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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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I Just Watched...


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#21 JamesStewartFan95

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Posted Yesterday, 07:34 PM

Tiny Tim may not quite be right for W A P.  We need a nerdy intellectual with perhaps effeminate characteristics and a big heart. Any ideas?
 
Or is a trivial pursuit like this retrograde to the thread?


Elvis Costello isn't effeminate, but he's both bespectacled and intellectual. He'd be a great fit for The Pinball Wizard. But he was sadly too young for the role in 1975.

#22 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted Yesterday, 05:58 PM

I just watched The Judge Steps Out.      Ok film,  with Knox bringing more energy into his performance that usual and Ann Sothern in fine form.     What I didn't know was that was Martha Hyer as the daughter.     Now typically I favor brunettes but Martha wasn't very noticeable in this picture verses some of her ice blonde roles in films like Some Came Running and House Boat.

 

 


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#23 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted Yesterday, 05:15 PM

Tiny Tim may not quite be right for W A P. We need a nerdy intellectual with perhaps effeminate characteristics and a big heart. Any ideas?

Or is a trivial pursuit like this retrograde to the thread?


1. Anthony Perkins
2. Trivial pursuit is why I keep coming here, Baby.

#24 laffite

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Posted Yesterday, 05:01 PM

Oh man, I did not realize that you were referring to Henry Fonda in WAR UNDTE PEACE and instead thought you were referring to Elton John in TOMMY, which another post references below.

I would TOTALLY DIG Tiny Tim as the Pinball Wizard.

 

Tiny Tim may not quite be right for W A P.  We need a nerdy intellectual with perhaps effeminate characteristics and a big heart. Any ideas?

 

Or is a trivial pursuit like this retrograde to the thread?



#25 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted Yesterday, 04:13 PM

Tiny Tim would have been better.

:lol:


Oh man, I did not realize that you were referring to Henry Fonda in WAR UNDTE PEACE and instead thought you were referring to Elton John in TOMMY, which another post references below.

I would TOTALLY DIG Tiny Tim as the Pinball Wizard.
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#26 laffite

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Posted Yesterday, 01:58 PM

I have - long ago, and it was a good, worthwhile read, except for some uninteresting military details at the end. I haven't seen the film in quite some time, but I do remember thinking Henry Fonda was badly miscast.

 

Tiny Tim would have been better.

 

:lol:



#27 JamesStewartFan95

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Posted Yesterday, 01:40 PM

"Tommy" (1975)--Starring Roger Daltrey, Ann-Margret, Oliver Reed, Tina Turner, and Jack Nicholson.  Directed by Ken Russell.
 
The music is good, especially Tina Turner, Ann-Margret's songs, and Elton John, who sings "Pinball Wizard".
 
Source--archive.org.  Search "Ken Russell"; restrict results to movies only.  Should be one of the first three results.  Was archived on October 8th, 2016.


Elton John's performance in Tommy is indeed a highlight.
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#28 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted Yesterday, 12:04 PM

I have - long ago, and it was a good, worthwhile read, except for some uninteresting military details at the end. I haven't seen the film [WAR AND PEACE] in quite some time, but I do remember thinking Henry Fonda was badly miscast.

 

AND HEAVILY MADE-UP.

I could not BELIEVE how BEAT his face was, at least during his first scenes.

 

Tammy Faye would've been like "damn girl, take it down a notch or four with the rouge."


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#29 Hibi

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Posted Yesterday, 11:56 AM

I read about 2/3 of it. I skipped the long, rambling, philosophical discussions about war etc.......

 

Film suffers from too many accents, too many cooks etc. But it's worth watching if you have the time...


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#30 scsu1975

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Posted Yesterday, 11:24 AM

"War and Peace" (1956)--Starring Audrey Hepburn, Henry Fonda, Mel Ferrer, and Vittorio Gassman.  Directed by King Vidor.

 

Full disclosure--I haven't read Tolstoy's book.

 

I have - long ago, and it was a good, worthwhile read, except for some uninteresting military details at the end. I haven't seen the film in quite some time, but I do remember thinking Henry Fonda was badly miscast.


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I'm a big boy.


#31 film lover 293

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Posted Yesterday, 11:05 AM

"War and Peace" (1956)--Starring Audrey Hepburn, Henry Fonda, Mel Ferrer, and Vittorio Gassman.  Directed by King Vidor.

 

Full disclosure--I haven't read Tolstoy's book.

 

Choppy,sprawling epic set in 1805-1814 Russia during the Napoleonic Wars.  The film traces the lives of Natasha (Hepburn), Pierre (Fonda), and Andrey (Ferrer) during this period.  

 

The film had six credited adaptors (including Vidor), plus the screenwriter  Irwin Shaw.

 

One of the film's biggest problems is that few of the actors get enough screen time to fully develop  their characters.  Hepburn is most successful, as Natasha goes from kittenish young girl to sadder, wiser young woman.  Fonda is problematic; he may be the right personality type for Pierre, and his sincerity shines, but he sounds just out of Nebraska. Mel Ferrer is fine as Andrey, Natashas' first love.   Vittorio Gassman does a memorable sketch of an uncaring cad.  Herbert Lom shows the madness that motivates Napoleon in limited screen time.  Anita Ekberg has just enough screen time to establish  Helene as a scheming witch, then disappears from the film.

 

The rushed, shallow script that tries to do too much in too little time is another big problem.

 

There are occasional images of the horror of war.  A womans' frozen corpse tumbling out of a carriage during Napoleon's retreat from Moscow; a white horse dying on the battlefield; the wheels of Napoleons' carriage running over the hand of an infantryman during the Moscow retreat.

 

Film is far from a success, but it's not a disaster either.  The performances make it worth the watch.  2.4/4.

 


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#32 cigarjoe

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 09:05 AM

The Deserter (The Devil's Backbone) (1971) Just watched the Pan & Scan Youtube version, it was actually very good and I wonder why it was never in serious rotation on US TV, reminded me of a lesser The Professionals with a surprisingly great cast. Bekim Fehmiu, Richard Crenna, Chuck Connors, Ricardo Montalban, Ian Bannen, Brandon De Wilde, Slim Pickens, Woody Strode, Albert Salmi, John Huston, and Patrick Wayne. 

 
I'd like to see it with a better widescreen print. Taking place during the Apache Indian campaigns there wasn't anything anachronistic that I noticed and the Natives were quite convincing, nice locations also. The OST wasn't much. Worth checking out. 8/10

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#33 cigarjoe

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 06:03 AM

Broken City (2013) Dir. by Allen Hughes starring Mark Wahlberg, Russell Crowe, Catherine Zeta-Jones, noir-ish story of an ex cop who is hired by NYC Mayor to spy on his cheating wife, though it's actually about a more convoluted scenario than that. Some nice cinematography of the city but story has some plot problems. 6/10


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#34 TikiSoo

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 04:49 AM

This would be a perfect film for TCM Underground.  Has TCM ever shown it?

 

Yes they have. Thank you for your impressions on this movie!

I saw this when it first came out (I was 15 and a huge Who fan) and us teens panned it. 

 

I liked it a lot better as an adult seeing it when TCM aired it a few years back. It was wonderful seeing Keith Moon cavort around. And I agree Tina Turner was the standout performance & sequence. I was surprised how young & beautiful Ann-Margret was, when originally saw it, thought she was a "has-been" (ah the teen mind!) 

At 15, I knew who Oliver Reed was, and thought he was a poor choice to cast in this movie-as an adult I realize how lucky they were to have an actor of his caliber!

 

Despite the fantastic music & nostalgic cameos, the story still is a bit weak. But I think the sheer amount of talent, including Ken Russell's direction makes it worth watching at least once or twice.


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#35 EricJ

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 04:17 AM

"Scaramouche" (1923) movie is quite good.  People of France can only eat so much cake.  What was André-Louis Moreau trying to play on the stage, a clown or...

 

mqdefault.jpg

 

(From our Joke & Dagger Department: )

 

Technically, it's "Commedia Dell'Arte"--Which we learned about in high school when having to watch a commedia dell'arte production of Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew.

https://en.wikipedia...media_dell'arte

The talking 1952 Scaramouche does a better job of illustrating Sabatini's use of the character tropes and theater style of the day.  Not to mention why Scaramouche wears a mask...Who is he?  A lover?  A fighter?


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Let's start a revolution: http://movieactivist.blogspot.com

#36 hamradio

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 01:31 AM

"Hal Roach's Rascals - Monkey Business" (1926) short on TCM.  Very funny, couldn't help to notice the can of Ben Hur Pepper the chimp grabbed.  It's not a prop but a real brand name.

 

Screenshot of movie scene

 

2a4pkt1.jpg

 

 

876_1456955830A.jpg

 

 

 

Publicity photo.

 

Roach%2520%26%2520Our%2520Gang-1%2520cop


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#37 hamradio

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Posted 26 June 2017 - 01:13 AM

"Scaramouche" (1923) movie is quite good.  People of France can only eat so much cake.  What was André-Louis Moreau trying to play on the stage, a clown or...

 

mqdefault.jpg


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#38 film lover 293

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 08:05 PM

"Tommy" (1975)--Starring Roger Daltrey, Ann-Margret, Oliver Reed, Tina Turner, and Jack Nicholson.  Directed by Ken Russell.

 

Film is based on The Who's rock opera.  It's about a boy (Barry Winch) who goes deaf, dumb, and blind as a result of a traumatic event he witnesses.  The boy grows up to be Daltrey, and the film is about what happens to him and his parents (Ann-Margret & Reed).

 

The performances, music, and the images are what made an impression on me.  Tina Turner is unforgettable as the Acid Queen, who promises to make Tommy grow up.  Ann-Margret is better than I ever remember her being; she got a Best Actress Oscar nomination and won a Golden Globe as Best Actress in a Comedy or Musical.  Roger Daltrey does well in his first movie.  Jack Nicholson as The Specialist has a better voice than Marlon Brando.  Oliver Reed's singing skills are debateable, but he acts the part well.

 

The music is good, especially Tina Turner, Ann-Margret's songs, and Elton John, who sings "Pinball Wizard".

 

The images that work--the ones I remember best; The Church of Marilyn Monroe, with her statue in the pose from "The Seven Year Itch" (1955), when she stood above a subway grating and her skirt blew upward.  The whole scene with Tina Turner.  Ann-Margret dressed in white, in an all white room; Daltrey, singing in a church, with a cross as his microphone.

 

This would be a perfect film for TCM Underground.  Has TCM ever shown it?

 

Film's not for everyone, but is very worth a watch.  3.3/4.

 

Source--archive.org.  Search "Ken Russell"; restrict results to movies only.  Should be one of the first three results.  Was archived on October 8th, 2016.


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#39 TomJH

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 05:53 PM

As far as the '43 version of Phantom of the Opera is concerned, Universal had toyed with the idea of casting Karloff in a version during the '30s and, following his success in Hunchback of Notre Dame a few years later, Charles Laughton.

 

Lon Chaney Jr., a Universal contract player, was dying to recreate the part that was so important a part of his father's legend. Here's a photo of Chaney in makeup as the Monster in Ghost of Frankenstein visiting the Phantom set.

 

aaaarains16.jpg

 

Claude Rains finally accepted the part but with reservations. He was greatly concerned that his makeup not be too extreme, and he was also wary off the possibility of a too close identification with the horror genre having a detrimental impact upon his future career when it came to leading roles.

 

From Claude Rains: An Actor's Voice:

 

(Director Arthur) Lubin told historian Scott MacQueen that Rains was so concerned about his burn makeup and its potential effect upon his career that the director was forced to employ a hidden camera to capture needed footage during the unmasking scene. The initial shot, in which Susanna Foster rips off the mask, was compromised by a slightly out-of-focus zoom-in. Two perfectly focused head shots of Rains were subsequently inserted; these, apparently, are the surreptitious footage Lubin described.

 

Rains never talked about his collaboration with (makeup artist Jack) Pierce, who was notoriously testy and autocratic. As it turned out, the final makeup was uncannily similar to the effects of the World War I gas that had blinded Rains in one eye, which doubtless added to his discomfort. Since he insisted on being masked until the very end of the film, Rains created a dilemma for himself somewhat parallel to being unseen in The Invisible Man, and he held out for the most flattering mask possible. Lubin remembered "a great deal of argument" about the "testing of the damn mask." But the result was brilliant - a pale blue, almost feline stylization of Rains's own face, allowing the actor to be perfectly recognizable even when disguised. The mask is believed to have been executed by Pierce's assistant (and later his successor at Universal), Bud Westmore.

 

22013407078_89419b3c09_o.jpg


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#40 TomJH

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 04:14 PM

"The Phantom of the Opera" (1962)--Starring Herbert Lom, Heather Sears, Michael Gough, and Edward De Souza.  Directed by Terence Fisher.

 

I recall being taken to the show to see this one by my parents. I was all excited to see what I had read was "the greatest horror film ever made," not realizing that in my horror fan magazine reading I had it confused with the Lon Chaney silent.

 

Boy, was I disappointed.

 

Later I saw the Chaney version and found it more theatrical than horrifying. Chaney's makeup, of course, is memorable. It must have been a shock for 1925 audiences when they saw the unmasking scene since Universal had made a point of not letting the Phantom's makeup be seen in any of the publicity surrounding the film. Today, of course, we all know what Chaney's Phantom looks like through millions of photographs published of it since, lessening the impact of the big reveal scene.

 

giphy.gif

 

I always thought that one of the most effective moments in this uneven film is the climax when furious crowds are pursuing Chaney's Phantom who is driving a horse drawn coach, which finally overturns.

 

SPOILER ALERT:

 

There is then a marvelous moment of defiance from Chaney as he stops the crowd from closing in upon him by holding a closed fist above his head, the implication being that there is a bomb in it. Holding them at bay for a few seconds, he then opens his hand to reveal that there is nothing in it, laughing at them over his having briefly fooled them (once again) and making them cower. The angry crowd then quickly moves in upon him to beat him to death and throw his body into the river. But it's the Phantom's final laughter and his defiance of the crowd that stays in this viewer's memory.


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