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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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#301 LawrenceA

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Posted 25 March 2016 - 10:45 AM

Earl Hamner Jr. (1923-2016) had died. His semi-autobiographical novel Spencer's Mountain served as the basis for the 1963 film of the same name, as well as the long-running television series The Waltons (1972-1981). He also created the night time soap Falcon Crest (1981-1990).

 

To me, though, he will always be remembered as a writer on the classic television series The Twilight Zone. He wrote 8 episodes in total. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe he was the last living writer for that iconic TV show.

 

He was 92.



#302 Mr. Gorman

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 10:28 PM

I remember Peter Brown the most from the 1974 movie 'ACT OF VENGEANCE' (aka:  Ra pe  Squad).

 

      He plays a psycho who wears an orange prison jumpsuit and gets off on assaulting women and making them sing 'Jingle Bells'.  He also wears a hockey mask long before Jason did! 

 

      Not exactly a 'date movie'.   



#303 Kid Dabb

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Posted 23 March 2016 - 02:25 PM

A memorable actor.  R.I.P. Peter

 

His official fan site hasn't been updated yet. It's HERE

 

Careful! One section, OUI Magazine Pictorial, contains partial nudity.


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#304 wouldbestar

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Posted 22 March 2016 - 10:26 PM

Westerns on the Web is reporting that Peter Brown of Lawman and Laredo died today at 80.  There's no news stories yet; I guess we'll know all by tomorrow.  

 

Some years back he spent a day on Encore Westerns hosting episodes of Cheyenne and Maverick he appeared in and giving interesting and amusing anecdotes about his co-stars and himself during that time at WB.  The one I remember most was about his being such an avid horseman that he rode his from his nearby home to the lot instead of driving a car when making Lawman.  That I'd like to have seen!  RIP, Mr. Brown.

 

Sadly, it's true.  This is what was on the internet.

 

Soap Alum Peter Brown Passes Away At 80


Soap star Peter Brown passed away on Monday March 21, the cause of the actor’s death is still unknown, he was 80 years old. Per Soap Opera Digest, the iconic actor’s close family friend made the sad announcement. A Brown family friend, Alison Reynolds, made the sad announcement on Twitter, she stated: “My dear friend, actor Peter Brown died today with his loving wife Kerstin by his side.”

 

Peter Brown appeared on not one, but four soap operas, NBC’s ‘Days Of Our Lives’ and CBS’s ‘The Bold and the Beautiful’ and ‘The Young And The Restless.’ Peter starred on DOOL from 1972-1978 as Dr. Greg Peters. In 1986 he appeared on the now cancelled soap opera ‘One Life To Live’ as Charles Sanders. In 1991 he appeared as Robert Laurence on Y&R and as Blake Hayes on B&B.

 

Peter Brown’s impressive acting resume spans much farther than just our favorite daytime dramas – he actually began appearing in movies back in 1957 and acted regularly until he filmed his final movie “Hell To Pay” in 2005. Brown also had more than 50 television credits to his name, including some classic shows like “Dukes of Hazzards” and “Dallas.”

 

Soap Opera Spy would like to send our condolences to Peter’s wife Kerstin and their children. It truly is a sad day in Hollywood – and Peter Brown will be missed by many!

 

He was a soap star? I had no idea.  They didn't mention his movie or prime time work.  IMBD says he was married five times so perhaps this genre was a good fit for him. 


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#305 Bogie56

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Posted 19 March 2016 - 07:05 AM

 

Oscar-winning film editor Jim Clark
 
 

 

 

Thank you, Richard for posting this.  I knew Jim.  He didn't live very far rom me in London.  A real gentleman.  R.I.P., Jim.


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#306 Richard Kimble

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Posted 19 March 2016 - 06:51 AM

Well, I'm sure it wasn't easy for Becker at the local L.A.P.D. precinct with Rockford-hating bosses like Lt. Diehl (Tom Atkins) and Lt. Chapman (James Luisi) around.

 

Chapman's distaste for Rockford was kind of a Joe Fridayish obsession with SOP and disdain for anyone or anything not connected to the LAPD. But Diehl seemed to have an almost pathological hatred of Rockford.

 

you would think Becker would have had total confidence in Rockford based on his batting average for solving mysteries.

 

Yes, but you also have to consider how many people around Rockford kept ending up dead. Jim was almost as devastating to the population of LA as Jessica Fletcher was to that of Cabot Cove.

 

Maybe those ups and downs come with the territory when P.I.s and detectives are friends. I remember that Mike Hammer (Ralph Meeker) had a rocky relationship with his detective pal Pat (Wesley Addy) in the 1955 film "Kiss Me Deadly."

 

It was a part of the genre. Every detective had his police contact. Mike Hammer had Pat Chambers, Peter Gunn had Lt Jacoby, Johnny Staccato had... Well, several guys, depending on which actor was available. Didn't Marlowe have a cop contact in the novels?


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#307 jakeem

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Posted 19 March 2016 - 06:29 AM

Dennis Becker was Rockford's friend. But sometimes he lost patience with Jim, and the way Jim's often messy cases might make him look bad -- once Dennis gave Jim some vital info, but as Jim was leaving the office Dennis yelled, "Get out Rockford, and don't come back!", to save face with the other guys in the squad room. In at least one episode ("Chicken Little Is a Little Chicken") Dennis actually arrests Jim! Still Jim would stay loyal, even when Dennis was later framed for dealing drugs.

 

The two had their ups and downs, in what was a refreshingly three-dimensional relationship.

 

Well, I'm sure it wasn't easy for Becker at the local L.A.P.D. precinct with Rockford-hating bosses like Lt. Diehl (Tom Atkins) and Lt. Chapman (James Luisi) around. But you'd  think Becker would have had total confidence in Rockford based on Jim's batting average for solving mysteries.

 

Maybe those ups and downs come with the territory when P.I.s and detectives are friends. I remember that Mike Hammer (Ralph Meeker) had a rocky relationship with his detective pal Pat (Wesley Addy) in the 1955 film "Kiss Me Deadly." 



#308 Richard Kimble

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 10:10 PM

I'd have to watch "The Rockford Files" again in sequence to be sure. But it always seemed to me that Dennis Becker was an inconsistent character during the series' run. Sometimes he was Jim Rockford's best friend and a supporter. Other times, he was a hard-nosed cop who was hardly a Rockford ally.

 

Dennis Becker was Rockford's friend. But sometimes he lost patience with Jim, and the way Jim's often messy cases might make him look bad -- once Dennis gave Jim some vital info, but as Jim was leaving the office Dennis yelled, "Get out Rockford, and don't come back!", to save face with the other guys in the squad room. In at least one episode ("Chicken Little Is a Little Chicken") Dennis actually arrests Jim! Still Jim would stay loyal, even when Dennis was later framed for dealing drugs.

 

The two had their ups and downs, in what was a refreshingly three-dimensional relationship.


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#309 jakeem

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 09:30 PM

Joe Santos (1931-2016) best known as LAPD Sergeant Dennis Becker on the TV show The Rockford Files. He also appeared in many films from 1960's through 2010.

 

becker.jpg

 

I'd have to watch "The Rockford Files" again in sequence to be sure. But it always seemed to me that Dennis Becker was an inconsistent character during the series' run. Sometimes he was Jim Rockford's best friend and a supporter. Other times, he was a hard-nosed cop who was hardly a Rockford ally.


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#310 wouldbestar

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 09:00 PM

Larry Drake was so believable on LA Law that I though he actually was mentally challenged until seeing him in an interview.  I hope Benny was an inspiration to those folks not born "perfect" but can still contribute to society in their own ways. 

 

Joe Santos did the last season of Magnum, PI  as the police detective who took over for his friend, Lt. Tanaka.  I also saw him as the "guest villain" on a few other crime shows.  He was obviously a very versatile actor; I'm glad TV gave him deserved recognition. 


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#311 LawrenceA

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 07:06 PM

Another death to report

 

Jan Nemec (1936-2016) Czech filmmaker who was a leading figure in the Czech New Wave of the 1960's.

 

Among his many films were the critically acclaimed Diamonds of the Night (1964) and A Report on the Party and the Guests (1966).

 

280full.jpg


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#312 Richard Kimble

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 07:05 PM

Oscar-winning film editor Jim Clark
 
 
Jim Clark (right) with John Schlesinger
 
aSi5f0f.jpg
 
 
One of the many adages that circulate in the movie business is that every film is made three times: once when it is written, once when it is shot and once, finally, when it is edited. Like many an old saw it is true, but I believe that it is a truth that can only really be recognised by people who have been physically involved in the making of a film. I don’t think audiences, or film critics or film theorists, for that matter, have any real idea of how a film can be totally reshaped and reinvented in the cutting room. As a film-maker, you hope that the editing process is merely an enhancement of your original vision – but sometimes what occurs in the cutting room can be something entirely new. In that regard great editors can be as important as great film directors or great screenwriters. They can be equal auteurs of a film, when called on – but that is usually when a film is in deep trouble. 

Jim Clark (who died on 25 February at the age of 84) was a great editor – a great British editor – and, indeed, something of a legend in the industry. His career spans a vast swath of British and American film history, from Ealing comedies in the 1950s, to Stanley Donen’s Charade with Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn, to a Brosnan Bond, all the way to Mike Leigh’s Happy-Go-Lucky in 2008, the last film he edited. He was known in the business as “Dr Clark” because very frequently he was called on when a film was sick and he was needed to make it well again.

His most famous work of doctoring was forMidnight Cowboy (1969). John Schlesinger was the director, and he realised, when he tried to cut the film together, that it was in dire straits. Jim was called (he and Schlesinger had collaborated on other films) and went to work. He recut the film in its entirety, and it was his idea to put Harry Nilsson singing “Everybody’s Talkin’” on the soundtrack. It is impossible to imagine Midnight Cowboy without Nilsson singing that song. Jim’s new cut won the film three Oscars – including one for Schlesinger’s direction and one for “Best Film”. 

If there was ever an instance of a film being remade a third time in the cutting room, then Midnight Cowboy is the shining exemplar. Everybody thinks Jim also won an Oscar for his heroic editing job, but his credit on the finished movie is only “creative consultant”. There are no Oscars for creative consultants, however vital they are. Jim did win an Oscar later, however, for The Killing Fields in (1984).​

 

 
So Clark was responsible for Midnight Cowboy's greatest scene? (The montage after Joe Buck is first conned by Ratso)

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#313 GregoryPeckfan

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 05:57 PM

Thanks, Lawrence for the update.

 

 

I am a big fan of The Rockford Files.


Peter Fonda and Gregory Peck are my heroes.

#314 LawrenceA

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Posted 18 March 2016 - 03:42 PM

A couple of character actor deaths to report:

 

Larry Drake (1950-2016) best known for his role on the TV show L.A. Law, as well as memorable roles in various films including Darkman (1990) and the title role in Dr. Giggles (1992).

 

 

4884-4431-0.jpg

 

 

Joe Santos (1931-2016) best known as LAPD Sergeant Dennis Becker on the TV show The Rockford Files. He also appeared in many films from 1960's through 2010.

 

 

becker.jpg


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#315 Richard Kimble

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Posted 14 March 2016 - 01:30 AM

Robert Horton

 

http://www.examiner....horton-has-died

 

Boyd Magers at the Western Clippings website has reported that Robert Horton, an actor best known for the western TV series “Wagon Train” has died. He was 91 years old. 

 

Horton played scout Flint McCullough on “Wagon Train” from 1957-1962, quitting the series to explore other pursuits as an actor. He left the show right around the time the star, Ward Bond, died in 1961 [actually he died in 1960], and the series moved from NBC to ABC. He was replaced by Robert Fuller. [Technically Horton was not replaced by Fuller. Horton left in 1962, Fuller joined the show in 1963.]

 

Horton made many film appearances, including Lewis Milestone’s “A Walk in the Sun” and the cult sci-fi favorite, “The Green Slime.” He was on such TV shows as “The Lone Ranger,” and also several dramatic anthology series. On one of these, “King’s Row,” he played the role Ronald Reagan made famous in the movie version. Another interesting television appearance was as an amnesiac in the series “A Man Called Shenandoah.” 

 

Along with his TV and movie work, Horton appeared often on stage. Possessing a fine singing voice, Horton enjoyed success in musical theater, including a 330-performance run on Broadway in a musical version of “The Rainmaker.”  Receiving many lifetime awards for television, including the Golden Boot Award honoring western actors, Horton stopped acting in 1989 and quit making personal appearances in 2009. Horton died in a Los Angeles rehabilitation center.

 

 

Robert Horton always seemed to me like the prototype for a TV (as opposed to movie) western star. His face was rugged, but his voice was soft and his manner low-key -- perfect for the cool medium of television.

 

aXdi5Ka.jpg

 


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#316 Hibi

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 05:22 PM

She projected such a fresh faced, girl next door quality in many of her film roles. But there was toughness underneath too.


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#317 sapphiere

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 05:15 PM

SO SORRY to hear this!!! :( I was just thinking of her the other day and wondering if she was still alive. (after watching Kansas City Confidential again) Now I know. :(

 

She was the last of the noir dames still surviving from that panel discussion they had with RO about 15 years ago. I dont know why TCM never reruns it. Would've been perfect for the Summer of Darkness series. :(

 

The others were Marie Windsor, Audrey Totter, I've forgotten the other one now. Was it Jane Greer?

R.I.P. Coleen I will always remember you as Molly in NIGHTMARE ALLEY. You stayed with Tyrone until the end, through all his ups and downs. We are fortunate that The SUMMER OF DARKNESS featured you in two film noirs,NIGHTMARE ALLEY and KANSAS CITY COFIDENTIAL. THE KILLERS was shown three months ago in May. Coleen, you willnot be forgotten by your many fans.


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#318 Hibi

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 04:42 PM

Coleen Gray, star of the film noir classics KISS OF DEATH (1947), NIGHTMARE ALLEY (1947) and THE KILLING (1956), has died. She was 92. Gray also appeared in a supporting role in the classic Western RED RIVER (1948) as John Wayne's sweetheart.

 

The Hollywood Reporter remembers her here: http://www.hollywood...ss-death-812916.

 

 

SO SORRY to hear this!!! :( I was just thinking of her the other day and wondering if she was still alive. (after watching Kansas City Confidential again) Now I know. :(

 

She was the last of the noir dames still surviving from that panel discussion they had with RO about 15 years ago. I dont know why TCM never reruns it. Would've been perfect for the Summer of Darkness series. :(

 

The others were Marie Windsor, Audrey Totter, I've forgotten the other one now. Was it Jane Greer?


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#319 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 02:53 PM

Coleen Gray, star of the film noir classics KISS OF DEATH (1947), NIGHTMARE ALLEY (1947) and THE KILLING (1956), has died. She was 92. Gray also appeared in a supporting role in the classic Western RED RIVER (1948) as John Wayne's sweetheart.

 

 

Don't forget her role in Kansas City Confidential which was just on TCM.    Gray was an actress that I admit I just didn't notice until the last 4 or so years especially after re-viewing her noir films Nightmare Alley, Kiss of Death and Kansas City Confidential.    I still want to see Death of a Scoundrel.       


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#320 film lover 293

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Posted 04 August 2015 - 02:10 PM

R.I.P., Miss Gray--you were a favorite actress of many, myself included.






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