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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Death Takes No Holiday -- The Obituary Thread


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#41 Richard Kimble

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 09:47 AM

http://deadline.com/...rfs-1202138575/
 

Patti Deutsch, a comic who was a regular on the last season of Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In, appeared often on the 1970s Match Game and went on to a successful voice-over career, has died. She was 73. Her family said she died Wednesday at her Los Angeles home after a long battle with cancer.

 

patti-deutsch-obit.jpg

 

Born in Pittsburgh on December 16, 1943, Deutsch worked alongside Fred Willard in the improv troupe Ace Trucking Company in the 1960s and early ’70s. The group, which made multiple appearances on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, also featured Bill Saluga, who would go to be known as the “You can call me Ray” pitchman for Natural Light beer.

Deutsch’s big break came in 1972 when she was cast as a regular on NBC’s politically tinged sketch series Laugh-In. But the show was past its peak as a big part of the era’s pop culture zeitgeist, and the 1972-73 season would be its last.

As that series wrapped, the nasally voiced comic and actress became a semi-regular on Match Game ’73, the Gene Rayburn-hosted daytime game show revival known for celebrities’ racy and ribald answers to the host’s questions. Deutsch was a popular draw on the show, which led to her joining the couples game show Tattletales, appearing with and her husband, writer Donald Ross (The Love Boat, Murder, She Wrote).

By the mid-’80s, Deutsch had begun a successful second career as a voice actor on shows including The Smurfs, while continuing to guest on live-action TV series such as She’s the Sheriff and Moonlighting. She lent her voice to episodes of such ’90s toon series as Darkwing Duck and The Critters.

She continued to work through the 2000s, doing voice roles in such films as Tarzan, The Emperor’s New Groove, Monsters, Inc. and Happily N’Ever After. Her final credit was a guest role in the 2013 ABC series Don’t Trust the B— in Apartment 23.


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Life is never interesting enough somehow... You people who come to the movies know that.

 

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#42 Richard Kimble

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Posted 28 July 2017 - 08:10 PM

http://www.latimes.c...0727-story.html

Marty Sklar had only just graduated from UCLA, and here he was shadowing Walt Disney, his demanding new boss.

The fledgling writer was unsure how to make himself useful, but he had a mind to scribble down some of the maxims Disney laced into conversation.

“Know your audience.” “Tell one story at a time.” “Wear your guests' shoes.”

Long after his mentor's death, Sklar recognized the treasure-trove of wisdom he had started compiling at Walt Disney's elbow in the late 1950s. He distilled it all into "Mickey's Ten Commandments," a widely circulated creed that remains a touchstone in the theme park industry.

Walt Disney Co., where he led the creative development of the Burbank company’s parks, attractions and resorts around the world, including its ventures in the cruise business, housing development and the redesign of Times Square in New York.

Sklar died Thursday in his Hollywood Hills home. No cause of death was given. He was 83.

His retirement in 2006 marked the end of an era: He was one of the last remaining executives to have worked alongside Walt Disney in shaping the company into a global powerhouse. Sklar, who last served as principal creative executive of Walt Disney Imagineering, the storied theme park design and development outfit, was so closely associated with the company’s namesake that he became known as the Sorcerer's Apprentice.

“He embodied the very best of Disney, from his bold originality to his joyful optimism and relentless drive for excellence,” Disney Chief Executive Robert Iger said in a statement. “He was also a powerful connection to Walt himself. No one was more passionate about Disney than Marty and we’ll miss his enthusiasm, his grace, and his indomitable spirit.”

Martin “Marty” Sklar was born in New Brunswick, N.J., and attended UCLA, where he was editor of the Daily Bruin newspaper. While there, he got a summer job at Disneyland in 1955 — the year the park opened. Sklar, who grew up in Long Beach, had only just started working at Disneyland when Walt Disney asked him to give a 10-minute presentation on how he would create a newspaper for Main Street, U.S.A., the quaint themed area near the park’s entrance.

"I was frightened. Here I was 21 years old, had never worked professionally," Sklar recalled in a 2002 interview with The Times. "He had time for even the smallest detail, like my newspaper."

Disney was impressed enough with Sklar that he hired him full time to write marketing and sales brochures for Disneyland after he graduated from UCLA in 1956.

Sklar soon became Walt Disney’s lieutenant, and, according to several former colleagues, developed a reputation for being able to channel the boss’ unique style in speeches and other material he’d write on his behalf.

“Walt and he seemed to think alike,” said Dave Smith, Disney’s former chief archivist, who began at the company in 1970. “Marty really understood Walt more than a lot of people.”


  • film lover 293 likes this

Life is never interesting enough somehow... You people who come to the movies know that.

 

gq1BVs3.jpg


#43 Hibi

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 03:48 PM

Two roles that I associate with John Heard were his terrific lead in 1981's Cutter's Way, and the cult horror movie C.H.U.D. (1984).

 

5085c.jpg

 

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Cutter's Way was a much neglected 80s film. Never got the recognition it deserved.........



#44 Vautrin

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 03:38 PM

I wonder if Laddie took his "step-up" Box with him.

When Laddie wasn't working with his made in heaven actresses, like Veronica Lake and June Allyson, the studio provided him with a "step-up" Box so he could easily kiss the ladies who were a tad bit taller than him.

I also heard that Yul Brynner had to borrow the Box when he was working with the tall and lovely Ingrid Bergman in Anastasia.

I imagine it would have been pretty awkward carrying around a step up box

all the time in real life. Maybe he could have had someone come up with

very thick slinkies he could attach to the bottom of his shoes. Hey, there

goes Alan Ladd. He seems taller and has a real spring in his step. Not

being a big Yul Brynner fan, I never realized he wasn't very tall. I can see

him in The Magnificent Seven--Boys you go right ahead, I'll be in in just

a minute, there's something I've go to attend to.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#45 Princess of Tap

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 11:42 AM

That's why Frank liked to keep Alan Ladd around.



I wonder if Laddie took his "step-up" Box with him.

When Laddie wasn't working with his made in heaven actresses, like Veronica Lake and June Allyson, the studio provided him with a "step-up" Box so he could easily kiss the ladies who were a tad bit taller than him.

I also heard that Yul Brynner had to borrow the Box when he was working with the tall and lovely Ingrid Bergman in Anastasia.

#46 SansFin

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 12:29 AM

June Foray (1917–2017)

 

http://variety.com/2...kle-1202508180/


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#47 Vautrin

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 10:23 PM

That's why Frank liked to keep Alan Ladd around.


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Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#48 scsu1975

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 05:02 PM

At the height of his popularity, Sinatra was still short.


I'm a big boy.


#49 Vautrin

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 04:58 PM

Even at the height of his popularity, Sinatra was a nobody.


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#50 Princess of Tap

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 04:09 PM

For a moment there, I thought it was Frank Sinatra's first wife Nancy, who should be turning 100 in a couple of months.


I thought the same thing automatically.

BTW-- She's not just his first wife; she's the mother of his three children and the helpmate who supported him and put up with him when he was a nobody.

#51 Barton_Keyes

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 03:58 PM

For a moment there, I thought it was Frank Sinatra's first wife Nancy, who should be turning 100 in a couple of months.

 

Per The Chicago Tribune ​(http://www.chicagotr...0331-story.html​), she turned 100 on March 25, 2017.


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#52 jakeem

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 03:28 PM

Before marrying Sinatra, Barbara was the wife of Zeppo Marx, by whom she had a son.

 

For a moment there, I thought it was Frank Sinatra's first wife Nancy, who should be turning 100 in a couple of months.



#53 Princess of Tap

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 03:08 PM


45]lf5NWhm__bigger.jpgEntertainment WeeklyVerified account @EW


More



Barbara Sinatra, humanitarian and wife of Frank Sinatra, dies at 90

http://ew.com/music/...ialflow_twitter

gettyimages-695321384.jpg?w=2000

Before marrying Sinatra, Barbara was the wife of Zeppo Marx, by whom she had a son.

#54 jakeem

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Posted 25 July 2017 - 01:43 PM

Barbara Sinatra, humanitarian and wife of Frank Sinatra, dies at 90

http://ew.com/music/...ialflow_twitter

 

gettyimages-695321384.jpg?w=2000



#55 SansFin

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:40 PM

I lost my mother 

 

 

I am very sorry for your loss. I understand quite well the turmoil of this time for you. I hope you can take heart in the fact that she is now at rest beyond pain and suffering. 

 

You are in our thoughts and prayers.


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#56 wouldbestar

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 07:54 PM

I lost my mother to dementia on Tuesday just a month after she turned 94.  Her mental state had been going downhill since the month began and honestly I was praying for this rather than have her keep growing more frightened and disoriented.  I saw her yesterday and she looked so at peace.  It made me think of all the aged stars we've lost and mourned lately because we like their work; perhaps their loved ones feel the same about them as I do Mom.  May they all truly RIP.        


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#57 ChristineHoard

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 04:50 PM

It seems like all the obits I've seen say "John Heard of HOME ALONE" but old me remembers his very first flick BETWEEN THE LINES (1977) about an alternative newspaper.  A true '70's flick co-starring some up-and-comers like Jeff Goldblum and Lindsay Crouse.



#58 Sepiatone

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 04:35 PM

CAT PEOPLE was probably my earliest association with Heard.  I didn't see any of his earlier work until after that.

 

Always liked the guy.  Even when he was playing not so likeable guys.  He'll be missed.

 

RIP

 

 

Sepiatone


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I started out with NOTHING...and still have most of it left!


#59 jakeem

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:43 AM

Joan Micklin Silver's 1979 relationship tale "Chilly Scenes of Winter" -- originally released as "Head Over Heels" -- is a must-see Heard film. It also starred Mary Beth Hurt, Peter Riegert, Kenneth McMillan, Mark Metcalf and Gloria Grahame.

 

1491158859_1.png


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#60 LawrenceA

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Posted 22 July 2017 - 10:21 AM

Two roles that I associate with John Heard were his terrific lead in 1981's Cutter's Way, and the cult horror movie C.H.U.D. (1984).

 

5085c.jpg

 

7741-2725-0.jpg


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