the film, but can't remember how it ended, maybe it was that unaffecting.


Last I checked, it's online in full if you're down with that sort of thing.

#11 Swithin

Swithin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,656 posts
  • LocationNew York City

Posted Yesterday, 09:40 AM

The restoration of this film was very good.  I'd never heard of Constance Cummings until 2016 when she was a Summer Under The Stars honoree.  She had an interesting career; one of the few American-born actors or actresses who went overseas to continue and complete their vocation.

 

I saw Constance Cummings in Wings, at the National Theatre in London, in 1979. Ten years later, I saw her in Semi-Monde, a rarely performed Noel Coward play. It was a one-off benefit for an actors' charity and also featured Judi Dench, Bob Hoskins, Kenneth Branagh, Elisabeth Welch, Evelyn Laye, Joyce Carey, Joanna Lumley, Tim Pigott-Smith, and many others.

 

Irene Worth, who was a friend of mine, was another American actress who spent much of her career in London, although unlike Ms. Cummings, Irene came back to America later in life, to live on 56th Street in NYC.

 

Regarding Blithe Spirit, there are a few television productions of the play, include one with Noel Coward, Lauren Bacall, and Claudette Colbert.


  • midwestan and LornaHansonForbes like this

#12 cigarjoe

cigarjoe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,101 posts
  • LocationNY

Posted Yesterday, 09:24 AM

S'more in RE: BLITHE SPIRIT

(SPOILERS!)

 

IN RE: THE ENDING...The only honest answer I can give on how I would end it is I DON'T KNOW. i think i would need a brainstorming session with input from others and possibly some mind-altering substances involved to come up with just the right ending for it...one thing i did not bring up in discussing the film was that it reminded me quite a bit of DEATH BECOMES HER- which has built a well-deserved cult following since its release- and many of the British horror anthologies that followed- as well as TALES FROM THE CRYPT- that last one kinda killed the genre in a way because every episode gave us an awful person who does awful things and is ALWAYS ALWAYS killed in some ironic form with NO VARIATION on the theme and zero surprise.

 

thus, watching BLITHE SPIRIT, i kinda sensed where it was going- but only because its original trail has been MUCH HACKED UPON since first it was blazed.

 

I'm sure BLITHE SPIRIT was a sensation when it came out because it was rather unexpected for it to end in such a way- being one of the first stories to use the above discussed method of storytelling- although the "horror" is subtle and the fact the protagonists are- kind of- awful people is subtle and hidden by their intrinsic Britishness.

You know come to think of it I remember liking the film, but can't remember how it ended, maybe it was that unaffecting.



#13 LornaHansonForbes

LornaHansonForbes

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,697 posts
  • LocationDark City, USA

Posted Yesterday, 08:39 AM

S'more in RE: BLITHE SPIRIT

(SPOILERS!)

 

IN RE: THE ENDING...The only honest answer I can give on how I would end it is I DON'T KNOW. i think i would need a brainstorming session with input from others and possibly some mind-altering substances involved to come up with just the right ending for it...one thing i did not bring up in discussing the film was that it reminded me quite a bit of DEATH BECOMES HER- which has built a well-deserved cult following since its release- and many of the British horror anthologies that followed- as well as TALES FROM THE CRYPT- that last one kinda killed the genre in a way because every episode gave us an awful person who does awful things and is ALWAYS ALWAYS killed in some ironic form with NO VARIATION on the theme and zero surprise.

 

thus, watching BLITHE SPIRIT, i kinda sensed where it was going- but only because its original trail has been MUCH HACKED UPON since first it was blazed.

 

I'm sure BLITHE SPIRIT was a sensation when it came out because it was rather unexpected for it to end in such a way- being one of the first stories to use the above discussed method of storytelling- although the "horror" is subtle and the fact the protagonists are- kind of- awful people is subtle and hidden by their intrinsic Britishness.


  • TikiSoo, midwestan and film lover 293 like this

#14 LornaHansonForbes

LornaHansonForbes

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,697 posts
  • LocationDark City, USA

Posted Yesterday, 08:28 AM

"Go Naked in the World" (1961)-

This one is early 60's MGM melodrama, and full of howlers.

 

A few of the films' memorable lines;


Julie to Nick, after he's asked how many men she's been with--"Why count waves in the ocean?"

 

 

 

DANG HOE!

I'm gonna use that line some time IRL...


  • cigarjoe, LawrenceA and film lover 293 like this

#15 LornaHansonForbes

LornaHansonForbes

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,697 posts
  • LocationDark City, USA

Posted Yesterday, 08:27 AM

I caught the end of GO NAKED.... and- yeah- I think it's far to say it would place somewhere in the mid-range of the LYLAH scale.

 

ps- it's hard to believe Tony Franciosa was "a thing."


  • film lover 293 likes this

#16 film lover 293

film lover 293

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,053 posts

Posted Yesterday, 07:32 AM

"Go Naked in the World" (1961)--Starring Gina Lollobrigida, Anthony Franciosa, and Ernest Borgnine. Written and directed by Ranald MacDougall.

 

This one is early 60's MGM melodrama, and full of howlers.

 

As the film begins, Julie (Lollobrigida) gets out of a limousine, accompanied by an older man.  A "sister" on the street, dressed all in red, winks at her.  Message sent to audience.  Julie and companion enter the fancy restaurant.  Her escort has to leave.  Julie sits in a booth.  Nick (Franciosa), who has just finished an enlistment in the Army, catches sight of her.  Despite her brushing him off like a fly, he persists in trying to make a date with her.  They proceed to her place and sleep together as an ending to their first date.  It never dawns on Nick that Julie  is anything other than a "nice" girl, despite numerous hints given him. Their romance proceeds from there.

 

A few of the films' memorable lines;

 

Julie to companion :"I haven't been alone since I was twelve years old".

 

Nicks father Pete (Borgnine) to Nick: "Spit on me for luck".

 

Nick's clueless mother Mary (Nancy R. ****) to Julie, at her 30th wedding anniversary party--"Everybody is staring" (with good reason, as it turns out).

 

Nick to Julie, after he's found out the terrible truth--"I'll never get clean again!"

 

Julie to Nick, after he's asked how many men she's been with--"Why count waves in the ocean?"

 

Lollobrigida is ok as Julie, and has a way with a sarcastic line.  Franciosa is just terrible as Nick; nobody is that stupid.  Borgnine yells his way through his part, but manages some good acting in his few quiet scenes. 

 

Check out the portrait above Lollobrigida's bed in the two scenes where it's shown.  It looks like a fuzzy picture of Elizabeth Taylor in her slip from "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" (1958),  The artist didn't even bother to change the hair color.

 

If you like melodramas to laugh at, this film's for you.  2.7/4.

 

Edit--Otto censored the actress's name.


  • mr6666, misswonderly3, midwestan and 1 other like this

#17 Swithin

Swithin

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 12,656 posts
  • LocationNew York City

Posted 23 September 2017 - 10:26 PM

I just watched Walk on Water (2004), a deeply moving Israeli film about a Mossad agent who befriends two young Germans as part of a scheme to locate their Nazi grandfather. The complex characters develop beautifully in this film -- the acting is excellent, particularly Lior Ashkenazi, Knut Berger, and Caroline Peters. Directed by Eytan Fox.

 

The film has one of the great endings. SPOILER ALERT: When the Nazi is finally located, the Mossad agent charged with the execution finds he can no longer kill. The act is carried out by the Nazi's grandson, a sweet, gay young man who loves life. This is a remarkable movie.

 

osVUxR3HdccQG8yBKX3VWp8nVFv.jpg

 

http://www.imdb.com/...ef_=nm_rvd_vi_1


  • mr6666, misswonderly3, midwestan and 1 other like this

#18 cigarjoe

cigarjoe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,101 posts
  • LocationNY

Posted 23 September 2017 - 06:39 PM

Sudden Fear (1952)

 

I loved this movie.  At the urging of some of my friends here on the board, I recorded this film last December when it was a TCM premiere.  It's been 9 months, but I've finally watched it.  I should have watched it sooner because this was a great film--probably one of the best films I've watched in awhile.

 

I'm not the biggest fan of Joan Crawford's MGM years, but I love her work in the 1940s-1950s when she was with Warner Brothers and then later freelance (?).  Sudden Fear was an RKO production.  I thought the whole cast was excellent and I liked how the story was told.  While the idea of a husband teaming up with his mistress to kill his wife is not novel, I felt that the way that the events unfolded in Sudden Fear was very creative and interesting.  I also liked that Crawford was a strong character in this film and didn't just wait around being scared.

 

In a nutshell, without giving too much away, Sudden Fear tells the story of a woman (Crawford) who discovers that her husband and his girlfriend are planning on murdering her in order to claim rights to her wealthy estate.  Crawford's character is a wealthy woman who is also a playwright.  When the film opens, she is in New York watching rehearsals for her new play.  The leading man Jack Palance, is good but Crawford doesn't think he's right for the lead in her play and has him fired.  Palance is understandably upset.  Later, Crawford is on a train headed back to her home in San Francisco.  She ends up meeting Palance and the two have a whirlwind relationship on the week long train trip.  By the time the pair make it to San Francisco, they are in love and marry soon after.

 

For awhile, it seems that Crawford and Palance are completely enamored with one another and have an ideal relationship.  At a party, Crawford meets Gloria Grahame, the girlfriend of her lawyer (Bruce Bennett)'s friend, Junior (a pre-Mannix Mike Connors).  Grahame seems innocent and sweet enough and Crawford doesn't think much about her.  She soon discovers that husband Palance and Grahame are acquainted with one another and they're scheming to murder her over the weekend.  Of course, they are planning on framing Crawford's death to look like an accident, as the husband would be the first suspect (any avid Forensic Files viewer knows that).  

 

Palance and Grahame do not know that Crawford knows about their plan.  Crawford does everything she can to foil their plans.  There is also a deadline that the pair is working against, as Crawford is planning on signing a new Will on Monday (it's I believe, Thursday or something on the day Crawford finds out what is happening) which will greatly reduce the amount of money that Palance would be bequeathed.  

 

The third act of the film when it's Sunday night and Palance and Grahame are desperate is the highlight of the film.  Crawford's meticulous planning and execution of her plan is flawless and very interesting to watch in the film.  The director chooses to only show Crawford's hands and body during the scenes where she is preparing for her plot.  The cinematography during the climactic finale is excellent and very unusual.  There were lots of various angles used, not to mention the great scenery of San Francisco.

 

I really liked Crawford in this film--especially her eyes.  Her eyes were almost their own character in the film.  Crawford's facial expressions conveyed every ounce of fear that she was feeling.  I liked her in the scene where she collapses as her idyllic world has suddenly fallen apart without warning.  Palance was excellent.  I had never seen him in a film where he was young.  He reminded me a lot of Martin Landau.  I also really liked Grahame in this film.  Every time I see her in a film, her screen presence is so unique and she brings so much to all her roles, no matter how small.  I like that Grahame also manages to almost always bring a bit of a sleazy quality to her roles, it works well for noir.  She's even a bit sleazy in It's a Wonderful Life

 

This was a great film and I'd love to watch it again, even though I know how it'll end.  I feel like this is one of those films that you can watch over and over and always get something different out of it.  I was excited to find that it was on DVD/Blu Ray.

 
A very, very dark and claustrophobic noir, with good performances all around, especially by the more creepy than usual Palance, it has to be the lighting that is enhancing his train wreck of a face.  
 
It's a veritable juxtaposition of grotesques the ghoulish Palance with the almost buffoonish Crawford.  Crawford no matter how you slice it looks downright clownish (wearing a nightgown inspired by Uncle Fester) while she runs about chewing the scenery with ape like hysterics that makes you feel like throwing her a banana. It's hard to root for a leading lady that looks like this:
 
Joan.jpg
 
Joan%2B01.jpg
 
Palance in one of his better closeups
 
Jack.jpg
 
I can only imagine what Joan's eye bulging school of acting must have looked like on a full 60' screen.
 
Some great noir cinematography ominous convertible
atmo.jpg
 
All in all it has great atmospherics, the Kino DVD is bare bones, too bad, I have a feeling that a running commentary would have been hilarious. I'll subtract 2 points for the post plucked eye browed Crawford, final tally 7/10

  • LornaHansonForbes and film lover 293 like this

#19 Fedya

Fedya

    Crotchety blankety-blank

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,385 posts

Posted 23 September 2017 - 12:30 PM

Morgan is so appealing that you can put up with most of the nonsense that occurs for most of the film (like his singing in the police glee club).


No he's not. I tried watching this once, and bailing on it 20 minutes or so in when all the horrendous Irish singing started in earnest.

#20 midwestan

midwestan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 823 posts
  • LocationIllinois

Posted 23 September 2017 - 08:08 AM

I saw "Blithe Spirit" for the first time on Friday.  I too was chuckling at Margaret Rutherford's performance as Madame Arcati---she was a kick!  I'm still deciding whether or not the ending was satisfying to me.  At first glance, I'd say 'no', but reflecting on how the story unfolded, you could take it two ways and say 'yes, it was a decent ending'.

 

Kay Hammond (wife #1) and Constance Cummings (wife #2) were either so in love with Rex Harrison that they couldn't bear to be without him, even in the afterlife.  Or, they didn't trust him as far as they could throw him, and were thus jealous that he would take on a wife #3 rather than live out his mortal life as a widower.

 

The restoration of this film was very good.  I'd never heard of Constance Cummings until 2016 when she was a Summer Under The Stars honoree.  She had an interesting career; one of the few American-born actors or actresses who went overseas to continue and complete their vocation.

 

Just a note about TCM On Demand.  I fell asleep watching "The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit" the other night, so I thought I'd catch the remainder on the computer the next day.  Everything was cool until the film froze up with 10 minutes to go (Yaaaaarrrrrrggggghhhhh)!  So, I waited until later in the day to try it again.  This time, it ran all the way through with no hitches in the playback.


  • mr6666 and LornaHansonForbes like this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users