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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Golden age: Roll call


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#1 TopBilled

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Posted Today, 11:17 AM

She was interesting in "The Picture of Dorian Gray" and "Green Dolphin Street".

 

I think she struggled with the accent she had to use in DORIAN GRAY and felt she was miscast. GREEN DOLPHIN STREET is a good film but it's a picture that caused her to leave MGM, because I don't think she wanted to play second fiddle to Lana Turner. She considered herself a star in her own right after IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE, and justifiably so.


  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#2 rayban

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Posted Today, 11:16 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-03-22-at-8-59-00-am.png

 

Donna Reed was born Donna Mullenger, and she grew up an Iowa farm girl. She wanted to become a teacher and on the advice of a relative, she went to college in Los Angeles. While working on her degree, she was spotted by MGM talent scouts. Donna was signed to a motion picture contract with the studio, but because America was about to enter the war, and there was a bias against Germans, her last name was changed to Reed.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-12-56-am.jp

 

She had a lead role in a remake of PUBLIC HERO NO. 1, which was titled THE GET-AWAY. It was a hit, but different from the kinds of wholesome pictures the studio would start to place her in. She soon worked with Mickey Rooney in an Andy Hardy picture; played little Bobby Blake’s mom in the family comedy MOKEY; and she had a role in the western comedy GENTLE ANNIE. During this time, her image became popular with American service personnel.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-13-27-am.jp

 

As a result of her popularity with soldiers, MGM decided to cast Donna as Robert Walker’s girlfriend in the military satire SEE HERE, PRIVATE HARGROVE. There was also an assignment in John Ford’s war drama THEY WERE EXPENDABLE, where she played opposite fellow Iowa native John Wayne. Donna and Duke would work together again in the 50s, in the college football comedy-drama TROUBLE ALONG THE WAY. From this point forward Donna was generally typecast as the girl-next-door.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-15-15-am.jp

 

As a result of her screen image, RKO requested to use her for Frank Capra’s postwar drama IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE. It’s probably Donna’s most well-known film, with her cast as James Stewart’s small town sweetheart. After the success of this picture, Donna returned to Metro but was dissatisfied with subsequent roles and asked to be let out of her contract. She did two films at Paramount with Alan Ladd, then signed with Columbia. And at Columbia, she successfully played against type in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, earning an Oscar.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-15-36-am.jp

 

By the late 50s, Donna’s movie career was in decline. She and her producer husband sought to re-establish her on television. For eight years, she starred in The Donna Reed Show, playing (what else) an all-American suburban mom. After the sitcom left the airwaves in 1966, Donna went into semi-retirement. But in the mid-80s, producers Leonard Goldberg and Aaron Spelling lured her back to television for a movie of the week and a special two-part episode of The Love Boat. Then when Barbara Bel Geddes temporarily vacated her role on the primetime sudser Dallas, producers of that program enticed Donna to step in for a year to play Miss Ellie.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-17-22-am.jp

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the get-away (1941); mgm; crime; robert sterling; 89 mins.
  2. the courtship of andy hardy (1942); mgm; comedy; mickey rooney; 95 mins.
  3. mokey (1942); mgm; comedy; bobby blake; 88 mins.
  4. see here, private hargrove (1945); mgm; comedy; robert walker; 101 mins.
  5. they were expendable (1945); mgm; war; john wayne; 135 mins.
  6. it’s a wonderful life (1946); rko; comedy drama; james stewart; 130 mins.
  7. beyond glory (1948); paramount; drama; alan ladd; 82 mins.
  8. trouble along the way (1953); warners; comedy drama; john wayne; 110 mins.
  9. from here to eternity (1953); columbia; war; montgomery clift; 118 mins.
  10. backlash (1956); universal; western; richard widmark; 84 mins.

 

She was interesting in "The Picture of Dorian Gray" and "Green Dolphin Street".


  • TopBilled likes this

"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#3 TopBilled

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Posted Today, 11:09 AM

screen-shot-2017-03-22-at-8-59-00-am.png

 

Donna Reed was born Donna Mullenger, and she grew up an Iowa farm girl. She wanted to become a teacher and on the advice of a relative, she went to college in Los Angeles. While working on her degree, she was spotted by MGM talent scouts. Donna was signed to a motion picture contract with the studio, but because America was about to enter the war, and there was a bias against Germans, her last name was changed to Reed.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-12-56-am.jp

 

She had a lead role in a remake of PUBLIC HERO NO. 1, which was titled THE GET-AWAY. It was a hit, but different from the kinds of wholesome pictures the studio would start to place her in. She soon worked with Mickey Rooney in an Andy Hardy picture; played little Bobby Blake’s mom in the family comedy MOKEY; and she had a role in the western comedy GENTLE ANNIE. During this time, her image became popular with American service personnel.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-13-27-am.jp

 

As a result of her popularity with soldiers, MGM decided to cast Donna as Robert Walker’s girlfriend in the military satire SEE HERE, PRIVATE HARGROVE. There was also an assignment in John Ford’s war drama THEY WERE EXPENDABLE, where she played opposite fellow Iowa native John Wayne. Donna and Duke would work together again in the 50s, in the college football comedy-drama TROUBLE ALONG THE WAY. From this point forward Donna was generally typecast as the girl-next-door.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-15-15-am.jp

 

As a result of her screen image, RKO requested to use her for Frank Capra’s postwar drama IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE. It’s probably Donna’s most well-known film, with her cast as James Stewart’s small town sweetheart. After the success of this picture, Donna returned to Metro but was dissatisfied with subsequent roles and asked to be let out of her contract. She did two films at Paramount with Alan Ladd, then signed with Columbia. And at Columbia, she successfully played against type in FROM HERE TO ETERNITY, earning an Oscar.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-15-36-am.jp

 

By the late 50s, Donna’s movie career was in decline. She and her producer husband sought to re-establish her on television. For eight years, she starred in The Donna Reed Show, playing (what else) an all-American suburban mom. After the sitcom left the airwaves in 1966, Donna went into semi-retirement. But in the mid-80s, producers Leonard Goldberg and Aaron Spelling lured her back to television for a movie of the week and a special two-part episode of The Love Boat. Then when Barbara Bel Geddes temporarily vacated her role on the primetime sudser Dallas, producers of that program enticed Donna to step in for a year to play Miss Ellie.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-10-17-22-am.jp

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the get-away (1941); mgm; crime; robert sterling; 89 mins.
  2. the courtship of andy hardy (1942); mgm; comedy; mickey rooney; 95 mins.
  3. mokey (1942); mgm; comedy; bobby blake; 88 mins.
  4. see here, private hargrove (1945); mgm; comedy; robert walker; 101 mins.
  5. they were expendable (1945); mgm; war; john wayne; 135 mins.
  6. it’s a wonderful life (1946); rko; comedy drama; james stewart; 130 mins.
  7. beyond glory (1948); paramount; drama; alan ladd; 82 mins.
  8. trouble along the way (1953); warners; comedy drama; john wayne; 110 mins.
  9. from here to eternity (1953); columbia; war; montgomery clift; 118 mins.
  10. backlash (1956); universal; western; richard widmark; 84 mins.

  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#4 rayban

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Posted Yesterday, 10:35 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-03-20-at-6-31-07-am.png

 

Kieron Moore grew up in a home that fostered an appreciation for literature and the arts. His father was a linguist, a sister became a radio performer, and a brother was a music director. Kieron had wanted to be a doctor but dropped his studies in medicine when an opportunity came along to join Ireland’s national theater. He quickly established himself, and at age 19 was playing Heathcliff in a version of ‘Wuthering Heights.’

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-7-59-24-am.png

 

He took his skills to London and after a successful run in another stage production, he was signed to a movie contract. The bosses at the studio that signed him felt he could convincingly play romantic leads as well as villains. After the war, Kieron made his movie debut, and during one of the first pictures he did, he fell in love with a female costar (Barbara White) and they married. It was a union that would last sixty years until Kieron’s death. Back on screen he had an ill-fated romance with Vivien Leigh in a remake of ANNA KARENINA, where he played Count Vronsky.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-7-55-52-am.png

 

Hollywood production companies were taking notice of Kieron, and they requested his services in a few American films. He costarred alongside Burt Lancaster in a Columbia western called TEN TALL MEN; and he worked with Gregory Peck in Fox’s biblical epic DAVID AND BATHSHEBA. Peck became a lifelong friend, and they would reunite on screen in the 60s for ARABESQUE. After his experiences in Hollywood, Kieron returned to London where he continued to appear in top-drawer films, usually as the lead.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-7-54-33-am.png

 

Occasionally Kieron branched out and attempted other kinds of roles. He tried his hand at a few Hammer horror films, and in Ronald Neame’s heist drama THE LEAGUE OF GENTLEMEN he played a gay crook who also happened to be a fascist. After this he did some war films and westerns, plus there were appearances on British television programs. But in 1974, Kieron quit acting and turned his efforts towards humanitarian causes. He did some voice-over work on documentaries about the plight of people in third world countries.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-7-54-10-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. mine own executioner (1947); british lion; drama; barbara white; 108 mins.
  2. anna karenina (1948); london films; drama; vivien leigh; 139 mins.
  3. the naked heart (1950); british lion; drama; michele morgan; 100 mins.
  4. david and bathsheba (1951); fox; drama; gregory peck; 116 mins.
  5. ten tall men (1951); columbia; western; burt lancaster; 97 mins.
  6. conflict of wings (1954); british lion; drama; john gregson; 84 mins.
  7. the blue peter (1955); british lion; adventure; sarah lawson; 93 mins.
  8. the steel bayonet (1957); hammer; war; leo genn; 87 mins.
  9. darby o’gill and the little people (1959); disney; fantasy; sean connery; 93 mins.
  10. the league of gentlemen (1960); british lion; crime; jack hawkins; 116 mins.

 

His Count Vronsky in "Anna Karenina" was an awesome performance.


  • TopBilled likes this

"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#5 TopBilled

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Posted Yesterday, 09:15 AM

Can you guess the ones I will be spotlighting..?

 

Names on television

 

screen-shot-2017-02-25-at-8-07-37-pm.png

 

Wednesday March 22-- #493: Donna Stone and Ellie Ewing.

Thursday March 23-- #494: Columbo.

Friday March 24-- #495: Alexis Carrington Colby.

Saturday March 25-- #496: Fred Mertz.

Sunday March 26-- #497: Granny Clampett.

Monday March 27-- #498: Ralph Kramden.

Tuesday March 28-- #499: Jeannie Nelson.

 


  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#6 TopBilled

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 08:41 AM

screen-shot-2017-03-20-at-6-31-07-am.png

 

Kieron Moore grew up in a home that fostered an appreciation for literature and the arts. His father was a linguist, a sister became a radio performer, and a brother was a music director. Kieron had wanted to be a doctor but dropped his studies in medicine when an opportunity came along to join Ireland’s national theater. He quickly established himself, and at age 19 was playing Heathcliff in a version of ‘Wuthering Heights.’

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-7-59-24-am.png

 

He took his skills to London and after a successful run in another stage production, he was signed to a movie contract. The bosses at the studio that signed him felt he could convincingly play romantic leads as well as villains. After the war, Kieron made his movie debut, and during one of the first pictures he did, he fell in love with a female costar (Barbara White) and they married. It was a union that would last sixty years until Kieron’s death. Back on screen he had an ill-fated romance with Vivien Leigh in a remake of ANNA KARENINA, where he played Count Vronsky.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-7-55-52-am.png

 

Hollywood production companies were taking notice of Kieron, and they requested his services in a few American films. He costarred alongside Burt Lancaster in a Columbia western called TEN TALL MEN; and he worked with Gregory Peck in Fox’s biblical epic DAVID AND BATHSHEBA. Peck became a lifelong friend, and they would reunite on screen in the 60s for ARABESQUE. After his experiences in Hollywood, Kieron returned to London where he continued to appear in top-drawer films, usually as the lead.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-7-54-33-am.png

 

Occasionally Kieron branched out and attempted other kinds of roles. He tried his hand at a few Hammer horror films, and in Ronald Neame’s heist drama THE LEAGUE OF GENTLEMEN he played a gay crook who also happened to be a fascist. After this he did some war films and westerns, plus there were appearances on British television programs. But in 1974, Kieron quit acting and turned his efforts towards humanitarian causes. He did some voice-over work on documentaries about the plight of people in third world countries.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-7-54-10-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. mine own executioner (1947); british lion; drama; barbara white; 108 mins.
  2. anna karenina (1948); london films; drama; vivien leigh; 139 mins.
  3. the naked heart (1950); british lion; drama; michele morgan; 100 mins.
  4. david and bathsheba (1951); fox; drama; gregory peck; 116 mins.
  5. ten tall men (1951); columbia; western; burt lancaster; 97 mins.
  6. conflict of wings (1954); british lion; drama; john gregson; 84 mins.
  7. the blue peter (1955); british lion; adventure; sarah lawson; 93 mins.
  8. the steel bayonet (1957); hammer; war; leo genn; 87 mins.
  9. darby o’gill and the little people (1959); disney; fantasy; sean connery; 93 mins.
  10. the league of gentlemen (1960); british lion; crime; jack hawkins; 116 mins.

  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#7 TopBilled

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 10:52 AM

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-8-39-41-am.png

 

Sara Allgood lost her father when she was sixteen. This required Sara to quit school and take a job to help support the family. Some of her younger siblings were placed in an orphanage. She stayed in touch with one of them, a sister named Mary, and when they were a bit older they pursued careers in the Irish theater. Both eventually became quite successful as actresses.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-6-47-33-am.png

 

For quite a few years Sara and Maire (Mary’s stage name) worked for a national theater group in Dublin. Like many of their contemporaries, they eventually relocated to London to find other stage work and opportunities in the British motion picture industry. During the 1930s, the Allgood sisters found roles in the cinema, and in addition to separate ventures, they appeared in four films together. Sara starred in Alfred Hitchcock’s early sound film JUNO AND THE PAYCOCK, and she worked for Hitch in other movies. She continued to find steady employment, usually typecast in servant roles that made good use of her Irish accent. One particularly delightful performance had her appearing opposite Rex Harrison and Vivien Leigh in the political satire STORM IN A TEACUP.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-19-at-9-18-23-am1.jp

 

By the end of the decade Sara was seeking the chance to go to Hollywood. A production she did had gone to Broadway and a short time later she toured America with the show. She eventually made her way to California and landed a part in John Ford’s HOW GREEN WAS MY VALLEY. It led to an Oscar nomination and a long-term contract with 20th Century Fox. For the next several years, Sara played all kinds of character parts at the studio. She was Carole Landis’ tough-talking aunt who owned a baseball team in IT HAPPENED IN FLATBLUSH; she had a soft spot for Ida Lupino’s father in LIFE BEGINS AT EIGHT-THIRTY; and she played Bessie in JANE EYRE.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-7-08-07-am.png

 

In the mid-40 she began to freelance. Sara turned in outstanding performances in THE STRANGE AFFAIR OF UNCLE HARRY (as a housekeeper); and in THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE (as Ethel Barrymore’s abused nurse). During this time she became a U.S. citizen and continued to make movies until her passing in 1950. Her last screen appearance occurred in Fox’s original version of CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-6-47-50-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. juno and the paycock (1930); wardour; drama; barry fitzgerald; 85 mins.
  2. irish hearts (1934); mgm; drama; lester matthews; 70 mins.
  3. storm in a teacup (1937); london films; comedy; rex harrison; 87 mins.
  4. how green was my valley (1940); fox; drama; maureen o’hara; 118 mins.
  5. dr. jekyll and mr. hyde (1941); mgm; horror; spencer tracy; 115 mins.
  6. it happened in flatbush (1942); fox; comedy; carole landis; 80 mins.
  7. life begins at eight-thirty (1942); fox; comedy drama; monty woolley; 85 mins.
  8. the strange affair of uncle harry (1945); universal; drama; george sanders; 80 mins.
  9. the spiral staircase (1946); rko; crime; ethel barrymore; 83 mins.
  10. cheaper by the dozen (1950); fox; comedy; clifton webb; 85 mins.

  • yanceycravat likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#8 TopBilled

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Posted 18 March 2017 - 04:31 PM

screen-shot-2017-03-18-at-2-18-06-pm.png

 

Dan O’Herlihy usually played supporting roles in films. But every so often, there was a lead in a good picture; and for one of those, he received an Oscar nomination. It was 1954’s independently produced version of ROBINSON CRUSOE. Originally the financial backers of the film wanted Orson Welles to play the title character, but director Luis Bunuel insisted on hiring Dan O’Herlihy. This was after he had seen the Irish-born actor’s work in Welles’ recent adaptation of MACBETH.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-09-at-2-16-35-pm.png

 

Dan was trained in the theater, and like other prominent actors who honed their craft during those years in Dublin, he apprenticed under Sean O’Casey. After appearing in one of the dramatist’s plays, Dan quickly caught on with the public. Critics were enamored with his acting style, and more important roles came his way. Within a very short time he was in London, where he had a part in Carol Reed’s ODD MAN OUT and another role in THE HUNGRY HILL.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-09-at-2-11-19-pm.png

 

A year later Dan  was working in Hollywood. It was a fast climb for him, but his talent sustained the rapid advancement of his career. In addition to the films with Welles and Bunuel, he had other successes in America. These included a film noir at Universal; a western for United Artists; and a war film at Fox. Many of these were supporting roles but he remained very much in demand for the types of characters in which he specialized. Typically he portrayed authority figures or men with a great deal of influence (and resilience).

 

screen-shot-2017-03-09-at-2-12-05-pm.png

 

After his nomination for the Bunuel film, which was produced in Mexico, he still did not become an ‘A’ list star. Dan next appeared in THE VIRGIN QUEEN at Fox; as well as Warners’ HOME BEFORE DARK, where he was very effective as Jean Simmons’ philandering husband. In the meantime he would return to the stage and took jobs on television shows. His feature film appearances, though, would continue until the late 1990s. He played the role of ‘The Old Man’ in the ROBOCOP franchise. Dan was a survivor, just like Robinson Crusoe had been.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-09-at-1-56-40-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the hungry hill (1947); two cities; drama; margaret lockwood; 92 mins.
  2. macbeth (1948); republic; drama; orson welles; 107 mins.
  3. kidnapped (1948); monogram; drama; roddy mcdowall; 81 mins.
  4. soldiers three (1951); mgm; adventure; stewart granger; 92 mins.
  5. robinson crusoe (1954); independent; drama; jaime fernandez; 89 mins.
  6. that woman opposite (1957); british; crime; phyllis kirk; 85 mins.
  7. home before dark (1958); warners; drama; jean simmons; 136 mins.
  8. a terrible beauty (1960); ua; drama; robert mitchum; 90 mins.
  9. one foot in hell (1960); fox; western; alan ladd; 89 mins.
  10. the cabinet of caligari (1962); fox; horror; glynis johns; 105 mins.

  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#9 TopBilled

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 02:20 PM

screen-shot-2017-03-17-at-12-07-50-pm.pn

 

Kathleen Ryan was considered one of the most beautiful women of Ireland in the 1940s. Before she decided to give acting a shot, she was a popular model for portraitists. She would pose for artists while she was attending college; and some of the paintings with her as a subject are in museums today. As she finished her schooling, she wed a young man who had been studying to be a doctor and they settled into married life.

 

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But after the war, Kathleen was given the opportunity to appear in motion pictures. It meant leaving her native Ireland and relocating to London (at least part-time). For her debut, she made a biographical drama with Stewart Granger. Then she was cast in what would be her most important role in Carol Reed’s classic crime film ODD MAN OUT. Kathleen became a bonafide star after it was released. She followed this with assignments in other British films, including one with Dirk Bogarde where she was billed first, as well as another with Fredric March.

 

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In 1950 she made her first Hollywood film– it was THE SOUND OF FURY, a prison break story with Frank Lovejoy and Richard Carlson. Around this time she had also worked for American director Edward Dmytryk in the neorealist drama GIVE US THIS DAY; though that picture was made in England because he was blacklisted at the time. She would make another Hollywood film in the mid-50s, when Douglas Sirk cast her in his historical drama CAPTAIN LIGHTFOOT, which was filmed on location in Ireland.

 

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Usually when Kathleen wasn’t working on movies, she returned to her home in Ireland where she lived with her husband. She only made one television program– it was an episode for Douglas Fairbanks Jr.’s British anthology series. He told a TV columnist he personally selected her to appear with him in a story about Ireland, because he wanted an authentic Irish actress who was beautiful, warm and sincere.

 

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09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. odd man out (1947); rank; crime; james mason; 116 mins.
  2. captain boycott (1947); individual; historical drama; stewart granger; 92 mins.
  3. esther waters (1948); general film; drama; dirk bogarde; 108 mins.
  4. christopher columbus (1949); universal; historical biopic; fredric march; 104 mins.
  5. give us this day (1949); eagle-lion; drama; sam wanamaker; 120 mins.
  6. prelude to fame (1950); universal; drama; guy rolfe; 78 mins.
  7. the sound of fury (1950); ua; crime; frank lovejoy; 92 mins.
  8. laxdale hall (1953); british pathe; romantic comedy; ronald squire; 77 mins.
  9. captain lightfoot (1955); universal; adventure; rock hudson; 92 mins.
  10. jacqueline (1956); rank; drama; john gregson; 89 mins.

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"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#10 TopBilled

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 07:57 AM

He also appeared with his brother Arthur Shields.  They co starred in John Ford's "The Long Voyage Home" and "The Quite Man" together....

 

Yes, Barry's brother Arthur was also a member of John Ford's stock company. 


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"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#11 fredbaetz

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Posted 17 March 2017 - 03:24 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-03-16-at-11-42-18-am.pn

 

Barry Fitzgerald made motion picture history when he was nominated in two major acting categories for the same performance. It was for his work in Paramount’s hit film GOING MY WAY, in which he played an older priest whose ways of thinking are challenged by a younger colleague (Bing Crosby). Barry ended up receiving the award in the supporting category, while Bing was honored as the lead. Soon after, Academy rules changed preventing any performer from being nominated more than once for a single role.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-08-at-6-45-33-pm.jpg

 

Because of his Oscar performance in GOING MY WAY, Barry became a household name. But it wasn’t always that way. He spent years in his native Ireland working as a civil service employee by day and acting on stage at night. He eventually became an esteemed member of Ireland’s national theater, and only then did he feel comfortable enough to quit his day job.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-08-at-6-45-20-pm.png

 

In the late 1920s he went to London to explore opportunities there. He was cast in an early sound film directed by Alfred Hitchcock but other movie roles were not forthcoming. He continued to work in various stage productions, and finally in 1936, he was given the chance to go to Hollywood to appear in John Ford’s version of THE PLOUGH AND THE STARS, written by renowned Irish playwright Sean O’Casey– a man Barry had once lived with. After filming was completed, Ford used Barry again in another picture at Fox. And from this point forward Barry became an ‘unofficial’ member of the John Ford stock company.
 

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After signing a contract with Paramount, Barry began to find the kinds of roles he was born to play. He costarred in THE STORK CLUB with Betty Hutton; he worked with Barbara Stanwyck and Ray Milland in the robust Technicolor western CALIFORNIA; and he made several other romantic comedies with Bing Crosby. Barry’s career was at its peak, and when he wasn’t on movie sets, he relaxed by playing golf and enjoying his favorite ale.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-08-at-6-48-44-pm.png

 

In the early 50s, he slowed down a bit, but there were a few other memorable turns. He costarred with Yvonne De Carlo in SILVER CITY; and his old boss John Ford hired him for a supporting role in Republic’s THE QUIET MAN, which took him back to Ireland for on-location shooting. In the mid-50s Barry did a bit of television– he had a notable role in a Christmas-themed episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents; and then he worked with Bette Davis and Ernest Borgnine in THE CATERED AFFAIR. By the later part of the decade, his health was in decline. The only logical thing for him to do was to go back to Ireland, and that is where he passed away.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-3-21-59-pm.jpg

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the plough and the stars (1937); rko; drama; barbara stanwyck; 72 mins.
  2. bringing up baby (1938); rko; comedy; may robson; 102 mins.
  3. the long voyage home (1940); ua; drama; john wayne; 105 mins.
  4. going my way (1944); paramount; comedy drama; bing crosby; 126 mins.
  5. and then there were none (1945); fox; crime; walter huston; 97 mins.
  6. the stork club (1945); paramount; musical comedy; betty hutton; 98 mins.
  7. california (1947); paramount; western; barbara stanwyck; 97 mins.
  8. the naked city (1948); universal; crime; howard duff; 96 mins.
  9. the story of sea biscuit (1949); warners; drama; shirley temple; 98 mins.
  10. the quiet man (1952); republic; drama; john wayne; 129 mins.

 

He also appeared with his brother Arthur Shields.  They co starred in John Ford's "The Long Voyage Home" and "The Quite Man" together....


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#12 TopBilled

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Posted 16 March 2017 - 02:00 PM

screen-shot-2017-03-16-at-11-42-18-am.pn

 

Barry Fitzgerald made motion picture history when he was nominated in two major acting categories for the same performance. It was for his work in Paramount’s hit film GOING MY WAY, in which he played an older priest whose ways of thinking are challenged by a younger colleague (Bing Crosby). Barry ended up receiving the award in the supporting category, while Bing was honored as the lead. Soon after, Academy rules changed preventing any performer from being nominated more than once for a single role.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-08-at-6-45-33-pm.jpg

 

Because of his Oscar performance in GOING MY WAY, Barry became a household name. But it wasn’t always that way. He spent years in his native Ireland working as a civil service employee by day and acting on stage at night. He eventually became an esteemed member of Ireland’s national theater, and only then did he feel comfortable enough to quit his day job.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-08-at-6-45-20-pm.png

 

In the late 1920s he went to London to explore opportunities there. He was cast in an early sound film directed by Alfred Hitchcock but other movie roles were not forthcoming. He continued to work in various stage productions, and finally in 1936, he was given the chance to go to Hollywood to appear in John Ford’s version of THE PLOUGH AND THE STARS, written by renowned Irish playwright Sean O’Casey– a man Barry had once lived with. After filming was completed, Ford used Barry again in another picture at Fox. And from this point forward Barry became an ‘unofficial’ member of the John Ford stock company.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-3-00-58-pm.jpg

 

After signing a contract with Paramount, Barry began to find the kinds of roles he was born to play. He costarred in THE STORK CLUB with Betty Hutton; he worked with Barbara Stanwyck and Ray Milland in the robust Technicolor western CALIFORNIA; and he made several other romantic comedies with Bing Crosby. Barry’s career was at its peak, and when he wasn’t on movie sets, he relaxed by playing golf and enjoying his favorite ale.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-08-at-6-48-44-pm.png

 

In the early 50s, he slowed down a bit, but there were a few other memorable turns. He costarred with Yvonne De Carlo in SILVER CITY; and his old boss John Ford hired him for a supporting role in Republic’s THE QUIET MAN, which took him back to Ireland for on-location shooting. In the mid-50s Barry did a bit of television– he had a notable role in a Christmas-themed episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents; and then he worked with Bette Davis and Ernest Borgnine in THE CATERED AFFAIR. By the later part of the decade, his health was in decline. The only logical thing for him to do was to go back to Ireland, and that is where he passed away.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-10-at-3-21-59-pm.jpg

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the plough and the stars (1937); rko; drama; barbara stanwyck; 72 mins.
  2. bringing up baby (1938); rko; comedy; may robson; 102 mins.
  3. the long voyage home (1940); ua; drama; john wayne; 105 mins.
  4. going my way (1944); paramount; comedy drama; bing crosby; 126 mins.
  5. and then there were none (1945); fox; crime; walter huston; 97 mins.
  6. the stork club (1945); paramount; musical comedy; betty hutton; 98 mins.
  7. california (1947); paramount; western; barbara stanwyck; 97 mins.
  8. the naked city (1948); universal; crime; howard duff; 96 mins.
  9. the story of sea biscuit (1949); warners; drama; shirley temple; 98 mins.
  10. the quiet man (1952); republic; drama; john wayne; 129 mins.

  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#13 TopBilled

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 12:28 PM

She shined brightly in the presence of Freddie Bartholomew.

 

Yeah, she's a very interesting character actress. She didn't make her first film until she was around 50.


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"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#14 rayban

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 10:44 AM

 

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Belfast native Una O’Connor is remembered for her expressive eyes. The stage-trained actress did not begin her career until she was in her early 30s. She learned how to create flesh-and-blood characters in the theater, often with the most minimal script description or direction. This skill would serve her well when she started making movies.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-3-14-13-pm.png

 

An early sound picture for Una was Alfred Hitchcock’s MURDER!, made in Britain in 1930. It didn’t take long for other directors to see what a valuable addition she was to any feature film in which she was cast. Though she had spent many years struggling to get noticed, her talent was obvious. And eventually Noel Coward wrote the part of an independent maid for her in his play CAVALCADE, which brought her real and lasting success. Fox made the story into a motion picture, and Una gladly repeated the performance in the studio’s screen adaptation.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-3-07-25-pm.png

 

After CAVALCADE, Una decided to remain in Hollywood. She hit her stride playing quirky comical characters in films with spooky settings during the mid-1930s. At Universal she worked with director James Whale in THE INVISIBLE MAN and in THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN. Both became cult classics and her acting in them stands out. She went on to appear in other notable Hollywood productions, including a role in David Selznick’s version of LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-3-00-48-pm1.pn

 

In between films Una continued to work on stage. She had become typecast in servant roles but didn’t seem to mind. When television came along in the late 1940s, many film stars felt the new medium was beneath them. Not Una. She saw it as an important field of employment which allowed her to play in a variety of productions. She also liked how television required her to combine the skills she had developed on the stage and in films. Occasionally, she still made movies. Though failing health curtailed her activities in the last few years of her life, she did manage turn up in Billy Wilder’s WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION as (what else) a prosecution witness, a role she had also done in the theater.
 

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09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. murder! (1930); british international; crime; herbert marshall; 98 mins.
  2. cavalcade (1933); fox; drama; diana wynyard; 150 mins.
  3. the invisible man (1933); universal; horror; claude rains; 71 mins.
  4. david copperfield (1935); mgm; drama; edna may oliver; 129 mins.
  5. the bride of frankenstein (1935); universal; horror; elsa lanchester; 75 mins.
  6. the informer (1935); rko; drama; victor mclaglen; 91 mins.
  7. little lord fauntleroy (1936); ua; drama; freddie bartholomew; 98 mins.
  8. the plough and the stars (1937); rko; drama; barry fitzgerald; 72 mins.
  9. the sea hawk (1940); warners; adventure; flora robson; 127 mins.
  10. witness for the prosecution (1957); ua; crime; norma varden; 116 mins.

 

She shined brightly in the presence of Freddie Bartholomew.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#15 TopBilled

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Posted 15 March 2017 - 02:23 AM

screen-shot-2017-03-15-at-12-11-29-am.pn

 

Belfast native Una O’Connor is remembered for her expressive eyes. The stage-trained actress did not begin her career until she was in her early 30s. She learned how to create flesh-and-blood characters in the theater, often with the most minimal script description or direction. This skill would serve her well when she started making movies.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-3-14-13-pm.png

 

An early sound picture for Una was Alfred Hitchcock’s MURDER!, made in Britain in 1930. It didn’t take long for other directors to see what a valuable addition she was to any feature film in which she was cast. Though she had spent many years struggling to get noticed, her talent was obvious. And eventually Noel Coward wrote the part of an independent maid for her in his play CAVALCADE, which brought her real and lasting success. Fox made the story into a motion picture, and Una gladly repeated the performance in the studio’s screen adaptation.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-3-07-25-pm.png

 

After CAVALCADE, Una decided to remain in Hollywood. She hit her stride playing quirky comical characters in films with spooky settings during the mid-1930s. At Universal she worked with director James Whale in THE INVISIBLE MAN and in THE BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN. Both became cult classics and her acting in them stands out. She went on to appear in other notable Hollywood productions, including a role in David Selznick’s version of LITTLE LORD FAUNTLEROY.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-3-00-48-pm1.pn

 

In between films Una continued to work on stage. She had become typecast in servant roles but didn’t seem to mind. When television came along in the late 1940s, many film stars felt the new medium was beneath them. Not Una. She saw it as an important field of employment which allowed her to play in a variety of productions. She also liked how television required her to combine the skills she had developed on the stage and in films. Occasionally, she still made movies. Though failing health curtailed her activities in the last few years of her life, she did manage turn up in Billy Wilder’s WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION as (what else) a prosecution witness, a role she had also done in the theater.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-3-10-09-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. murder! (1930); british international; crime; herbert marshall; 98 mins.
  2. cavalcade (1933); fox; drama; diana wynyard; 150 mins.
  3. the invisible man (1933); universal; horror; claude rains; 71 mins.
  4. david copperfield (1935); mgm; drama; edna may oliver; 129 mins.
  5. the bride of frankenstein (1935); universal; horror; elsa lanchester; 75 mins.
  6. the informer (1935); rko; drama; victor mclaglen; 91 mins.
  7. little lord fauntleroy (1936); ua; drama; freddie bartholomew; 98 mins.
  8. the plough and the stars (1937); rko; drama; barry fitzgerald; 72 mins.
  9. the sea hawk (1940); warners; adventure; flora robson; 127 mins.
  10. witness for the prosecution (1957); ua; crime; norma varden; 116 mins.

  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#16 rayban

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 04:38 PM

If I had to make a list of interesting actors, who were just interesting on their own, with all the movie star quirks pushed off to the side, Richard Todd would be near the top of the list. His persona is very enigmatic, hard to pinpoint-- and in real life, he was a perfect storm of vulnerable and brutal.

In "The Battle of The Villa Fiorita", in which he played Maureen O'Hara's husband, you could only by mystified by what she saw in her lover, Rossano Brazzi.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#17 TopBilled

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 12:46 PM

Who could forget him in "The Hasty Heart"?

 

If I had to make a list of interesting actors, who were just interesting on their own, with all the movie star quirks pushed off to the side, Richard Todd would be near the top of the list. His persona is very enigmatic, hard to pinpoint-- and in real life, he was a perfect storm of vulnerable and brutal.


  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#18 rayban

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 11:30 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-03-14-at-6-38-58-am.png

 

Richard Todd was born in Dublin, the son of a doctor. He spent part of his childhood in India and learned to appreciate what the world had to offer. When he was old enough, he briefly considered a military career, but then decided on acting and went to London to study. In the late 1930s he was gaining experience in Shakespearean roles when the war intervened.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-2-31-03-pm.png


After his military service Richard went back to the theater. He continued to hone his craft and in the process was discovered by a talent agent for a British film studio. They signed him to a long-term contract in 1948. Things moved quickly after this– he appeared in his first film, then was given the lead in a stage production of THE HASTY HEART. Jack Warner saw Richard’s performance and requested his services for the Hollywood movie version. Soon Richard left England and arrived in Los Angeles.
 

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Richard’s work in Warners’ adaptation of THE HASTY HEART earned him an Oscar nomination. His new studio then cast him in Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller STAGE FRIGHT where he acted opposite Jane Wyman and Marlene Dietrich. There was another follow-up at Warners in King Vidor’s LIGHTNING STRIKES TWICE. He continued to make American films during the next few years– after Warners, he worked for Disney and also for 20th Century Fox. At Fox he appeared with Bette Davis and Joan Collins in THE VIRGIN QUEEN; and he also portrayed the title character in A MAN CALLED PETER.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-2-29-20-pm.png


Eventually Richard returned to Britain where he would have even greater success on the big screen. He did a fine job in the British war film THE DAM BUSTERS; there was a memorable turn in THE YANGTSE INCIDENT for producer Herbert Wilcox; and he did another picture for Fox supporting Jean Seberg in SAINT JOAN. Fox also hired him to play a soldier in its all-star war film THE LONGEST DAY.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-2-29-58-pm.png


In later years, after his movie career had gone into decline, Richard did voice-over narration and took special guest roles on television series like Murder, She Wrote.
 

screen-shot-2017-03-07-at-2-29-30-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the hasty heart (1949); warners; drama; patricia neal; 102 mins.
  2. stage fright (1950); warners; crime; jane wyman; 110 mins.
  3. flesh and blood (1951); british lion; crime; glynis johns; 102 mins.
  4. lightning strikes twice (1951); warners; crime; ruth roman; 91 mins.
  5. the story of robin hood and his merrie men (1952); disney; adventure; peter finch; 84 mins.
  6. the sword and the rose (1953); disney; adventure; glynis johns; 92 mins.
  7. a man called peter (1955); fox; drama; jean peters; 119 mins.
  8. the dam busters (1955); british pathe; war; michael redgrave; 124 mins.
  9. the virgin queen (1955); fox; historical biopic; bette davis; 92 mins.
  10. chase a crooked shadow (1958); warners; crime; anne baxter; 87 mins.

 

Who could forget him in "The Hasty Heart"?


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#19 TopBilled

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Posted 14 March 2017 - 08:49 AM

screen-shot-2017-03-14-at-6-38-58-am.png

 

Richard Todd was born in Dublin, the son of a doctor. He spent part of his childhood in India and learned to appreciate what the world had to offer. When he was old enough, he briefly considered a military career, but then decided on acting and went to London to study. In the late 1930s he was gaining experience in Shakespearean roles when the war intervened.
 

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After his military service Richard went back to the theater. He continued to hone his craft and in the process was discovered by a talent agent for a British film studio. They signed him to a long-term contract in 1948. Things moved quickly after this– he appeared in his first film, then was given the lead in a stage production of THE HASTY HEART. Jack Warner saw Richard’s performance and requested his services for the Hollywood movie version. Soon Richard left England and arrived in Los Angeles.
 

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Richard’s work in Warners’ adaptation of THE HASTY HEART earned him an Oscar nomination. His new studio then cast him in Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller STAGE FRIGHT where he acted opposite Jane Wyman and Marlene Dietrich. There was another follow-up at Warners in King Vidor’s LIGHTNING STRIKES TWICE. He continued to make American films during the next few years– after Warners, he worked for Disney and also for 20th Century Fox. At Fox he appeared with Bette Davis and Joan Collins in THE VIRGIN QUEEN; and he also portrayed the title character in A MAN CALLED PETER.
 

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Eventually Richard returned to Britain where he would have even greater success on the big screen. He did a fine job in the British war film THE DAM BUSTERS; there was a memorable turn in THE YANGTSE INCIDENT for producer Herbert Wilcox; and he did another picture for Fox supporting Jean Seberg in SAINT JOAN. Fox also hired him to play a soldier in its all-star war film THE LONGEST DAY.
 

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In later years, after his movie career had gone into decline, Richard did voice-over narration and took special guest roles on television series like Murder, She Wrote.
 

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  1. the hasty heart (1949); warners; drama; patricia neal; 102 mins.
  2. stage fright (1950); warners; crime; jane wyman; 110 mins.
  3. flesh and blood (1951); british lion; crime; glynis johns; 102 mins.
  4. lightning strikes twice (1951); warners; crime; ruth roman; 91 mins.
  5. the story of robin hood and his merrie men (1952); disney; adventure; peter finch; 84 mins.
  6. the sword and the rose (1953); disney; adventure; glynis johns; 92 mins.
  7. a man called peter (1955); fox; drama; jean peters; 119 mins.
  8. the dam busters (1955); british pathe; war; michael redgrave; 124 mins.
  9. the virgin queen (1955); fox; historical biopic; bette davis; 92 mins.
  10. chase a crooked shadow (1958); warners; crime; anne baxter; 87 mins.

  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.


#20 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

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Posted 13 March 2017 - 08:58 AM

Can you guess the ones I will be spotlighting..?

 

In Hollywood from Ireland

 

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Tuesday March 14-- #486: He dealt with a hasty heart.

Wednesday March 15-- #487: She appeared in James Whale horror films.

Thursday March 16-- #488: Bing was going his way.

Friday March 17-- #489: Ireland's most beautiful lass of the 1940s.

Saturday March 18-- #490: He played Robinson Crusoe.

Sunday March 19-- #491: She owned a baseball team in Flatbush.

Monday March 20-- #492: He played Count Vronsky in ANNA KARENINA.

 


  • rayban likes this

"You've had a few hours given back to you from life. A few hours in which to change your minds and your hearts. When you came into the grounds of this inn, you came into a place as it was a year ago today. You were in your own time, but the house and garden and Gwyneth and I are in the time of last year. The day the bomb hit. When you go away and walk up the road you will have spent a night in an inn. But if you look back from the crest of the hill, the halfway house will not be here...but if you remember, it will be as you remember a forgotten snatch of song. It will be a picture before your eyes. Gone before you realize it is there. Or an echo in the hidden places of your mind. But you have been here...and the world is what you make it." -- Mervyn Johns, THE HALFWAY HOUSE.





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