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Healthcare in America?


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#21 Bogie56

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 01:02 PM

About the only true statement President Trump has made since he's been in the White House is that fixing healthcare in America is complicated.  Lobbyists are a problem in Washington and not just as their work pertains to the medical industrial complex in this country.

 

Now, I'll give the politicians a bit of cover here.  If a member of Congress had a town hall-type meeting and randomly selected 15 or 20 audience members to spend a day with them to discuss their experiences with health care and what they thought worked well and didn't work well and what improvements could be made to our system from the ground up, you'd probably end up with 15 or 20 divergent views on what could or should be done to make health care affordable and equitable in the United States.

 

However, aside from failing to recognize health care as a right in America, too many politicians (especially Republicans) have a disturbing disdain for poor and impoverished people in my country.  Unfortunately, this lack of concern for these types of people (even the working poor) is not limited to the issue of health care.  We will see cuts to many social service programs as a way to improve our government budgets, thereby forcing people to take low-paying jobs and at the same time thwarting any attempts to raise the minimum wage.  Working a minimum wage job will pay an individual more than if they are receiving assistance, but the difference in earnings compared to benefits received is very tight.  Housing costs everywhere are high in comparison to wages earned.  Gas and grocery prices fluctuate and can work in the worker's favor, but once they start to rise and wages stagnate, the wage earner is in trouble.   Throw in an unexpected medical expense or auto repair bill, and the worker is right back to square one if not worse.  Many conservatives think churches will be the salvation of the impoverished in the U.S.  I think they are delusional.

 

And all of this adds up to a case where millions of people are in no position to financially withstand a recession.  With a recession comes the loss of jobs.  And we know that one will come at some point.  And because Trump has now gotten rid of the banking restrictions that were put in place after 2008 you can expect to see tens of thousands of bankruptcies and people losing their homes when it all collapses.  But not to worry.  Trump liked the 2008 recession.  It was a great buying opportunity for him.  He said so himself in a debate with Clinton.  His base applauded him for it too.  I didn't know that many Americans were in favour of a total financial collapse.


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#22 Arturo

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 12:31 PM

Are not the lobbyists controlling the politicians part of the big problem?  The politicians don't act on behalf of the interests of the people.  I would argue that Trump and his billionaire cabinet is only exasperating this problem.  Not draining the swamp at all.  That was just the con.


Case in point. McConnell going to the lobbyists to help craft the recent healthcare proposal.

Trump is so for this. Get industry lobbyists to help craft your bill, or better yet, point out all the regulations you want them to be gotten rid of. The American people are the losers, including his enthusiastic supporters. But if you point this out, they parrot their madman leader, "Fake News!"
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#23 Arturo

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 12:28 PM

Yes, the definition of the swamp changed. During the campaign it was lobbyists, Wall Street bankers and other special interest groups. After the election, the swamp now means Democrats, or Republicans who oppose Trump's policies.



The definition of the Swamp has not changed, it just now means something else when Trump says it. He has to deflect from his own reality, with so many swamp-dwellers now dwelling in this administration, by Trump's invitation. Just like Trump flipping the term Fake News, which had always meant the alt right garbage he espouses. Now it's anything Anti-Trump. The sad thing is his people believe it.
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#24 TheCid

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 11:21 AM


  "Many conservatives think churches will be the salvation of the impoverished in the U.S.  I think they are delusional."

 

Before the Great Depression, churches were the primary providers of help for poor, elderly, disabled, unemployed, etc.  But the Depression wiped them out financially, so Social Security and many other programs were created by the federal government.  The churches have never been able to provide support for those above since then, even if they wanted to.

 

The Republicans and conservatives do not really believe churches, charities, wealthy benfactors/donors, etc. will step up to take care of these people, nor do they care.  It is just a cover story they use.


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#25 midwestan

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 11:05 AM

Are not the lobbyists controlling the politicians part of the big problem?  The politicians don't act on behalf of the interests of the people.  I would argue that Trump and his billionaire cabinet is only exasperating this problem.  Not draining the swamp at all.  That was just the con.

 

About the only true statement President Trump has made since he's been in the White House is that fixing healthcare in America is complicated.  Lobbyists are a problem in Washington and not just as their work pertains to the medical industrial complex in this country.

 

Now, I'll give the politicians a bit of cover here.  If a member of Congress had a town hall-type meeting and randomly selected 15 or 20 audience members to spend a day with them to discuss their experiences with health care and what they thought worked well and didn't work well and what improvements could be made to our system from the ground up, you'd probably end up with 15 or 20 divergent views on what could or should be done to make health care affordable and equitable in the United States.

 

However, aside from failing to recognize health care as a right in America, too many politicians (especially Republicans) have a disturbing disdain for poor and impoverished people in my country.  Unfortunately, this lack of concern for these types of people (even the working poor) is not limited to the issue of health care.  We will see cuts to many social service programs as a way to improve our government budgets, thereby forcing people to take low-paying jobs and at the same time thwarting any attempts to raise the minimum wage.  Working a minimum wage job will pay an individual more than if they are receiving assistance, but the difference in earnings compared to benefits received is very tight.  Housing costs everywhere are high in comparison to wages earned.  Gas and grocery prices fluctuate and can work in the worker's favor, but once they start to rise and wages stagnate, the wage earner is in trouble.   Throw in an unexpected medical expense or auto repair bill, and the worker is right back to square one if not worse.  Many conservatives think churches will be the salvation of the impoverished in the U.S.  I think they are delusional.


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#26 LawrenceA

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 10:36 AM

Are not the lobbyists controlling the politicians part of the big problem?  The politicians don't act on behalf of the interests of the people.  I would argue that Trump and his billionaire cabinet is only exasperating this problem.  Not draining the swamp at all.  That was just the con.

 

Yes, the definition of the swamp changed. During the campaign it was lobbyists, Wall Street bankers and other special interest groups. After the election, the swamp now means Democrats, or Republicans who oppose Trump's policies.


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#27 Bogie56

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 10:18 AM

Are not the lobbyists controlling the politicians part of the big problem?  The politicians don't act on behalf of the interests of the people.  I would argue that Trump and his billionaire cabinet is only exasperating this problem.  Not draining the swamp at all.  That was just the con.


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#28 midwestan

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 10:12 AM

Doctors and big pharma is going to PROFIT regardless if we have ACA, an alternative or none at all.

 

This is the PROBLEM!  Medical care shouldn't be high to begin with!

 

This is enough to make one sick!

 

http://www.cnbc.com/...tion-drugs.html

 

I wholeheartedly agree with this!  I think I've mentioned this before here, but I can't understand why there is such a disparity of medical care costs in America for the same procedures.  In Japan, every medical procedure of a certain type costs the same, whether you live in the northernmost reaches of Hokkaido or the southern part of Kyushu.  If someone in either of those regions needs care for say, a separated shoulder, they will be charged the same amount of money for the care they receive.  Here in the U.S., you find wide variations for the cost of care within a state or even certain parts of a large city.  To me, this is stupid and unfair.

 

In Germany, the government will pay for someone's medical education.  This means doctors and specialists will have minimal or even no debt once they get out of residency.  There are trade-offs for those receiving a medical degree.  First, if someone is ready to work as a cardiologist or general practitioner, for example, and they want to work in Frankfurt, the government has the right to assign them to Dresden if that area has a greater need for his or her services.  They have to commit to their assigned area for a certain period of time (maybe 3-5 years).  After that, they can apply for re-assignment to another part of the country, should they so desire, and they will be given priority on their requests, if at all possible.  Second, Germany puts limits on what a doctor can earn over the course of a year, depending on their field of expertise.  German doctors don't particularly like this restriction, but their malpractice insurance costs are only about 10% of what doctors in America pay.  Increases in annual salary are permitted, but they are closely monitored so they don't get out of hand as to be unaffordable for the patient or their insurance company.  This means (and I don't know anything about German law) there is probably a cap on malpractice awards if a patient is made worse by a doctor's mistake or negligence.  The doctor can be suspended or dismissed from the profession in such instances, which would be much more damaging to the medical professional compared to any monetary penalty they would incur.

 

Switzerland, home to many of the world's largest pharmaceutical companies, allows for drug manufacturers to raise prices on their medications, but like other parts of Europe, increases in medical care, prescriptions, and insurance are limited by statute, and if they are deemed too large, those increases have to be justified by the company or national medical board before government approval is granted.  In the end, compromises seem to rule the day when it comes to higher costs associated with patient care.

 

There is no spirit of compromise for healthcare in the United States, because too many politicians and residents alike don't think affordable health care to its citizenry is a right.  I wouldn't be opposed to tearing down the healthcare system here, then starting from scratch, but we will probably die waiting for that day to come.


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#29 Vautrin

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 03:23 PM

Charging what the market can bear. Seems pretty entrepreneurial

to me. :)


Curse Sir Walter Raleigh, he was such a stupid get.


#30 TheCid

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 01:34 PM

One proof of the inordinate amount of power and influence the medical profession has is the significance of the term Doctor.

Most websites and similar that asks for salutation or prefix where you fill out your name, etc. has the following selections:  Mr., Ms., Mrs., Dr.  So, right off the bat, the "doctors" get preferential treatment.

There are many other prefixes that people have earned, such as honorable, Rev., Sen., Mayor, Gov., Sgt, Sgt. Maj., Col, Adm, etc.

And medical doctors almost always sign their non-professional correspondence with Joe ****, MD to make sure the recipient knows how important they are. 

I am a member of several community organizations.  Whenever the list of members comes out the "doctors" always have the prefix, even the PhD's.  Nobody else on the list, not even mayor, sen. or rep. that are responsible for approving grants, gets a prefix.



#31 hamradio

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 09:26 AM

Pharma bro Martin Shkreli begins jury selection in federal securities fraud trial

 

http://www.cnbc.com/...ial-begins.html

 

Anyone paying high drug prices want to pitchfork him? :angry:

 

104392197-RTSSBLZ.600x400.jpg?v=14915923

 

 

150922132020-daraprim-price-hike-540x304


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#32 hamradio

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 03:09 PM

Doctors and big pharma is going to PROFIT regardless if we have ACA, an alternative or none at all.

 

This is the PROBLEM!  Medical care shouldn't be high to begin with!

 

This is enough to make one sick!

 

http://www.cnbc.com/...tion-drugs.html



#33 mr6666

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 02:55 PM

For-Profit Health Care Is a Merciless Sham-

 

"...The health insurance industry, for the most part, is the Mob painted over with a veneer of legitimacy. They’re a protection racket.

 

 

'The problem is the fact that health care in the United States is a for-profit industry, like petroleum speculation or automobile manufacture. It’s a few people making a lot of money off of sick people, and after so many years of this being the status quo, they have the political system wired to keep it that way....

 

 

"certain unalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

 

Life. Liberty. The pursuit of happiness.

There is no life without health.

There is no liberty without health.

There is no pursuit of happiness without health.

 

Health care is an unalienable right, up there with freedom of speech, and it is front and center in our founding document. Treating it as anything else, and especially treating it as a cash machine fed by illness and injury, should be considered a criminal act....

 

'Medicare-for-All'...

The program would be funded by the savings obtained from replacing today’s inefficient, profit-oriented, multiple insurance payers with a single streamlined, nonprofit, public payer, and by modest new taxes based on ability to pay. Premiums would disappear; 95 percent of all households would save money. Patients would no longer face financial barriers to care such as co-pays and deductibles, and would regain free choice of doctor and hospital. Doctors would regain autonomy over patient care.

 

...You will get sick,.... if you have not already. It will likely be amazingly expensive. We are all breathing pre-existing conditions who will get sick or hurt at some point; there is no avoiding this axiomatic truth.

Health care is a right, not a privilege, and it is time to claim it as such.,,"

 

http://billmoyers.co...merciless-sham/


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#34 hamradio

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 12:40 PM

Stock in drug companies is up significantly today.  I wonder why.

 

A pill for every ill.



#35 Bogie56

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 12:31 PM

Stock in drug companies is up significantly today.  I wonder why.



#36 hamradio

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 12:07 PM

Missouri attorney general sues 3 drug companies over state's opioid crisis

 

http://www.cbsnews.c...ical-companies/



#37 mr6666

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 05:37 PM

Major Insurance Company’s Payment Decision Angers ER Doctors

 

"The insurance company is not on the same plane. They are not here to take care of people. They are here to make money. It's clear that the insurance companies are looking to make money. It is about the dollar. It is not about high quality care,"

 

Blue Cross and Blue Shield may potentially deny a claim from someone who shows up with chest pain, ACEP said. Davis said a sharp pain with a deep breath could be a symptom of the common cold, and is not an emergency.

There are a lot of people who go to emergency rooms for things that are not true emergencies.”

Parker said it's not reasonable to expect a patient to know the difference.

"I don't know and you don't know if that is a heart attack, a blood clot, or a collapsed lung unless I see you in the emergency room," she said.....

 

http://www.nbcnews.c...doctors-n767766


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#38 mr6666

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 05:31 PM

 The California Senate Just Passed Single-Payer Health Care....

 

"I f health care is a right—and it is—the only honest response to the current crisis is the single-payer “Medicare For All” reform that would bring the United States in line with humane and responsible countries worldwide.

 

 It is unfortunate that Donald Trump, who once seemed to recognize the logic of single payer, has aligned himself with House Speaker Paul Ryan’s scheme to make health a privilege rather than a right—and to use a “reform” of the Affordable Care Act as a vehicle to reward wealthy campaign donors with tax cuts and sweetheart deals....

 

https://www.thenatio...yer-healthcare/


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#39 TheCid

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 01:19 PM

Gun Rights Group Takes a Shot at Elizabeth Warren — Over Effort to Make Hearing Aids Cheaper-

 

"...A bipartisan group in in the Senate introduced a bill in March to make hearing aids more affordable by allowing them to be sold-over-the counter. Only a handful of manufacturers make hearing aids, and most state laws restrict the selling of hearing aids to licensed audiologists, giving them an effective monopoly.

After a huge markup by the manufacturer, the audiologists add another premium, bundling the cost of the device with the cost of their services.

As a result, hearing aids are out of reach for more than 80 percent of people with hearing impairment. So a market has sprung up for affordable sound amplification devices. They are not hearing aids, and users will struggle with them in noisy situations like restaurants, but they’re better than nothing.

The devices — they’re called personal sound amplification products (PSAPs).....

 

Co-sponsored by more Senate Republicans than Democrats, and backed by the libertarian Niskanen Center, Warren’s bill is a rare example of truly bipartisan healthcare reform. Progressives back efforts to lower the cost of hearing aids, and conservatives can support the idea of ending a government-guaranteed monopoly and allowing competitive markets to set prices....

 

Jodi Follweiler, who owns and runs JLF Hearing Aid Sales & Services in Kutztown, Pa., is a strong supporter of Warren, but is torn on the bill. “I get why she’s doing it, and if I weren’t in the industry I’d probably support it. But it’s going to kill me,” she told The Intercept. “The irony is it’ll be great for hunters, but they’re used to voting against their own interests, so this is nothing new for them.”

 

https://theintercept...g-aids-cheaper/

 

:blink:

 

Republicans are trying to make it easier to purchase silencers for guns.  Our Congressman said he has a hearing loss because of hunting and silencers would have prevented that.

I learned in the Army that vast majority of hearing loss from firing weapons occurs in training on rifle ranges, not in combat.  

Even more applicable to hunting.  How many times does a hunter actually fire his weapon when hunting vs. firing it in practice or at a range?  Very, very little.  Wearing hearing protection  when firing at range or practicing will prevent the hearing loss (if any).  Also, wearing it when using power equipment, including elecric leaf blowers will do more than silencers for weapons.


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#40 mr6666

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:48 PM

Gun Rights Group Takes a Shot at Elizabeth Warren — Over Effort to Make Hearing Aids Cheaper-

 

"...A bipartisan group in in the Senate introduced a bill in March to make hearing aids more affordable by allowing them to be sold-over-the counter. Only a handful of manufacturers make hearing aids, and most state laws restrict the selling of hearing aids to licensed audiologists, giving them an effective monopoly.

After a huge markup by the manufacturer, the audiologists add another premium, bundling the cost of the device with the cost of their services.

As a result, hearing aids are out of reach for more than 80 percent of people with hearing impairment. So a market has sprung up for affordable sound amplification devices. They are not hearing aids, and users will struggle with them in noisy situations like restaurants, but they’re better than nothing.

The devices — they’re called personal sound amplification products (PSAPs).....

 

Co-sponsored by more Senate Republicans than Democrats, and backed by the libertarian Niskanen Center, Warren’s bill is a rare example of truly bipartisan healthcare reform. Progressives back efforts to lower the cost of hearing aids, and conservatives can support the idea of ending a government-guaranteed monopoly and allowing competitive markets to set prices....

 

Jodi Follweiler, who owns and runs JLF Hearing Aid Sales & Services in Kutztown, Pa., is a strong supporter of Warren, but is torn on the bill. “I get why she’s doing it, and if I weren’t in the industry I’d probably support it. But it’s going to kill me,” she told The Intercept. “The irony is it’ll be great for hunters, but they’re used to voting against their own interests, so this is nothing new for them.”

 

https://theintercept...g-aids-cheaper/

 

:blink:


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