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Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

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Golden age: Roll call


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#41 TopBilled

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Posted 11 April 2017 - 09:06 AM

screen-shot-2017-04-11-at-6-53-32-am.png

 

Janis Carter’s movie career lasted about a dozen years, from the early 1940s until the mid-1950s. During that time she appeared in films at several Hollywood studios; though the majority of those years were under contract at Columbia. She initially set out to be an opera singer and wound up singing on Broadway which brought her to the attention of a Hollywood mogul. However, by the time she was landing lead roles at Columbia, she was not exactly used for her musical skills.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-4-18-48-pm.png

 

Janis appeared in quite a few crime dramas during the war years, when Columbia had several mystery series in production. For instance, she costarred with Richard Dix in one of the Whistler movies; then was assigned to work with Chester Morris in a BostonBlackie picture; and this was followed by a role opposite Gerald Mohr in a retooled version of The Lone Wolf. These were hardly challenging roles, but Janis made the most of them.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-3-47-43-pm.png

 

When she was not cast in crime pictures, the actress was typically featured as a second lead in comedies headlined by bigger name actresses. She supported Lucille Ball, Barbara Hale and Rosalind Russell in these films. Sometimes she was loaned out and fared a little better. She wrapped up her Columbia contract in 1951 with a lead opposite Randolph Scott in the hit western SANTA FE.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-3-49-06-pm.png

 

After her days at the studio were over, Janis freelanced for a while. But by 1953 she was done with movies and went back east. She found jobs on live television programs and also found stage work. Then she married and decided to give her career up for love.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-3-47-20-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the mark of the whistler (1944); columbia; crime; richard dix; 60 mins.
  2. one mysterious night (1944); columbia; crime; chester morris; 61 mins.
  3. the ghost that walks alone (1944); columbia; comedy; arthur lake; 63 mins.
  4. the fighting guardsman (1945); columbia; adventure; anita louise; 84 mins.
  5. the notorious lone wolf (1946); columbia; crime; gerald mohr; 64 mins.
  6. framed (1947); columbia; crime; glenn ford; 82 mins.
  7. slightly french (1949); columbia; comedy; dorothy lamour; 81 mins.
  8. and baby makes three (1950); columbia; comedy; barbara hale; 83 mins.
  9. a woman of distinction (1950); columbia; comedy; rosalind russell; 85 mins.
  10. santa fe (1951); columbia; western; randolph scott; 87 mins.

  • jamesjazzguitar likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#42 rayban

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 10:42 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-04-09-at-8-11-44-pm.png

 

Vince Edwards had already played the title role in the independently produced comedy MR. UNIVERSE when he was signed to a contract at Columbia. The Mr. Universe movie capitalized on his boyish charm and allowed him to show off his physique.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-00-10-pm.png

 

He had been a championship swimmer and trained for the Olympics in college. He decided to study acting, learning the craft with other future Hollywood notables (including Grace Kelly). His acting career took off and his aspirations for the Olympics were set aside.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-08-45-pm.png

 

At first Columbia typecast Vince in crime dramas. His looks made him a natural for film noir, usually cast in bad boy roles. Most of these pictures were hits, and they established him as a leading man. But they didn’t exactly do a whole lot to make him a household name. That wouldn’t happen until he worked on television.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-01-09-pm.png

 

In 1961 Vince signed on to play the lead role in a medical drama series– Ben Casey. It was a huge success with TV audiences, even if the formula had been borrowed from MGM’s even more successful Dr. Kildare series with Richard Chamberlain. For five seasons, Vince played Dr. Casey, and he began to gain more control behind the scenes. In addition to acting, he would direct episodes of the program.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-1-51-18-pm1.pn

 

When his hit TV show ended production, it went into syndication. But Vince wasn’t one to sit around and not work, so he looked for another project. Instead of jumping back into the weekly series grind, he went back to movies full time. He experienced a career resurgence when he appeared in several big budget films in the 60s.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-1-59-08-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. cell 2455, death row (1955); columbia; crime; william campbell; 77 mins.
  2. the night holds terror (1955); columbia; crime; jack kelly; 86 mins.
  3. murder by contract (1958); columbia; crime; phillip pine; 81 mins.
  4. city of fear (1959); columbia; crime; lyle talbot; 81 mins.
  5. the victors (1963); columbia; war; albert finney; 175 mins.
  6. hammerhead (1968); columbia; crime; judy geeson; 99 mins.

 

"The Victors" is such an interesting film - if only it were shown on TCM - or, for that matter, on DVD - or somewhere. 


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#43 TopBilled

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Posted 10 April 2017 - 08:25 AM

screen-shot-2017-04-09-at-8-11-44-pm.png

 

Vince Edwards had already played the title role in the independently produced comedy MR. UNIVERSE when he was signed to a contract at Columbia. The Mr. Universe movie capitalized on his boyish charm and allowed him to show off his physique.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-00-10-pm.png

 

He had been a championship swimmer and trained for the Olympics in college. He decided to study acting, learning the craft with other future Hollywood notables (including Grace Kelly). His acting career took off and his aspirations for the Olympics were set aside.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-08-45-pm.png

 

At first Columbia typecast Vince in crime dramas. His looks made him a natural for film noir, usually cast in bad boy roles. Most of these pictures were hits, and they established him as a leading man. But they didn’t exactly do a whole lot to make him a household name. That wouldn’t happen until he worked on television.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-01-09-pm.png

 

In 1961 Vince signed on to play the lead role in a medical drama series– Ben Casey. It was a huge success with TV audiences, even if the formula had been borrowed from MGM’s even more successful Dr. Kildare series with Richard Chamberlain. For five seasons, Vince played Dr. Casey, and he began to gain more control behind the scenes. In addition to acting, he would direct episodes of the program.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-1-51-18-pm1.pn

 

When his hit TV show ended production, it went into syndication. But Vince wasn’t one to sit around and not work, so he looked for another project. Instead of jumping back into the weekly series grind, he went back to movies full time. He experienced a career resurgence when he appeared in several big budget films in the 60s.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-1-59-08-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. cell 2455, death row (1955); columbia; crime; william campbell; 77 mins.
  2. the night holds terror (1955); columbia; crime; jack kelly; 86 mins.
  3. murder by contract (1958); columbia; crime; phillip pine; 81 mins.
  4. city of fear (1959); columbia; crime; lyle talbot; 81 mins.
  5. the victors (1963); columbia; war; albert finney; 175 mins.
  6. hammerhead (1968); columbia; crime; judy geeson; 99 mins.

  • rayban likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#44 TopBilled

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 01:31 PM

12 years and 28 films - what a run for Penny Singleton and Arthur Lake,

 

Penny Singleton also starred in the original version of "Good News".

 

Yes, she did. Thanks for mentioning it. She was billed as Dorothy McNulty in the 1930 version of GOOD NEWS.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#45 rayban

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 01:25 PM

 

screen-shot-2017-04-08-at-8-25-20-pm.png

 

Was there anyone more adorable than Penny Singleton? Especially when she played Blondie in Columbia’s long-running series based on the popular comic strip. Other performers came and went at the studio (a war even raged in the background), but for twelve years Penny and costar Arthur Lake were in their own little world as Blondie and Dagwood Bumstead. They entertained moviegoers and helped them forget the more serious issues of the day.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-12-10-pm.png

 

Altogether there were 28 films that showed the antics of the Bumstead household. Later Penny would gain even more fans when she was voicing June Jetson in Hanna-Barbera’s animated classic The Jetsons. In 1990 she "played" the character again in a feature film version. But it was her tenure as Blondie for which she is most remembered.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-13-11-pm.png

 

Before she signed with Columbia, Penny had previously worked at Warner Brothers. Mostly she appeared in comedies, but there were some exceptions. For example, she had a role in the Jane Russell drama YOUNG WIDOW; and she can be seen slinging lead with Glenn Ford and Ann Miller in the western GO WEST, YOUNG LADY. Ford had previously played a supporting role in BLONDIE PLAYS CUPID. In fact, most of Columbia’s rising stars paid their dues supporting Penny as Blondie. Performers like Rita Hayworth, Larry Parks and Janet Blair.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-10-35-pm.png

 

After her movie career went into decline Penny kept busy on television. Often she would use her talents as a voice actress for commercials and various animated programs. Audiences couldn’t get enough of Penny. She was delightful and always had a way of making people laugh, even when she was having a bad hair day.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-12-41-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. blondie (1938); columbia; comedy; arthur lake; 70 mins.
  2. blondie on a budget (1940); columbia; comedy; rita hayworth; 72 mins.
  3. blondie plays cupid (1940); columbia; comedy; 68 mins.
  4. blondie goes latin (1941); columbia; comedy; tito guizar; 68 mins.
  5. go west, young lady (1941); columbia; western; glenn ford; 70 mins.
  6. blondie goes to college (1942); columbia; comedy; janet blair; 74 mins.
  7. blondie for victory (1942); columbia; comedy; stuart erwin; 71 mins.
  8. blondie’s holiday (1947); columbia; comedy; jerome cowan; 67 mins.
  9. blondie’s anniversary (1947); columbia; comedy; william frawley; 67 mins.
  10. blondie’s hero (1950); columbia; comedy; arthur lake; 67 mins.

 

12 years and 28 films - what a run for Penny Singleton and Arthur Lake,

 

Penny Singleton also starred in the original version of "Good News".


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#46 TopBilled

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Posted 09 April 2017 - 08:44 AM

screen-shot-2017-04-08-at-8-25-20-pm.png

 

Was there anyone more adorable than Penny Singleton? Especially when she played Blondie in Columbia’s long-running series based on the popular comic strip. Other performers came and went at the studio (a war even raged in the background), but for twelve years Penny and costar Arthur Lake were in their own little world as Blondie and Dagwood Bumstead. They entertained moviegoers and helped them forget the more serious issues of the day.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-12-10-pm.png

 

Altogether there were 28 films that showed the antics of the Bumstead household. Later Penny would gain even more fans when she was voicing June Jetson in Hanna-Barbera’s animated classic The Jetsons. In 1990 she "played" the character again in a feature film version. But it was her tenure as Blondie for which she is most remembered.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-13-11-pm.png

 

Before she signed with Columbia, Penny had previously worked at Warner Brothers. Mostly she appeared in comedies, but there were some exceptions. For example, she had a role in the Jane Russell drama YOUNG WIDOW; and she can be seen slinging lead with Glenn Ford and Ann Miller in the western GO WEST, YOUNG LADY. Ford had previously played a supporting role in BLONDIE PLAYS CUPID. In fact, most of Columbia’s rising stars paid their dues supporting Penny as Blondie. Performers like Rita Hayworth, Larry Parks and Janet Blair.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-10-35-pm.png

 

After her movie career went into decline Penny kept busy on television. Often she would use her talents as a voice actress for commercials and various animated programs. Audiences couldn’t get enough of Penny. She was delightful and always had a way of making people laugh, even when she was having a bad hair day.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-12-41-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. blondie (1938); columbia; comedy; arthur lake; 70 mins.
  2. blondie on a budget (1940); columbia; comedy; rita hayworth; 72 mins.
  3. blondie plays cupid (1940); columbia; comedy; 68 mins.
  4. blondie goes latin (1941); columbia; comedy; tito guizar; 68 mins.
  5. go west, young lady (1941); columbia; western; glenn ford; 70 mins.
  6. blondie goes to college (1942); columbia; comedy; janet blair; 74 mins.
  7. blondie for victory (1942); columbia; comedy; stuart erwin; 71 mins.
  8. blondie’s holiday (1947); columbia; comedy; jerome cowan; 67 mins.
  9. blondie’s anniversary (1947); columbia; comedy; william frawley; 67 mins.
  10. blondie’s hero (1950); columbia; comedy; arthur lake; 67 mins.

  • rayban likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#47 TopBilled

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Posted 08 April 2017 - 09:31 AM

screen-shot-2017-04-08-at-7-09-28-am.png

 

Jim Bannon was already in his thirties and had been married to radio actress Bea Benaderet for several years when he made his first motion picture. It was a Hopalong Cassidy film, independently produced by its star William Boyd, and it featured Jim in a supporting role.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-8-01-02-am.png

 

Though he would come to be associated most strongly with the western genre, when he signed with Columbia a short time later, the studio originally used him in crime dramas. Notably Jim had the lead role in a series of programmers based on the popular radio drama I LOVE A MYSTERY.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-8-02-31-am.png

 

He was cast as super detective Jack Packard, and when the first film was a hit, Harry Cohn ordered up more installments with Jim returning as the main character. In one of the films Packard’s name was changed and the connection to the original franchise was downplayed. After portraying Packard, Columbia continued to use Jim in noir. He was cast in FRAMED with Glenn Ford; and in JOHNNY O’CLOCK with Dick Powell. Plus there was a part as a detective in the crime comedy THE CORPSE CAME C.O.D.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-8-03-11-am.png

 

At this point Jim started to appear in westerns. Before his contract ended at Columbia he teamed up again with Glenn Ford in THE MAN FROM COLORADO; and he was in RENEGADES with Evelyn Keyes. Based on the strength of his performances in these pictures, he was hired by an independent producer to make a series of Red Ryder films for which he is most known. Red Ryder was a B movie series that had been popular with audiences. Jim appeared in four of these productions, then he went to Republic to make other westerns, as well as a serial and some adventure flicks.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-8-01-53-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. i love a mystery (1945); columbia; crime; nina foch; 69 mins.
  2. the gay senorita (1945); columbia; comedy; jinx falkenburg; 69 mins.
  3. the devil’s mask (1946); columbia; crime; anita louise; 65 mins.
  4. the unknown (1946); columbia; crime; karen morley; 70 mins.
  5. renegades (1946); columbia; western; evelyn keyes; 87 mins.
  6. framed (1947); columbia; crime; glenn ford; 82 mins.
  7. the corpse came c.o.d. (1947); columbia; comedy; joan blondell; 87 mins.
  8. the thirteenth hour (1947); columbia; crime; richard dix; 65 mins.
  9. trail to laredo (1948); columbia; western; charles starrett; 54 mins.
  10. the man from colorado (1948); columbia; western; glenn ford; 100 mins.

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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#48 TopBilled

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 01:47 PM

Thanks TB for mentioning Edith Fellows.   One of my favorite child stars. 

 

I haven't seen The Peppers.      Like I have been saying for years,  I wish TCM showed more 30's Columbia films and serials. 

 

You're welcome. TCM has aired all four Pepper movies a few times since I started watching in 2008, but the broadcasts are not often. It's a cute family-friendly series. Edith is great in them.

 

Is "The Peppers" franchise available on DVD?

 

Not to my knowledge, Ray.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#49 jamesjazzguitar

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 01:13 PM

Thanks TB for mentioning Edith Fellows.   One of my favorite child stars. 

 

I haven't seen The Peppers.      Like I have been saying for years,  I wish TCM showed more 30's Columbia films and serials. 

 

 

 


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#50 rayban

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 10:45 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-04-07-at-7-02-37-am.png

 

She was the first child performer to be given a long-term contract at Columbia, and she was probably one of the most memorable. In 1935 studio boss Harry Cohn was so taken with Edith’s performance as Melvyn Douglas’ bratty daughter in SHE MARRIED HER BOSS, he decided a series of films could be tailored around the young actress’s talents.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-19-18-am.png

 

Originally Edith had learned to dance to correct a problem with her foot. Her mother had abandoned her, and she was raised by her father and paternal grandmother. But after Edith’s dad disappeared, it was just her and her grandma, and young Edith wanted to get into the movies. One day while her grandmother was working, she went with a friend to be an extra in a film. During a break between scenes, Edith was dancing and singing on the set and caught the eye of the director who hired her a few days later for a short comedy film.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-08-57-am.png

 

In the early 30s, before her success at Columbia, Edith had bit parts at a variety of studios. She was still finding her way professionally and learning as much as possible about the movie-making business. By the time she was cast in the Douglas picture she was a seasoned veteran. Though her performance gained her a contract and many subsequent roles at the studio, it also typecast her. She had the looks of Shirley Temple, but the acting style of Bonita Granville, and she would not really be able to expand into playing other characters as she grew older. Nevertheless she made several memorable pictures, including one with Bing Crosby.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-10-19-am.png

 

After a year of fame and financial success, Edith’s mother returned to her life. Unfortunately, it was not a happy reunion, since it put Edith in the middle of a widely publicized custody battle between the mom and grandmom. Eventually Edith was allowed to choose which one she would prefer to live with, and she asked to remain with her grandmother and keep making movies.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-14-08-am.png

 

She stayed at Columbia until 1941. During her last two years at the studio, she headlined a series of family comedies called THE PEPPERS. She played the oldest daughter, and the pictures were popular with audiences. But she was growing up and wanted to try her hand at more mature roles. After she left Columbia, she found other opportunities, but soon left the screen and turned her energies toward the stage. A few years later she was married and raising a daughter. She would return to acting in the late 70s and 80s, when she had character parts on television series like Simon & Simon and Cagney & Lacey.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-12-53-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. she married her boss (1935); columbia; comedy; melvyn douglas; 85 mins.
  2. tugboat princess (1936); columbia; drama; valerie hobson; 66 mins.
  3. pennies from heaven (1936); columbia; musical comedy; bing crosby; 81 mins.
  4. and so they were married (1936); columbia; comedy; melvyn douglas; 74 mins.
  5. life begins with love (1937); columbia; drama; jean parker; 72 mins.
  6. little miss roughneck (1960); columbia; comedy; leo carrillo; 64 mins.
  7. the little adventuress (1938); columbia; adventure; richard fiske; 60 mins.
  8. five little peppers and how they grew (1939); columbia; comedy; charles peck; 58 mins.
  9. music in my heart (1940); columbia; romance; rita hayworth; 70 mins.
  10. nobody’s children (1941); columbia; drama; billy lee; 64 mins.

 

Is "The Peppers" franchise available on DVD?


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#51 TopBilled

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Posted 07 April 2017 - 09:39 AM

screen-shot-2017-04-07-at-7-02-37-am.png

 

She was the first child performer to be given a long-term contract at Columbia, and she was probably one of the most memorable. In 1935 studio boss Harry Cohn was so taken with Edith’s performance as Melvyn Douglas’ bratty daughter in SHE MARRIED HER BOSS, he decided a series of films could be tailored around the young actress’s talents.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-19-18-am.png

 

Originally Edith had learned to dance to correct a problem with her foot. Her mother had abandoned her, and she was raised by her father and paternal grandmother. But after Edith’s dad disappeared, it was just her and her grandma, and young Edith wanted to get into the movies. One day while her grandmother was working, she went with a friend to be an extra in a film. During a break between scenes, Edith was dancing and singing on the set and caught the eye of the director who hired her a few days later for a short comedy film.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-08-57-am.png

 

In the early 30s, before her success at Columbia, Edith had bit parts at a variety of studios. She was still finding her way professionally and learning as much as possible about the movie-making business. By the time she was cast in the Douglas picture she was a seasoned veteran. Though her performance gained her a contract and many subsequent roles at the studio, it also typecast her. She had the looks of Shirley Temple, but the acting style of Bonita Granville, and she would not really be able to expand into playing other characters as she grew older. Nevertheless she made several memorable pictures, including one with Bing Crosby.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-10-19-am.png

 

After a year of fame and financial success, Edith’s mother returned to her life. Unfortunately, it was not a happy reunion, since it put Edith in the middle of a widely publicized custody battle between the mom and grandmom. Eventually Edith was allowed to choose which one she would prefer to live with, and she asked to remain with her grandmother and keep making movies.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-14-08-am.png

 

She stayed at Columbia until 1941. During her last two years at the studio, she headlined a series of family comedies called THE PEPPERS. She played the oldest daughter, and the pictures were popular with audiences. But she was growing up and wanted to try her hand at more mature roles. After she left Columbia, she found other opportunities, but soon left the screen and turned her energies toward the stage. A few years later she was married and raising a daughter. She would return to acting in the late 70s and 80s, when she had character parts on television series like Simon & Simon and Cagney & Lacey.

 

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-6-12-53-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. she married her boss (1935); columbia; comedy; melvyn douglas; 85 mins.
  2. tugboat princess (1936); columbia; drama; valerie hobson; 66 mins.
  3. pennies from heaven (1936); columbia; musical comedy; bing crosby; 81 mins.
  4. and so they were married (1936); columbia; comedy; melvyn douglas; 74 mins.
  5. life begins with love (1937); columbia; drama; jean parker; 72 mins.
  6. little miss roughneck (1960); columbia; comedy; leo carrillo; 64 mins.
  7. the little adventuress (1938); columbia; adventure; richard fiske; 60 mins.
  8. five little peppers and how they grew (1939); columbia; comedy; charles peck; 58 mins.
  9. music in my heart (1940); columbia; romance; rita hayworth; 70 mins.
  10. nobody’s children (1941); columbia; drama; billy lee; 64 mins.

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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#52 TopBilled

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 11:33 AM

Can you guess the ones I will be spotlighting..?

 

Columbia Pictures contract players

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-6-31-35-pm.png

 

Friday April 7-- #507: The first child star to have a contract at the studio.

Saturday April 8-- #508: Played Jack Packard.

Sunday April 9-- #509: She was Blondie Bumstead.

Monday April 10-- #510: He was later known as Ben Casey.

Tuesday April 11-- #511: Starlet usually cast in film noir.

Wednesday April 12-- #512: Married to Linda Evans.

Thursday April 13-- #513: Sexy British actress of the 50s & 60s.


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#53 TopBilled

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 11:00 AM

John Saxon gave Sandra Dell her first screen kiss in "The Reluctant Debutante", which was directed by Vincente Minnelli.

 

He was also instrumental to her emotional development in "The Restless Years", which was based on the play, "Teach Me How To Cry".

 

I wonder if people can tell which performers I (really) like when I write these. John Saxon is someone I like a lot. A perfect example of a guy who had looks and no acting talent when he started, but became one of the screen's most versatile performers. I love how entertaining he is in his character roles. 


"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#54 rayban

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Posted 06 April 2017 - 10:54 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-46-25-pm.png

 

John Saxon was from a working class Italian family in New York. He hadn’t even graduated from high school when his picture appeared on the cover of a magazine. Super agent Henry Wilson noticed and at 17, the young kid was signed to a contract. Wilson gave him his new ‘movie star name’ and put him into acting classes with Stella Adler. For the next two years John prepared for his first motion picture role. Meanwhile, Wilson negotiated a deal for him to appear in films at Universal.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-6-59-15-pm.png

 

In 1955, at the age of 20, John made his first Universal picture, portraying a teenage delinquent in RUNNING WILD. He played a similar but more calculating character a short time afterward in THE UNGUARDED MOMENT where he was a dangerous youth stalking his pretty teacher (Esther Williams). Other films at the studio followed, and gradually he was given more romantic roles to play.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-00-21-pm.png

 

During John’s early days at Universal he worked with Sandra Dee several times and more than once with Audie Murphy. The studio also gave him jobs on its television programs, usually western shows. Despite the great exposure, John did not become a lead star; he was featured mainly in supporting roles. By the mid-60s, he was taking on character parts, where he specialized in ethnic types– cast as Italians, Arabs and Mexicans. A lot of these parts were villains, where he was seen as a bandit or a deadly revolutionary.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-02-18-pm.png

 

John’s work on television provided opportunities for him to develop his range as a character actor. He had very different roles on The Virginian for Universal; in fact, he’s the only guest star who worked with all the show’s main leads (Lee J. Cobb; Charles Bickford; John McIntire; and Stewart Granger). When he wasn’t on screen, John spent his free time refining techniques in martial arts. This would come in handy when he was hired for Bruce Lee’s first American film, ENTER THE DRAGON.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-02-35-pm.png

 

In addition to his assignments as villains and ethnic types, John also became known for playing detectives in horror films and thrillers. He made several Italian police thrillers; and he can be seen investigating deaths at a sorority house in BLACK CHRISTMAS. A few years later, he was investigating killings in THE NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET. He continued to remain in demand on television– he had a recurring role on Falcon Crest as Lorenzo Lamas’ father; and he was a slick Middle Eastern oil dealer in episodes of Dynasty opposite Joan Collins.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-04-40-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. running wild (1955); universal; crime; mamie van doren; 81 mins.
  2. the unguarded moment (1956); universal; crime; esther williams; 95 mins.
  3. rock, pretty baby (1956); universal; comedy; sal mineo; 89 mins.
  4. the restless years (1958); universal; drama; sandra dee; 86 mins.
  5. the plunderers (1960); aa; western; jeff chandler; 94 mins.
  6. posse from hell (1961); universal; western; audie murphy; 89 mins.
  7. war hunt (1962); ua; war; robert redford; 83 mins.
  8. the appaloosa (1966); universal; western; marlon brando; 98 mins.
  9. black christmas (1974); warner brothers; horror; olivia hussey; 98 mins.
  10. a nightmare on elm street (1984); new line; horror; 91 mins.

 

John Saxon gave Sandra Dell her first screen kiss in "The Reluctant Debutante", which was directed by Vincente Minnelli.

 

He was also instrumental to her emotional development in "The Restless Years", which was based on the play, "Teach Me How To Cry".


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#55 TopBilled

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Posted 05 April 2017 - 05:10 PM

screen-shot-2017-04-05-at-2-46-25-pm.png

 

John Saxon was from a working class Italian family in New York. He hadn’t even graduated from high school when his picture appeared on the cover of a magazine. Super agent Henry Wilson noticed and at 17, the young kid was signed to a contract. Wilson gave him his new ‘movie star name’ and put him into acting classes with Stella Adler. For the next two years John prepared for his first motion picture role. Meanwhile, Wilson negotiated a deal for him to appear in films at Universal.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-6-59-15-pm.png

 

In 1955, at the age of 20, John made his first Universal picture, portraying a teenage delinquent in RUNNING WILD. He played a similar but more calculating character a short time afterward in THE UNGUARDED MOMENT where he was a dangerous youth stalking his pretty teacher (Esther Williams). Other films at the studio followed, and gradually he was given more romantic roles to play.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-00-21-pm.png

 

During John’s early days at Universal he worked with Sandra Dee several times and more than once with Audie Murphy. The studio also gave him jobs on its television programs, usually western shows. Despite the great exposure, John did not become a lead star; he was featured mainly in supporting roles. By the mid-60s, he was taking on character parts, where he specialized in ethnic types– cast as Italians, Arabs and Mexicans. A lot of these parts were villains, where he was seen as a bandit or a deadly revolutionary.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-02-18-pm.png

 

John’s work on television provided opportunities for him to develop his range as a character actor. He had very different roles on The Virginian for Universal; in fact, he’s the only guest star who worked with all the show’s main leads (Lee J. Cobb; Charles Bickford; John McIntire; and Stewart Granger). When he wasn’t on screen, John spent his free time refining techniques in martial arts. This would come in handy when he was hired for Bruce Lee’s first American film, ENTER THE DRAGON.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-02-35-pm.png

 

In addition to his assignments as villains and ethnic types, John also became known for playing detectives in horror films and thrillers. He made several Italian police thrillers; and he can be seen investigating deaths at a sorority house in BLACK CHRISTMAS. A few years later, he was investigating killings in THE NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET. He continued to remain in demand on television– he had a recurring role on Falcon Crest as Lorenzo Lamas’ father; and he was a slick Middle Eastern oil dealer in episodes of Dynasty opposite Joan Collins.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-7-04-40-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. running wild (1955); universal; crime; mamie van doren; 81 mins.
  2. the unguarded moment (1956); universal; crime; esther williams; 95 mins.
  3. rock, pretty baby (1956); universal; comedy; sal mineo; 89 mins.
  4. the restless years (1958); universal; drama; sandra dee; 86 mins.
  5. the plunderers (1960); aa; western; jeff chandler; 94 mins.
  6. posse from hell (1961); universal; western; audie murphy; 89 mins.
  7. war hunt (1962); ua; war; robert redford; 83 mins.
  8. the appaloosa (1966); universal; western; marlon brando; 98 mins.
  9. black christmas (1974); warner brothers; horror; olivia hussey; 98 mins.
  10. a nightmare on elm street (1984); new line; horror; 91 mins.

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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#56 TopBilled

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 06:49 PM

screen-shot-2017-04-04-at-4-41-19-pm.png

 

John Agar’s father died when he was just becoming an adult. He had several younger siblings and stayed with his mother for a few more years to help raise them. The Agars originally resided in the midwest but relocated to Los Angeles to find new opportunities. Around this time the country entered the war, and John was soon active in the military.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-6-32-37-pm.png

 

When he finished serving he was back in Los Angeles, and met one of his sister’s friends. The friend was Shirley Temple. John and Shirley began to date and were married a short time later. Shirley was under contract with David Selznick during these years, and the producer offered to give John acting lessons and represent him, too. In 1948, the same year John and Shirley had a daughter, they both appeared in John Ford’s FORT APACHE. It was John’s motion picture debut, and it was a success with audiences.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-6-31-56-pm.png

 

The next year Selznick put John and Shirley into the period piece ADVENTURE IN BALTIMORE, which was produced at RKO. There were several other assignments at various studios, including another picture for director John Ford. And at Republic, John scored a hit in the war drama SANDS OF IWO JIMA which reunited him with John Wayne. He and Duke would work together on several more occasions. After a five year contract with Selznick ended, John moved over to Columbia then signed a contract with Universal in the mid-50s.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-6-40-40-pm.png

 

There were a series of alcohol-related problems, and the end of his marriage to Shirley, but somehow John’s film career continued without losing any momentum. Signing with Universal led to his being cast in a series of science fiction flicks. Many of them would go on to become cult classics.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-6-34-55-pm.png

 

In addition to the sci-fi stories, he was often assigned to westerns. In the late 50s John left Universal but continued to find work as a lead in other low-budget films for American International– usually science fiction or horror. In the early 60s he was making westerns for producer A.C. Lyle at Paramount. Plus there were occasional turns on television. While acting roles became less frequent in later decades, he was still appearing on screen in the 1990s, accepting whatever good offers came his way.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-6-46-20-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. fort apache (1948); rko; war/western; john wayne; 125 mins.
  2. adventure in baltimore (1949); rko; drama; shirley temple; 89 mins.
  3. sands of iwo jima (1949); republic; war; john wayne; 109 mins.
  4. breakthrough (1950); warner brothers; war; david brian; 91 mins.
  5. the magic carpet (1951); columbia; adventure; lucille ball; 84 mins.
  6. shield for murder (1954); ua; crime; edmond o’brien; 82 mins.
  7. revenge of the creature (1955); universal; horror; lori nelson; 82 mins.
  8. tarantula (1955); universal; horror; mara corday; 81 mins.
  9. star in the dust (1956); universal; western; mamie van doren; 80 mins.
  10. the mole people (1956); universal; horror; hugh beaumont; 77 mins.

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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#57 rayban

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 11:46 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-04-03-at-4-32-49-pm.png

 

John Dall’s career as an actor had its share of ups and downs. He had originally planned to become a civil engineer like his late father, but those plans changed when he realized life as a performer was more fun. After a period of paying his dues in the early 40s, he began to land important roles on Broadway. It wasn’t long before he earned strong notices on the New York stage for his work in the hit play ‘Dear Ruth.’ But Paramount decided to use William Holden in the role when the play was turned into a film.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-07-09-pm.png

 

Nevertheless, John had a chance to be in the movies and seemed poised for great success when Warner Brothers signed him to a contract. He was quickly cast in the 1945 drama THE CORN IS GREEN, opposite Bette Davis– she portrayed the influential schoolmarm; and he was the impressionable student in her care. It was a hit, and John’s performance netted him an Oscar nomination that year as supporting actor.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-10-57-pm.png

 

The next film the studio put him in was ROPE, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It was based on the infamous Leopold and Loeb case about two prep school students who decide to commit murder for the heck of it. Farley Granger played the other killer, and James Stewart was a man who caught on to what the lads had done. It was not a commercial success, and John did not make any more films for Warners. In the meantime he appeared in two pictures at Universal– a romantic comedy with Deanna Durbin where he was a second lead; and the dramatic adaptation of Lillian Hellman’s ANOTHER PART OF THE FOREST, where John was sixth-billed.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-07-48-pm.png

 

He had a lead in his next picture, the classic noir GUN CRAZY. Like ROPE it was also not a hit but gradually achieved cult status in subsequent years. He played a trigger happy young lover who goes on a killing spree with his girlfriend (Peggy Cummins). There was another crime drama after this, then he began to turn to television. The small screen kept him busy during the 50s, and he didn’t return to the movies until 1960, when he was cast in Stanley Kubrick’s SPARTACUS.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-08-38-pm.png

 

John appeared in just one more film after SPARTACUS, then there were a few more roles on TV. Several times in the early 60s, he had guest spots on his friend Raymond Burr’s program Perry Mason. The last few years of his life, he and his partner travelled; and an injury kept him from working. He passed away at the relatively young age of 50 in 1971.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-11-31-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the corn is green (1945); warner brothers; drama; bette davis; 115 mins.
  2. something in the wind (1947); universal; musical comedy; deanna durbin; 94 mins.
  3. another part of the forest (1948); universal; drama; fredric march; 107 mins.
  4. rope (1948); warner brothers; crime; farley granger; 80 mins.
  5. gun crazy (1950); ua; crime; peggy cummins; 87 mins.
  6. the man who cheated himself (1950); fox; crime; lee j. cobb; 81 mins.
  7. spartacus (1960); universal; drama; kirk douglas; 184 mins.
  8. atlantis, the lost continent (1961); mgm; science fiction; anthony hall; 90 mins.

 

John Dall was just so unforgettable in "Rope" and "Gun Crazy".

 

He's also been a lot of fun on the "Perry Mason" series.


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"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#58 TopBilled

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 06:40 PM

screen-shot-2017-04-03-at-4-32-49-pm.png

 

John Dall’s career as an actor had its share of ups and downs. He had originally planned to become a civil engineer like his late father, but those plans changed when he realized life as a performer was more fun. After a period of paying his dues in the early 40s, he began to land important roles on Broadway. It wasn’t long before he earned strong notices on the New York stage for his work in the hit play ‘Dear Ruth.’ But Paramount decided to use William Holden in the role when the play was turned into a film.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-07-09-pm.png

 

Nevertheless, John had a chance to be in the movies and seemed poised for great success when Warner Brothers signed him to a contract. He was quickly cast in the 1945 drama THE CORN IS GREEN, opposite Bette Davis– she portrayed the influential schoolmarm; and he was the impressionable student in her care. It was a hit, and John’s performance netted him an Oscar nomination that year as supporting actor.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-10-57-pm.png

 

The next film the studio put him in was ROPE, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. It was based on the infamous Leopold and Loeb case about two prep school students who decide to commit murder for the heck of it. Farley Granger played the other killer, and James Stewart was a man who caught on to what the lads had done. It was not a commercial success, and John did not make any more films for Warners. In the meantime he appeared in two pictures at Universal– a romantic comedy with Deanna Durbin where he was a second lead; and the dramatic adaptation of Lillian Hellman’s ANOTHER PART OF THE FOREST, where John was sixth-billed.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-07-48-pm.png

 

He had a lead in his next picture, the classic noir GUN CRAZY. Like ROPE it was also not a hit but gradually achieved cult status in subsequent years. He played a trigger happy young lover who goes on a killing spree with his girlfriend (Peggy Cummins). There was another crime drama after this, then he began to turn to television. The small screen kept him busy during the 50s, and he didn’t return to the movies until 1960, when he was cast in Stanley Kubrick’s SPARTACUS.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-08-38-pm.png

 

John appeared in just one more film after SPARTACUS, then there were a few more roles on TV. Several times in the early 60s, he had guest spots on his friend Raymond Burr’s program Perry Mason. The last few years of his life, he and his partner travelled; and an injury kept him from working. He passed away at the relatively young age of 50 in 1971.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-26-at-3-11-31-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the corn is green (1945); warner brothers; drama; bette davis; 115 mins.
  2. something in the wind (1947); universal; musical comedy; deanna durbin; 94 mins.
  3. another part of the forest (1948); universal; drama; fredric march; 107 mins.
  4. rope (1948); warner brothers; crime; farley granger; 80 mins.
  5. gun crazy (1950); ua; crime; peggy cummins; 87 mins.
  6. the man who cheated himself (1950); fox; crime; lee j. cobb; 81 mins.
  7. spartacus (1960); universal; drama; kirk douglas; 184 mins.
  8. atlantis, the lost continent (1961); mgm; science fiction; anthony hall; 90 mins.

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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#59 TopBilled

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 03:42 PM

I never heard of her.

 

She's one of my favorite British actresses of the 40s. So elegant, refined and she underplays instead of overplays her scenes. Kind of refreshing to see a performer so strong and low-key.


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"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#60 rayban

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Posted 03 April 2017 - 10:39 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-04-02-at-6-26-24-am.png

 

Rosamund John was known for her portrayals of gentle British women on the screen. Initially she had made a name for herself on the London stage in the late 1930s and early 1940s. She was content with her work in the theater, and after an early film appearance, she wasn’t exactly looking to become a movie star. But that’s what happened.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-25-at-3-04-46-pm.png

 

After a hit play with Robert Donat, she was selected by Leslie Howard to costar with him in his next motion picture. They ended up getting along so well she worked with Howard two more times before his untimely death. In an interview decades later, Rosamund fondly described the experience and indicated she had learned a great deal from Mr. Howard as a performer.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-25-at-3-08-13-pm.png

 

One of the films Rosamund made during this time had Stewart Granger as the leading man, with Howard just producing. It was a wartime drama about valiant nurses called THE LAMP STILL BURNS, and it did well with audiences. The following year she played another nurse when she appeared in TAWNY PIPIT, which became her biggest hit. While considered to be a war film, the basic scenario had more light-hearted elements and allowed Rosamund the chance to do some comedy.  For her next assignments, she was back to serious drama, collaborating with Trevor Howard; James Mason; and Michael Redgrave.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-25-at-3-06-37-pm.png

 

By the late 40s, she began to turn her energies to politics. She would still appear in films during the 1950s but she was more interested in representing her fellow performers in a British actors union. Her second husband was also active in politics and served as a member of the Labour Party. He became a cabinet minister in the 1970s, around the time Rosamund retired from acting.

 

screen-shot-2017-03-25-at-3-05-04-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the first of the few (1942); rko; war; leslie howard; 118 mins.
  2. the lamp still burns (1943); general film; drama; stewart granger; 92 mins.
  3. tawny pipit; general film; comedy; bernard miles; 81 mins.
  4. the way to the stars (1945); two cities; war; michael redgrave; 109 mins.
  5. green for danger (1946); general film; crime; trevor howard; 91 mins.
  6. the upturned glass (1947); gainsborough; crime; james mason; 90 mins.
  7. fame is the spur (1947); general film; drama; michael redgrave; 116 mins.
  8. when the bough breaks (1947); gainsborough; drama; patricia roc; 78 mins.
  9. no place for jennifer (1949); british pathe; drama; leo genn; 89 mins.
  10. street corner (1953); london independent; drama; peggy cummins; 94 mins.

 

I never heard of her.


"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".





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