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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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I Just Watched...


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#41 Hibi

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 11:52 AM

MV5BNzVjOTk2NDMtYWQyNi00MmJlLWIzYjEtYWI3

La Otra, or The Other One is a 1946 Mexican noir starring Dolores Del Rio.  I wasn't long into it when I had the feeling that this would make a good Bette Davis film.  It then twigged that this was indeed remade with Bette Davis as Dead Ringer (1964).

The remake follows the original screenplay very closely but only Rian James' story is given credit in the latter.

B8EZ_A7CAAE2rB1.jpg

It's hard to beat Bette Davis but Del Rio and co-star Augustin Irusta are better suited for the parts.  They are younger for starters and I found Karl Malden a bit annoying in Dead Ringer.

But the real star of La Otra is the cinematographer, Alex Phillips.  Phillips was from Renfrew, Ontario but moved to Mexico in 1931 to work on their first sound film and stayed there until his death in 1977 (source, imdb).  There are many lovely B&W noir shots.  This is worth tracking down for fans of the genre and Del Rio.

 

 

Wish I could see this film. Always curious about it, since Dead Ringer was based on it........



#42 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 11:48 AM

i worked at Universal for a while ca. 2003 and had full access to the soundstages and backlot as it was at the time, which was much as i would imagine it was in the 40's and 50's (a lot of the same buildings.)

 

stage 28, THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA STAGE, was still there, but I never went in. :( it has since been torn down.

 

a fair amount of their backlot still exists, and whereas Warners only has that one "all american" Stars Hollow/Hazard City town square- Uni at the time had two:

 

(and i believe this to be true from personal recollection)

1. the one used in BACK TO THE FUTURE which was still almost the same

2. the one pictured in ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS and ALL I DESIRE that- at the time- also looked very much the same- I distinctly recall the church steeple.

 

(i used to take the golf cart through there all the time.)

 

universal also has a lot of their Europe town square sets like the ones from the FRANKENSTEIN films (don't know if they are the same or in the same location) but i would tear through there on the golf cart singing "FA LO LAH LAH LOH DEE" they also still had a 19th century New York street and a few different city streets which you see in commercials all the time.



#43 cmovieviewer

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 04:16 AM

ALL I DESIRE (1953)-

GORGEOUS black and white!
Stanwyck was terrific.
It was a lot better- and more visually sumptuous- than I expected.
Sirk continues to surprise me.

 

I also found this to be a wonderful example of concise storytelling - 20 minutes in and you know who all the characters are and how they have reacted to the wife/mother returning home and what their hopes are, both for and against her return.  Beautifully written, directed, and photographed.


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#44 cmovieviewer

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Posted 15 August 2017 - 04:04 AM

Also also:

 

it's worth reiterating how STUNNING a film ALL I DESIRE was, the print they showed was PRISTINE; I knew from THE TARNISHED ANGELS that SIRK could do GORGEOUS BLACK AND WHITE, but really- there were some incredible shots in this thing, i did not know a film made at Universal could be so lovely.

 

The Universal Backlot, which later showed up in the autumnal technicolor of ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS:

 

univ_circle_drive_all_i_desire.jpg

 

Well said!  I thought that town looked familiar...

 

y6EwxWs.jpg


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#45 EricJ

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 03:38 PM

The Universal Backlot, which later showed up in the autumnal technicolor of ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS:

 

univ_circle_drive_all_i_desire.jpg

 

"Quick, Marty, we've got to get to the town clock before lightning strikes!"


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#46 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 09:19 AM

Also also:

 

it's worth reiterating how STUNNING a film ALL I DESIRE was, the print they showed was PRISTINE; I knew from THE TARNISHED ANGELS that SIRK could do GORGEOUS BLACK AND WHITE, but really- there were some incredible shots in this thing, i did not know a film made at Universal could be so lovely.

 

The Universal Backlot, which later showed up in the autumnal technicolor of ALL THAT HEAVEN ALLOWS:

 

univ_circle_drive_all_i_desire.jpg


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#47 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 09:05 AM

Stanwyck could have and should have been nominated for All I Desire....her performance could have nudged any of the nominees off of that year's relatively weak list.

 

Yeah...except Audrey IS magic in HOLIDAY...

 

*note- I am about to spout off some stuff without checking REFERENCES- so get ready to call out any errors i make:

 

STANWYCK was never a STUDIO CONTRACTEE and as such, never really had a lock on the Oscar; Universal also had a terrible record for acting nominees- in the entirety of the 1940's i can only think of one person to get nominated for a performance in a Universal film- MARJORIE MAIN in THE EGG AND I. (it's worth noting that the handful of acting nods Uni got in the 1950s were ALL for Sirk-DIRECTED films- WRITTEN IN THE WIND, MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION and L'IMITACCION D'LA VIE.)

 

i think it would've helped if STANWYCK had some stronger support in ALL I DESIRE- LORI NELSON (later of REVENGE OF THE CREATURE) was beautiful but not on her level, RICHARD CARLSON (later of CREATURE OF THE BLACK LAGOON and TORMENTED) looked old enough for the part, but couldn't match her fire...

 

(side note- you could see just why Barbara bailed on him, wet matchstick that he was.)

 

there's also the fact that STANWYCK was a profoundly talented actress, REALLY in charge of her emotions- so much so that her having at least one BIG HISTRIONIC SCENE got to be her trademark (a la her temple breakdown in MIRACLE WOMAN or her "I SEEM TO BE GOING ALL TO PIECES!" moment from MON REPUTACCION...) she did it all the time, and her doing it all the time made it look easy, made it maybe seem like "showboating"-  but it wasn't.

 

every moment BARBARA STANWYCK is on screen, either histrionic or in control, you get something real and done the way it should be.

 

ALL I DESIRE really brought home last night how TREMENDOUS A DECADE the `1950's were for STANWYCK- more than any actress who had been around since the thirties- she was still doing big movies and GOOD movies and movies where she got to be strong or sexy and desirable- NO MAN OF HER OWN, JEOPARDY!, THELMA JORDAN, THERE'S ALWAYS TOMORROW, CRIME OF PASSION...

 

really hope the rest of you got to see ALL I DESIRE, and thanks to all who recommended it.


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#48 TomJH

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 07:06 AM

About a month ago, I was at the New Britain (CT) Museum of Art, and from a distance, spotted a painting of several men. At first glance, I thought one of the men looked like Barry Fitzgerald, which seemed odd.  As I moved closer, I realized I was correct … which brings me to …

 

The Long Voyage Home (1940)

 

 

Great eye in spotting that painting and making the connection, Rich.

 

According to Wiki:

 

The painting came to be because of Wood's art dealer Associated American Artists and the film producer Walter Wanger, who commissioned nine popular artists to paint a motif from the upcoming film The Long Voyage Home, directed by John Ford. The other artists who participated were Thomas Benton, George Biddle, James Chapin, Ernest Fiene, Robert Philipp, Luis Quintanilla Isasi, Raphael Soyer and Georges Schreiber. The artists visited the set of the film for several weeks in May 1940. Wood's scene is toward the end of the film and features, from left to right, the actors John Qualen, John Wayne, Barry Fitzgerald, Thomas Mitchell, Joe Sawyer, David Hughes and Jack Pennick.

 

By the way, I think that John Wayne gives a lovely performance as "Ole" in The Long Voyage Home, the only time I can think of in which he played a character with an accent. The Duke convincingly comes across like a bit of an innocent. Having said that the film still belongs to Thomas Mitchell, second billed but the real star of the film. This was one of the best roles of the actor's career, an impressive followup to his Oscar win the year before with Stagecoach. He and John Ford made beautiful screen magic together in these two films.

 

I often wondered when Ford was directing Edmond O'Brien two decades later as the drunken lawyer in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance if his instructions to the actor on the set had been, "Play it like Tommy Mitchell." Mitchell died of cancer the same year as that film's release.


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#49 RoyCronin

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 06:38 AM

Stanwyck could have and should have been nominated for All I Desire....her performance could have nudged any of the nominees off of that year's relatively weak list.

#50 Bogie56

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 05:54 AM

MV5BNzVjOTk2NDMtYWQyNi00MmJlLWIzYjEtYWI3

La Otra, or The Other One is a 1946 Mexican noir starring Dolores Del Rio.  I wasn't long into it when I had the feeling that this would make a good Bette Davis film.  It then twigged that this was indeed remade with Bette Davis as Dead Ringer (1964).

The remake follows the original screenplay very closely but only Rian James' story is given credit in the latter.

B8EZ_A7CAAE2rB1.jpg

It's hard to beat Bette Davis but Del Rio and co-star Augustin Irusta are better suited for the parts.  They are younger for starters and I found Karl Malden a bit annoying in Dead Ringer.

But the real star of La Otra is the cinematographer, Alex Phillips.  Phillips was from Renfrew, Ontario but moved to Mexico in 1931 to work on their first sound film and stayed there until his death in 1977 (source, imdb).  There are many lovely B&W noir shots.  This is worth tracking down for fans of the genre and Del Rio.


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#51 TikiSoo

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Posted 14 August 2017 - 05:13 AM

At first glance, I thought one of the men looked like Barry Fitzgerald

 

I can't "like" that post enough, scsu. Amazing how you were drawn to that painting....and even more amazing Grant Wood painted it. And how cool that you connected the two! Thank you so much for posting it.

 

Really, this was 1940, before video. Wood must have seen the movie in a theater and "remembered" the scene well enough to paint it? Maybe there was a lobby card of the scene?

 

Grant Wood is one of my favorite artists. He only had one functioning eye which is why his paintings lack depth.


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#52 scsu1975

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:38 PM

About a month ago, I was at the New Britain (CT) Museum of Art, and from a distance, spotted a painting of several men. At first glance, I thought one of the men looked like Barry Fitzgerald, which seemed odd.  As I moved closer, I realized I was correct … which brings me to …

 

The Long Voyage Home (1940)

 

A surprisingly engrossing film about men aboard a freighter just at the outbreak of WW II. Some action here and there, but mostly a treat to watch the ensemble cast working together. John Wayne is almost believable as a soft-spoken Swede. However, Thomas Mitchell and Ian Hunter stand out, particularly in a scene where the crew humiliate Hunter, whom they think is a spy. The ending is downbeat, but does nothing to spoil the film. Worth a look.

 

Now, on to the painting. In 1940, Grant Wood painted a scene of several men in a bar, and called it “Sentimental Ballad.” It is a beautiful piece of art. The painting is shown below, along with a similar scene from the film, in case you have trouble identifying the actors.

 

NLnJAMG.jpg
Mf2gRJx.png

 


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I'm a big boy.


#53 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 08:55 PM

ALL I DESIRE (1953)-

GORGEOUS black and white!
Stanwyck was terrific.
It was a lot better- and more visually sumptuous- than I expected.
Sirk continues to surprise me.
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#54 NickAndNora34

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 12:42 PM

Shallow Hal (2001) starring Gwyneth Paltrow and Jack Black. Definitely something almost completely different from my usual stuff, but my friends' dad wanted to watch this one haha. 


"The prettier the flower, the farther from the path." -Into the Woods 


#55 MovieCollectorOH

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 09:35 AM

Sadly, that is all I could stay for the entire weekend film festival. There's always next year!

 

I'll have to pencil that in.  We were thinking about making the trip one of these times, but it completely slipped our minds.  Were there a lot of people there?


Moviecollector's Corner                                                                                               Principia-Scientific.org (independent science news)

 


#56 TikiSoo

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 05:12 AM

I just watched:

SCREEN SNAPSHOTS SERIES 19 Number 6 from 1939. It was one of those "see the stars at leisure" reels. Fun seeing the stars attending baseball games or golfing. When someone particularly popular showed on the screen, you'd hear a twitter of applause....

 

I KNOW EVERYBODY AND EVERYBODY'S RACKET a 1933 Universal one reeler. A newly restored or newly discovered digital restoration. This short looked great and packed a big story in 20 minutes. A country girl bumps into celebrity columnist Walter Winchell playing himself who escorts the young girl around nightclubs to expose her to Broadway excitement. They see Paul Whiteman and his orchestra "Only if Whiteman doesn't stand in front". Full of several nasty funny lines like that.

 

My favorite: (girl) "Oh I wish I could see one of those!"

Winchell: "Why not give me a rub and maybe one will appear like a genie in a lamp." the audience howled at that, especially when he said "Rub harder" as she gamely stroked his arm.

Whiteman's singers did a particularly fun novelty number with a quartet of singers. Whiteman stood stone faced among them like a spector. I think I was the only one who laughed at that image.

 

But the punchline at the end was uttered by a black usher (or porter) and his face filled the screen as he grinned said the big payoff. It certainly packed a punch and the entire room roared with laughter. 

 

DISORDERLY CONDUCT Fox 1932 This was a good early Spencer Tracy as a cop movie. Ralph Bellamy was in it too, the youngest I had ever seen him. Bellamy is a real crowd pleaser, I think it's his winning smile.

Tracy is a good motorcycle cop supporting his mother & orphaned nephew & nieces. The nephew is played by uber scene stealer Dickie Moore. He looked to be about 5 years old. A few scenes were super close up on his angelic face, you could hear a hum of "aaawww" from the audience, he was so adorable.

Well good cop is punished and soon decides to be a bad cop and all hecks breaks loose. Dickie Moore is the sacrifice, of course. Maudlin story is only elevated by all the great performances and a few funny juicy lines.

 

180px-Tracy_disorderly_conduct_cropped.j

 

Sadly, that is all I could stay for the entire weekend film festival. There's always next year!


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#57 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 10:22 AM

Lorna and Hibi -

I still have access to Born to Kill, and as much as I can see Mrs. Kraft being in charge of such an establishment, it appears that she does not give explicit confirmation of same in the beginning of the film.  The only statement she really makes about her past is while discussing men with Helen and Laury.  Laury mentions how her new boyfriend (who turns out to be Lawrence Tierney) is “big across the shoulders,” and Mrs. Kraft says “I never knew a man like that. My two husbands was just turnips.” The scene continues just a bit longer before they switch to the casino locale where Helen first sees Sam at the craps table.

So unless “turnips” is a euphemism for “pimp” or something, Mrs. Kraft’s past is still a mystery.  She certainly does fit the bill, however, and even the boarding house scenes in the beginning look to me like they could be from a classic house of ill repute. Someone really should do a prequel where we find out how Mrs. Kraft learned to drink like that!

 

yes!

 

PS- thanks for the correction . i am sorry for remembering wrong. i do that. often...although I've been pretty good recently! i got Zandor Vorkov's name right in another thread, so there's that...

 

would love to see ESTHER (nee' HOFFMAN...?) HOWARD as MRS. KRAFT from BORN TO KILL and GLADYS GEORGE as LUTE MAE from FLAMINGO ROAD in some sort of delightful, two-woman WAITING FOR GODOT-type thing; like THE GIN GAME with no cards, but lots of gin...


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#58 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 09:43 AM

A Sirk I've never seen is premiering at 8 on Sunday.
ALL I DESIRE 1853

 

 

Damn ... does this film have sound??

 

sadly no, but it's well-worth catching- it's a series of tintype flashcards starring LEWIS STONE and MARIA OUSPENSKAYA as PRESIDENT AND MRS. WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON...(spoiler as per the title, "all he desired" was that he be president for AT LEAST 31 days, so the Sirkian theme of loss is heavily present- even early on.)

 

Joan Collins made her debut as a baby in a communion scene, Sirk would say years later that even then she was terribly temperamental (she threw up on his shoes. Twice.)


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#59 TikiSoo

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 05:54 AM

CHEER UP & SMILE 1930 starring a very young Arthur Lake & Dixie Lee. A silly early comedy about misunderstanding gives Lake the opportunity to spasm all over the screen. Bit part by a very young John Wayne and the organdy dresses worn by Lee were the highlight of this trifle.

 

THERE IT IS 1928 a one reel comedy starring Charley Bowers as a Scotland Yard detective dressed in a mini-kilt exorcizing a "spook" from a family's home. A small bald man with round glasses & big bushy mustache literally rolls across the set in funny costumes holding odd props periodically, then disappears as soon as someone spots him out of the corner of their eye. The old sliding panel trick. There's lots of innovative stop motion animation adding to the fun, like the pictures on the wall-one has the bald man's head rising in a picture called "sunrise".  The audience roared in laughter when the old man dressed in safari clothes, shoots a rifle toward the ceiling and a stiff, stuffed ram drops in the middle of the living room! A real crowd pleaser.

 

LITTLE ORPHANT ANNIE 1918 A Colleen Moore rarity. This is an early silent Colleen Moore, before the famous bob. She plays an orphan obviously, and is 19 years old, but looks much younger with long braids. This film was the premiere of a complete  restoration cobbled together from fragments-never seen since 1926!!

While the story dragged a little in the middle, whenever Moore was on screen it lit right up-you could definitely see her star quality. There were also very impressive special effects of goblins & witches fading in & out of the frame as she tells stories to the other little orphans. The blu-ray restoration was available at the dealer's booths, but one watch was good enough for me.

THANK YOU L.O.C. for funding that restoration!!!!

 

180px-Colleen_1921.JPG

 

Seen at 2017 CapitolFest....and today's another day! Hope to see fellow TCM members Ray Fiaola & midnight08 later!


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#60 film lover 293

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 12:45 AM

"Dreamboat" (1952)--Starring Ginger Rogers, Clifton Webb, and Elsa Lanchester.

 

Fun comedy about a college professor (Webb) who used to be a silent movie star.  His costar, Gloria Marlowe (Rogers) is now showing the old movies on television and selling perfume on the show where the movies are shown.  Life on campus becomes difficult for the professor and his daughter (Anne Francis) after the professor's past becomes known.  The head of the college (Lanchester) makes things even more difficult when she reveals she has a crush on him and has since she first saw his movies.  Movie goes from here.

 

Webb and Rogers make a marvelous team in the parodies of silent movies that are shown.  Webb gets a few good one liners and seems to be having a fine time in the movie parodies.  Rogers is witchily funny, and also appears to be having fun in the parodies.  She has a great last line to end the movie.  Lanchester is dependably eccentric and funny as the love stricken college dean.

 

Film's pacing is inconsistent, and there are dry spells between laughs, but the movie parodies, commercial parodies, and the stars' comedy expertise make this a entertaining watch. 3.2/4


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