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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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#301 sapphiere

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Posted 21 July 2015 - 03:52 PM

Theodore Bikel had recently attended THE TURNER CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL either this year or last year. I remember that he was interviewed.He was a supporting actor in a Susan Hayward film that I like WOMAN OBSESSED 1959. Theodore was in the cast of I BURY THE LIVING 1958. I have never seen the film, but it sounds like a horror flick instead of a film noir.



#302 Mr. Gorman

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Posted 21 July 2015 - 03:39 PM

Actor GEORGE COE died a couple days ago at age 86.  Same day as Alex Rocco.  He was recently seen on TCM as Dustin Hoffman's boss (the one that fires him) when Turner Classic aired KRAMER VS. KRAMER. 

 

      I saw him in other movies, too, such as THE ENTITY, THE FIRST DEADLY SIN, THE AMATEUR.

 

      I noted THEODORE BIKEL died earlier today at 91.  He and RON MOODY, who also died this year at 91, had famous 1960's musicals covered. 


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#303 Richard Kimble

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Posted 21 July 2015 - 03:34 PM

Theodore Bikel

 

Oscar- and Tony-nominated character actor and folk singer Theodore Bikel, who originated the role of Captain von Trapp in “The Sound of Music” on Broadway and starred in “Fiddler on the Roof” onstage in thousands of performances, died Tuesday morning in Los Angeles. He was 91.

To some, he is best known for his 1990 appearance on “Star Trek: The Next Generation” as the Russian adopted father of the Klingon Worf.

Bikel did his first bigscreen work in John Huston’s 1951 classic “The African Queen” and Huston’s “Moulin Rouge.” After acting in a series of English films, he did supporting work in two high-profile pics in 1957: historical epic “The Pride and the Passion,” starring Cary Grant, Frank Sinatra and Sophia Loren, and “The Enemy Below,” a WWII submarine thriller starring Robert Mitchum.

He often played Germans or Russians — in his autobiography, Bikel said that his facility with accents resulted in his typecasting “as the poor man’s Peter Ustinov.” But in Stanley Kramer’s 1958 film “The Defiant Ones,” starring Sidney Poitier and Tony Curtis, he portrayed a Southern sheriff pursuing a pair of fugitives — and was Oscar nominated for the role.

Bikel had notable supporting turns in Susan Hayward starrer “I Want to Live!” and the remake of “The Blue Angel.” He played dialect expert Zoltan Karpathy in the 1964 film version of “My Fair Lady” and the captain of the Russian submarine in “The Russians are Coming, the Russians Are Coming,” and he appeared in Frank Zappa’s experimental “200 Motels.”

 

http://variety.com/2...-91-1201544826/

 

 


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#304 film lover 293

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 12:16 PM

Yes, he was the creepy gardener in The Wicker Man (1973).  R.I.P., Mr Morris.



#305 Bogie56

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Posted 18 July 2015 - 12:05 PM

Aubrey Morris (1926-2015) has died.  He was probably best known for his role as Mr. Deltoid in Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange (1971) though he was primarily a stage actor.

Here is his obituary in The Guardian.

 

http://www.theguardi...6/aubrey-morris



#306 Mr. Gorman

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Posted 07 July 2015 - 12:26 AM

The 'superstar' line is a bit much. 

 

     I recall she co-starred with the ill-fated River Phoenix in the Joe Dante movie 'EXPLORERS' (1985). 



#307 Richard Kimble

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 11:10 PM

Those of y'all who dig '80s nostalgia will likely remember Amanda Peterson from the 1987 movie "CAN'T BUY ME LOVE" which starred Patrick Dempsey.  I saw it in theaters when I was 14 way back when.  Her father reported she died in Colorado yesterday at age 43.  I reckon an autopsy will be done; no cause of death was listed in the article I read. 

From her TMZ obituary:

 

Peterson became a superstar playing Cindy Mancini opposite Patrick Dempsey in the 1987 romantic comedy

 

???

 

One reason I try to avoid quoting TMZ


Life is never interesting enough somehow... You people who come to the movies know that.

 

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#308 Mr. Gorman

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 10:51 PM

Those of y'all who dig '80s nostalgia will likely remember Amanda Peterson from the 1987 movie "CAN'T BUY ME LOVE" which starred Patrick Dempsey.  I saw it in theaters when I was 14 way back when.  Her father reported she died in Colorado yesterday at age 43.  I reckon an autopsy will be done; no cause of death was listed in the article I read. 



#309 Richard Kimble

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Posted 06 July 2015 - 10:40 PM

Jerry Weintraub, who produced such hits as the Karate Kid and the Ocean's series, died Monday of cardiac arrest in Santa Barbara, his publicists said. He was 77.

 

A promoter and impresario in the old sense, Weintraub was a larger-than-life, Damon Runyon-esque character. A steely, hard-charging personality, he was wildly successful in a wide-ranging entertainment career that spanned more than 50 years.

 

Before his success as a motion picture producer, Weintraub was a force in the management and musical fields. He spent more than two decades promoting concerts and some of the top musical acts in the world: Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Bob Dylan, Dolly Parton, the Beach Boys, the Pointer Sisters and John Denver, among them.

 

His foray into movies came after a Weintraub-produced Denver performance, where he met director Robert Altman, who sent him a prospective project: Nashville. The 1975 film went on to garner five Oscar nominations, including one for best picture.

 

http://www.hollywood...cer-dies-806941

 

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Life is never interesting enough somehow... You people who come to the movies know that.

 

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#310 Richard Kimble

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Posted 29 June 2015 - 10:44 PM

Jack Carter, a pioneering comic, died of respiratory failure in his Beverly Hills, Calif. home on Sunday, according to the Associated Press. He was 93 years old.

 

DXQHyP0.jpg

 

He first popped in the mainstream after appearing on Texaco Star Theatre, Milton Berle’s variety show. Carter then hosted The Jackie Gleason Show precursor Cavalcade of Stars for a year before landing his own program: The Jack Carter Show. He regularly appeared on The Hollywood Squares and The Ed Sullivan Show later in his career. More recently, Carter had guest turns on New GirlShamelessParks and Recreation, and Rules of Engagement

 

TV aside, Carter was also a theater mainstay, making his Broadway debut in 1946 as a replacement in the musical revue Call Me Mister. In 1956, Carter first appeared in a leading role opposite Sammy Davis Jr. in Mr. Wonderful, and soon thereafter hosted the 10th annual Tony Awards, for the show’s first televised ceremony. Carter’s other stage credits include Guys and Dolls, Top Banana, The Odd Couple, Oliver!, Little Me, and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.

 

As for the silver screen, Carter acted in films such as Mel Brooks’ History of the World: Part I, Viva Las VegasThe Octagon, and many more.

 

Carter is survived by his wife Roxanne, sons Michael and Chase, daughter Wendy, and two grandchildren Jake and Ava.

 

 

http://www.ew.com/ar...-carter-dies-93


Life is never interesting enough somehow... You people who come to the movies know that.

 

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#311 Hibi

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 02:58 PM

Very sad to hear about Patrick McNee. Was a huge fan of The Avengers (at least till Diana Rigg left) But he did live a long life. Wish I could see those shows again on tv..........



#312 Richard Kimble

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 02:33 PM

So that's the three is it?  James Horner, Dick van Patten and Patrick Macnee.

 

No, James Dean, Horner, and Van Patten

 

Macnee starts a new three


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#313 Bogie56

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 02:19 PM

So that's the three is it?  James Horner, Dick van Patten and Patrick Macnee.



#314 Richard Kimble

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Posted 25 June 2015 - 02:16 PM

Patrick Macnee    

 

Actor Patrick Macnee, star of The Avengers TV series, has died in California at the age of 93.  The Briton, best known for playing John Steed in the 1960s television series, died at home with his family at his bedside, his son Rupert said.  Macnee also played roles in theatre, appearing on Broadway, and served in the Royal Navy during World War Two. 

 

A statement on the actor's website read: "Wherever he went, he left behind a trove of memories."  "Patrick Macnee was a popular figure in the television industry", the statement said. "He was at home wherever in the world he found himself. He had a knack for making friends, and keeping them."  He died peacefully at his home in California's Rancho Mirage on Thursday, Rupert said. 

 

Born in London and educated at Eton, Macnee first appeared in the West End while still in his teens.  He played a number of minor roles - including one in Laurence Olivier's 1948 film version of Hamlet - before rising to fame in the original Avengers series between 1961 and 1969.  He returned when that series was reprised as The New Avengers in the 1970s, appearing alongside Joanna Lumley's Purdey and Gareth Hunt's Mike Gambit.  He also appeared in the 1985 James Bond film A View to Kill, playing an ally of Roger Moore's Bond character. 

 

In a 2014 interview with The Lady magazine, Macnee said he believed The Avengers was a success because it "did something different and did it better."  He told the magazine: "It was beautifully written, the ideas were very good, way ahead of their time and they incorporated fantasies for people who dreamed of doing exciting things."

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-33279566


Life is never interesting enough somehow... You people who come to the movies know that.

 

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#315 Richard Kimble

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Posted 24 June 2015 - 12:00 AM

George "Foghorn" Winslow

 

http://www.pressdemo...-child-actor-in
 

A child actor with a bass voice and a deadpan comedic delivery, George Karl Wentzlaff appeared in 10 films in the 1950s along with stars like Cary Grant, Marilyn Monroe and Shirley MacLaine.

 

Retiring from show business at age 12, Wentzlaff finished school, served in the Navy during the Vietnam War, moved to Camp Meeker in the late 1970s and retired from the Postal Service a few years ago.

-----------------

 

Nicknamed “Foghorn” for his raspy voice as a slender child with dark blond hair and deep blue eyes, Wentzlaff, a Los Angeles native, broke into the entertainment business on Art Linkletter’s family-oriented radio program, “People Are Funny.” Asked his name by Linkletter, the youngster said: “George Wentzlaff, but I’d rather be Casey Jones,” with a delivery that cracked up Linkletter and the audience and led to about 20 subsequent appearances on the show, according to a biography on the IMDb.com website.

 

Grant, who heard the show and was impressed with Wentzlaff’s unusual voice and comedy instincts, introduced him to director Norman Taurog, leading to the boy’s first role in Grant’s 1952 film “Room for One More.” The successful movie landed Wentzlaff — under the stage name George Winslow — a contract with Warner Bros. that was bought out two years later by Twentieth Century Fox.

 

He teamed with Grant again in “Monkey Business,” another 1952 film that co-starred Ginger Rogers and Monroe, making her first movie appearance with platinum-blond hair. Next up was “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” (1953), in which Wentzlaff — playing Henry Spofford III, Monroe’s young admirer — stole scenes from the actress, including his classic line about her possessing a “certain animal magnetism,” according to IMDb.com.


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#316 lavenderblue19

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 06:55 PM

How sad.  Dick Van Patten was always on a tv show in the '60-'s and 70's and '80's. Talented real life family, that I'm sure he was proud of. I also liked Eight Is Enough. I agree, a very likeable guy.

 

RIP Dick Van Patten



#317 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 06:49 PM

I always liked Dick Van Patten. I remember him best in Eight is Enough, but my favorite role of his is in High Anxiety when he is driving his car in a rain storm and can't turn the radio off which is blaring rock and roll. It's a very funny scene. RIP, Dick.

 

Dick was a very likeable actor.     I watch his son Vince often since he host many poker tournaments.  


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#318 Janet0312

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 06:29 PM

Dick Van Patten
 
Actor Dick Van Patten, perhaps best known as patriarch Tom Bradford on the '80s series Eight Is Enough, has died. He was 86.  Van Patten died Tuesday morning at Saint John's Hospital in Santa Monica, California, due to complications from diabetes, PEOPLE confirms. 
 
The actor was born in Kew Gardens, New York, in 1928 and began his career as a child star and model. He made his Broadway debut when he was 7 years old in Tapestry in Gray.
 
He went on to appear in nearly 30 more Broadway shows.  Van Patten made the jump to television with the role of Nels Hansen in I Remember Mama, which ran from 1949 to 1957.  He also went on to act in numerous other TV shows including The New Dick Van Dyke Show, Happy Days, The Love Boat and, more recently, Arrested Development, That '70s Show and Hot in Cleveland.  In November, the actor joined his Love Boat castmates for a reunion in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida to help christen a new Regal Princess cruise ship and celebrate 50 years of Princess Cruises.  He also acted in various Disney films, along with three movies directed by Mel Brooks (High Anxiety, Spaceballs and Robin Hood: Men in Tights.)
 
In 2009, Van Patten penned an autobiography, Eighty Is Not Enough, and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.  He is survived by his wife Patricia Van Patten, whom he was married to for more than 60 years, and three sons.


I always liked Dick Van Patten. I remember him best in Eight is Enough, but my favorite role of his is in High Anxiety when he is driving his car in a rain storm and can't turn the radio off which is blaring rock and roll. It's a very funny scene. RIP, Dick.

#319 Richard Kimble

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Posted 23 June 2015 - 10:28 AM

Dick Van Patten

 

Actor Dick Van Patten, perhaps best known as patriarch Tom Bradford on the '80s series Eight Is Enough, has died. He was 86.  Van Patten died Tuesday morning at Saint John's Hospital in Santa Monica, California, due to complications from diabetes, PEOPLE confirms. 

 

The actor was born in Kew Gardens, New York, in 1928 and began his career as a child star and model. He made his Broadway debut when he was 7 years old in Tapestry in Gray.

 

He went on to appear in nearly 30 more Broadway shows.  Van Patten made the jump to television with the role of Nels Hansen in I Remember Mama, which ran from 1949 to 1957.  He also went on to act in numerous other TV shows including The New Dick Van Dyke Show, Happy Days, The Love Boat and, more recently, Arrested Development, That '70s Show and Hot in Cleveland.  In November, the actor joined his Love Boat castmates for a reunion in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida to help christen a new Regal Princess cruise ship and celebrate 50 years of Princess Cruises.  He also acted in various Disney films, along with three movies directed by Mel Brooks (High Anxiety, Spaceballs and Robin Hood: Men in Tights.)

 

In 2009, Van Patten penned an autobiography, Eighty Is Not Enough, and received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.  He is survived by his wife Patricia Van Patten, whom he was married to for more than 60 years, and three sons.


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#320 Richard Kimble

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Posted 19 June 2015 - 01:26 PM

Phil Austin of the comedy group The Firesign Theatre has died at age 75. From the group Facebook page:

 

TO ALL OUR DEAR FRIENDS AND FIRESIGN FANS:

Nick Danger has left the office.

Our dear friend and Firesign Theatre partner for over 50 years succumbed to various forms of cancer early this morning at his home on Fox Island, Washington, with his wife Oona and their six beloved dogs at his side. It is a tremendous and unexpected loss, and we will miss him greatly; but in keeping with his wishes, there will be no public memorial.

 

The group is best known for their radio work and LPs but they did make some films, including the "electric western" Zachariah (1971) and the serial spoof J-Men Forever (1979).

 

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