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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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I Just Watched...


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#6521 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 11:28 AM

Does time ever fly.  I thought she'd made it into her 80's, but then I discovered she'd died 10 years ago.  It seemed like only yesterday.

 

And I agree with your take on her in The Pumpkin Eater, although along with The Prisoner of Second Avenue, I wouldn't have wished those husbands of hers on my worst enemy.

I watched a few minutes of THE PUMPKIN EATER, including a scene in which Finch beat the c r a p out of her.



#6522 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 10:31 AM


And I agree with your take on her in The Pumpkin Eater, although along with The Prisoner of Second Avenue, I wouldn't have wished those husbands of hers on my worst enemy.

 

especially in THE PUMPKIN EATER...Man, that film...it's good, and she's terrific, but....wow.



#6523 AndyM108

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 10:26 AM

I think it was the Italian genes. She was born Anna Maria Louisa Italiano.

I watched some of THE PUMPKIN EATER yesterday and man, she was just beautiful. You could not take yours eyes off of her.

 

I can still remember when I heard she had died on the news, the reporter was just going in to the segment "...and actress Anne Bancroft" and a picture of her came up and I yelled out loud "NOOOO!" before she got to "...has died."

 

She was only 73.

 

Does time ever fly.  I thought she'd made it into her 80's, but then I discovered she'd died 10 years ago.  It seemed like only yesterday.

 

And I agree with your take on her in The Pumpkin Eater, although along with The Prisoner of Second Avenue, I wouldn't have wished those husbands of hers on my worst enemy.



#6524 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 10:22 AM

Bancroft  also aged better than any actress I can think of other than perhaps Loretta Young or Lauren Bacall, but that only complemented her acting talent; it wasn't a substitute for it.

 

I think it was the Italian genes. She was born Anna Maria Louisa Italiano.

I watched some of THE PUMPKIN EATER yesterday and man, she was just beautiful. You could not take yours eyes off of her.

 

I can still remember when I heard she had died on the news, the reporter was just going in to the segment "...and actress Anne Bancroft" and a picture of her came up and I yelled out loud "NOOOO!" before she got to "...has died."

 

She was only 73.



#6525 AndyM108

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 10:01 AM

Man, Anne Bancroft was just the best.

 

Miss her.

 

Was she ever, and do I ever. 

 

Like Hayward and Ida Lupino, Bancroft was one of those actresses who kind of snuck up on me, since we seldom get to see big chunks of her movies shown within a short time frame.  But in addition to the ones that were playing yesterday, all of which she was great in despite the mixed quality of some of the films,  there's Don't Bother to Knock, and even more, Life in the Balance, which is a classic noir pairing of Bancroft and Ricardo Montalblan along with Lee Marvin in one of his best psychopathic killer roles.  She also aged better than any actress I can think of other than perhaps Loretta Young or Lauren Bacall, but that only complemented her acting talent; it wasn't a substitute for it.



#6526 AndyM108

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 09:48 AM

I HAVE seen it, but I'm glad you are clarifying your seemingly sweeping statement.

 

Okay, then you're agreeing that it was laughable to imagine that chase scene with two real life characters as were depicted in the movie?   I fully concede that many 48 year olds could outrun and outfight many 28 year olds (which was Stallone's age in 1974), but not that 48 year old and that 28 year old.


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#6527 Sepiatone

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 09:16 AM

As it's 10:00am and I've been on this PC since 8:45, I haven't just seen anything today yet.

 

However, I DID last night(before my wife and I went out to celebrate our 27th anniversary) see "Underworld USA" with Cliff Robertson on MOVIES.

 

Believe it or not, I've never sat down( due to opportunity) and watched this flick in it's entirety.  And, I recall seeing many scenes on TV in the past....but never knowing what flick they were from.

 

My wife wondered if THAT was where I got it from..."it" being my tendency to refer to all phone calls our on-screen "caller ID"  only identifies as a "toll free call" (which usually winds up either being a charity with their hand out, or somebody trying to sell something I neither need or want) anyway....

 

When she, in another room, asks who just called, and it's one of THEM, I say it was "Tolly".

 

I myself never made any connection to this movie by doing so.  As I didn't remember anytime previously seeing the movie, It's also that I'd never recall the name "Tolly" from it!

 

 

Sepiatone


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I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#6528 LornaHansonForbes

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 08:57 AM

i caught a brief moment of THE PRISONER OF 2ND AVENUE yesterday, before I had to go back out. The news story about the 12 psychiatrists who were trapped in an elevator during a head-shrinker's convention in NYC was pretty funny, the punch line was that 10 of them had to be hospitalized for severe panic attacks.

 

when I  came home, GARBO TALKS! was on and I actually found myself enjoying it more than I thought I would.

 

Man, Anne Bancroft was just the best.

 

Miss her.


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#6529 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 08:27 AM

You must not have watched the movie.  Jack Lemmon's Mel was a physical and mental wreck who looked like he was 48 going on 68, and who'd earlier been clutching at his chest after screaming at a neighbor like Abe Simpson shouting at a cloud. 

 

Oh, and did I mention he was also an insomniac?

 

While Stallone was but two years removed from Rocky.  Don't confuse Lemmon's Mel with one of those cover subjects in an AARP magazine.  Trust me, this was more like Kramer and the cable guy.

I HAVE seen it, but I'm glad you are clarifying your seemingly sweeping statement.



#6530 AndyM108

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 08:25 AM

No 48 year old man can keep up with a younger man? I'm much older than 48, and I'm ready to take on some 20-something comers.

 

You must not have watched the movie.  Jack Lemmon's Mel was a physical and mental wreck who looked like he was 48 going on 68, and who'd earlier been clutching at his chest after screaming at a neighbor like Abe Simpson shouting at a cloud. 

 

Oh, and did I mention he was also an insomniac?

 

While Stallone was but two years removed from Rocky.  Don't confuse Lemmon's Mel with one of those cover subjects in an AARP magazine.  Trust me, this was more like Kramer and the cable guy.

 

P. S. I'm 71 and weigh what I did in high school.  But I wouldn't be chasing down anyone who looked like Sylvester Stallone.



#6531 DownGoesFrazier

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 08:07 AM

One thing I did like about The Prisoner of Second Avenue, even though it highlighted its impossibility, was the scene where the 48 year old Mel chased a young Sylvester Stallone for what seemed like a mile long series of sprints through the park and into the streets.  In real life, Mel would have dropped dead of a heart attack after the first 100 yards, but the sheer ludicrousness of of the chase did have its comic aspects.*  Fans of "Seinfeld" would have immediately been reminded of the epic chase scene where Kramer was being pursued by a grotesquely obese cable guy through Central Park and over the rooftops of Manhattan.  The Lemmon-Stallone chase wasn't quite that absurd, but it was close.

 

* And of course the punch line was quite comic:  The chase began because Mel thought Stallone had pickpocketed his wallet when they bumped up against each other waiting to cross the street, but when Mel got home and boasted how he'd caught up with Stallone and gotten "his" wallet back, Edna points out that this wasn't "his" wallet at all, and in fact Mel had left his wallet on the dresser when he went out that morning.  So instead of being a heroic citizen in pursuit of justice, it turns out Mel was the unlikeliest mugger in the history of New York City. 

No 48 year old man can keep up with a younger man? I'm much older than 48, and I'm ready to take on some 20-something comers.



#6532 AndyM108

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 07:52 AM

I just watched The Prisoner of Second Avenue, and brother, that had to be the most depressing movie I've seen in years, and on so many levels. 

 

To begin with, how on Earth could anyone put up with a madman like Mel for as long as Edna did, with every word of hers questioned or argued with, with a voice that never stopped shouting, and then topping it off with a parroted conspiratorial rant lifted off some talk radio show. 

 

And how could Mel have gone into work to a near empty office for day after day, with no messages and his fellow workers disappearing one after the other, not gotten the hint that his days were numbered, and done something about it?   What sort of work was he in, anyway?  Pet Rock or mood ring salesman?

 

And while the ending was somehow heartwarming, you have to believe about 6 impossible things before breakfast not to roll your eyes over it, the first one being that someone like Edna would ever put up with a maniac like that for as long as she did. 

 

If this was a "comedy", I'd sure hate to see what Simon's idea of an ulcer drama looks like, because this movie was just excruciating.  A few funny one liners thrown in like comps at a casino after you'd lost your bankroll didn't make up for it.

 

One thing I did like about The Prisoner of Second Avenue, even though it highlighted its impossibility, was the scene where the 48 year old Mel chased a young Sylvester Stallone for what seemed like a mile long series of sprints through the park and into the streets.  In real life, Mel would have dropped dead of a heart attack after the first 100 yards, but the sheer ludicrousness of of the chase did have its comic aspects.*  Fans of "Seinfeld" would have immediately been reminded of the epic chase scene where Kramer was being pursued by a grotesquely obese cable guy through Central Park and over the rooftops of Manhattan.  The Lemmon-Stallone chase wasn't quite that absurd, but it was close.

 

* And of course the punch line was quite comic:  The chase began because Mel thought Stallone had pickpocketed his wallet when they bumped up against each other waiting to cross the street, but when Mel got home and boasted how he'd caught up with Stallone and gotten "his" wallet back, Edna points out that this wasn't "his" wallet at all, and in fact Mel had left his wallet on the dresser when he went out that morning.  So instead of being a heroic citizen in pursuit of justice, it turns out Mel was the unlikeliest mugger in the history of New York City. 



#6533 EugeniaH

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 12:05 AM

I just finished watching The Lodger, with Laird Cregar, Merle Oberon, George Sanders, Cedric Hardwicke and Sara Allgood.  I had to laugh at the irony since it was only a few days before that I saw Hangover Square with Sanders and Cregar.  In Lodger, Sanders again played the authority figure (as a detective with Scotland Yard) and Cregar a dark character.

 

I liked Lodger; I liked Cregar.  He is a great choice to be cast as a villain; his outer appearance is like a hulking lamb with such expressive, soulful eyes.  He's obviously the focus of this movie, but all the other actors put in great performances, too.  Sara Allgood was natural and believable as a Victorian landlady and Cedric Hardwicke 'needs no introduction', being a brilliant character actor.

 

 

****SPOILER****

 

.

.

.

 

I found it disturbing and creepy (as it was meant to come across) when Mr. Slade (Cregar) spoke to Ellen Bonting (Allgood) about his late brother.  As Slade stared at his brother's picture he talked of his love for him in an almost obsessive way...  While I don't want to use the word "romantic", it didn't really sit comfortably with me... This relationship explains a lot about this movie, which I don't want to get into - you'll have to see it and find out!


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"It's easy to quit, but it's better to fight." - B.F. Fulton


#6534 AndyM108

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 09:22 PM

I just watched The Prisoner of Second Avenue, and brother, that had to be the most depressing movie I've seen in years, and on so many levels. 

 

To begin with, how on Earth could anyone put up with a madman like Mel for as long as Edna did, with every word of hers questioned or argued with, with a voice that never stopped shouting, and then topping it off with a parroted conspiratorial rant lifted off some talk radio show. 

 

And how could Mel have gone into work to a near empty office for day after day, with no messages and his fellow workers disappearing one after the other, not gotten the hint that his days were numbered, and done something about it?   What sort of work was he in, anyway?  Pet Rock or mood ring salesman?

 

And while the ending was somehow heartwarming, you have to believe about 6 impossible things before breakfast not to roll your eyes over it, the first one being that someone like Edna would ever put up with a maniac like that for as long as she did. 

 

If this was a "comedy", I'd sure hate to see what Simon's idea of an ulcer drama looks like, because this movie was just excruciating.  A few funny one liners thrown in like comps at a casino after you'd lost your bankroll didn't make up for it.


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#6535 cigarjoe

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 08:10 PM

Interesting how we get different takes on the same movie. The above example is a movie that was seen 20 years apart. The movie is the same but we change. It nearly makes one ask, have I really seen such-and-such movie, blithely affirming so despite many years since. Not that this would apply to all movies, some would seem to "stay the same." But with others, who might not stay the same, we might have to refrain from saying, "Yes, I've seen that one." It might turn out to be something else after a new reading. Just when we think we've got it nailed, we have to go back and see it again to ensure we really know the film. We can never catch up. (and then to think that there all those that have not been seen at all.)

Here's a film I've never seen in 20 years. What an interesting experience. 
 
Natural Born Killers (1994) A satirical, Neo Noir, sensory overdose, psychedelic acid road trip to Hell. 
 
Directed by Oliver Stone, based on a Quentin Tarantino story, with Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis, Tom Sizemore, Russell Means, Tommy Lee Jones, Rodney Dangerfield, Edie McClurg, Balthazar Getty, and Robert Downey Jr.
 
It's a bizarre black comedy satire of the American 24 hr news cycle celebrity/violence culture, much in the same vein of Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) and A Clockwork Orange (1971). 
 
I've managed to not see this somehow since it's release, and I believe my experience was all that more enhanced since I've begun delving into Noir and Neo Noir so heavily. The film, like a slow motion strobe, sporadically flashes between Black & White and Color film, it has these insanely canted Dutch Angles while at other times they tilt teeter-totter like along with other Noir stylistics, it uses documentary style footage and live breaking news parodies, animation, TV sit com satire, super 8 film sequences, TV quasi News Specials, and music video style promos and hyper violence mixed with cultural and natural Iconography all in a assault on the senses.  It's INSANITY, with a complimentary soundtrack. 
 
It's the same set up as Badlands (1973), but combined with They Live By Night (1948) and Gun Crazy (1950), Mickey & Mallory are depicted as damaged individuals two man created demon/outlaws rolling across the Southwest guns a-blazing, how different is this from say Quantrill's Raiders,  the James Gang or any other marauders roaming the West.
 
The film is full of these little  picaresque noir vignettes that will stuck in your mind amidst all the designed chaos. 
 
One you can call  Mallory 90s Femme Fatale sequence where Blondie-Mallory goes off half cocked away from Mickey in a cocktail dress, and ends up seducing a town pump gas jockey on the hood of a Corvette in the garage bay. He quickly looses control and Mallory frustrate-edly pushes him off the hood, pulls a revolver out of her bag, and cowboys him full of holes. She then grabs her shed panties and flings them at the corpse exclaiming "that was the worst head I ever got"! and stomps off. lol.
 
Welcome to the 90s. We are post code but it's still using dialog and suggestive images to jump start your imagination, but it actually has very little nudity in the whole film, your imagination fills in the rest just like it did during Classic Noir. 
 
A following related vignette has Jack Scagnetti the sadistic detective on their trail recreating the crime scene at the town pump. He picks up the panties and smells them then tosses them to a deputy. He sees the imprint of Mallory's **** on the hood remarks that it's a "fine ****", then makes note of the saliva drops in an obviously related location. He then leans over the corpse and extracts a **** hair from the dead mans teeth and exclaims "Malloy meet Jack Scagnetti". 
 
Another is the Mickey & Mallory take their marriage vows sequence. They are standing on a high bridge over a canyon its shot with a tongue in cheek tenderness which is temporarily shattered when a pickup full of jeering hecklers drives by. Mickey keeps it under control in truly warped solemnity saying "I will not murder anybody on my wedding day". 
 
Other times the vignettes are just small homages to the past cinema like when Mallory & Mickey are dancing at the diner the sequence changes from full traditional lit color to Astaire & Rogers low key chiaroscuro. 
 
Caution this film will not be for everyone. But it's still a refreshing alternative to most of the current output of films. 9/10

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#6536 faceinthecrowd

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 07:07 PM

well, at least he does have NIGHTMARE ALLEY to his credit, were it not for that film I'd be inclined to write Power off entirely.

aside from the failing looks, there is also the fact that Power, while blessed with an extraordinary face, did not have a voice to go with it, a fact that is not helped in his scenes with Laughton who, of course, one could listen to all day.

Power said that his favorite of his own films was NIGHTMARE ALLEY, and I agree with that. But his fans didn't like to see him playing a heel, and there was a collective "Ugh!!" at his appearance at the end of the picture. The movie has another plus: it gave Helen Walker a chance to show what she could do; her Lilith Ritter is a fascinating character.



#6537 darkblue

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 05:36 PM

According to recent theory on this thread, you will have a brand new experience of this movie. The 20-year rule, or is it the one-day rule? And it will be even better.

 

Sure, make my recommendation of 'Strange Days' a "theory". Make up some "rule" about 2nd viewings while you're at it, why don'tcha?

 

Not always easy to tell where you're coming from, oh french one.


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#6538 laffite

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 03:54 PM

The Suspect. Uh, oh. Not on TCM. You Tube, and thank goodness for You Tube. I haven't seen this picture in twenty years, maybe even more. But I missed it. I went onto Wikedpedia the other day to check out Laughton's flicks after watching Witness and came across The Suspect.

Isn't Henry Daniell simply sinister?

This is a film that quantifies my devotion to Universal ten fold.

 

According to recent theory on this thread, you will have a brand new experience of this movie. The 20-year rule, or is it the one-day rule? And it will be even better.



#6539 Janet0312

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 02:28 PM

The Suspect. Uh, oh. Not on TCM. You Tube, and thank goodness for You Tube. I haven't seen this picture in twenty years, maybe even more. But I missed it. I went onto Wikedpedia the other day to check out Laughton's flicks after watching Witness and came across The Suspect.

Isn't Henry Daniell simply sinister?

This is a film that quantifies my devotion to Universal ten fold.



#6540 darkblue

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Posted 17 September 2015 - 02:10 PM

Interesting how we get different takes on the same movie. The above example is a movie that was seen 20 years apart. The movie is the same but we change. It nearly makes one ask, have I really seen such-and-such movie, blithely affirming so despite many years since. Not that this would apply to all movies, some would seem to "stay the same." But with others, who might not stay the same, we might have to refrain from saying, "Yes, I've seen that one." It might turn out to be something else after a new reading. Just when we think we've got it nailed, we have to go back and see it again to ensure we really know the film. We can never catch up. (and then to think that there all those that have not been seen at all.)

 

Well, I could see a movie differently a single day apart watching it. A lot depends on how I'm feeling, what's on my mind, my momentary emotional state, level of restlessness or contentment, whether I'm tired or well-rested - who knows how many factors can influence how we receive a movie at one time or another?

 

That's why I watch almost everything I do at least twice. The second time is often the more appreciative viewing.


A guy once told a chick he didn't agree with her and that's why feminism is needed - he shouldn't be allowed to do that.





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