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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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I Just Watched...


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#41 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:28 PM

Thank you.

#42 LawrenceA

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:25 PM

Forgive me I'm kind of late to the party, but are they showing suspense movies only all March long? Like in a continuous block?

 

Up through Saturday, anyway.



#43 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:23 PM

Forgive me I'm kind of late to the party, but are they showing suspense movies only all March long? Like in a continuous block?

#44 Janet0312

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:04 PM

I just watched the first three episodes of  the first season of "The Defenders", a TV show from the early 60s. E.G. Marshall and Robert Reed star as a father and son team of defense lawyers. I can imagine the stink this might have made when it first came on the air 56 years ago. For example, episode one deals with mercy killing. There is a love interest for Robert Reed's character in the first episode, but then she disappears, at least in the next two episodes. Maybe the writers wanted to concentrate on the legal issues feeling that they had their hands full just with that. In just the first three episodes  Jack Klugman, Gene Hackman, Hugh Herbert, and William Shatner have had guest appearances. Also, right out of the gate, the two main characters have their personas down, and the writing is just superb. Not a wasted or boring minute in any of the first three episodes.
 
Season one was a blind DVD buy for me, and so far the glowing reviews have proved to be true.


Insomnia allows me from time to time to catch 77 Sunset Strip on MeTV in the wee small hours of the morning. I really like that show. I'd never seen it before, but I remember my brother was hooked on it when he was a kid. I love Kooky and in one of the episodes I watched, he was dancing up a storm and some of the moves reminded me of some of Gene Kelly's moves in American in Paris. Very modern for the day. Just goes to show you that some of those old shows, maybe more than some, still hold true for today. I mean they're good.
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#45 calvinnme

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 12:28 PM

How long was The Defenders on? I vaguely remember it...

 

It was on for four seasons, 1961-1965. Only season one is on DVD via Shout Factory. I don't remember it at all and I was old enough to remember it when it was on the air.. My parents are very conservative and I can see them banning this show from their TV back when I was a kid, thus I would have never known about it.



#46 EricJ

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 12:12 PM

I have no use for critics. Many people work for months - sometimes years - producing something for us to experience, only to have some snot go telling everyone how bad it is and interfering with any chance for a truly fair appraisal by movie-goers. They can seriously damage many careers with their flippant and often crap opinions.

 

You do know that if you say that now, you first have to publicly disclaimer that you have no ties whatsoever to Batman v. Superman or Suicide Squad? 

The new angry "DC Trump" fanboys-on-the-march armies have rather stunk up the "Critics are meanies and should be retired!" argument, and gotten themselves laughed off the press.

 

FMM, think it was Gene Siskel, the philosophical half of Siskel & Ebert, who said it best--

In school, your teacher didn't say you were a bad person when she gave you a C- on the test, she just pointed out why you didn't do as much work as the kids in class who got A's on the same question:

"A critic doesn't say he 'hated' the movie...He asks, 'Why wasn't it BETTER?'"


Let's start a revolution:  http://movieactivist.blogspot.com


#47 EricJ

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 12:00 PM

Long story short, I cried throughout this movie, which is really no surprise, considering how much I am obsessed with Disney. Give this movie a try, it was truly beautiful. It is my humble opinion that Disney is somewhat of a cult, but a cult that I am proud to be a member of. 

 

Well, B&B is more of a "cult", because its audience has DNA memories back to 1991, when grownups not in the Disney Cult DID NOT go around admitting they went to see a "G-rated kiddy movie".

Up that point, from '85-'90, the image of big-budget animation was still dictated by the success of the Care Bears Movie (and the failure of "The Black Cauldron", which made 80's Disney look even more like it was fatally stuck in its past with no future), and taken for granted that a "kiddy matinee" was used to sell an afternoon out for kids with their favorite TV characters, to sell the toys.  If anyone went around praising animated films, we all thought Don Bluth was going to take over the industry someday with "Secret of NIMH" and "The Land Before Time". 

Otherwise, you would literally hear average grownup people afraid that they'd be seen as "pedophiles" if they went to see the movie by themselves, and had to borrow some friend or relative's little kid as excuse.

 

I remember it was a bit of a surprise when "The Little Mermaid" turned out to be so newly cinematic (even though I'd seen the early harbingers in "The Great Mouse Detective" three years earlier), and we...didn't quite know how to rationalize our feelings over it.  It was certainly better than "An American Tail", so now we had to rethink the "Don Bluth will save us" thing...But 90's-Renaissance Disney had suddenly gotten their movies so right, after twenty-five years of getting them wrong, we thought it was just a lucky fluke.

And when Disney decided to try and calm those "It's just luck!" fears by showing B&B: a Work in Progress at the NY Film Festival...oh, well, there ya go:  It's art.  Grownup cineaste festival critics have approved it, it must be good.

(The "grownup" argument in favor of it at the time addressed the then-current 90's Broadway slump, and "Animation is the New Broadway!" was the big adult-validation critic phrase being thrown around in the press.  Guess what idea that gave Disney, and which one to try it on.)

 

When we had our usual October/November Oscar-guessing fears of "We don't know what to nominate!" in 1991 (since JFK and Bugsy of Tides hadn't opened yet, and every expert was sure the Academy would never remember Silence of the Lambs from spring), guess which movie became the default Front-Runner We've Heard Of, just on festival reputation.  

And once it did, new adult Disney-cult fans could finally come out in public and demand that EVERY Disney film be recognized for its grownup cinematic appeal, including Aladdin and Lion King...At least until Pixar's "Toy Story 2" came out in '00, and then the emphasis changed.

 

So it's always been my theory:  The "cults" around B&B and Lion King are the highest compliments Little Mermaid and Aladdin ever got.  But fans of those movies would still prefer a little fairer credit where due.

(And I've already gone into detail on the "Feminist role model!" angle that doesn't have a clue what the original source tale was about.)


Let's start a revolution:  http://movieactivist.blogspot.com


#48 Hibi

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 11:14 AM

I just watched the first three episodes of  the first season of "The Defenders", a TV show from the early 60s. E.G. Marshall and Robert Reed star as a father and son team of defense lawyers. I can imagine the stink this might have made when it first came on the air 56 years ago. For example, episode one deals with mercy killing. There is a love interest for Robert Reed's character in the first episode, but then she disappears, at least in the next two episodes. Maybe the writers wanted to concentrate on the legal issues feeling that they had their hands full just with that. In just the first three episodes  Jack Klugman, Gene Hackman, Hugh Herbert, and William Shatner have had guest appearances. Also, right out of the gate, the two main characters have their personas down, and the writing is just superb. Not a wasted or boring minute in any of the first three episodes.

 

Season one was a blind DVD buy for me, and so far the glowing reviews have proved to be true.

 

 

How long was The Defenders on? I vaguely remember it...



#49 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 10:11 AM

Beauty and the Beast (2017):

                     The Soich for More Money....

 

 

j/k

(twas a lovely review, and i get you on the Disney thing. )

 

 

 

(Spaceballs)


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#50 calvinnme

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 10:04 AM

I just watched the first three episodes of  the first season of "The Defenders", a TV show from the early 60s. E.G. Marshall and Robert Reed star as a father and son team of defense lawyers. I can imagine the stink this might have made when it first came on the air 56 years ago. For example, episode one deals with mercy killing. There is a love interest for Robert Reed's character in the first episode, but then she disappears, at least in the next two episodes. Maybe the writers wanted to concentrate on the legal issues feeling that they had their hands full just with that. In just the first three episodes  Jack Klugman, Gene Hackman, Hugh Herbert, and William Shatner have had guest appearances. Also, right out of the gate, the two main characters have their personas down, and the writing is just superb. Not a wasted or boring minute in any of the first three episodes.

 

Season one was a blind DVD buy for me, and so far the glowing reviews have proved to be true.


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#51 NickAndNora34

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 09:29 AM

Beauty and the Beast (2017): As much as it pains me to see movies being remade, I find that I am able to give Disney a pass for this, as the newer products rarely cease to amaze me. That being said, I thoroughly enjoyed Beauty and the Beast . I have been a fan of Emma Watson's, since first reading/watching the "Harry Potter" series several years ago when I was very young. It is evident she is not a strong singer, but her singing was quite pleasant to my ears. I think I doubted Disney's decision to cast her as Belle, but after seeing the movie, I feel as if those doubts have been put to rest. 

 

I thought the rest of the casting was en pointe (which is sometimes rare for movies these days). Dan Stevens (of Downton Abbey fame) was great as The Beast (in this version, he even gets to sing a song) and Kevin Kline was great as Maurice, Belle's father. Emma Thompson never fails to impress me. She was one of the people I was extremely glad was cast in this film. She did Angela Lansbury proud. Josh Gad (Lefou) is perhaps most famous for portraying the lovable snowman, Olaf, in Disney's 2013 animated film, "Frozen" (although I knew him mainly from the raunchy Broadway show, "Book of Mormon," but that's a story for another time). Luke Evans (Gaston): I am not as familiar with him; the only film of his I've seen is "Dracula: Untold." He was pretty good as well. Ian McKellen and Ewan McGregor were wonderful as per usual. The one I was impressed with the most, was 6-time Tony winner Audra McDonald. I have been a fan of hers since the year 2000 (when I first watched Disney's "Annie"), and she NEVER fails to amaze me with her consistency and overall talent. Her voice was, by far, the best in the movie. 

 

The cinematography/special effects were obviously all there. I mean, when you get a huge company like Disney, they naturally have all the money and the resources available to make the best quality motion picture that they want (except for "Cars 2," but that is also another story for another time). I can also say firsthand, that Lefou does, in fact, have a "gay moment" (director Bill Condon) in the film. Which, honestly, it's 2017, it's about time. 

 

Long story short, I cried throughout this movie, which is really no surprise, considering how much I am obsessed with Disney. Give this movie a try, it was truly beautiful. It is my humble opinion that Disney is somewhat of a cult, but a cult that I am proud to be a member of. 


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"The prettier the flower, the farther from the path." -Into the Woods 


#52 darkblue

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 05:08 AM

I think I stated in another discussion here that my Canadian friends refer to him as PM Zoolander.

 

Are your Canadian friends insecure boys? (They exist everywhere - even in Canada.)

 

They really resent that Justin is so attractive to chicks. Ton of jealousy feeding those snarks.


I may live badly but at least I don't have to work to do it.


#53 hamradio

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 10:40 PM

The Invisible Man was on this morning. An odd time to be playing, I would have enjoyed it more if it had been on at night. But it's such a great film, I stopped and sat down to watch. One thing I hadn't noticed before is at the end when he's lying invisible in his hospital bed, the covers move as if he's breathing. Nicely done. Claude Rains is exceptional, as usual.

 

Millard Nullings...any relationship? :lol:

 

Miss-Peregrines-Home-for-Peculiar-Childr



#54 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 07:18 PM

Justin Trudeau sane? .


By comparison?
Uh, yah.

#55 Fedya

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 07:11 PM

Justin Trudeau sane? I think I stated in another discussion here that my Canadian friends refer to him as PM Zoolander.

But thank you for your virtue signalling.

#56 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 06:56 PM

[quote name="misswonderly3" post="1473015" timestamp="1490121159"

ps: In place of Peeping Tom, we Canadians got Night Must Fall. I can see why this would fit in with the "malice" theme of the evening, but I've seen it twice now, and honestly, I don't think it's as good as many seem to think it is. (That's being polite.)[/quote]

(Oops messed up the quote)

ME:
when you say "it's not as good as many of you think" (paraphrasing) are you referring to NIGHT MUST FALL or PEEPING TOM?

Cause I'm with you: in spite of some good performances and brief moments of successful comedy, NIGHT MUST FALL isn't terribly good.

(PS, tell you what: we will trade Casino Mussolini for your hot, sane Prime Minister in exchange for the rights to pretty much every film ever made in America, classic or otherwise.How's that?)

Pss- tell you what, take the music too. And television rights. Just make sure to send us Justin and we will be sure to send you guys El Naranja...
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#57 Fedya

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 02:58 PM

Then it would have been like you had just watched Cyd Charisse dance and Gene Kelly killed her.


I'd rather watch him kill Judy Garland.
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#58 LawrenceA

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 02:00 PM

 

...we Canadians got  Night Must Fall. I can see why this would fit in with the "malice" theme of the evening, but I've seen it twice now, and honestly, I don't think it's as good as many seem to think it is. (That's being polite.)

 

That was remade in '64 with Albert Finney. I'd like to see that version.



#59 misswonderly3

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 01:32 PM

I should be used to this by now, but it never gets any easier to take. Peeping Tom was not aired in Canada. It always frustrates and infuriates me when some rare movie I'd love to see is blocked to Canadian viewers. It's hard to believe that there's a lot of money involved in this "rights" business.

 

The inertia on the part of someone - don't know who - to sort out this business of who has the "rights" to air old movies and what countries they can be aired in is a constant source of annoyance to me. Especially because the "who has the rights" issue is always about films that are at least 40 years old, usually much more. Is anyone really going to make or lose a lot of money from a film that was obscure even at the time of release (1960), let alone almost 60 years later? Aargh and aargh again.

 

ps: In place of Peeping Tom, we Canadians got  Night Must Fall. I can see why this would fit in with the "malice" theme of the evening, but I've seen it twice now, and honestly, I don't think it's as good as many seem to think it is. (That's being polite.)


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"....What is it?"

"The stuff that dreams are made of."


#60 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:59 PM

I expected to dislike Peeping Tom a lot, but I didn't.

 

wait a second, are you saying last night was the first time you saw it? if so, i'm pretty surprised, since you are clearly someone very well-versed in cinema!

 

i've seen it twice, and i will say IT IMPROVES a lot ON THE SECOND VIEWING!!!!! and it's a film whose sterling reputation and critic-driven narrative of "misunderstood masterpiece that (in fact really did) destroy the career of one of the true greats of British film" doesn't do it any favors in the long run...were it a film that i had just come across out of nowhere, not having read a thing about it, i'd've  likely liked it more the first go-round.






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