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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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I Just Watched...


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#41 cigarjoe

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:22 PM

MONSTROSITY: THE ATOMIC BRAIN (1963) ridiculous and fun time waster, in Ed Wood territory 5.5/10


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#42 CinemaInternational

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 05:51 PM

Last film seen in full was the wonderful Ginger Rogers film Tender Comrade on Warner Archive Instant. I know that the film became most controversial during the blacklisting era though. That's a shame because it is a terrific and moving drama with fine work all around.

 

(Note: I say last one finished because I started watching another film on the same service, the caustic 1981 Blake Edwards comedy, S.O.B., but curiously the video stopped playing and displayed an error message 36 minutes in. A pity because I had already laughed several times already. The cast is in fine form so far. And the slapstick joke with Robert Mulligan landing on Loretta Swit took me off-guard.



#43 TomJH

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 04:20 PM

"Make Mine Music" (1946)--Featuring the voices of Nelson Eddy, The Andrews Sisters, Dinah Shore, and many others.

 

Feature designed to encourage music appreciation is made up of ten cartoon shorts.   The high points are "The Whale Who Wanted To Sing At The Met", which is sung by Nelson Eddy.  According to the opening credits of that segment, Eddy did ALL the voices in that cartoon--by my count, around fifteen parts.

 

Other high points are "All The Cats Join In", by Benny Goodman and Orchestra, which is about 1940's teens getting together and going to the malt shop--images from this number can be spotted in "Pass That Peace Pipe" from 1947's "Good News"; PTPP is also set in a malt shop.  "Peter and the Wolf" and Goodman's "After You've Gone" are other highlights.

 

 

I don't believe I've ever seen Make Mine Music but I do remember seeing Disney's version of Peter and the Wolf, with music by Prokofiev and narrated by Sterling Holloway. I loved it, and will now make a point of looking for Make Mine Music if only just to see it again. Wonderful stuff.

 

Thanks filmlover.

 

Disney-PeterandtheWolf1946.jpg

 

LCD08SS.jpg


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#44 film lover 293

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 11:54 AM

"Make Mine Music" (1946)--Featuring the voices of Nelson Eddy, The Andrews Sisters, Dinah Shore, and many others.

 

Feature designed to encourage music appreciation is made up of ten cartoon shorts.   The high points are "The Whale Who Wanted To Sing At The Met", which is sung by Nelson Eddy.  According to the opening credits of that segment, Eddy did ALL the voices in that cartoon--by my count, around fifteen parts.

 

Other high points are "All The Cats Join In", by Benny Goodman and Orchestra, which is about 1940's teens getting together and going to the malt shop--images from this number can be spotted in "Pass That Peace Pipe" from 1947's "Good News"; PTPP is also set in a malt shop.  "Peter and the Wolf" and Goodman's "After You've Gone" are other highlights.

 

The low point is the arty "Two Silhouettes", which shows two ballet dancers and features some rare bad animation--the two ballet dancers just become one lumpy figure when they merge.  There's nothing wrong with Dinah Shore's vocal to the number.   The "Blue Bayou" Tone Poem that opens the film almost put me to sleep.  

 

Film's episodes are very good or bad, with little in between except the Andrews Sisters episode ( "Johnny Fedora and Alice BlueBonnet").

 

Uneven film is worth the watch.  2.6/4.

 

Source--archive.org.  Search "Disney_Classics.  Link was archived 2/28/2017.  Link has multiple films; MMM is #40.


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#45 scsu1975

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 10:06 AM


 

There was an incident that happened on the September 20, 1955 episode that caused many of the shows tv audience to turn against Martha, involving an african american child. 12-year-old $64,000 Question winner Gloria Lockerman was a guest, along with Tallulah Bankhead, on the show that night. "At the bows, when they were saying goodnight," recalls Norman Lear (the brains behind All in the Family, Sanford and Son, Maude, Good Times, and The Jeffersons) "Talullah Bankhead picked Gloria Lockerman up and hugged her; Martha joined them and the three of them were hugging, and they both kissed her, This was 1954. There were so many letters about hugging that little black child that the show never recovered from it, with the ad agency carrying on the way it did." For whatever reason, the show was cancelled at the end of the 1955-56 season.

 

http://1950sunlimite...artha-raye.html

 

 

I'd be curious to know where the author got that information (though I don't doubt it could have happened). Gloria Lockerman actually won $16,000, although the article makes it appear she won $64,000. She won the money by spelling antidisestablishmentarianism.

Her win was mentioned on a Honeymooners episode ("The $99,000 Answer"), starting at around the 9:40 mark below:

 


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#46 TomJH

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:47 AM

"Hellzapoppin'" (1941)--Starring Ole Olsen, Chic Johnson, and Martha Raye.

 


This is the first time I saw Olsen & Johnson, and I thought they were funny.  Martha Raye is the funniest performer in the film.  Kudos also go to Mischa Auer as a fake Russian count.  Jane Frazee sings nicely, and doesn't do any harm to the film.

 

 

I always thought, once you got past her mouth, that Martha Raye was quite attractive. This rare glamour photo seems to confirm it.

 

mrswim.jpg

 

I found this little bit in an article on Raye, of how racism may have played a role in the cancellation of a 1955 television series of her's.

 

During the 1950's Martha turned to TV where she hosted and guested on numerous variety programs. She did the Martha Raye Show in 1954-1956. She was considered one of the greats in TV comedy. "Her routines," explained TV Guide, "are boisterous, rowdy affairs, full of slapstick, wild plot lines and fantastic mugging - with appropriate crossed eyes, crooked arm and other contortionist business. But she's one of only a handful of clowns who can pull it off." Variety dubbed Raye "the funniest femme in television," She pulled it off for only two years. Television audiences were a different bunch in those days. Racism was rampant and shamefully a very normal part of our society.

 

There was an incident that happened on the September 20, 1955 episode that caused many of the shows tv audience to turn against Martha, involving an african american child. 12-year-old $64,000 Question winner Gloria Lockerman was a guest, along with Tallulah Bankhead, on the show that night. "At the bows, when they were saying goodnight," recalls Norman Lear (the brains behind All in the Family, Sanford and Son, Maude, Good Times, and The Jeffersons) "Talullah Bankhead picked Gloria Lockerman up and hugged her; Martha joined them and the three of them were hugging, and they both kissed her, This was 1954. There were so many letters about hugging that little black child that the show never recovered from it, with the ad agency carrying on the way it did." For whatever reason, the show was cancelled at the end of the 1955-56 season.

 

http://1950sunlimite...artha-raye.html

 

Sadly, Raye's final years sound pretty terrible, both emotionally and with major health issues. Not a nice way to remember a lady who brought a lot of high spirited laughs to the world, and was much beloved for her work before the troops during the Viet Nam War.



#47 scsu1975

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:26 AM

"Hellzapoppin'" (1941)--Starring Ole Olsen, Chic Johnson, and Martha Raye.


 

This is the first time I saw Olsen & Johnson, and I thought they were funny. 

They didn't make too many films, but a few were on tv often when I was a kid. I thought they were hysterical. My parents saw the duo perform on Broadway.

 

I recommend Crazy House, which has lots of cameos by Universal stars, and I especially recommend Ghost Catchers, which has a great dance sequence. 

 

Trivia about Ghost Catchers: Morton Downey, a popular Irish singer of the time, performs. His son, Morton Downey, Jr., had a crazy show in the late 1980s in NYC, with frequent guests like Al Sharpton (whom he called "Fats Domino") and Alan Dershowitz.


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#48 TomJH

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:19 AM

"Hellzapoppin'" (1941)--Starring Ole Olsen, Chic Johnson, and Martha Raye.

 

 

In the odd but true category (folks, you're not ever going to see this anywhere else) I came across an autograph album in an antique store once chock full of signatures of show biz stars from the '20s and '30s. The album is dated 1934.

 

Among the signatures I found, this one had to be the most unique because of the drawing that either Olsen or Johnson did on the page. The photos of the two comedians were glued onto the page by the album owner.

 

It's a little bit of a crazy autograph page, I guess, just like Hellzapoppin would later be in its humour.

 

7a4708c6-510f-4ec0-b19c-8f0ffcc261a6_zps


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#49 film lover 293

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Posted 22 April 2017 - 07:40 AM

"Hellzapoppin'" (1941)--Starring Ole Olsen, Chic Johnson, and Martha Raye.

 

Film is a non-stop series of gags loosely based on the Broadway show.  Film opens with a skewering of  "Ziegfeld Girl" (1941) and rarely slows down.  Other targets are "Citizen Kane" (1941), The Hays Office, sappy love songs and pretentious Broadway shows, to name a few.

 

Highlights include Martha Raye's "Watch the Birdie", a jam session that turns into a wild jitterbug number, and the destruction of a Broadway bound show (the final 20 minutes of the film).

 

This is the first time I saw Olsen & Johnson, and I thought they were funny.  Martha Raye is the funniest performer in the film.  Kudos also go to Mischa Auer as a fake Russian count.  Jane Frazee sings nicely, and doesn't do any harm to the film.

 

Most of the film's gags hit their targets, and those that missed I barely noticed.  Film is a fast paced, fun watch.  3.2/4

 

Source--archive.org.


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#50 Dargo

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 11:15 PM


 

Tales of Manhattan.  I was really looking forward to seeing this film as I'm a big fan of Rita Hayworth and Ginger Rogers.  I hate to say it, but I thought this film was boring? Maybe I'm missing something.  I just thought it was too long and nothing really interesting happened.  I liked the vignette with Rogers, Cesar Romero and Henry Fonda, but other than that, nothing grabbed me. 

Try the obscure adult film Tails of Manhattan instead.

 

Don't listen to Rich here, speedy. Ya see, I've seen that flick he just suggested and frankly I thought it sucked...errr, I mean I thought it was lousy.

 

However, IF you might be into westerns at all, back in the '70s I once watched an "obscure adult film" that I THOUGHT was pretty good.

 

(...but finding a copy of Hard On the Trail  might be a bit tough now days...and it sure as hell won't be found on YouTube)


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#51 scsu1975

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:40 PM


 

Tales of Manhattan.  I was really looking forward to seeing this film as I'm a big fan of Rita Hayworth and Ginger Rogers.  I hate to say it, but I thought this film was boring? Maybe I'm missing something.  I just thought it was too long and nothing really interesting happened.  I liked the vignette with Rogers, Cesar Romero and Henry Fonda, but other than that, nothing grabbed me.  

 

Try the obscure adult film Tails of Manhattan instead.


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#52 speedracer5

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 08:29 PM

I haven't written on here in forever! I've been so busy with my new position at work (Inventory Control Lead!) and it's just been crazy.  May is promising to be even crazier.  My manager is saying that we should be planning to work 7 days a week next month! It'll be tough physically, but financially, it'll be nice to get a minimum of 64 hours at time and a half! Do I be responsible and pay down some bills? Or do I buy a bunch of movies? Who knows?! 

 

Anyway...

 

I watched a few movies recently...

 

Illicit.  This was a 1931 Barbara Stanwyck pre-code that I watched last week.  This film features a very young Stanwyck.  She is the best part of this film.  This film involves a couple who is "living in sin" and very happy.  However, the couple's family and friends, especially Stanwyck's beau's (Dick) father, have been pressuring the couple to marry and make their relationship legitimate.  Stanwyck, a very progressive woman for 1931, does not want to marry because she feels that it'll negatively impact her relationship with Dick.  Stanwyck reluctantly agrees to marry and as she expected, their relationship ends up going sour.  

 

This was an okay film, but I didn't enjoy it nearly as much as I did other Barbara Stanwyck pre-codes, Night Nurse, Baby Face or Ladies They Talk About.  As interesting as the film's premise sounded, it ended up being kind of boring.  A young Joan Blondell also appears as one of Stanwyck's friends and has a hilarious line where she shames Stanwyck for considering to wear underwear on her wedding night.

 

---

 

Tales of Manhattan.  I was really looking forward to seeing this film as I'm a big fan of Rita Hayworth and Ginger Rogers.  I hate to say it, but I thought this film was boring? Maybe I'm missing something.  I just thought it was too long and nothing really interesting happened.  I liked the vignette with Rogers, Cesar Romero and Henry Fonda, but other than that, nothing grabbed me.  

 

Am I missing something?

 

I don't even have anything else to say about this film.  That's how forgettable it was.


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#53 Vautrin

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 04:02 PM

The new Tappan Zee should be done this year. B)

NNYB170227_12lr_zpsjpuihtfm.jpg

Yes, I see an article on it every once in a while. Maybe someday I'll

take a sentimental journey up there. And no, it didn't take a whole

weekend to cross the Tappan Zee bridge.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#54 cigarjoe

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 12:35 PM

The new Tappan Zee should be done this year.

 

I just drove over it last week & "this year" would be miraculous.

You know it was practically brand new (5 years old) when Elizabeth Taylor drove over it at the end of BUtterfield 8 (1960)



#55 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 10:46 AM

...oh, forgot to mention that i listened to THE LUX RADIO THEATER presentation of FIVE FINGERS starring James Mason as a disarmingly suave valet who may be a German Spy and his wife Pamela as Le Countess; a special broadcast for Armed Servicemen overseas (in Korea and Europe, this was 1951.)

 

Really a lot of fun, and it's funny how on some of these, you can sense/hear the live audience's enthusiasm for the story.

 

on youtube and (i'm sure) archive.org; not a bad way to kill an hour.


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#56 TomJH

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 10:17 AM

"My Little Chickadee" (1940)--Starring Mae West, W.C. Fields, and Margaret Hamilton.

 

 

It's been a while since I sat through this film but I recall being disappointed by it. It will, however, always be remembered for being the only screen collaboration between two of the iconic figures of film comedy. It's a shame they didn't mesh better.

 

As to which of the two comedians comes off best, I suspect it comes down to towards which of the two the viewer may be more favourably predisposed. For myself, I'm a Fields fan.

 

Some of his best moments in the film, for me, are simply Fields's comments and droll asides coming out of the corner of his mouth, such as when he is a bartender tending bar in one scene.

 

"Squawk Mulligan tells me you buried your wife several years ago," a bar patron says to him at one moment.

 

"Ah, yes, I had to. She died," Fields responds.

 

Fields then tells a tall tale about "Chicago Molly," proudly bragging that he had leaped over a bar to knock her down.

 

"You knocked her down?" says another bartender, "I knocked her down."

 

"Ah, yes, that's right," Fields concedes, "But I was the one who started kicking her."

 

That was the thing about Fields's irreverent humour, be it regarding children or tough dames, neither would be spared his scorn or brags of ungentlemanly behaviour, at times.

 

 

Annex%20-%20Fields,%20W.C.%20(My%20Littl


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#57 scsu1975

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 10:09 AM

"My Little Chickadee" (1940)--Starring Mae West, W.C. Fields, and Margaret Hamilton.

 

 

While subbing for the schoolteacher, she sees the sentence "I will be a good boy" on the blackboard and mutters "What is this, propaganda?!"  Her version of arithmetic; "1+1=2, 2+2=4, and 5 will get you 10 if you know how to work it". 

 

Mae%20West%20My%20Little%20Chickadee_zps


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#58 film lover 293

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 09:33 AM

"My Little Chickadee" (1940)--Starring Mae West, W.C. Fields, and Margaret Hamilton.

 

This only screen teaming of West and Fields keeps threatening to be explosively funny, but never quite reaches that level of amusement.  West is Flower Belle Lee, Fields is Cuthbert J. Twillie.  They meet on a train after Flower Belle has been evicted from town because she aided a bandit who robbed the stagecoach.

 

Film is a series of routines for the two comics.  West is unusually subdued, probably because the censors were watching her every move, but she gets off a few one-liners;

 

While subbing for the schoolteacher, she sees the sentence "I will be a good boy" on the blackboard and mutters "What is this, propaganda?!"  Her version of arithmetic; "1+1=2, 2+2=4, and 5 will get you 10 if you know how to work it".  Her battle with Indians attacking the train is also memorable.

 

Fields' scene with a goat is maybe the highlight of the picture.

 

Hamilton screams and shrieks her way through the film, and is dependably funny.

 

Potentially hilarious film only manages to produce sporadic laughter .  Still a fun watch.  2.5/4.

 

Source--archive.org.


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#59 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 08:56 AM

Rubber Racketeers (1942) youtube

 

Not to be confused with Prophylactic Pirates, Rubber Racketeers is an oddball wartime curio dealing with scumballs who replace rubber tires with cheap imitation crap.

 

wonder if this somehow inspired THE THIRD MAN in an odd, backdoor kinda way...

 

please tell me that this movie was successful enough the spawn two sequels: GREASE GRAFTERS and STOCKING STUFFERS about the shameless bacon drippings/nylon hosiery black market that thrived on the homefront during the war.


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#60 TikiSoo

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Posted 21 April 2017 - 07:35 AM

The new Tappan Zee should be done this year.

 

I just drove over it last week & "this year" would be miraculous.

 

I just started watching my "Barbara Stanwyck never seen festival" of 4 titles recorded March 7th. 

 

EAST SIDE WEST SIDE ('49) was my first viewing. I loved it. It is so fun to still have some old movies to discover-especially with a fave actress!!

 

The movie reminded me of Martha Ivers in plot & pace involving a disfunctional person-control freak really. This time played by James Mason. He easily convinces us despite his handsome & classy demeanor, he's a slimeball. And Babs gets to play his well liked, faithful, intelligent wife. 

Ava Gardner and Cyd Charisse were also in the movie -wowie- the women in this movie wear stunning gowns! Both actresses often had limited roles and this was no exception, though both did well making themselves memorable.

 

Ava did a great job as the siren, with an exciting nasty scene near the end. I never saw what was so charismatic about Ava, but she sure acted well in the role of sex goddess. Maybe that moniker just stuck to her from this role, as she filled it out perfectly.

 

Van Heflin is the other major player and as in Martha Ivers, plays the "good" guy. Despite his odd hammerhead shark face, Heflin is another good enough actor to convince me of his charms. 

Notable bit parts featured Gale Sondergaard, Beverly Michaels, William Frawley and Nancy Davis.

 

Mix them all that acting talent with well written dialogue, good photography, well edited, good production and you have that meal classic movie lovers live on.


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