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JULY 24 TCM FILM DISCUSSION FOR #NOIRSUMMER FOR ALL 13 FILMS


147 replies to this topic

#141 MyMoll

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 09:52 AM

i think you would like him in quicksand better. andy rooney plays a young man who steals out of his cash register to go on a date with an older woman. it also has peter lorre in it. it's a great noir and it suits andy rooney's personality

The Strip (1951)

 

Thankfully, I have just now seen "The End" on this film.

 

This may sound harsh, but the only redeeming quality about this movie is the music.

 

I have always loved Louis Armstrong. No one can replace him.

 

I was disappointed to see a short scene with Rooney playing the drums with these gentlemen...what a throwback to Andy Hardy! Perhaps this was purposeful in order to showcase Rooney's "musical talent" which in my opinion could never live up to this wonderful collection of musicians.

 

No noir for me in this film. The cineamatography was weak in that it didn't produce the camera moves or lighting and shading that typifies noir. Someone also pointed this out in an earlier post.

 

I had a hard time separating Rooney from his comedic and lighter roles. He didn't pull off the dramatic role well at all. The Las Vegas tough/mobster influence is missing.

 

I could have done without the dancing sequences. Somehow they seemed out of place and unnecessary.

 

Sorry for the negative review but I just couldn't help myself.

 

There are many more films scheduled for today and the DVR is working overtime. More discussions to come!


  • ThePaintedLady and goingtopluto like this

I'm NOT blogging #NoirSummer because it's over,
But I'm still blogging classic movies and Noir because
JOY LOVES OLD MOVIES
Follow me @ 
http://joysnoir.weebly.com

 

6751415_orig.jpg


#142 Karl H.

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 09:26 AM

Ida Lupino

Here is a link to a noir focused article about her.


http://www.criminale...ispensable-dame



#143 sheriff34

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 09:19 AM

The Strip (1951)

 

Thankfully, I have just now seen "The End" on this film.

 

This may sound harsh, but the only redeeming quality about this movie is the music.

 

I have always loved Louis Armstrong. No one can replace him.

 

I was disappointed to see a short scene with Rooney playing the drums with these gentlemen...what a throwback to Andy Hardy! Perhaps this was purposeful in order to showcase Rooney's "musical talent" which in my opinion could never live up to this wonderful collection of musicians.

 

No noir for me in this film. The cineamatography was weak in that it didn't produce the camera moves or lighting and shading that typifies noir. Someone also pointed this out in an earlier post.

 

I had a hard time separating Rooney from his comedic and lighter roles. He didn't pull off the dramatic role well at all. The Las Vegas tough/mobster influence is missing.

 

I could have done without the dancing sequences. Somehow they seemed out of place and unnecessary.

 

Sorry for the negative review but I just couldn't help myself.

 

There are many more films scheduled for today and the DVR is working overtime. More discussions to come!


  • MyMoll, ThePaintedLady, RichardW and 3 others like this

#144 Karl H.

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 09:19 AM

THE STRIP

Did Mickey Rooney really know how to play the drums?



#145 ThePaintedLady

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 08:21 AM

The Strip

 

I just can't see how this is categorized as Film Noir. Perhaps this is a failed attempt at trying to cash in on the popularity of film noir by creating a hodgepodge of noir elements. However, it creates nothing more than a sappy melodrama. Mickey Rooney is just awful as he just takes himself way too seriously as a dramatic actor.

 

Technically, the noir elements just aren't there. There is no use of chiaroscuro, no close-ups, no panning, or angled shots. The director tried to play a bit with the shadows, but even that falls shorts.

 

As a story, the plot teeters between campy and sappy. I don't even think the director new how to tell a story. The mobster motif came out of left field. There just wasn't any development leading up to that realization. Perhaps the director thinks he's creating a film noir with Rooney as the conflicted, jealous boyfriend. Even that's a stretch.

 

A better Noir film with Rooney is Quicksand; much better than this mess of a film.

 

Great jazz numbers, though. I immediately recognized the sounds of Earl "Fatha" Hines and Jack Teagarden.


  • Joifuljoi, sheriff34, RichardW and 1 other like this

Let us read and let us dance; two amusements that will never do harm to the world.

-Voltaire

 

http://scarlettestreet.blogspot.com/ (Film Noir blog)

http://thepaintedlady922.blogspot.com/ (Vintage living)


#146 cigarjoe

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 06:41 AM

Roadblock :

Its nicely filmed by Nicholas Musuraca. From a circular neon lit clock down to a doorway carved into a chiaroscuro building. A man (Peter Brocco) steps out to the sidewalk and drifts to his car. Out of an alley shadow, Miller runs towards the sled. Peters blasts him a duce in the back, Miller dies staring at the man hunched over his trunk. Peters points his gun at the man and tells him to drive. There is a nicely hard boiled exchange between Peters and Brocco as they drive away, Brocco in fear of his life as the sole witness to murder. McGraw is oozing menace, Brocco tries to buy his life offering Peters $100,000 from a bank heist. Peters bites, Brocco drives to a cemetery mausoleum where he pries up a flagstone revealing a tin box. At that moment, returning from the dead, Miller walks in the door, money recovered case closed.
 
Another sequence is the cute meet between Peters and Femme Fatale (Joan Dixon) as Diane, I bought this a whole lot better upon second view. It all takes pace in a commercial aviation setting (a new wrinkle in Crime Films), the initial contact where Diane overhears Peters booking his ticket in the waiting room and sets her con in motion is well acted between the two leads. Diane after flirting with Peters pretends to be his wife getting a discounted ticket. Their confrontation once Peters sees through her scheme and the continuation of their "fake" marriage after their plane is forced down are equally well written. 
 
But here may be one of the films minor faults, Joan Dixon does an adequate job, but what if McGraw had been cast against Noir Queen Marie Windsor, they had some great sparks/chemistry in The Narrow Margin as adversary's there. This alternative casting might have vaulted this film immediately into top shelf noir, and McGraw - Windsor into near Bogart - Bacall territory, on first view, as is, Dixon is a dame you have to warm to over repeated watches. Miss.
 
The detectives first encounter with racketeer Kendall Webb (Lowell Gilmore) is another great sequence, it has Webb exclaiming "you got more nerve than regular cops" to which Peters snaps "thanks".
 
The finale car chase with Peters' peddle to the metal Chevy barreling almost out of control through the concrete trough of the LA River is riveting. 
 

  • RichardW, HEYMOE and dwallace like this

#147 Sir David

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Posted 24 July 2015 - 04:54 AM

The Steel Trap 5am isn't on the list?

 

I'm watching it now and I'm sure it should be: good guy making bad decisions, voice-over narrative, and (most interestingly for me) this is the story of a guy with a decent job, a good life, and happy marriage and a nice kid and yet somehow he's having an existential crisis: all this "good" isn't enough, he wants more!

 


  • MyMoll likes this

#148 Dr. Rich Edwards

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Posted 23 July 2015 - 09:10 PM

This is a wonderful lineup this week. I'm a fan of so many of these films, and I provide "reasons to watch" each one in my Viewing Guide.

 

You can read my Summer of Darkness Viewing Guide in Canvas here: https://learn.canvas..._item_id=130653

 

Here's the terrific lineup, and each film title is link to their entry in the TCMDb, if you want further info:

 

6:45 AM ROADBLOCK (1951)

8:00 AM THE STRIP (1951)

9:30 AM BEWARE, MY LOVELY (1952)

11:15 AM CLASH BY NIGHT (1952)

1:15 PM KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL (1952)

3:00 PM MACAO (1952)

4:45 PM TALK ABOUT A STRANGER (1952)

6:15 PM SPLIT SECOND (1953)

8:00 PM THE NARROW MARGIN (1952)

9:30 PM HIS KIND OF WOMAN (1951)

11:45 PM THE LOCKET (1946)

1:30 AM ANGEL FACE (1952)

3:30 AM ELEVATOR TO THE GALLOWS (1958)

 

Let the discussions begin!


Richard Edwards, PhD

Ball State University

Instructor: TCM Presents: The Master of Suspense: 50 Years of Hitchcock (2017)

Instructor: TCM Presents: Painfully Funny: Exploring Slapstick in the Movies (2016)

Instructor: TCM Presents: Into the Darkness: Investigating Film Noir (2015)

 

 




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