We're excited to present a great new set of boards to classic movie fans with tons of new features, stability, and performance.

If you’re new to the message boards, please “Register” to get started. If you want to learn more about the new boards, visit our FAQ.

Register

If you're a returning member, start by resetting your password to claim your old display name using your email address.

Re-Register

Thanks for your continued support of the TCM Message Boards.

X

Kyle Kersten was a true friend of TCM. One of the first and most active participants of the Message Boards, “Kyle in Hollywood” (aka, hlywdkjk) demonstrated a depth of knowledge and largesse of spirit that made him one of the most popular and respected voices in these forums. This thread is a living memorial to his life and love of movies, which remain with us still.

X

Jump to content


Photo

Golden age: Roll call


  • Please log in to reply
1418 replies to this topic

#41 rayban

rayban

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,915 posts

Posted 16 May 2017 - 10:24 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-05-16-at-6-51-07-am.png

 

Like his Gunsmoke costar Ken Curtis, Glenn Strange had come to Hollywood as a singer. He grew up in the southwest and came from a ranching family. At a young age he showed skill as a singer and was performing on a local radio show in the late 1920s. He then toured with a band that went to California.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-52-49-pm.png

 

In the early 1930s Glenn was playing gigs with his band and finding small roles in movie serials. Because of his imposing build (he was 6’5″ tall), he was often used to play menacing characters. He would become known for his later villainous roles at Universal in the 40s. He was being fitted for a costume for an action picture when someone realized he’d be perfect as Frankenstein’s monster in several upcoming horror films at the studio. He went on to do the role in three Universal pictures, and it was his face that was used in the 50s for toys and other merchandising tie-ins.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-55-18-pm.png

 

In the monster flicks Glenn worked alongside people like Lon Chaney Jr. and Abbott & Costello. He also worked with the Bowery Boys over at Monogram; and in quite a few low-budget thrillers and westerns at PRC. He still took work in serials, too. In the 50s, he transitioned to television and usually played villains in adventure programs and action series.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-52-20-pm.png

 

By the time Glenn took the role of Sam the bartender on Gunsmoke, he had amassed over 300 screen credits. He played Sam from 1961 until his death in 1973 (his last episode aired two months after he had passed away). Costar Buck Taylor named a son after him; Taylor had also named an older son after Jim Arness.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-3-00-04-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the mad monster (1942); prc; horror; george zucco; 77 mins.
  2. the black raven (1943); prc; horror; george zucco; 61 mins.
  3. the monster maker (1944); prc; horror; j. carrol naish; 62 mins.
  4. valley of vengeance (1944); prc; western; buster crabbe; 56 mins.
  5. house of frankenstein (1944); universal; horror; boris karloff; 71 mins.
  6. house of dracula (1945); universal; horror; lon chaney jr.; 67 mins.
  7. renegades of the rio grande (1945); universal; western; rod cameron; 57 mins.
  8. abbott and costello meet frankenstein (1948); universal; horror comedy; abbott & costello; 83 mins.
  9. master minds (1949); monogram; horror comedy; leo gorcey; 64 mins.
  10. comanche territory (1950); universal; western; maureen o’hara; 76 mins.

 

As Sam, the bartender in "Gunsmoke", his presence at the bar was always a comforting one.


  • TopBilled likes this

"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#42 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36,521 posts

Posted 16 May 2017 - 09:01 AM

screen-shot-2017-05-16-at-6-51-07-am.png

 

Like his Gunsmoke costar Ken Curtis, Glenn Strange had come to Hollywood as a singer. He grew up in the southwest and came from a ranching family. At a young age he showed skill as a singer and was performing on a local radio show in the late 1920s. He then toured with a band that went to California.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-52-49-pm.png

 

In the early 1930s Glenn was playing gigs with his band and finding small roles in movie serials. Because of his imposing build (he was 6’5″ tall), he was often used to play menacing characters. He would become known for his later villainous roles at Universal in the 40s. He was being fitted for a costume for an action picture when someone realized he’d be perfect as Frankenstein’s monster in several upcoming horror films at the studio. He went on to do the role in three Universal pictures, and it was his face that was used in the 50s for toys and other merchandising tie-ins.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-55-18-pm.png

 

In the monster flicks Glenn worked alongside people like Lon Chaney Jr. and Abbott & Costello. He also worked with the Bowery Boys over at Monogram; and in quite a few low-budget thrillers and westerns at PRC. He still took work in serials, too. In the 50s, he transitioned to television and usually played villains in adventure programs and action series.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-52-20-pm.png

 

By the time Glenn took the role of Sam the bartender on Gunsmoke, he had amassed over 300 screen credits. He played Sam from 1961 until his death in 1973 (his last episode aired two months after he had passed away). Costar Buck Taylor named a son after him; Taylor had also named an older son after Jim Arness.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-3-00-04-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the mad monster (1942); prc; horror; george zucco; 77 mins.
  2. the black raven (1943); prc; horror; george zucco; 61 mins.
  3. the monster maker (1944); prc; horror; j. carrol naish; 62 mins.
  4. valley of vengeance (1944); prc; western; buster crabbe; 56 mins.
  5. house of frankenstein (1944); universal; horror; boris karloff; 71 mins.
  6. house of dracula (1945); universal; horror; lon chaney jr.; 67 mins.
  7. renegades of the rio grande (1945); universal; western; rod cameron; 57 mins.
  8. abbott and costello meet frankenstein (1948); universal; horror comedy; abbott & costello; 83 mins.
  9. master minds (1949); monogram; horror comedy; leo gorcey; 64 mins.
  10. comanche territory (1950); universal; western; maureen o’hara; 76 mins.

  • rayban likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#43 rayban

rayban

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,915 posts

Posted 15 May 2017 - 10:53 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-05-15-at-6-58-57-am.png

 

You name it, Ken Curtis did it. His first love was music, and as a young man, he played in bands and toured the country. Eventually he made his way from his hometown in Colorado to Los Angeles. In the early 40s, he was known as a vocalist, fronting for several well-known orchestras– including Tommy Dorsey’s. In fact, Ken took over when Frank Sinatra went solo.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-40-47-pm.png

 

During this time Ken also tried to break into movies. Just as that goal was about to be realized, the war began. So Ken spent two years in the military, but after his military duty ended, he was back in Hollywood. He was no longer singing with Dorsey (that job had been taken by Dick Haymes), but Ken continued to sing with other top-name bands. He also landed a movie contract at Columbia, where he was put in a series of B musicals.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-44-18-pm.png

 

During the late 40s Ken was not only a lead vocalist, but he was a leading man in B movies, playing the romantic hero. A far cry from the folksy character he would portray on Gunsmoke later. After his days as a B musical star, Ken took minor roles in John Ford films (Ford was his father-in-law). He also produced a low-budget horror flick in which he played a supporting role.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-43-23-pm.png

 

Meanwhile, Ken had started to appear on television. When Gunsmoke premiered on CBS TV, Dennis Weaver portrayed Marshal Dillon’s sidekick. In those early seasons of the program, Ken guest-starred as other short-term characters. He also had roles on countless other TV shows, and for two seasons he had a featured part in the syndicated action series Ripcord.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-42-52-pm.png

 

When Festus Haggen was initially introduced, Ken signed on as a guest. But Festus was a hit with viewers and was invited back. As the tenth season of Gunsmoke got underway Ken was hired to be a regular member of the cast. He continued playing Festus until the program ended in 1975. Afterward Ken did other roles; he had a recurring gig in the 80s western drama The Yellow Rose. Of course, by then, nobody remembered he had started as a singer or that he had played with Dorsey and had hit records with the Sons of the Pioneers.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-45-20-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. out of the depths (1945); columbia; war; jim bannon; 61 mins.
  2. rhythm round-up (1945); columbia; musical western; cheryl walker; 64 mins.
  3. song of the prairie (1945); columbia; musical western; june storey; 62 mins.
  4. throw a saddle on a star (1946); columbia; musical western; jeff donnell; 60 mins.
  5. that texas jamboree (1946); columbia; musical western; jeff donnell; 59 mins.
  6. cowboy blues (1946); columbia; musical western; jeff donnell; 62 mins.
  7. singing on the trail (1946); columbia; musical western; jeff donnell; 60 mins.
  8. lone star moonlight (1946); columbia; musical western; joan barton; 67 mins.
  9. over the santa fe trail (1947); columbia; musical western; jennifer holt; 63 mins.
  10. the killer shrews (1959); independent; horror; james best; 70 mins.

 

Ken Curtis' Festus was a memorable characterization.

 

Too bad, other supporting actors like Ben Cooper's young lawyer and Roger Ewing's virginal soul weren't allowed the same room. 


  • TopBilled likes this

"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#44 ChristineHoard

ChristineHoard

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 781 posts
  • LocationGA

Posted 15 May 2017 - 09:52 AM

Ken Curtis was also in THE SEARCHERS and, if I recall correctly, got to do a little strumming on the guitar and singing.  I didn't know he was John Ford's son-in-law.


  • TopBilled and rayban like this

#45 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36,521 posts

Posted 15 May 2017 - 09:08 AM

screen-shot-2017-05-15-at-6-58-57-am.png

 

You name it, Ken Curtis did it. His first love was music, and as a young man, he played in bands and toured the country. Eventually he made his way from his hometown in Colorado to Los Angeles. In the early 40s, he was known as a vocalist, fronting for several well-known orchestras– including Tommy Dorsey’s. In fact, Ken took over when Frank Sinatra went solo.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-40-47-pm.png

 

During this time Ken also tried to break into movies. Just as that goal was about to be realized, the war began. So Ken spent two years in the military, but after his military duty ended, he was back in Hollywood. He was no longer singing with Dorsey (that job had been taken by Dick Haymes), but Ken continued to sing with other top-name bands. He also landed a movie contract at Columbia, where he was put in a series of B musicals.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-44-18-pm.png

 

During the late 40s Ken was not only a lead vocalist, but he was a leading man in B movies, playing the romantic hero. A far cry from the folksy character he would portray on Gunsmoke later. After his days as a B musical star, Ken took minor roles in John Ford films (Ford was his father-in-law). He also produced a low-budget horror flick in which he played a supporting role.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-43-23-pm.png

 

Meanwhile, Ken had started to appear on television. When Gunsmoke premiered on CBS TV, Dennis Weaver portrayed Marshal Dillon’s sidekick. In those early seasons of the program, Ken guest-starred as other short-term characters. He also had roles on countless other TV shows, and for two seasons he had a featured part in the syndicated action series Ripcord.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-42-52-pm.png

 

When Festus Haggen was initially introduced, Ken signed on as a guest. But Festus was a hit with viewers and was invited back. As the tenth season of Gunsmoke got underway Ken was hired to be a regular member of the cast. He continued playing Festus until the program ended in 1975. Afterward Ken did other roles; he had a recurring gig in the 80s western drama The Yellow Rose. Of course, by then, nobody remembered he had started as a singer or that he had played with Dorsey and had hit records with the Sons of the Pioneers.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-45-20-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. out of the depths (1945); columbia; war; jim bannon; 61 mins.
  2. rhythm round-up (1945); columbia; musical western; cheryl walker; 64 mins.
  3. song of the prairie (1945); columbia; musical western; june storey; 62 mins.
  4. throw a saddle on a star (1946); columbia; musical western; jeff donnell; 60 mins.
  5. that texas jamboree (1946); columbia; musical western; jeff donnell; 59 mins.
  6. cowboy blues (1946); columbia; musical western; jeff donnell; 62 mins.
  7. singing on the trail (1946); columbia; musical western; jeff donnell; 60 mins.
  8. lone star moonlight (1946); columbia; musical western; joan barton; 67 mins.
  9. over the santa fe trail (1947); columbia; musical western; jennifer holt; 63 mins.
  10. the killer shrews (1959); independent; horror; james best; 70 mins.

  • ChristineHoard and rayban like this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#46 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36,521 posts

Posted 13 May 2017 - 04:40 PM

screen-shot-2017-05-13-at-2-26-34-pm.png

 

While some sources credit Amanda Blake with playing Miss Kitty for the entire run of Gunsmoke, the truth is she left at the end of the penultimate season. For 19 out of the show’s 20 years, she played Miss Kitty, the saloon proprietress of Dodge on CBS’ long running western. She became an international star because of her participation in the series, and like it did for the rest of the cast, it pretty much curtailed her blossoming movie career.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-34-57-pm.png

 

There are worse things than being typecast in a hugely popular weekly TV series, and I’m sure Amanda realized that. Before she was cast as Kitty, she had come to Hollywood like so many other hopefuls, determined to be a movie star. At the age of 20 she was signed by MGM. In fact Metro dubbed her their ‘young Greer Garson.’ Probably because of the resemblance in hair color (both ladies were redheads), though their acting styles and overall demeanor were hardly similar. Interestingly Greer was still making pictures at the studio, but Amanda was never put in any of those.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-38-46-pm.png

 

Instead Amanda’s assignments at MGM found her appearing in a musical with Esther Williams; two musicals with Leslie Caron; and a western with Joel McCrea that also happened to costar a young James Arness. Jim was billed considerably lower than Amanda in STARS IN MY CROWN; and little did the two know they would work together on Gunsmoke just five years later.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-34-02-pm.png

 

While she was still under contract with her home studio, Amanda made films on loan out in a variety of genres. The most notable of these is her starring role in the 20th Century Fox adventure drama MISS ROBIN CRUSOE, in which she played the lead. Fox also used her for an adventure story with John Derek.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-35-14-pm.png

 

After she left her role as Miss Kitty, Amanda devoted herself to the preservation of wildlife. She was known for being an animal rights activist, and fellow cast mates from the TV series would recall occasions when she brought a pet lion on to the set. In her later years, she had small roles in two feature films; and she also returned to television for one of the Gunsmoke reunion movies before her death in 1989.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-34-34-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. duchess in idaho (1950); mgm; musical; esther williams; 98 mins.
  2. stars in my crown (1950); mgm; western; joel mccrea; 89 mins.
  3. scarlet angel (1952); universal; adventure; yvonne de carlo; 81 mins.
  4. cattle town (1952); warners; western; dennis morgan; 71 mins.
  5. lili (1953); mgm; musical; leslie caron; 81 mins.
  6. sabre jet (1953); ua; war; robert stack; 90 mins.
  7. miss robin crusoe (1954); fox; adventure; george nader; 74 mins.
  8. the adventures of hajji baba (1954); fox; adventure; john derek; 94 mins.
  9. a star is born (1954); warners; drama; judy garland; 182 mins.
  10. the glass slipper (1955); mgm; musical; leslie caron; 93 mins.

  • ChristineHoard and rayban like this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#47 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,059 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 13 May 2017 - 12:56 PM

In a few days I will be featuring Ken Curtis who played Festus. He had quite a varied career; he was a talented man.

 

Yes,  Ken Curtis was very talented and had a varied career.   That is why my comment was very specific;  I really disliked the Festus character.    Of course I understand Curtis was just doing his job (playing the character as the producers of the series wanted him to play it). 


  • TopBilled likes this

#48 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36,521 posts

Posted 13 May 2017 - 12:53 PM

starring in emerald point probably funded that house made out of debri of his in the desert southwest.

 

I remember seeing an interview of he and his wife sitting on the sofa in their living room.

 

You may be right about that. Dennis Weaver certainly became an advocate for environmental awareness. He also promoted vegetarianism. I believe the house you mention was in Colorado, which is where he died years later.


  • rayban likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#49 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36,521 posts

Posted 13 May 2017 - 12:51 PM

Dennis Weaver:  In an uncredited role in The Mississippi Gambler, he plays the brother of Julia Adams's character whose gambling away the company funds leads to his suicide and romantic problems for her (she loves a man who loves another woman while her brother loves Anne/Julia). 

 

Also Rock Hudson, Tony/Anthony Curtis and Dennis all played "Indians" in various U-I Westerns of the late 40's-early 50's.  After straying from the nest they would come back to Universal in the 70's for TV work that made them bigger stars than their movie work.  This is ironic as when they began their climbs to success TV was looked down on by the film industry when it ended up extending the careers of so many people in front of and behind the screen. 

 

That's a good point. Many of them continued to work for Universal during the golden age of television. Ray Danton is another one-- he became an episodic TV director at the studio and worked on many of Universal's television programs. 


  • rayban likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#50 NipkowDisc

NipkowDisc

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 10,650 posts
  • Locationzaygon hegemony

Posted 13 May 2017 - 12:05 PM

Yes, sorry. I thought about mentioning it but I was trying to focus on his earlier film work-- I am sure he did many TV movies.

 

I remember watching him in Emerald Point, a primetime soap opera in the 80s. 

starring in emerald point probably funded that house made out of debri of his in the desert southwest.

 

I remember seeing an interview of he and his wife sitting on the sofa in their living room.


  • TopBilled likes this

"okay, so we're moving right along, folks" -al pacino, dog day afternoon


#51 RipMurdock

RipMurdock

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 358 posts

Posted 13 May 2017 - 11:35 AM

In a few days I will be featuring Ken Curtis who played Festus. He had quite a varied career; he was a talented man.

He sang too which adds to his talents as comedic support and other acting gigs.


  • TopBilled likes this

#52 wouldbestar

wouldbestar

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,616 posts
  • LocationTampa, FL

Posted 13 May 2017 - 09:54 AM

Dennis Weaver:  In an uncredited role in The Mississippi Gambler, he plays the brother of Julia Adams's character whose gambling away the company funds leads to his suicide and romantic problems for her (she loves a man who loves another woman while her brother loves Anne/Julia). 

 

Also Rock Hudson, Tony/Anthony Curtis and Dennis all played "Indians" in various U-I Westerns of the late 40's-early 50's.  After straying from the nest they would come back to Universal in the 70's for TV work that made them bigger stars than their movie work.  This is ironic as when they began their climbs to success TV was looked down on by the film industry when it ended up extending the careers of so many people in front of and behind the screen. 


  • TopBilled and rayban like this

#53 ChristineHoard

ChristineHoard

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 781 posts
  • LocationGA

Posted 12 May 2017 - 09:22 PM

Yes, sorry. I thought about mentioning it but I was trying to focus on his earlier film work-- I am sure he did many TV movies.

 

I remember watching him in Emerald Point, a primetime soap opera in the 80s. 

 

You are forgiven, sir!    :)  I just wanted to point out that although Dennis did a lot of TV work (love him in TOUCH OF EVIL, by the way) his performance in DUEL is special.  Thanks.


  • TopBilled and rayban like this

#54 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36,521 posts

Posted 12 May 2017 - 08:55 PM

topbilled, how could you leave out DUEL?!?  Dennis is great in this tense, taut thriller!  I know that technically it's a TV movie but I believe it was released overseas and it's on DVD.  Early Spielberg; I know you know about it.  You mention Dennis' TV work so please give DUEL a shout-out (oh, wait, I just did).  If anybody hasn't seen DUEL, check it out.  It is really, really good.  

 

Yes, sorry. I thought about mentioning it but I was trying to focus on his earlier film work-- I am sure he did many TV movies.

 

I remember watching him in Emerald Point, a primetime soap opera in the 80s. 


  • ChristineHoard and rayban like this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#55 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36,521 posts

Posted 12 May 2017 - 08:51 PM

My parents would watch Gunsmoke each week,  but I wasn't much of a fan.   I liked Doc (Milburn Stone),  and Dennis Weaver as Chester but that was about it.   (I was OK with Arness).      But I really disliked the Festus character.   

 

In a few days I will be featuring Ken Curtis who played Festus. He had quite a varied career; he was a talented man.


  • rayban likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#56 ChristineHoard

ChristineHoard

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 781 posts
  • LocationGA

Posted 12 May 2017 - 07:17 PM

topbilled, how could you leave out DUEL?!?  Dennis is great in this tense, taut thriller!  I know that technically it's a TV movie but I believe it was released overseas and it's on DVD.  Early Spielberg; I know you know about it.  You mention Dennis' TV work so please give DUEL a shout-out (oh, wait, I just did).  If anybody hasn't seen DUEL, check it out.  It is really, really good.  


  • TopBilled likes this

#57 jamesjazzguitar

jamesjazzguitar

    There is nothing as bad as something not so bad

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 17,059 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Posted 12 May 2017 - 06:14 PM

It's ironic that an athletic man who almost made the Olympics in track became known for playing a character with a limp. I guess that's what they call acting!

 

My parents would watch Gunsmoke each week,  but I wasn't much of a fan.   I liked Doc (Milburn Stone),  and Dennis Weaver as Chester but that was about it.   (I was OK with Arness).      But I really disliked the Festus character.   


  • TopBilled likes this

#58 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36,521 posts

Posted 12 May 2017 - 10:34 AM

Dennis Weaver was so memorable as Chester on "Gunsmoke".

 

I could never forget that limp of his.

 

I could never forget the way he talked, either.

 

It's ironic that an athletic man who almost made the Olympics in track became known for playing a character with a limp. I guess that's what they call acting!


  • rayban likes this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).


#59 rayban

rayban

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,915 posts

Posted 12 May 2017 - 10:29 AM

 

screen-shot-2017-05-12-at-5-44-01-am.png

 

Dennis Weaver sort of drifted into acting by default. In his younger days he was known more for his athletic abilities. His performance as a runner at track and field events in college led to him trying out for the Olympics. He just narrowly missed making the Olympic team, and when those dreams didn’t pan out, he turned to his second ambition, which was to become an actor.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-28-31-pm.png

 

During his early days in show business, he met other performers who were studying Method acting. Dennis soon became a “disciple” of the Method and honed his dramatic skills. He signed with Universal, thanks to help from his friend Shelley Winters, who was already under contract with the studio. In his first year at Universal, Dennis was lucky to get small credited roles, but he began to make an impression with directors and folks in the casting office.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-21-04-pm.png

 

Though Dennis was working on a contract at Universal, he had a wife and family to support, and to add to his income, he took various odd jobs. Usually he worked as a flower deliveryman when he wasn’t going to auditions or doing minor roles on movie sets. One day while on a delivery, he found out he had been cast in Gunsmoke. He had never heard the  radio version and played Chester with his own ideas about the character and considerably more flair than the radio actor. Dennis charmed audiences; he remained as Marshal Dillon’s sidekick Chester for the show’s first five seasons, and it led to his earning an Emmy and becoming a household name.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-24-35-pm.png

 

During his time on Gunsmoke Dennis also continued to take roles in films. For instance, he had a memorable turn as a motel clerk in Universal’s TOUCH OF EVIL. After five years on a hit TV show, he was anxious to find more substantial movie jobs. During lulls in his motion picture career, he would return to series television. He starred in Gentle Ben in the 1960s; and he gained even more fame as McCloud in the 1970s. Later years saw Dennis continue to appear on screen, though more of his time became focused on environmental causes and animal rights issues that were near and dear to his heart.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-23-02-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. horizons west (1952); universal; western; robert ryan; 81 mins.
  2. the lawless breed (1953); universal; western; rock hudson; 83 mins.
  3. column south (1953); universal; western; audie murphy; 84 mins.
  4. dangerous mission (1954); rko; crime; victor mature; 75 mins.
  5. storm fear (1955); ua; crime; cornel wilde; 89 mins.
  6. touch of evil (1958); universal; crime; charlton heston; 111 mins.
  7. the gallant hours (1960); ua; drama; james cagney; 115 mins.
  8. duel at diablo (1966); ua; western; james garner; 103 mins.
  9. gentle giant (1967); paramount; drama; vera miles; 93 mins.
  10. what’s the matter with helen? (1971); ua; horror; shelley winters; 101 mins.

 

Dennis Weaver was so memorable as Chester on "Gunsmoke".

 

I could never forget that limp of his.

 

I could never forget the way he talked, either.


  • TopBilled likes this

"I was born the day she kissed me.  I died the day she left me.  I lived a few weeks while she loved me." - Humphrey Bogart in "In A Lonely Place".


#60 TopBilled

TopBilled

    Film Writing and Selected Journalism

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 36,521 posts

Posted 12 May 2017 - 07:58 AM

screen-shot-2017-05-12-at-5-44-01-am.png

 

Dennis Weaver sort of drifted into acting by default. In his younger days he was known more for his athletic abilities. His performance as a runner at track and field events in college led to him trying out for the Olympics. He just narrowly missed making the Olympic team, and when those dreams didn’t pan out, he turned to his second ambition, which was to become an actor.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-28-31-pm.png

 

During his early days in show business, he met other performers who were studying Method acting. Dennis soon became a “disciple” of the Method and honed his dramatic skills. He signed with Universal, thanks to help from his friend Shelley Winters, who was already under contract with the studio. In his first year at Universal, Dennis was lucky to get small credited roles, but he began to make an impression with directors and folks in the casting office.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-21-04-pm.png

 

Though Dennis was working on a contract at Universal, he had a wife and family to support, and to add to his income, he took various odd jobs. Usually he worked as a flower deliveryman when he wasn’t going to auditions or doing minor roles on movie sets. One day while on a delivery, he found out he had been cast in Gunsmoke. He had never heard the  radio version and played Chester with his own ideas about the character and considerably more flair than the radio actor. Dennis charmed audiences; he remained as Marshal Dillon’s sidekick Chester for the show’s first five seasons, and it led to his earning an Emmy and becoming a household name.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-24-35-pm.png

 

During his time on Gunsmoke Dennis also continued to take roles in films. For instance, he had a memorable turn as a motel clerk in Universal’s TOUCH OF EVIL. After five years on a hit TV show, he was anxious to find more substantial movie jobs. During lulls in his motion picture career, he would return to series television. He starred in Gentle Ben in the 1960s; and he gained even more fame as McCloud in the 1970s. Later years saw Dennis continue to appear on screen, though more of his time became focused on environmental causes and animal rights issues that were near and dear to his heart.

 

screen-shot-2017-05-07-at-2-23-02-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. horizons west (1952); universal; western; robert ryan; 81 mins.
  2. the lawless breed (1953); universal; western; rock hudson; 83 mins.
  3. column south (1953); universal; western; audie murphy; 84 mins.
  4. dangerous mission (1954); rko; crime; victor mature; 75 mins.
  5. storm fear (1955); ua; crime; cornel wilde; 89 mins.
  6. touch of evil (1958); universal; crime; charlton heston; 111 mins.
  7. the gallant hours (1960); ua; drama; james cagney; 115 mins.
  8. duel at diablo (1966); ua; western; james garner; 103 mins.
  9. gentle giant (1967); paramount; drama; vera miles; 93 mins.
  10. what’s the matter with helen? (1971); ua; horror; shelley winters; 101 mins.

  • ChristineHoard and rayban like this

"The truth? What good is the truth if it destroys us all..?" -- Mady Christians in ALL MY SONS (1948).





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users